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Flexible Work Frequently Asked Questions

How do i initiate a remote work request.

Whether you are an employee or supervisor, the first step is to review the Remote Work policy and the HRM Work Location Request form . Develop a proposal and discuss it with your supervisor or unit leadership. During that discussion, determine whether the arrangement is feasible and how it would impact the department. If the impact is unknown it, is advisable to begin with a proposal for a hybrid vs total remote work arrangement and then re-evaluate after a designated period of time to determine if the change is successful or requires modification.

Once an agreement is reached between the employee and supervisor, a HRM Work Location Request form must be submitted and reviewed by Human Resource Management (HRM). Remote work arrangements cannot begin until HRM has provided approval.

Is a Work Location Request form required for new employees hired to work in a remote or hybrid capacity?

No. Beginning August 2021, all new hires will receive information regarding their work location assignment through the KU Onboarding system.

Is a Work Location Request form required for existing employees that are being informed of their work location assignment in the Summer of 2021 in preparation for the Fall 2021 semester?

Current employees whose work location arrangements are being formalized for the return of a residential campus experience for the Fall 2021 term are not required to immediately submit the HRM Work Location Request form , to continue their arrangement.  Decisions of work location assignments made by unit leadership were communicated to HRM in April/May 2021.

During annual performance reviews, supervisors should discuss work location arrangements with employees.  If, at that time, the employee, supervisor, and departmental leadership are in agreement to continue a remote or hybrid work arrangement, and a Work Location Form has already been completed, a new Form will not be necessary.  If a Work Location Form has not been completed or the work arrangement will change, it will be necessary to complete the HRM Work Location Request form to document the arrangement. 

Does a Work Location Arrangement need to be reviewed or renewed?

Remote work arrangements should be reviewed by the supervisor and employee after the first six months and annually thereafter or at the time of evaluation to confirm continuation of the arrangement. Employees hired into a position designated as fully remote do not necessitate a review outside of the performance evaluation process.

If an end date was provided on the HRM Work Location Request form , an extension to the location arrangement will require a new form to be submitted. At least 28 calendar days prior to the expiration of the Remote Work arrangement, supervisors should notify employees about what the expected return requirements are.

Which jobs are suited for remote work?

Remote work is easiest to implement for jobs or tasks that require reading, writing, research, working with data, working on the computer and talking on the phone. In general, and at management’s discretion, a job is suited for remote work if the job or some components of it can be done off-site without disruption to the regular flow of work and communication. Work that requires on-site presence, but not in a full-time capacity, may be designated as a hybrid work arrangement.

Are student employees eligible for remote work?

Student employees are not eligible for remote work arrangements unless an exception is approved by the unit leadership and HRM.

Are remote workers restricted as to where they can work from?

Remote work arrangements are limited to the United States and the District of Columbia.

Which jobs are not as well suited for remote work?

Remote work arrangements are not required to be uniformly available to all positions or employees within a unit because not all positions are conducive to remote work arrangements. Remote work arrangements are based upon the University’s mission in providing a residential campus experience coordinated with the unit’s defined business model.

Instructional duties are generally not eligible for a remote work arrangement. Instructors are expected to provide classroom instruction and conduct office hours in person unless an exception or official accommodation is approved, the position is hired as remote, or the class is officially designated as an online course.

Due to a health issue, I have concerns about the designation of my position (in-person, fully remote, or hybrid), What steps should I take?

A work schedule modification, location change, or equipment/furniture request for a health-related reason should be submitted directly to the ADA Resource Center for Equity & Accessibility by completing the intake form or emailing [email protected] .

How is the remote work designation made?

A remote work arrangement can be made at the time of recruitment, during the employment period by the assigned unit leadership, or at an employee’s request to transition to a remote work arrangement. All employees are expected to follow all professional standards of performance and conduct, applicable laws, and Kansas Board of Regents and University of Kansas policies and procedures while at all work locations. KU employees are required to complete all University mandatory training by specified deadlines, regardless of the work location. A fully remote work arrangement will necessitate both the supervisor and employee to complete required trainings.

Employees who elect to pursue a remote work arrangement after hire should discuss their interest with their supervisor and complete and submit the HRM Work Location Request form .

Should an employee’s proximity to the assigned campus location be a reason for a supervisor to approve a remote work assignment?

A remote work assignment should be based upon the duties and work activities of the position, the needs of the unit, and the customers it supports. Although a physical location of a current or prospective employee might precipitate a request, a full evaluation of the position should be conducted. Establishing a designated mileage threshold of the individual’s location from the primary work site is not a sufficient justification or an equitable measure to approve a hybrid or remote work assignment.

What is flextime or a flexible work schedule?

Flextime or flexible work schedule is an arrangement where the employee works any approved schedule that does not adhere to the traditional Monday through Friday or 5-day work week and/or the 8:00 – 5:00 workday. Schedule changes may be intermittent based upon occasional need or may be formalized. A flexible schedule may also be one that will result in fewer workdays in a week with longer days.

Can I combine a Remote Work arrangement with a flexible work schedule?

Yes, if the position duties, work unit and customer needs can be managed effectively. Interested employees should have an initial conversation with their supervisor. A HRM representative can be consulted for additional guidance at [email protected] .

When does a flexible work schedule need to be formalized?

Employees should work directly with their supervisor, in advance, for any work schedule assignments or modifications. If the work schedule change is either on-going or will be for more than two pay periods, upon a communicated agreement with the employee, the supervisor should update HR/Pay with the newly revised work schedule. Work schedule changes for an occasional appointment may be verbally agreed upon between the employee and supervisor. Employees reporting their work time on an hourly basis will be required to accurately report all work hours with the newly revised work schedule. 

What is the difference between a formal and informal flextime work arrangement?

A formalized work arrangement is one that has been documented as an official work schedule change update in HR/Pay. This work schedule will impact leave accruals and holiday eligibility.

Remote Work

What is fully remote.

Fully remote employees perform ongoing work activities at an off-campus designated location. Fully remote employees may be requested to return to the primary campus location for training or other needs as discussed with the supervisor, with longer days.

My child or elder relative are self-sufficient and do not need my care. Can they be in the home while working remotely?

A remote work arrangement is not intended to provide child, dependent, or family care. Employees will need to evaluate their specific circumstances to ensure that the presence of others in the work location does not prohibit or impede work productivity in an ongoing manner. All employees, including those working remotely, are expected to work in a professional and collegial manner, reflecting the mission, values and goals of the KU brand.

As a remote worker will I be required to work when the University is closed for inclement weather?

Employees working remotely are not eligible for any inclement weather or weather-related compensation time during the period(s) of designated inclement weather. For additional information, review the Inclement Weather Policy . Fully remote employees experiencing an extreme weather-related or other uncontrolled event (e.g., loss of electricity) that restricts or prohibits the ability to work should contact their supervisor for further instruction.

How will I communicate with colleagues when working remotely?

Supervisors and employees should discuss in advance the communication expectations while working remotely. Employees should expect to utilize KU IT technology platforms and participate in required meetings or calls to ensure that priorities and progress are communicated regularly.

What type of equipment and technology will I be required to supply if working remotely?

Remote workers are required to have their own internet at a speed which is acceptable to support the technology requirements to conduct University business. The University will furnish an electronic device to all remote workers (i.e., laptop). Requests for other items should be discussed with your supervisor to determine if other equipment will be provided.

How should brief periods of remote work be addressed if the assignment is for less than two consecutive pay periods?

Intermittent or brief periods of remote work should be discussed in advance between the employee and supervisor. A HRM Work Location Request form does not need to be submitted for any activity that is continuing for less than two consecutive bi-weekly pay periods. Employees are to continue to report time and leave as appropriate regardless of the temporary assigned work location.

If I am asked to return to campus for a required in-person training or meeting, will I be reimbursed?

The University is not required to reimburse travel costs (i.e., airfare, mileage., hotel, per diem) of remote workers. If a unit does provide reimbursement, such benefit should be afforded to all employees in that designated work unit. Non-exempt, hourly employees are required to be paid if travel time is during the designated work hours under the Fair Labor Standards Act

What is a hybrid work arrangement?

A hybrid work arrangement is when the employee has an established work schedule to perform job duties from multiple primary worksites on a reoccurring basis: 1) on-site at the designated campus location and 2) at an alternate work location (likely the employee’s residence). Generally, one day or more per week should be assigned to work at each designated location noting that work schedules may be adjusted as needed between the supervisor and employee for specific unit and customer needs. The employee may or may not have a private or shared designated workspace on campus.

What is hoteling and how do I reserve a workspace for a temporary period of time?

Hoteling is when the employee is designated as a remote worker but will occasionally need to work on campus and does not have a specific, designated workspace. In this situation, workspace reservations may be required when the employee will be on campus. Details on how to make a reservation to be announced.

As a hybrid worker will I have a dedicated office space at my designated campus location?

Not necessarily, some areas may have designated spaces but may not be assigned to an individual. This will be dependent upon your job duties and space availability.

Remote employees may be required to return to the campus location for designated training, projects, etc. What steps should an employee take to ensure that they will have a space to work at upon arrival and avoid a parking violation?

Employees should work with their supervisor to determine an appropriate hoteling location and make a reservation prior to their arrival. Employees can purchase parking permits and can see the options available through the KU Parking portal .

What form do I use to change an official work assignment location?

The HRM Work Location Request form can be initiated by either the employee or supervisor if a change needs to be made to a work location designation. Work location changes require HRM’s approval and a 28-calendar day notice period.

Do I need to complete a form for a work schedule change?

No. Work schedule changes can be submitted by the supervisor in HR/Pay . An employee should be provided a 14-calendar day advance notice of any work schedule change.

Who updates the directory data, where is this done and why it is done?

Directory Data is to be maintained by the Employee in HR/Pay Self Service . ( Supervisors also have access to update their employees ). This data is used for space utilization, for state reporting and for validation of state taxation.

  • If the employee is hybrid or fully on campus their primary work address is to be their KU Building and Room.
  •  States outside of Kansas start with the Building Code of OTH-
  • Counties in Kansas start with the Building Code of KS-
  • Materials: Full List of Building Codes is located on the HRM website.
  • If you do not find a building code or need assistance, please contact [email protected]

When does a directory primary work address need to be updated in HR/Pay?

Primary work locations should be kept current if the location change is ‘Permanent”. Moving to a new location while repair work is being performed is not considered permanent. 

Equipment and Resources

Can i use a personal device when working remotely.

Employees with a remote work arrangement are required to have a University issued computer or other electronic device. Security and confidentiality of University records must be maintained, and electronic records must be stored in University-identified drives via secure remote access technology provided by KU Information Technology. For further information please refer to the Information Technology Security Policy . The supervisor should identify the employee’s equipment needs and coordinate acquisition of assigned equipment with their KU IT Technical Services Liaison.  

How do I handle sensitive and confidential data when working remotely?

The employee is required to follow all University policies and procedures regarding access to and destruction of sensitive or confidential data at any assigned work location. Employees are required to keep University-owned equipment and information secure at the work site. The stipulations for use of personal computers for University business is outlined in the Acceptable Use of Electronic Information Resources policy. 

What do I have to supply in the way of technology and/or equipment?

The unit is not required to reimburse or provide internet service to employees designated as fully remote or hybrid.  Employees in such work arrangements are required to have connectivity speed that supports meeting the required work and meeting assignments.  Employees located in areas that may have reduced internet options may discuss with their supervisor if the unit will help with related internet support such as an assigned hot spot. 

A unit is required to provide an electronic device (i.e., laptop) for remote workers.  For further information please refer to the Information Technology Security Policy . Although the University is not required to supply furniture or additional equipment for remote workers, the unit has discretion to make such purchases.  The University is not required to furnish or provide additional equipment for the remote work location beyond the designated computer requirements unless the designated item is approved by HRM as a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Is there information from KU’s IT Security Office about working remotely?

Yes, there is helpful information on the IT website about policies as well as information about home internet connection, how to prepare in advance for technical help, connecting to KU, conferencing and privacy. 

I was designated a remote worker during the COVID-19 pandemic, however I have now been informed I will be returning to in-person. Do I need to bring back my workstation, monitors, electronic equipment or furniture I took home during the pandemic?

Yes.  Employees returning to an in-person work assignment should work with their supervisor about equipment and property returns to campus.  Employees may be required to return items for use onsite.  

Will there be training for remote workers and will it be mandatory? 

HRM-Learning & Development staff will be providing mandatory virtual training for remote workers beginning summer 2021.  Course descriptions and class times are available in MyTalent . You can access them here:

Working Remotely – KU Staff  

Will there be training for supervisor of remote workers and will it be mandatory? 

HRM-Learning & Development staff will be providing mandatory virtual training for supervisors of remote workers beginning in summer 2021.  Course descriptions and class times are available in MyTalent . You can access them here:

Supervising Remote Workers

Will there continue to be virtual trainings for remote workers? 

Yes. HRM-Learning & Development staff will continue to provide virtual trainings via Zoom during the 2021-2022 school year. For the full suite of offerings, visit MyTalent .   

Where can I find information about virtual trainings for remote workers?

First, visit MyTalent for a full suite of offerings. Secondly, watch for HRM emails every quarter that list the professional development trainings. The emails are normally distributed to all staff in December, March, June, and September.   

Will remote workers still be able to access LinkedIn Learning courses in at mytalent.ku.edu?

Yes, the LinkedIn Learning courses at MyTalent and will continue to be available for free to all KU staff and faculty (remote or not) for the foreseeable future.  

Can remote workers attend staff trainings that occur on the Lawrence campus? 

Speak with your supervisor regarding professional development opportunities and training requirements. 

Will hybrid assigned employees and their supervisors be required to take training?

At this time training for hybrid arrangements is not required but is encouraged for both employees and supervisors.  Please check MyTalent for availability. 

My remote working status has always been 100% remote and was not as a result of the impact of COVID. Am I required to complete this training?

Yes. The university wants to provide resources and information to all remote workers whether you have been remote for a while or are continuing remote beyond the pandemic. 

What steps are most important for a productive remote work arrangement?

When clearly outlined and executed, remote work can prove beneficial to both employees and managers. Managers should articulate clear procedures regarding check-in times and hours of availability. With proper planning, communication problems can be minimized.  

How do I manage a team effectively if all or a portion if the team is designated as remote?

Because employee work designations are changing and teams may not all be in the same location, HRM recommends that employee and team goals be modified to reflect expectations about communication, priorities and project progress. Contact HRM at [email protected] for an individual consultation on goals and expectations, if needed.

Supervisors managing fully remote employees are required to attend the   Supervising Remote Workers – KU Staff training available in MyTalent. 

What items should I be considering if a fully remote worker is out-of-state?

The following factors should be evaluated by the supervisor and unit leadership: 

  • The remote work arrangements must not adversely affect the services provided to students, parents, employees, colleagues, or the public, whether those services are directly provided by the employee or by other unit members.  
  • The remote work arrangements must not be assigned if it adversely impacts productivity at the individual or unit level, or if the arrangement negatively impacts communications, collaborations, team-based environments, etc.  
  • Work schedules in different time zones will need to be considered and managed to ensure unit operations and services are not disrupted. Work schedules should be aligned with the Central Standard Time Zone when possible. 
  • A remote work location agreement is not intended to provide child, dependent, and family care, convalescing, or caring for an ill family member. The presence of children or other dependents, guests, or pets in the remote work location cannot disrupt the overall performance of work activities or negatively affect the productivity of the employee. 
  • Although a work schedule modification that is reflective of both the employee and employer needs might be possible, the focus of the arrangement must remain on the effective fulfillment of job responsibilities. 
  • The remote work arrangements should be analyzed to determine if the position duties can be performed in a remote environment.  
  • The employee’s prior/current work performance and conduct should be considered to determine whether the employee is likely to be successful in a remote work arrangement.  
  • The remote work arrangements should not create or increase a need for additional staffing or increase work hours of existing staff. 
  • The remote work arrangements should not create data security or other confidentiality risks that cannot be effectively mitigated. 
  • The remote work arrangements require supervisors to be able to effectively manage work hours and productivity. The supervisor should provide clear performance goals and expectations for the employee, and the employee’s work quality, quantity, and timeliness should be adequately monitored by the supervisor.  
  • Hourly (non-exempt) employees working over 40 hours during an assigned work week are eligible for compensatory time/overtime hours. 

Can my supervisor change my Remote Work Arrangement?

Yes.  A supervisor may change a work location arrangement based upon operational needs of the unit and the position.  A notice of 28-calendar days must be provided in advance to the employee regarding a work location change unless an emergency necessitates otherwise, and the situation has been endorsed by the unit leadership and HRM.

Can my Remote Work or Flexible Work Schedule request be denied?

Yes.  Remote work and/or flexible schedule is not universal nor an entitlement.  The goal is to create a work arrangement that effectively balances the needs of the department and its employees.  These situations work best when they contribute positively to employee’s work/life balance, while not negatively impacting their productivity and availability.  Supervisors need to assess the impact of a flexible schedule or remote work arrangement on their department’s continuity of operations, customer service, and goals when making the decision. 

As a newly hired remote employee, how will my I-9 form be completed?

A member of the Shared Service Center team will reach out to you to coordinate a time to discuss the options available for the I-9 visual verification process if an in-person appointment is not possible.

The Work Location Request form request I submitted was denied by my supervisor without supporting information. Who can I contact regarding my questions and concerns regarding this outcome?

It is recommended to begin discussions with your supervisor.  If that is not an available option, contact HRM directly at [email protected] and a member of our team will schedule a time to meet with you directly.

If I am an hourly (non-exempt) employee, am I still eligible for compensatory time/overtime hours if I work remotely?

Yes, hourly (non-exempt) employees working over 40 hours during an assigned work week are eligible for compensatory time/overtime hours.

How will taxes be calculated if I am working remotely outside the state of Kansas?

Employees will be subject to the applicable tax jurisdiction, zoning, and tax liability associated with the remote work location as determined by KU Financial Services (KU Payroll). Employees whose remote work arrangements are not within the state of Kansas will be subject to applicable laws related to employment conditions. Remote work arrangements outside of the United States are not allowed unless it is approved official travel. For more information please visit the KU Payroll webpage for out of state employees .

If my remote location changes, who do I need to notify?

Fully remote employees approved for remote work arrangements are required to update primary work address information in HR/Pay . The employee must notify their supervisor and KU Payroll anytime there is a city and/or state location change to the primary work address . The employee and/or supervisor are responsible for accurately reporting and maintaining primary work address and directory building information in HR/Pay under Personal Information>KU Directory, which may include a different state or Kansas county location designation if the employee is not primarily working at a campus designated location. Hybrid employees will default to an on-campus location as their primary work location. Hybrid employees should still notify their supervisor of changes to their alternate work location address. 

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  • Remote Working

Flexible Working Is Here To Stay: Here’s How To Make it Work

April 21, 2021 - 7 min read

Nicky Daly

What does the future of work look like? For many, a year of remote work has offered a chance to identify unsustainable work expectations and patterns. From the rigid 9–5 to our relentless "always on" work culture, work from home has made it clear just how primed for burnout the average worker truly is. 

Remote working has also presented a glimpse at a future where flexible working is the standard — not the exception. But what does that mean in practical terms? How can workers ask for and create flexible work schedules that increase productivity and well-being , allowing them to achieve the elusive work-life balance they need to stay happy and healthy?

As businesses eye in-person and hybrid return-to-work plans , flexible work arrangements should be top of mind for both employers and employees. Post-pandemic, building flexible work policies and structures that actually work, and address work from home problems , will be an essential part of returning to the office. 

What is flexible working?

Flexible working is a style of work that gives employees greater control over their hours, frequency of work, work location, and other factors. Types of flexible working can include part-time hours, remote work , flextime, a compressed workweek, hybrid remote work, or any other similar structure. 

Flexible working examples may include the following:

  • A project manager who works an extra two hours a day as part of a compressed four-day workweek schedule
  • A programmer who works from their home office two days a week and out of their company’s office the rest of the time 
  • A marketing manager who works a modified schedule of 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. instead of 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Workers may seek flexible work arrangements for any number of reasons. Parents of young children and caretakers, for example, may find strict 9-5 in-office attendance difficult to balance with their other commitments. 

Flexible working can also suit the lifestyles of digital nomads and other professionals who prefer to be untethered from one centralized physical location. 

What are the benefits of flexible working?

For employees, the benefits of flexible working are numerous. Let’s start with the most obvious benefit — work-life balance. According to one FlexJobs survey in partnership with Mental Health America, 48% of workers with flexible working options say their work-life balance is “excellent” or “very good.” 

Think of it this way. Most of us have worked in jobs where our work-life balance has not been excellent or very good at all. If you think back to a time in your life when this was the case, did you find that you were more productive or less? 

Research tells us that work-life balance is likely linked to productivity. Just look at the working from home statistics :   one survey conducted by the Corporate Executive Board found that those who said they had good work-life balance worked 21% harder than those who didn’t. 

When it comes to attracting and retaining top talent, flexible working is a major benefit as well. In fact, flexible work schedules can help reduce turnover by up to 87%, according to one study .  

Are there disadvantages to flexible work arrangements? 

Ultimately, those who opt for flexible working hours will still need to create a structure that works for them. Although it seems like a great option, there are work from home problems that can crop up for remote employees. 

Flexible working doesn't mean logging on sporadically to do an undefined amount of work a couple of times a week, even while assignments roll in. This is an unsustainable working style. It may create issues for those who struggle with managing their day-to-day work while away from a full-time office setting. 

Flexible working and “work whenever” aren’t one and the same. Overcome time management roadblocks by being intentional with your working schedule. Take advantage of flexible working by identifying optimal working days and hours and building structures that support productivity and balance.    

Flexible working post-COVID

Work has changed. That much we know. The exact ways in which things have changed are only just beginning to take shape. What we do know is that workers who can carry out their job functions online and on computers expect a higher degree of flexibility than before. 

In a Slack survey of over 9,000 knowledge workers (workers whose duties can primarily be done on a computer), 72% of respondents said they are hoping for a mix of remote and office work moving forward. This is known as a hybrid working model. 

Flextime and compressed workweeks are also playing on the minds of global workers. In a recent YouGov UK survey, 40% of respondents indicated an interest in flextime, while 19% said they would try a compressed workweek.

Less commuting, fewer expenses, and a chance at better work-life balance are likely motivating factors for those who say they’d like to retain some of their work-from-home privileges post-COVID. 

And companies are listening. In early 2021, Citigroup’s CEO revealed that most of their company’s workforce would be designated as hybrid, with an expectation of at least three in-office attendance days per week. In the same vein, Spotify has announced a “distributed first” policy that takes into account “increased sustainability, flexibility, and well-being to ensure that all of our employees, regardless of ability or situation, can work comfortably and efficiently.”

Of course, this isn’t the case universally. Many companies are eager for employees to return to pre-COVID workplace norms, meaning that the future of flexible working post-COVID will not be a uniform experience. 

Building a flexible work schedule

Building a flexible work schedule presents an opportunity to adjust your routine in a way that works for you and your productivity. You understand your productivity the best, so take advantage of that knowledge when considering a change in work routine. 

Tips for creating a flexible work schedule: 

Be realistic.

In a society obsessed with productivity and output, it can be tempting to create a schedule that prioritizes work over balance. Trying to compress your 40-hour workweek into three days, for example, could lead to burnout and poor job performance. Be realistic with yourself and your employer when discussing changes to your work schedule. 

Ask for exactly what you need and be ready to negotiate

There’s no point asking for less than what you need. If your circumstances mean you need flextime or a hybrid schedule, then ask for flextime or hybrid in-office attendance. While your workplace may have a specific flexible work schedule policy in place, there may be room for discussion and compromise. 

Try techniques like time blocking to stay on track 

Flexible working may mean that you have to explore new ways to structure your day or week. Time blocking, task batching , and time batching are just a few ways to approach that. For example, if flexible working means you’re in the office two days a week, you may designate those as your “project meeting” days to go over progress and project roadblocks. Other “day themes” can include professional development days, writing days, networking days, etc.

Over-communicate

A change in your company’s flexible work schedule policy may mean that your team is dispersed during critical projects and assignments. Over-communicating about things like your adjusted work schedule, essential deadlines, and other team updates keeps work moving forward at all times. 

Remote collaboration tools and software like Wrike increase team visibility on tasks and progress so that it’s always clear who is working on what and when it is due. 

Wrike helps address an "always on" culture by optimizing flexible working

Flexible working is the future of work. It has long been the case for the youngest members of the labor market that work isn't a “place” but rather “a thing .” That means that work tools need to be accessible, flexible, and robust to handle the challenges that come with an increasingly dispersed workforce.

The answer to our "always on" culture isn’t to herd workers back to the office en masse to resume their hour-long commutes and 9–5 structures. The answer lies in creating flexible work policies that acknowledge the realities of our modern workforce. 

Wrike helps companies establish digital workspaces for employees that are collaborative, transparent, productive, and flexible. Whether hybrid working is in your team’s future or if you’re exploring adjusted hours and flextime, Wrike meets you where you are. Try a free two-week trial of Wrike to join the 2 million users who are already building the future of work.

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Nicky is a former Content Marketing Manager of Wrike.

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Natalia Brouge

September 1, 2023

Implementing Flexible Work Arrangements: Strategies for Success

Table of contents.

Are you tired of the traditional 9-to-5 office grind? Do you dream of having a more flexible work schedule that allows you to juggle your professional and personal commitments with ease? Well, you're in luck! Flexible work arrangements are becoming increasingly popular in today's ever-changing work environment. In this article, we'll explore the concept of flexible work arrangements, delve into their benefits, discuss key strategies for implementation, and address the challenges that may arise. So, let's get started on this exciting journey towards a more flexible and fulfilling work life!

Understanding the Concept of Flexible Work Arrangements

Flexibility is the name of the game in the modern workplace. But what exactly do we mean by flexible work arrangements? Simply put, flexible work arrangements refer to any non-traditional work schedule or location that allows employees to have more control over when, where, and how they work. This could include alternative work hours, remote work options, or job-sharing arrangements.

In today's fast-paced and interconnected world, the need for flexibility is more crucial than ever. As technology continues to advance and blur the boundaries between work and personal life, employees are seeking a better work-life balance and employers are recognizing the benefits of accommodating their workforce's needs.

Defining Flexible Work Arrangements

Flexible work arrangements can take on many forms. Some examples include flextime, compressed workweeks, part-time schedules, telecommuting, and even freelance or gig-based work. The key is to find a structure that suits both the organization's needs and the individual employee's circumstances.

Flextime, for instance, allows employees to choose their start and end times within a set range of hours. This flexibility enables individuals to align their work schedules with their personal obligations, such as dropping off and picking up children from school or attending medical appointments.

Compressed workweeks, on the other hand, involve working longer hours over fewer days. This arrangement allows employees to enjoy extended weekends or have additional time off during the week, providing them with more opportunities to pursue personal interests or spend quality time with family and friends.

Telecommuting, also known as remote work, allows employees to perform their job duties from a location other than the traditional office setting. With advancements in technology, individuals can connect with their colleagues, attend meetings, and complete tasks from the comfort of their own homes or any other suitable environment. This arrangement not only saves commuting time but also reduces carbon emissions and promotes a healthier work-life balance.

Freelance or gig-based work has gained popularity in recent years. This type of flexible work arrangement allows individuals to work on a project-by-project basis, giving them the freedom to choose the projects they want to take on and the flexibility to manage their own schedules.

The Importance of Flexibility in Today's Work Environment

In this fast-paced, ever-evolving world, adaptability is crucial. Organizations that embrace flexibility are more likely to attract and retain top talent. By providing employees with the opportunity to manage their work commitments alongside personal responsibilities, employers can foster a happier, more motivated, and more loyal workforce.

Moreover, flexible work arrangements have proven to enhance job satisfaction, reduce stress levels, and boost overall well-being. When employees have the freedom to structure their workday around their personal lives, they are more likely to feel fulfilled and engaged in their work.

Flexible work arrangements also contribute to increased productivity. By allowing employees to work during their most productive hours or in an environment that suits their preferences, organizations can tap into their full potential. This leads to higher quality work, improved creativity, and better problem-solving abilities.

Furthermore, flexible work arrangements promote diversity and inclusion. They provide opportunities for individuals with different needs and circumstances, such as parents, caregivers, individuals with disabilities, or those living in remote areas, to participate in the workforce. This not only creates a more inclusive work environment but also harnesses a wider range of skills and perspectives.

In conclusion, flexible work arrangements have become a vital aspect of the modern workplace. They offer numerous benefits for both employees and employers, including improved work-life balance, increased job satisfaction, enhanced productivity, and a more diverse and inclusive workforce. As the world continues to evolve, organizations that embrace flexibility will be better positioned to thrive in the ever-changing business landscape.

The Benefits of Implementing Flexible Work Arrangements

Now that we've discussed the importance of flexibility, let's explore some of the key benefits associated with implementing flexible work arrangements.

Flexible work arrangements offer numerous advantages that can positively impact both employees and organizations. By providing employees with the freedom to choose when and where they work, organizations can create a more inclusive and accommodating work environment.

Increased Employee Satisfaction and Retention

It's no secret that happy employees are more productive employees. When employees have control over their work schedules, they feel valued and trusted by their employers. This sense of autonomy leads to increased job satisfaction and higher levels of employee retention.

Moreover, flexible work arrangements can help employees achieve a better work-life balance. They can attend to personal responsibilities, such as childcare or caring for elderly parents, without sacrificing their professional commitments. This balance contributes to overall well-being and reduces stress levels, resulting in happier and more engaged employees.

Furthermore, offering flexible work arrangements can give organizations a competitive edge when it comes to attracting top talent. In today's job market, many candidates prioritize flexibility over other perks or benefits. By embracing flexible work arrangements, organizations can position themselves as desirable employers and attract highly skilled individuals who might otherwise seek opportunities elsewhere.

Enhanced Productivity and Efficiency

Contrary to popular belief, flexible work arrangements can actually boost productivity and efficiency. When employees have the freedom to work when they feel most productive, they can optimize their workflow and deliver high-quality results.

Additionally, eliminating the daily commute to the office can save valuable time and reduce stress levels. With fewer distractions and interruptions, employees can focus on their tasks and complete them more efficiently. They can also allocate their time in a way that aligns with their energy levels, allowing them to tackle complex projects during their most productive hours.

Moreover, flexible work arrangements can foster a sense of empowerment and ownership among employees. When individuals have the flexibility to design their work environment, they can create an atmosphere that suits their preferences and enhances their creativity. This autonomy can lead to innovative thinking and problem-solving, ultimately benefiting the organization as a whole.

In conclusion, implementing flexible work arrangements can have a multitude of benefits for both employees and organizations. From increased employee satisfaction and retention to enhanced productivity and efficiency, the advantages are clear. By embracing flexibility, organizations can create a more adaptable and inclusive work culture that attracts top talent and drives success.

Key Strategies for Implementing Flexible Work Arrangements

Implementing flexible work arrangements requires careful planning and consideration. Here are some key strategies to ensure a successful transition:

Flexible work arrangements have become increasingly popular in today's workforce, offering employees the opportunity to have a better work-life balance and employers the chance to attract and retain top talent. However, implementing these arrangements requires more than just a simple policy change. It requires a thoughtful approach that takes into account the needs of both the employees and the organization as a whole.

Establishing Clear Policies and Guidelines

Transparency is key when implementing flexible work arrangements. Clear policies and guidelines should be in place to communicate expectations regarding work hours, availability, and communication protocols. This clarity ensures everyone is on the same page and helps prevent misunderstandings.

For example, a policy might outline that employees are expected to be available during core business hours, but have the flexibility to adjust their schedules as needed. It could also specify the preferred methods of communication, such as email or instant messaging, and the expected response times.

Ensuring Effective Communication and Collaboration

Flexible work arrangements should not hinder effective communication and collaboration. Employers should invest in technology and tools that facilitate seamless virtual meetings, project management, and team collaboration. Regular check-ins and team-building activities can also help maintain strong connections and foster a sense of belonging.

One way to ensure effective communication is to provide employees with access to video conferencing software. This allows them to participate in meetings and discussions as if they were physically present, regardless of their location. Additionally, project management tools can help teams stay organized and on track, even when working remotely.

Leveraging Technology to Support Flexibility

Technology is the backbone of flexible work arrangements. Employers should invest in reliable and user-friendly tools that enable remote work and flexible scheduling. Cloud-based platforms, project management software, and communication tools like video conferencing and instant messaging are essential for smooth collaboration and connectivity.

Cloud-based platforms, such as Google Drive or Dropbox, allow employees to access and share files from anywhere, eliminating the need for physical copies and enabling real-time collaboration. Project management software, like Asana or Trello, can help teams stay organized and track progress on tasks and projects. And of course, video conferencing and instant messaging tools provide the means for virtual face-to-face communication, fostering a sense of connection and teamwork.

Implementing flexible work arrangements is not without its challenges, but with the right strategies in place, it can be a win-win for both employees and employers. By establishing clear policies and guidelines, ensuring effective communication and collaboration, and leveraging technology to support flexibility, organizations can create an environment that promotes productivity, engagement, and work-life balance.

Overcoming Challenges in Implementing Flexible Work Arrangements

While the benefits of flexible work arrangements are undeniable, challenges may arise during the implementation process. Let's take a closer look at some common obstacles and how to address them:

Addressing Concerns About Employee Accountability

Skepticism about employee accountability is a common concern when it comes to flexible work arrangements. To overcome this, it's important to clearly communicate performance expectations and set measurable goals. Regular check-ins, progress reviews, and tracking systems can help ensure transparency and accountability.

Managing Potential Impact on Team Dynamics

With employees working on different schedules or from various locations, maintaining strong team dynamics can be challenging. Regular team meetings, both virtual and in-person, can foster collaboration and a sense of camaraderie. Encouraging open communication and providing opportunities for social interaction can also help build and maintain strong team relationships.

Evaluating the Success of Flexible Work Arrangements

Regular evaluation is essential to ensure the success of flexible work arrangements and make any necessary adjustments. Here are some strategies to monitor and enhance the effectiveness of your flexible work policies:

Monitoring Employee Performance and Engagement

Regular performance reviews are crucial for assessing employee productivity and engagement. Managers should provide constructive feedback and address any performance issues promptly. Open lines of communication and ongoing feedback can help employees thrive in a flexible work environment.

Gathering Feedback and Making Adjustments

Employee feedback is invaluable when evaluating the success of flexible work arrangements. Conduct surveys or hold focus groups to gather insights and suggestions for improvement. Based on this feedback, make adjustments to policies, procedures, and technology to better support employee needs and ensure maximum productivity.

Implementing flexible work arrangements can revolutionize the way we work, providing employees with the freedom to balance their professional and personal lives. By understanding the concept, embracing the benefits, and implementing key strategies, organizations can create a more productive and engaged workforce. So, what are you waiting for? It's time to break free from the traditional work mold and embrace flexibility for a brighter and more fulfilling future!

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What Is Workplace Flexibility?

Definition and Examples of Workplace Flexibility

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Workplace flexibility is a strategy for responding to changing circumstances and expectations. Employees who approach their job with a flexible mindset are typically more highly valued by employers.​ Similarly, employers who cultivate a flexible work environment are attractive to employees.

Learn more about workplace flexibility, its benefits, and the skills that workers and employers use to stay flexible.

Workplace flexibility emphasizes the willingness and ability to adapt to change, particularly regarding how and when work gets done.

In a flexible workplace, the needs of both employee and employer are met. Workplace flexibility is often used as a tool for retaining and engaging employees. It can also help an organization reach its goals thanks to improved productivity.

  • Alternate names : Flexible work arrangement, work-life balance

There are different types of workplace flexibility, including the following:

  • Informal flexibility is occasional, is agreed on between an employee and a manager, and has little impact on others in the workplace.
  • Formal flexibility is typically an ongoing arrangement that is different from a team's standard hours and work location. It could include working remotely or a change in schedule.

How Does Workplace Flexibility Work?

There are various ways that workplace flexibility can be implemented by workers and employers.

Flexible Employees

Workers with an orientation toward flexibility don't say, "It’s not my job" or "Do I have to?" when they are asked to take on a new assignment. Instead, flexible employees modify their approach to tasks based on the preferences of stakeholders and the unique demands of each situation. 

Flexibility on the part of a worker could be to adjust the hours they work—coming in early, staying late, or working on an off day—to accommodate the needs of the company.

Flexibility is a trait that most employers look for in an employee. Regardless of the type of job you are applying for, it will benefit your candidacy if you can show the interviewer examples of how you are flexible and willing to change course.

Here are some examples of the ways workers can demonstrate flexibility.

  • Learning complex new software that will increase efficiency
  • Listening carefully to constructive criticism as part of a performance review
  • Offering to cover the responsibilities of a colleague while they are ill or on vacation
  • Offering to work extra hours during a year-end crunch
  • Pushing aside the work planned for the day to respond to an emerging problem
  • Working overtime to help a colleague meet a deadline

Employees with a flexible attitude keep the company's objectives in mind and work to achieve them, tailoring their efforts to the mission at hand.

Flexible Employers

Flexibility skills are also relevant to the approach that management takes to handling employees. Flexible managers treat employees as individuals and make an effort to accommodate personal styles and needs. 

Managers who are flexible provide workers with greater latitude about the way they accomplish goals. They assess the needs of employees and provide feedback, guidance, and recognition individually to optimize performance.

For example, one employee may require more structure in their job duties and another may function better working independently. Managers will often need to adjust schedules and delegate routine tasks as they focus on reaching the company's priorities.

Some examples of workplace flexibility on the part of a manager include:

  • Analyzing the style and preferences of individual subordinates 
  • Praising the work of a productive employee more frequently because she craves feedback 
  • Providing release time for parents to attend school programs
  • Rewarding subordinates who make impactful suggestions

Flexible Schedules

Workplace flexibility can also refer specifically to regular work arrangements that promote work-life balance, as opposed to one-off accommodations for special circumstances. These work arrangements typically include flexible schedules outside of the traditional 9-to-5.

Flextime: Employers with a flextime policy allow their workers to stagger arrival and departure times as necessary.

Telecommuting: Not every employee needs (or wants) to work in an office; telecommuting lets them work from elsewhere, such as a home office or coworking space. They may telecommute during special conditions, such as inclement weather, or on a daily basis.

Condensed schedules: Rather than a five-day workweek, a condensed schedule fits the same amount of work over a shorter amount of time, such as three or four days, giving the employee an additional day or two off during the week.

Reduced schedules: Working fewer hours than the standard workweek constitutes a reduced or part-time schedule.

Benefits of Workplace Flexibility

A flexible work environment has many benefits. It helps workers achieve greater work-life balance , leading to increased employee satisfaction and improved morale. That in turn means employee turnover is reduced, as is the cost to recruit and train new hires.

Loyalty, engagement, and retention are improved, which helps a company's productivity and its bottom line.

Employers that permit telecommuting, or working from home, can reduce overhead with less need for office space; working from home can also have a beneficial environmental impact by eliminating lengthy commutes.

Flexible employees, for their part, are willing to do whatever is necessary to get the task accomplished, whether that means taking on more responsibilities, doing different tasks , or doing more at work. Thus, they have more to offer their employer than employees who can only do one or two tasks. Having employees who are willing to step outside their job description  means employers don't need to find others to take on more work.

Key Takeaways

  • Workplace flexibility is a strategy that emphasizes being able and willing to adapt to changing circumstances when it comes to how work gets done.
  • Workplace flexibility meets the needs of both the business and its workers.
  • Workplace flexibility can enhance work-life balance for employees, leading to greater satisfaction and retention.

CareerOneStop. " Flexible Schedules for Work-Life Balance ."

How to Take Advantage of Flexible Work Arrangements

If your company allows you to work remotely from anywhere, should you take that opportunity to travel for an extended period of time?

Guide to Flexible Work Arrangements

When Meredith McIntosh and her husband Chris both found themselves working remotely full time, they discussed the possibility of not renewing the lease on their apartment in the Washington, D.C., suburbs and instead traveling for a year, taking their work with them on the road.

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“It was a lot of conversations around the logistics of it all, like good internet, the cost of staying wherever we are, maintaining our car, where does the mail go?” says McIntosh, a technical support engineer for subscription commerce company Recharge Payments. “A lot of those pieces we eventually figured out and decided to make the move.”

In November 2021, the couple loaded their two dogs and minimal personal belongings into their Jeep and hit the road. More than six months later, their travels have taken them from coast to coast, switching time zones and scenery while keeping full-time schedules for their respective employers.

As flexible work arrangements become the norm for a variety of roles and companies, employees who work from home may find themselves with the freedom to visit family or go somewhere else for a change of scenery without using vacation days to do so.

Benefits of Remote and Flexible Work Arrangements

U.S. News recently conducted an internal survey of 200 companies in technology, digital media and financial services. The findings show that of these 200 companies, 77% offer remote job opportunities, 74% offer hybrid job opportunities – where employees are expected to be in the office part time and work remotely part time – and a whopping 86.5% have offices outside the U.S., opening the door for employees to virtually work from anywhere. Only 5% of companies surveyed do not have any kind of flexible work arrangements.

“I’ve noticed companies being more open to hiring talent from other parts of the country, which of course we know is a great way to bring diversity into the workforce because you’re not pulling from the same pool that’s kind of niche to your geographic area,” says Tiffani Foster, a Nashville, Tennessee-based leadership recruiter who has been working from home since 2017. “So it’s actually a benefit for companies and employees altogether.”

But just because a company offers remote roles doesn’t mean every job opportunity with that company can be done remotely, or that “remote” means working from multiple locations, potentially in varying time zones. Before you apply for a new job, you should understand the expectation for remote, hybrid or return-to-office work associated with that position. Foster’s team at her current company was remote prior to the coronavirus pandemic, which means guaranteed flexibility, but not all remote work arrangements are created equal.

“Within any organization, there will be some teams that are fully remote and some teams that don’t have that option,” she says.

Traveling While Working Full Time

If your company allows employees in your role to work from anywhere, should you take that opportunity to travel for an extended period of time? Life on the road isn’t for everyone, and there are some things to consider before taking the plunge.

Make sure your employer is supportive of employees working on the road. Just because a company allows you to work from home doesn’t mean your job is compatible with a full-time travel schedule. So before you start planning to take your work on the road for more than a few days, ensure you get the green light from your employer. Some companies may even assist you in your travels; McIntosh, who spoke to U.S. News over the phone from a WeWork in Phoenix, says her employer pays for her coworking fees when she utilizes coworking spaces in various locations.

Have a cushion in your bank account. It’s important to make sure you have the money to cover unforeseen expenses while traveling. For example, taking an extended road trip means putting wear and tear on your personal vehicle faster than if you just used it to commute back and forth to an office each day – something McIntosh has experienced while driving across the country over the past few months. “Since traveling – don’t get me wrong, it’s been a beautiful adventure – but we had transmission issues that we had to get fixed in Pensacola. We had a tire blow in the middle of nowhere Texas. And we just had to get our windshield replaced … because we got hit by a rock in our travels and got a huge crack going across the windshield,” McIntosh says. “Life still has surprises even when you’re traveling.

“We said we were not even going to consider doing this until we had X amount in savings so we could handle little emergencies like that,” she adds. “And I feel like it would be so much more stressful if those unexpected traveling things happened without having that safety net.”

Make a lodging plan that works for you. While RVs and van life are popular among some travelers, investing in a vehicle like this might not be the best choice for everyone, especially if you’re not sure what the future holds for the vehicle after your trip. When your time on the road concludes, will you have somewhere to park the RV or camper van, or are you confident you’d be able to find a buyer if you try to sell it?

McIntosh and her husband researched multiple options before embarking on their yearlong road trip and found that staying in Airbnbs is the best fit for them. They also discovered that in many places, booking an Airbnb for an entire month rather than a few days results in a substantial discount.

“A lot of times, our rent for Airbnb is cheaper than our rent was in Alexandria, Virginia,” McIntosh says. “We’re about to go to LA and San Diego; they’re going to be more. But it kind of balances out because we’re not paying for water, we’re not paying electric, we’re not paying for trash – just a lot of those things that are additional to rent.”

The couple usually checks out of an Airbnb on Sunday morning and drives to their next location so they’re ready to log in to work Monday morning. They also try to reserve their lodging for each stop three months in advance to ensure they have a pet-friendly place to stay in their desired neighborhood at each destination.

Ensure you have good internet connectivity. It’s crucial that you’re able to do your job effectively while traveling. If your job includes video conferencing and responding to emails, having a strong internet connection is essential. If your lodging doesn’t provide good Wi-Fi, you may need to find another location that does.

“That’s one of the most important things about being remote: You have to have solid internet,” McIntosh says. “Sometimes we’ve tried to work at our Airbnb but the internet wasn’t great, so we had to do some last-minute quick trip to make sure that we both make our meetings, our deadlines and our metrics for work.”

And if you work from a coffee shop or other place using a public Wi-Fi network, logging on to your employer’s VPN can add a layer of security between your work and potential hackers.

How to Manage Work-Life Balance in a Remote Role

Traveling or even working from the comfort of your own home may sound like an automatic way to improve your work-life balance , but figuring out the balance that works for you takes effort.

“You should consider that as fun as it sounds, it’s actually a very steep learning curve,” Foster says of remote work. “I know that I made a calculated decision: ‘This will be better for my work-life balance,’ but I will say within the first year, I think my work-life balance actually suffered because it was harder to draw those lines between work and home.” She found that having a designated place to work – her home office – helps her separate her job from the rest of her life.

“The door between my office and the rest of my house is pretty much that thick line between work and everything else,” she says.

Fully taking advantage of flexible work arrangements at home or on the go involves determining when and where you do your best work so you can give the right amount of attention to your job and your life outside of it. Here are some ways to make a remote role work for you.

Find your work-life pattern. Foster says she’s taken work with her on multiple trips and has learned that a few consecutive days off followed by working for a few consecutive days is best for her. On a trip to Disney World, for example, she says she would go to the theme park the first half of the week and log on to work the second half of the week.

“I’ve known some people who say, ‘I’ll work on Monday and I’ll go have fun on Tuesday, work on Wednesday and have fun on Thursday.’ But that never works, because it’s too jarring, especially being in a new environment,” she says. “I know people have different ways of doing it; I’ve just found that personally, I need to almost prepare myself for work.”

Find ways to connect with other people. Remote work means eliminating the in-person interactions you’d have with coworkers in the office, but it’s still important to build community. On her travels, McIntosh says doing her job at a coworking space is an ideal way to interact with locals.

“You’re around people who live in the area, so they share their favorite restaurants or places to get coffee,” she says. “So while working, you kind of get to immerse yourself in the area while you’re there.”

Even when you’re not in the same physical space, it’s important to stay connected with your colleagues. You should still be as accessible to your supervisor and teammates when you’re traveling or at home as when you’re in the office, and you should contribute the same amount of work as if you were working in-office. Your teammates shouldn’t have to pick up any slack from you because you’re on the road, and your company likely will evaluate whether the remote work arrangement is a good fit . If you do have to be offline for part of a day occasionally to run an errand or make an appointment, communicate that to your colleagues and give them an estimate of how long you’ll be offline, if possible.

Foster acknowledges that while many people are tired of Zoom and other virtual meetings, actually seeing your coworkers’ facial expressions and hearing the tones of their voices on those calls can help build lines of communication. She also encourages building a network where you live by spending time with neighbors who are also remote workers.

“There are people on my block who work remotely too, and that’s a good way to build community and make sure we’re still connecting as people,” Foster says. “It’s easy to become a hermit crab; you don’t ever have to leave your house. But we are people who love and crave connection, so make sure you’re fostering that.”

Take breaks when you need them. One perk of remote work is the flexibility to step away from work when you need to. Go for a walk on a nice day to give your eyes a rest from staring at your computer screen, or run an errand in your neighborhood during your lunch break.

“Use that 15-minute break to kind of disconnect,” Foster says. “If your kids are in the next room, check in on them.” She adds, “It can’t be understated: Get out of the house sometimes. Go for a walk. Go for a drive. Do something else. Just like you get office fatigue, you’ll realize you can get home fatigue kind of quickly.”

This principle also applies to life on the road. McIntosh says that during the course of their trip, she and her husband have stayed at some places for a week or less, and that those stays are more tiring than monthlong stays. Because they’re in a city for such a short period of time during weeklong stays, they feel like they have to go out and explore after work in the evenings, which means less time to rest. Monthlong stays allow the couple to spend some evenings and weekends immersed in their new surroundings, and others to recharge their batteries in the Airbnb.

“At the end of the day, we’re human, and I don’t think we’re built to adventure every single day,” McIntosh says. “You definitely need those days to breathe. We have to be like, ‘It’s OK that we just sit at home and watch a show and eat popcorn and not explore.’”

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3505 Out-of-State Work Locations

Policy sections, 3505.1 out-of-state work locations – u.s. locations, 3505.2 out-of-state work locations – international locations, 3505.3 approval process – u.s. and international work locations.

This policy covers the hiring of a staff employee to work at a location outside Connecticut, the assigning of a current staff employee to a work location outside Connecticut, and the use of University-approved flexible work arrangements outside Connecticut.  This policy applies to all University staff employees, including temporary staff employees.

Policy Statement

The majority of Yale staff employees work at a University campus location in Connecticut.  In limited circumstances, a University department may identify a business need to hire a staff employee for, assign a staff employee to, or authorize a staff employee’s request for a flexible work arrangement in, a work location outside Connecticut.  All such arrangements require specific advance University approval.

Reason for the Policy

This Policy provides the basis for permitting staff employees to work at a location outside Connecticut and the specific approvals required in advance of establishing a work location outside Connecticut (refer to Procedure 3505 PR.01 Out-of-State Work Locations Procedure and Staff Workplace Policies , Workplace Practices ).  Advance University approval is required to ensure that the full school or departmental operations, services, and academic commitments will be maintained, and that the University complies with all additional employment-related requirements pertaining to work locations outside Connecticut.

Definitions

Employee with an Out-of-State Work Location

An employee with an out-of-state work location is a staff employee who works, including one who telecommutes, from a location outside Connecticut for at least one day per week on a continual basis.  It does not apply to employees who work from a location outside Connecticut on an occasional basis.

Yale is subject to the employment-related laws (e.g., tax, labor, insurance) of the states and localities in which its employees work.  The University may also be subject to additional compliance requirements, which vary by jurisdiction.  Therefore, prior to hiring an employee for, assigning an employee to, or authorizing an employee’s flexible work arrangement for, a work location outside Connecticut, the University requires advance approval by the University’s Out-of-State Work Location Committee.  In reviewing the request, the Committee evaluates the University’s business needs and compliance requirements.

Employees must not use University funds for the purchase or rental of work space for out-of-state work locations related to a flexible work arrangement, pursuant to Staff Workplace Policies , Flexible Work Arrangements .

Important :  In addition to University obligations, an employee with an out-of-state work location may be subject to employment-related and other laws of his or her work state.

Yale is subject to the employment-related laws (e.g., tax, labor, insurance) of any country in which its employees work.  Hiring an employee for, assigning an employee to, or authorizing an employee’s flexible work arrangement for, a work location in another country, may require Yale to register and maintain a local legal presence, in addition to complying with the host country’s employment-related laws.  Such arrangements require the advance approval of the University’s Out-of-State Work Location Committee.  In reviewing the request, the Committee evaluates the University’s business needs and compliance requirements.  In most cases, however, this may not be a viable option.

It is recommended that, as an alternative, departments explore billing arrangements with a personnel employment agency or a local institution before attempting to establish a direct employment relationship.  Alternatively, contracting with an independent contractor to perform these activities may be an appropriate course of action.  The relationship, however, must be in accordance with Policy 3210 Purchase Contracts .  Please contact the University Tax Office or the Office of the General Counsel for assistance prior to entering into any such arrangements.

Employees must not use University funds for the purchase or rental of work space for international work locations related to a flexible work arrangement, pursuant to Staff Workplace Policies , Flexible Work Arrangements .

Important :  In addition to University obligations, an employee with an international work location may be subject to employment-related and other laws of his or her host country.

In general, departments must first obtain approval from the appropriate Human Resources Business Partner and Lead Administrator, and then obtain approval from the Out-of-State Work Location Committee, if applicable, prior to hiring an employee for, assigning an employee to, or authorizing an employee’s flexible work arrangement for, a work location outside Connecticut.  Refer to Procedure 3505 PR.01 Out-of-State Work Locations Procedure for the detailed approval process.  In the case of an employee’s request for a flexible work arrangement at a location outside of Connecticut, the employee must follow the procedure outlined in Staff Workplace Policies , Flexible Work Arrangements .

With approval from the Human Resources Business Partner and Lead Administrator, if the work location is in a state that the University has already approved (see University Approved States ), then the department may proceed with the hiring, assignment, or flexible work arrangement.

If the work location is in a state that the University has not yet approved, or is outside the United States, approval from the Out-of-State Work Location Committee is required prior to hiring or assignment of a current employee, or allowing a flexible work arrangement in a work location outside Connecticut.

These arrangements must be reviewed by the Committee, and approved by both the Controller and the Vice President for Human Resources & Administration, or designee.  Due to the additional administrative and compliance requirements, the arrangement will likely not be approved if it is located in a state not previously approved (see University Approved States ) or outside of the United States.  In reviewing the request, the Committee evaluates the University’s business needs and its compliance requirements.

Special Situations / Exceptions

Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Controller, with final approval by the Vice President for Human Resources & Administration, or designee.

Roles & Responsibilities

Controller and Vice President for Human Resources & Administration

  • Provide final review and approval of adding a work location in a new state or in a country outside the United States, based on recommendations from the Out-of-State Work Location Committee.
  • Maintains accurate home and work address information in the University’s Workday system. 

Requesting Department Head, or Direct Manager

  • Sends the request to hire or assign an employee to an out-of-state location, or the request by an employee for a flexible work arrangement at an out-of-state location, to the appropriate Lead Administrator and Human Resources Business Partner.

Lead Administrator

  • Reviews and approves departmental requests for out-of-state positions/assignments, with the appropriate Human Resources Business Partner.

Human Resources   Business Partner 

  • Reviews and approves requests for out-of-state work assignments with the appropriate Lead Administrator.
  • Obtains additional approval for assignments in states which the University has not yet approved, or that are outside the United States.

Payroll Department

  • Monitors payroll-related changes (including work location) in the University’s Workday system.
  • Ensures payroll-related compliance for all out-of-state employees (e.g., state and local tax filings, withholding, reporting).
  • Conducts periodic reviews of employees with out-of-state home and work addresses to confirm work locations, and provide reports to the University Out-of-State Work Location Committee for review and follow up.
  • Reviews annual submission of out-of-state work locations and makes any payroll adjustments, as needed.
  • Maintains a complete list of approved jurisdictions; the list should include withholding and SUI account numbers and registration criteria for jurisdictions where SUI liability is not yet met; the list should be available to the Committee upon request.
  • Collects all information required for state employment tax registration documents. 

Tax Department

  • Assists the Payroll Department with the payroll and unemployment registration process.
  • Files employment tax registration documents, where required.

Office of General Counsel

  • Provides final review of employment tax registration documents prior to submission.                                                                                                                               

Out-of-State Work Location Committee

  • Reviews requests for work assignments and flexible work arrangements in not yet approved states and locations outside the United States.
  • Provides recommendations to the Controller and to the Vice President for Human Resources & Administration for final approval.
  • Reviews reports provided by the Payroll Department and recommends action.
  • The Committee consists of representatives from Finance (Tax and Payroll), Human Resources, Risk Management, and the Office of General Counsel.

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Increase your visibility to the location options and the composition of future workforces

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work location assignment flexible

Rupert Bader

Senior Director, Workforce Planning

work location assignment flexible

This post summarizes Anaplan’s HR approach in using our own product to implement flexible workforce location strategies.

As an organization grows and evolves its strategies, providing employees with the option to choose where they work has a significant impact on attracting and retaining the best talent. Relocation costs can be substantial, and for many workers, the disruption to family and personal life is not worth significant and frequent changes. Companies like Spotify, Atlassian, Twilio, and VMware have already loosened their policies to make many roles available for flexible and virtual (remote) work. Removing the traditional boundaries defined by the physical locations allows these companies to access the full breadth of talent available in their countries of operation.

Increased visibility to the location options and the composition of future workforces requires recruiting and hiring today with a clear understanding of what is necessary to produce future experts and leaders. This approach reduces the cost of external hiring at the mid- and senior level, while also improving the career prospects for emerging talent within the company. Another added benefit is accelerating the representation of diverse talent at the mid- and senior levels of the company – improving equity of compensation and attracting more diverse workers. That’s a strategic benefit because 78% of U.S. workers say it is important that their companies foster an inclusive and equitable environment ( April 2021 CNBC/Surveymonkey workforce happiness index ).

At Anaplan, we use our own product to make sure that our future workforce is developed with emerging talent at the forefront and include a flexible location strategy that supports employee choice and benefits. A lot was learned during 2020, when work-from-home was the company-wide policy. In this post, I’ll share the process you can use to bring this vision to reality in your workplace.

Where to start

Begin by delivering a simple snapshot of your workforce including location (organized into state/country/regional hierarchies), organization (using financial or HR reporting hierarchies), and job level (using compensation guidelines or job libraries). You can integrate your HRIS data with Anaplan through two simple, automated daily feeds, in just two weeks: It usually takes less than a week to adapt an existing feed or create a new one, and another week at the most to create the data, views, and metrics that make the most sense to your HR teams.

By building calculations for annual hiring, termination, and promotion rates (with differences where statistically significant) into your Anaplan model, your model will project the baseline workforce forward for five years.

Next, create scenarios that narrate different growth trajectories (e.g., higher revenue growth, increased product development, or both simultaneously) by the organization, location, and level. Some examples are:

  • Scenario #1: Accelerated growth for emerging talent requires higher investment in training.
  • Scenario #2: Ramping up emerging talent slowly means externally hiring more mid-level managers.
  • Scenario #3: Incorporate a flexible working policy based on research like this from Gallup , where 54% of software engineers prefer to work virtually, providing increased access to diverse talent across the country.
  • Scenario #4: Demonstrate the tradeoffs of shifting hiring to lower-cost locations vs. high-cost locations over time.
  • Scenario #5: Show the implications of improved hiring and promotion rates at all levels for the leadership representation of women and other under-represented groups over time.

Using Anaplan’s “what-if” modeling to experiment with these ideas, you will find several scenarios that describe possible futures for your workforce under various conditions of growth, distribution, and investment in emerging talent. Our internal Anaplan modeler team developed such a baseline model over a two-month sprint in close collaboration with the workforce planning team.

work location assignment flexible

Decide on the most favorable path

Once you have developed your baseline model, add more context based on your organization’s unique challenges. This helps you land on the preferred long-range plan for the optimal ability to attract and retain talent, while staying within cost and contractual constraints. Do this in partnership with finance and real estate teams that already have their own perspectives on future expense and real estate constraints for the organization. Their input belongs in your Anaplan model as well.

  • You can add a variable to show the mix of employees in each country that will be office-based or virtual/remote . This allows you to estimate a budget that allow remote employees to travel one or two times per year to work with their teams in person as well as examine the capacity requirements for specific offices, estimate relocation budgets, and measure the environmental impacts of reduced commuting requirements.
  • You can include the external talent market data (e.g., U.S. Census workforce data on race/ethnicity) that shows the profile of talent across the countries where you operate (or wish to operate) and set expectations for the future set of candidates and hires that you should be able to attract given an increased number of roles that are open to virtual/remote work.
  • You can work with finance and emerging-talent recruiting teams, as well as each of the business leaders, to set goals for building an emerging talent pool from universities, apprentice programs, internships, bootcamps, military exits, and second-career candidates that will enter the workforce in future fiscal years and can reduce demand for external hiring at the mid- and senior levels.

In the first-year, the results of such a long-range workforce plan can then be connected to short-term planning and budgeting cycles to inform overall employee expense cost expectations. It can even be expanded to include real estate, IT, and recruiting capacity expenses.

As the organization evolves, update the underlying rosters and assumptions (through automatic, statistical, or manual input) in the model so that it can be used by leadership teams for more detailed organizational planning and “what-if” scenarios.

This simple approach – powered by Anaplan’s multidimensional modelling and scenario-building capabilities – empowers leaders and their teams to see the future through one common framework. Companies can increase diversity, decrease wasted time, and improve productivity by investing in an emerging talent program that allows use of mid-level workers for more specialized work, leading to more employee satisfaction.

Learn more about how Anaplan provides workforce agility in our agile workforce planning white paper.

University Human Resources

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Flexible Work at NC State

NC State remains committed to delivering world-class educational programs and services while providing opportunities to foster work-life balance for our employees when possible. At NC State, we’ve established flexible work options that are designed to meet the employee and/or business unit’s operational needs in this ever-changing, globally influenced, educational environment. A flexible work arrangements regulation has been instituted to align units’ business and operational needs with employee interest in alternative work locations and flexible work schedules. Our program enables units to manage their business needs while offering employees who work diligently to meet those needs some flexibility related to their work schedules, hours and locations.

NC State also has certain positions designated to conduct 100% of their university business from a remote work location . These assignments which are designated by the manager and senior leadership, not employee requests, are more specialized and unique to the program or service being provided to the university.

This page provides information, resources, and tools on these flexible work programs. If you have additional questions regarding flexible work at NC State, please contact University Human Resources at [email protected] .

Flexible Work Arrangements

NC State has established a regulation that allows flexible work arrangements . Flexible work arrangements are working options that involve adjustments to an employee’s work schedule, hours, and/or work site to effectively accomplish the duties and responsibilities in the employee’s position.

The purpose of the regulation, which went into effect Oct. 1, 2021, is for supervisors to consider various work scheduling options and alternative work locations that align with the operational, business and customer service needs of their units as well as the personal and/or professional scheduling interests of the employee.

Who is eligible for a flexible work arrangement? Show More

The following employee categories are covered by this regulation, however, not all employee categories or positions may be eligible for flexible work arrangements:

  • SAAO Tier I and Tier II employees;
  • EHRA non-faculty employees;
  • EHRA professional faculty in the Libraries;
  • SHRA employees;
  • Post-doctoral scholars and House Officers;
  • Temporary employees; and
  • *Graduate and undergraduate student workers

The following employees are not covered by this regulation:

  • EHRA faculty;
  • County-based NC Cooperative Extension employees; and
  • Employees with a special temporary off-site assignment

*Supervisors of graduate student teaching assistants or research assistants are not required to utilize this request process. Other student workers employed as graduate services assistants or temporary employees will follow the request processes established in their employing college or division for student employees.

What types of flexible work arrangements are available? Show More

The regulation allows supervisors and managers to grant an employee flexibility related to the arrangement based on an individual or combination of the following options:

  • Flexible Work hours (e.g., hours that extend outside of a unit’s core work hours)
  • Flexible Work week schedules (e.g., compressed work weeks)
  • Alternate Work Location (home address, other off-site/satellite location within the state of North Carolina)

How do you request a flexible work arrangement? Show More

It is important that an employee meets with their supervisor and has an agreed upon schedule before submitting the Flexible Work Request in the HR System.

Flexible Work Arrangement Request

Employees can submit a Flexible Work Arrangement Request in MyPack Portal by accessing Employee Self Service and clicking on the “Flexible Work Arrgmt (Emp)” tile.

Employee requests are routed directly to their supervisor for review and approval. Supervisors will have the option to deny, pushback, or approve the submitted request. The requests are stored in the HR system and managed by your supervisor based on the operational needs of your unit along with your performance evaluation.

Employee Training Resources Show More

  • Employee User Guide
  • Flexible Work Arrangement Request Training Video (5 mins)

Supervisor Training Resources Show More

LinkedIn Learning Video Resources

  • Leading at a Distance (36 mins)
  • How to Be an Effective Remote Manger (1 hr 9 mins)
  • Managing Virtual Teams (56 mins)
  • Building Connection and Engagement in Virtual Teams (41 mins)

Flexible Work Arrangement Approval Process Training

  • Supervisor User Guide
  • Flexible Work Arrangement Approval Training Video (3 mins 27 sec)
  • Instructor-led Course: (HR-LOD53) Flexible Work Arrangement Training 

Supervisor Tools Show More

  • Operational Guide for Managers and Supervisors (pdf)
  • Hybrid Remote/Alternate Work Location Tool for Supervisors
  • Fexible Work Arrangements FAQs (pdf)

Remote Work Location

NC State has established a regulation that allows for remote work locations . This regulation, which went into effect March 1, 2022, applies to employees with a primary or permanently assigned duty station that is 100% remote and are not expected to work on university property. This regulation is distinguished from the Flexible Work Arrangements regulation because this regulation covers positions that are not assigned to an on-site duty station, while the Flexible Work Arrangements regulation applies to employees who have an on-site duty station but may occasionally perform work from an alternate work location. The decision to approve a Remote Work Location for a position must be based on the position’s duties and responsibilities, not by an employee’s preference or desire to work remotely.

What types of positions are eligible for a remote work location? Show More

This regulation covers all position types as well as employee classifications (full-time, part-time, permanent, temporary) including:

  • EHRA faculty,
  • EHRA Non-faculty,
  • Post-doctoral Scholars and CVM House Officers, and
  • Student Workers (undergraduate and graduate General Services Associates in temporary positions)

Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants are not covered under this regulation.

The decision to approve a Remote Work Location for a position must be based on the position’s duties and responsibilities, not by an employee’s preference or desire to work remotely.

What types of remote work locations are available? Show More

Generally, a remote work location is an assigned primary duty station that is off-site (i.e., not located on central campus or other university owned or operated locations). This regulation applies to employees with a primary or permanently assigned duty station that is 100% remote and are not expected to work on university property. A remote work location includes the following:

  • This type of Remote Work Location typically involves a position where the duties and responsibilities require an employee to work from the particular Off-Campus Location due to the nature of the position.
  • Examples might include a private office space in Charlotte or a laboratory in Wilmington.
  • This type of Remote Work Location typically involves a position where the duties and responsibilities may be performed off-site and where management has—based on operational needs—approved the position for a Remote Work Location that is home-based.
  • Examples might include faculty members who only teach courses through distance education or information technology employees whose job duties may be performed entirely remotely.

Approval for Remote Work Locations Show More

A position must be approved to work from a designated Remote Work Location. Unlike a request submitted by an employee for an alternate work location as part of a flexible work arrangement, the assignment of an employee to a designated Remote Work Location must originate from an employee’s supervisor.

Supervisor Tools and Resources Show More

  • Operational Guide for managers and supervisors (pdf)
  • Remote Work Location tool for supervisors

Things to consider regarding the employee prior to a full remote assignment:

  • Does the employee have a suitable space in their home or alternate work location to complete their work tasks and communicate with you as the supervisor, their team, and other stakeholders or customers?
  • Is the employee able to meet work performance whether onsite or working elsewhere?
  • Does an employee’s work location impact team work processes and efficiency?
  • Does the employee possess appropriate time management and organizational skills?
  • Does the employee understand their role and expectations, and require little supervision to complete their tasks?

Make sure the employee will sustain engagement while working remotely and feel as productive at home as in the office.

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work location assignment flexible

The Future of Flexibility at Work

  • Ellen Ernst Kossek,
  • Patricia Gettings,
  • Kaumudi Misra

work location assignment flexible

What does true flexibility look like? Most organizations approach it in one of two ways: as an ad hoc work-life accommodation available upon request, or as giving people permission to get their work done on their own schedule — as long as they’re available to answer emails or put out fires 24/7. Neither approach is sustainable over the long term. The authors, who have been studying workplace flexibility for years, advocate a more balanced approach that makes employer and employee needs equal. In this article they outline the downsides of work-life accommodation and boundaryless working and discuss the tenets that organizations should follow as they develop their own flexibility programs and policies.

You can tailor programs and policies to fit your employees’ needs.

As organizations tentatively plan how to get work done amid the uncertainty of the coronavirus, both leaders and employees are touting the benefits of flexibility. But what does flexibility at work look like in practice? And how can you know whether your team or organization is using it successfully?

Advice on inclusivity, onboarding, performance measurement, and more.

  • Ellen Ernst Kossek is the Basil S. Turner Distinguished Professor of Management at Purdue University and was president of the Work & Family Researchers Network. She studies how leader support of work-life boundaries, flexibility, and remote work affect women’s inclusion and career equality.
  • Patricia Gettings is an assistant professor of communication at the State University of New York at Albany. She studies the intersections between personal relationships and organizational commitments and how individuals and organizations negotiate those overlaps.
  • Kaumudi Misra is an assistant professor of management at California State University, East Bay. She studies the role of work-life flexibility practices as a strategic human resource lever for individual and organizational productivity.

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What Is Workplace Flexibility? Definitions & Examples from Top Workplaces

 Workplace flexibility is depicted in an image showing a mother working on her laptop, in her family room/kitchen, with her two children in the background having food.

Elements of Company Culture ,  Employee Experience ,  Employee Well-being ,  Remote & Hybrid Culture

Workplace flexibility is about providing the conditions for employees to thrive. And it’s only successful in great high-trust company cultures.

Unlimited time off. Flex hours. The ability to work whenever and wherever.

Not too long ago, these were unheard of in the working world. Typical employment meant being visible, at your desk or station, for eight hours a day, five days a week.

And then COVID came.

Flexibility in the workplace was already on the rise pre-pandemic, with forward-thinking, globalized organizations adopting non-traditional setups such as remote teams and flex schedules. But then lockdowns forced everyone to embrace workplace flexibility — whether they were ready or not.

And now, while some companies have returned to their old routines, other employers have decided to stay flexible for good.

What is workplace flexibility?

Workplace flexibility means providing the conditions for employees to thrive. Workplace flexibility embraces the idea that employees can be productive no matter when or where they perform their work. Rather than enforcing a rigid workplace environment or schedule, workplace flexibility acknowledges individual needs and supports better work-life balance and employee well-being.

Note that this is different from employee flexibility, which typically refers to how adaptable an employee is in the workplace. Workplace flexibility is also different from 'work-life balance' which pits work against life - as if  work  is an antonym to  life.  Workplace flexibility acknowledges that the two are more intertwined and fluid. 

In a flexible workplace, management trusts employees to perform their work in a non-traditional structure, and provides the necessary resources and environment to empower employees to work in this way.

Revolutionizing Employee Retention Report

Trust is the key factor in flexible workplaces

Flexible work and remote work are most effective in high-trust cultures. In high-trust company cultures, employees feel safe to speak up, feel safe to fail, and feel trusted by their leaders to get their job done regardless of when and where they work.

This is something that Meg Newhouse, co-founder and CEO of consulting firm and Certified™ great workplace Inspirant Group , advocates.

Inspirant is a remote-first organization, with flex hours and unlimited PTO, and a focus on supporting employees so they can be successful both in and out of the workplace — whether that’s by letting them set their own personal goals in performance reviews or giving them the trust and freedom to take time off whenever they need.

“We’ve never felt like we needed to monitor where people are working or how they’re working or when they’re getting their work done,” says Meg. “People just fit the work into their day, just like they fit everything else into their schedule.”

Why is workplace flexibility important in today’s work environment?

Employees are demanding more workplace flexibility — and even leaving their current jobs in search of it. The Great Resignation has proven that employees are seeking greater purpose and flexibility in the workplace .

“You can’t advertise a job without saying it’s flexible and expect to get high quality applicants,” warns Meg. “Advertising a position as remote-first is what people are looking for.”

Workplace flexibility also bursts your talent pool wide open. When you’re no longer tied to only hiring people within commuting distance or who are always available Monday to Friday, nine-to-five, the world becomes your recruitment oyster.

Not only that, but companies that fail to adapt and adopt at least some sense of flexibility are going to fall behind as the global workforce continues to change.

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“We’re in the midst of a workplace revolution and, as a result, employees are in the driver’s seat,” says Meg. “And with that comes a shift in how leaders need to show up.”

What are the advantages and disadvantages of workplace flexibility?

As with anything, there are pros and cons to a flexible workplace.

Advantages of workplace flexibility:

  • Flexible work opens you to the best recruits, from anywhere. Once location and hours aren’t criteria, you’re more likely to build a diverse team of top talent.
  • Psychological health. According to our 2022 survey of average U.S. workplaces, employees who work remote part-time or full-time report higher psychological health than employees fully onsite. In fact, 57% of fully remote employees report good psychological health compared to 49% of employees who work on site five days per week.
  • Work-life In the same study, employees who work remotely were more satisfied with their work-life balance than those working onsite (63% vs. 57%).
  • Employee engagement. When employees feel trusted and can have a healthy work-life balance , they’ll be more engaged, more productive, and less likely to quit. Remote or hybrid employees report more willingness to give extra on the job (60%) compared to employees fully onsite (53%).
  • Business results. Despite many employers’ fears, switching to remote work during the pandemic did not hurt their bottom line. In fact, in many cases.

workplace flexibility

Disadvantages of workplace flexibilty:

  • Employee perceptions of fair promotions. Companies with hybrid workplaces or that are 100% remote have a more difficult time creating fair promotions practices compared to workplaces with a fully on-site workforce. As our research revealed, remote employees are 6% less likely to believe promotions are fair at their workplace compared to employees who spend one to four days on-site or in the office.
  • Connection to the bigger picture. Employees who work fully remote tend to feel less connected to the company mission and feel less like they make an impact. At the average U.S. workplace, 58% of remote employees feel they make a difference at work compared to 65% of on-site employees.
  • While tools like Zoom, Teams, and Slack are great for keeping your team connected, there really is no substitute for face-to-face communication. And when employees are online at different times, it can be challenging to resolve urgent issues that pop up.
  • Blurring of home and work. Despite the freedom that flexible work can bring, it’s very easy for employees to work longer hours at home, or to struggle with setting a schedule for themselves — a recipe for workplace burnout .
  • Remote work can easily lead to feelings of social disconnection and loneliness, especially if it’s an employee’s first time working this way.

6 Examples of flexible working conditions

There are variations to flexible working arrangements, which can be mixed and matched based on your organization’s needs:

  • Flexible scheduling. Employees can set their own hours, shifts, and break times, or could opt for a compressed workweek (i.e., working full-time in four days instead of five ).
  • Flexible hours. Employees can switch to part-time or cut hours when needed.
  • Flexible location. Employees can choose to work from home, the office, or other location. Many high-trust workplaces enable their employees to work from any location in the world. Other companies allow their employees to work from a remote location as long as they are on the same time zone.
  • Flexible (or unlimited) PTO. Employees are free to take time off when they need it, without having to worry about using up a limited vacation allotment.
  • Flexible positions (job sharing). Two or more employees share a single role so that they can work part-time while the role is covered full-time.
  • Cross-department secondments which let employees immerse themselves in a different area of the business for a temporary period without losing their “day job.” Focused on career development and exposure, Certified workplace Cox Enterprises calls these secondments “Cox Gigs.” Cox Gigs builds collaboration across the company and help their people discover their passions and network with other teams. A software engineer might try her hand at social media marketing. A human resources manager might decide to give project management a try. Cox Gigs is just one way to empower employees to not only succeed in their career paths, but to chart new ones.

Offering any (or all) of these arrangements can significantly boost employee morale and overall company culture.

For example, at consulting firm QVest US, a flexible PTO policy proves to employees that management trusts them.

“Leadership understands that taking time off to recharge is important for our success and our well-being,” one employee said in the survey for our . “We are trusted and empowered to take time off when necessary, as long as we coordinate with our teams to ensure our projects will not be impacted.”

Another flexible workplace, hospitality-staffing platform Qwick , has just switched to a four-day workweek.

“[It’s] been life-changing for me,” commented an employee. “I feel like it is really helping me to achieve a better work-life balance and also meet important goals in my personal life.”

Flexible work arrangements can also include offering things like mental health days or offline days. For example, Forma , a life benefits platform, offers “Recharge Days,” and Front , a customer communication service, has a weekly company-wide “unreachable day.”

How to handle supervision in flexible workplaces

Micromanaging is the antithesis of flexible work. Meg Newhouse recommends managers meet at least weekly one-on-one with their employees, especially in a remote environment. However, she’s quick to point out, this isn’t about checking up on how they’re working, but rather checking in on how they’re doing..

“If you’re not in a traditional office where you could just stop by someone’s desk or bump into them in the kitchen, or jump out to a quick lunch, you have to be more intentional about these virtual check-ins,” she says.

And don’t even think about installing any remote tracking programs or requiring employees to have their video cameras turned on whenever they’re online.

“You’re not running a daycare,” adds Meg. “If they’re not delivering on time or if they’re not showing up when they say they’re going to be there, those are red flags you should address. But if you’ve got people delivering good quality work … there’s no reason for extreme oversight.”

How can you measure the success of a flexible work environment?

You just need to look at your business results, says Meg. If employees are unhappy, customers and clients will be equally unhappy, and your business overall will suffer.

That’s not a problem at Inspirant.

“Our revenue numbers are continually increasing, our profit margin looks good,” she says. “If you want to look at the bottom line, you can see the ROI of trusting your workforce.”

Beyond that, you’ll want to regularly check in with your employees — whether that’s in your one-to-one catch-ups or via pulse survey — to ensure your flexible work environment is meeting their needs. Do they have the tools they require? Do they feel supported by their manager? How is their employee well-being ?

“There’s no work-life balance,” Meg explains. “It’s all life.”

Does your organization have a great flexible work environment? Show employees, recruits, and customers why your company is a great workplace by getting Great Place To Work Certified ™.

Learn how to create the kind of culture that makes people excited to come to work.

Claire Hastwell

As the Content Program Manager at Great Place To Work, Claire helps decode the psychology behind high-trust workplaces using Great Place To Work's extensive data repository on employee experience. Claire has co-authored noted reports such as "Women in the Workplace" and “The Power of Purpose at Work,” and contributed to Fortune with her profiles of the Best Workplaces™. Her latest white paper draws on three decades of employee survey data to give HR leaders strategic guidance on nurturing trust, inclusivity, and growth within their organizations.

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work location assignment flexible

FieldFLEX Mobile

Running safe and efficient maintenance operations in the Transportation Sector can pose significant challenges for operators when the location and nature of work are unpredictable

A large metropolitan train network with over 200 train stations and 500 passenger carriages was facing challenges ensuring the upkeep of train platforms and carriages due to the fluid nature of the transportation system.  Peak and unanticipated network demand meant that pre-scheduled maintenance and cleaning services could not adapt to the needs of the transportation service. Assigning personnel to fixed locations or train routes was leaving assets and locations vulnerable.

FieldFLEX implemented Dynamic Work Assignment that assigns tasks to the nearest available personnel, ensuring the train cars and platforms remained in peak operating condition.

  • Scheduling tool implemented and FFX deployed the work management app to mobile techs.
  • Bluetooth LE beacons installed at train platforms and in train carriages to automatically signal a location or asset. As personnel arrive at train station their FieldFLEX device listens for the beacon signal and communicates with enterprise system to automatically retrieve pending tasks based on the technician’s location or proximity to an asset, their qualifications and availability.
  • FFX listens for a beacon signal as the tech entered train – start timer upon entry and stop timer when they exited.
  • Arrival at next station automatically synch completed tasks and dispatch new ones.
  • Fully automated timekeeping and task synchronization – guaranteeing completion.
  • Operator met and exceeded safety and cleanliness service levels.

KEY OUTCOMES

  • Auditable work records (location, date/time)
  • Improved mobile performance, download only what is needed
  • Optimized work routes, reduced travel, just-in-time work assignment

FieldFLEX Enterprise Mobile Platform tightly integrates with  IBM Maximo  and  TRIRIGA  platforms and has all the field service capabilities available to help you maintain and inspect your assets and facilities.

work location assignment flexible

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Flexible Work Arrangements

Appropriately planned and managed flexible work arrangements, including teleworking, are an effective way to recruit and retain excellent employees. They can also improve productivity, reduce commuting time, and promote a healthy balance between work and home. 

We appreciate that opportunities to telework, work remotely, and leverage alternative work schedules make the College a more competitive employer.

Types of Flexible Work Arrangements

Telework/Telecommute

Allows an employee to trade a commute to perform work, during any part of their authorized work schedule, away from their main worksite at an approved alternate work site. 

Telework Eligibility: Factors for Supervisors to Consider

Telework eligibility is based on the operational and service needs and requirements of the area or unit and the essential job duties of a position. Therefore, it is up to the area administrator and unit supervisors to determine which positions would be eligible and what the appropriate schedule should be (i.e., every other week, 1x a week, 2x a week, etc.) based on operational and service needs and requirements. 

The job has clearly defined tasks, deliverables, and/or levels of service.

Work is of a nature where in-person interaction is minimal and/or may be scheduled or facilitated effectively with technology.

All or a significant portion of the job tasks are portable and can be done at an alternate work location without altering the employee’s duties or work standards/competencies.  Examples of portable job tasks include:

reading, writing/editing, research, working with data, and communicating by e-mail, telephone, chat/instant messaging, and videoconferencing.

The job does not rely upon specific equipment or supplies/information that are only available at a College work site.

The work can be performed away from the College work site without diminishing the following:

ability to meet the needs of internal and external “customers” (i.e., students, faculty/staff, co-workers, visitors, etc.) an the quality of services provided.

the flow of work, communication, collaboration, and productivity.

Working from an alternate location will not have an adverse impact on the productivity or work quality of other employees.

The employee’s performance is at a satisfactory level (i.e., meets expectations or satisfactory rating) on the most recent performance evaluation.

The employee works effectively without regular close supervision or monitoring.

The employee demonstrates good time management skills by completing assignments on time.

The employee demonstrates self-motivation and independence.

The employee communicates information to students, leadership, co-workers, support staff, and customers in a timely and complete manner.

The employee’s demonstrated computer skills and proficiency with technology tools are sufficient to allow the employee to be productive at the alternate work site.

The employee understands and demonstrates effective use of technology to ensure integrity, confidentiality, and security of data.

Telework allows an employee to trade a commute to perform work, during any part of their authorized work schedule, away from their main worksite at an approved alternate work site. This is not a full-time arrangement. This does not include work done while on official travel or mobile work.

The types of telecommute schedules are: 

Regular Telework Schedule : Telework that occurs on a periodic and regularly-scheduled basis.

Situational Telework Schedule : Telework that is approved on a case-by-case basis, or that is not a part of a regular telework/telecommute schedule. Instances in which situational telework may be approved include, but are not limited to: operational need, inclement weather, maximize productivity when the teleworker’s availability is impacted by personal appointments, or special work assignments. 

Get Adobe Acrobat PDF Reader.-Link opens in new window.

Telework Terms and Conditions

Work place safety.

  • If the employee incurs a work-related injury while working, they must immediately notify their supervisor and the Office of Human Resources and Strategic Talent Management and complete all necessary and/or management-request documents regarding the injury. Worker’s Compensation does not cover accidents or injuries of family members or other third parties present at the Alternate Work Location.
  • work space is free of potential hazards that could cause physical harm (such as frayed wires, bare conductors, loose wires, exposed wires to the ceiling, frayed or torn carpeting seams, and or uneven floor surfaces)
  • electrical outlets are grounded (3 pronged)
  • furniture being used ( i.e. , desk, file cabinets, shelves, bookcases) is sturdy and adequate for use
  • the rungs and legs of the chair are sturdy and free of loose casters (wheels)
  • the phone lines, electrical cords, and extension wires are secured
  • the office space is neat, clean, and free of obstructions and excessive amounts of combustibles
  • the temperature, noise, ventilation, and lighting levels are adequate for maintaining your normal level of job performance
  • a fire extinguisher easily accessible from the office space
  • there is a working smoke detector (confirmed with a test) within sensory ( i.e. , hearing, seeing, feeling) distance of the workspace
  • the area is free from distractions ( e.g. , noise, children, etc.)

Communication

  • The employee must meet with their immediate supervisor and established that supervisor and employee have documented a work schedule and completed the self- assessment, if applicable.

Equipment, Records, and Materials

  • The employee is responsible for maintaining and repairing employee-owned equipment used at their Alternate Work Location at their personal expense and on their personal time. The employee is responsible for paying all expenses related to using equipment such as utilities expenses at their Alternate Work Location.
  • If the College provides equipment for home use, the employee agrees to provide a secure location for the equipment and will not use such equipment for purposes other than College Use of College equipment or access to the College’s network by others is strictly prohibited. The College is responsible for maintaining, repairing, and replacing College-owned equipment issued to teleworking employees. In the event of equipment malfunction, the employee must notify their supervisor immediately.
  • All equipment, records, and materials provided by the College shall remain College property. The employee agrees to return College equipment, records, and materials upon All College equipment will be returned by the employee for inspection, repair, replacement, or repossession, as needed or requested.

Information Technology and Security

  • The employee is required to have the appropriate technology and security measures in place to perform the work that is outlined in their position description. In addition, the employee must have access to the College email system and any College systems and applications necessary to perform their tasks and duties. For systems that require virtual private network (VPN) access, the employee may request a VPN account through the Office of Information Technology (OIT) Work From Home Tools Note the VPN user agreement terms apply, i.e. , safeguard data, your MyMC username and password.
  • The employee and their supervisor shall determine the minimum equipment and software necessary to telework. In determining which equipment (if any) shall be provided by the College, the employee’s supervisor may consult with OIT regarding needs.
  • The employee will implement sound information security practices by completing the required DataSecurity@MC training modules prior to commencing telework and pay extra attention to the Working Remotely and Cloud Services modules within Workday MC Learns.
  • The employee will immediately call in any security concerns or incidents to the OIT Service Desk at 240-567-7222 .
  • When working from their approved Alternate Work Location the employee will adhere to all College policies, procedures and guidelines which are expressly incorporated by reference into, and made a part of, the Telework Application and Terms and Conditions Agreement. Specific policies related to the use of information technology and data security include:
  • Approved firewalls and anti-virus software are on all computers used at the Alternate Work Location and are updated daily with current definitions or set to update automatically.
  • Computers used at the Alternate Work Location have an operating system currently supported by the computer’s manufacturer and patching is set to update automatically.
  • Computing equipment used to process, review, edit, or access College data – including personally-owned tablets and mobile devices – are password protected.
  • Flash drives or other portable drives are scanned for viruses before being used for uploading or downloading data.
  • Sensitive information in hardcopy form is returned to the office or shredded.
  • Assignments completed at the Alternate Work Location are backed-up according to College procedures.
  • The College’s network will only be accessed from the Alternate Work Location, unless approved in advance by supervisor.
  • The employee will adhere to the College’s procedures in the handling of public records, and Personally Identifiable Information (PII).
  • The employee will limit personal use of College equipment and follow the College’s guidelines pertaining to limited personal use of College-Provided Internet, Intranet, and Electronic Mail Services.
  • The employee will ensure that unauthorized parties including spouses, children, family and friends will not use College devices and systems.

Additional Telework Conditions  

  • Teleworking is not a substitute for child/adult day If applicable, the employee agrees to make regular dependent care arrangements while teleworking.
  • The employee cannot operate a business or work for another employer during remote work hours.
  • Flexible work arrangements, including teleworking, are a privilege and are not a guarantee of employment. Management retains the right to abbreviate or terminate the Telework Application and Terms and Conditions Agreement in totality due to changes in work demands, office staffing, and/or other operational Management retains the right to modify or terminate the Telework Application and Terms and Conditions Agreement if the performance of the employee’s duties decline and/or are deemed less than satisfactory.

Certifications

  • A telework-eligible employee must read the requirements outlined in the Telework Terms and Conditions BEFORE submitting a Telework Application and Terms and Conditions Agreement, in addition to meeting with the immediate supervisor, discussing and documenting an acceptable telework schedule, and reviewing the Work Site Safety Checklist.
  • Once fully approved and signed, the employee will submit a copy of the Telework Application and Terms and Conditions Agreement via the Approved FWA Submission Form . Please note that HRSTM only maintains copies of Telework Application and Terms and Conditions Agreements for employee records and does not approve the Application and Agreement.

If approved, the immediate supervisor submits request to the next level supervisor in the employee's supervisory chain for final approval and signature.

If the employee and immediate supervisor cannot agree to the terms of the agreement,  the employee may send a copy of the agreement, including a summary of the points on which the supervisor and employee agreed and disagreed, to the next-level supervisor in the employee’s supervisory chain. The next-level supervisor will review the materials and approve or disapprove the request. If the request is not approved, the next-level supervisor will provide the reason for the decision in writing to the employee (process ends).

Upon approval, the employee completes the Approved Flexible Work Arrangement Submission Form new window and uploads the approved agreement PDF.

Alternate Work Schedule

Alternate Work Schedule (AWS) allows an employee to work a schedule that differs from the department’s standard schedule. 

The types of AWS are:

Flexible work time is defined as an agreed-upon starting and departure times that differ from the standard schedule for the department. The schedules may be fixed for a period or can vary from day to day. 

Compressed work week is defined as regularly scheduled hours worked are fixed over fewer than five days or in some cases over a two-week period. 

The process to apply for an alternate work schedule is as follows:

If approved, the immediate supervisor will forward the agreement to the next-level supervisor in the employee’s supervisory chain for final approval and signature.

If the employee and immediate supervisor cannot agree to the terms of the agreement, the employee may send a copy of the agreement, including a summary of the points on which the supervisor and employee agreed and disagreed, to the next-level supervisor in the employee’s supervisory chain. The next-level supervisor will review the materials and approve or disapprove the request. If the request is not approved, the next-level supervisor will provide the reason for the decision in writing to the employee.

Remote Work 

Allows an employee to perform the duties and responsibilities of the employee’s position at a remote work site as their primary work location on a routine basis.

STATUS NOTE: Due to the College's return to campus and onsite teaching, learning, and working, voluntary remote work assignment considerations and approvals are suspended until further notice.

Remote work is when an employee performs their job at a remote work site as their primary work location on a routine basis. In most cases, the remote work site is the employee’s home, and they will not have a dedicated office or workspace on campus (onsite).

Flexible Work Arrangement Guidance

Use these guidelines when developing and documenting specific standard operating procedures for your department/unit/area for how to use flexible work options and telework.

Use these resources to support and maintain the specific standard operating procedures for your department/unit/area’s use of flexible work options and telework.

Consider using these sample work plans and a weekly tracker. Note that these samples are available in Word and Excel so that you can make any changes to the documents that best serve your department/unit/area’s standard operating procedures. Unlike PDF files, Word and Excel files will automatically download to your computer; save them somewhere else before you make your desired changes. Feel free to curate and/or develop your own tools, as well.

  • Sample Weekly FWA Tracker (Excel) new window
  • Sample Telework Work Plan (Word) new window
  • Sample Telework Work Plan (Excel) new window

All MC employees have access to LinkedIn Learning content through Workday Learning (sign in using your MC email address). Please consider reviewing the following courses which were designed to help supervisors and employees navigate a hybrid work environment.

  • Mastering Hybrid Work new window
  • Navigating Hybrid Work with Mindfulness new window

Course recommendations specifically for managers/supervisors: 

  • Overcome the Productivity Perception Gap as a Manager new window
  • Leading Virtual Meetings new window
  • Leading Remote Projects and Virtual Teams new window
  • Managing Team Conflict new window
  • Giving and Receiving Feedback new window
  • Leading with Emotional Intelligence new window
  • Leading and Motivating People with Different Personalities new window

Employees: Submit Your Flexible Work Arrangement Document(s)

Upon approval, the employee uploads the completed agreement with appropriate signatures.  

Administrators: Submit Your Flexible Work Arrangement Schedules Form

Administrators shall submit a completed schedules form for their department/unit/area with all FWA use for the applicable Term by the end of the month that the term begins (January, May, August). DEADLINE EXTENDED: The first FWA Schedules Form will be due by March 22, 2024 for the Spring 24 term.

Frequently Asked Questions

Telework (or telecommute) is when employees perform part of their work schedule at an alternate location ( e.g. , at home). A teleworker’s main or primary worksite is located on one of the College’s campus or business center locations.

A regular telework schedule is when telework days occur on a periodic and regularly-scheduled basis ( e.g. , each Tuesday and Thursday, the first Monday each month).

Situational telework schedule is one that is approved on a case-by-case basis, or that is not a part of a regular telework schedule. Instances in which situational telework may be approved include, but are not limited to: an operational need, inclement weather, to maintain productivity when the telework/telecommuter’s ability to work onsite is impacted by personal appointments, or to complete special work assignments.

No. Telework is when employees perform part of their work schedule at an alternate location ( e.g. , at home). A teleworker’s main or primary worksite is located on one of the College’s campuses or centers. Remote work is when an employee performs their full work schedule at an alternate location (e.g., at home) and this alternate location serves as the remote worker’s primary work site. Remote workers do not typically have a dedicated space at one of the College’s campus or business center locations.

Telework eligibility is based on the operational and service needs of the area or unit and the essential job duties of the position. It is up to the supervisor to determine which positions will be eligible and what the appropriate schedule should be based on the needs.

Factors to be considered for telework are job duties, responsibilities, and performance. View additional guidelines for supervisors , including the Making Decisions: Telework Requests interactive workflow .

Employees who work a standard work schedule and would like to be considered for telework may apply for supervisor approval and submit an approved telework agreement once approved. This includes administrators, department chairs, non-instructional (counseling) faculty, and staff.

Under normal circumstances, casual temporary employees and student employees are not eligible for telework unless this was a condition within the hiring agreement.

Due to the flexibility that is inherent in the schedules of instructional faculty, telework applications and plans are not applicable at this time.

Applying is a three-step process:

Verify with your supervisor that your position is eligible for telework.

Once your supervisor has approved the application form, complete the online, Approved Flexible Work Arrangement Submission Form and upload the approved agreement.

Any employee whose flexible work arrangement, including telework, is denied or terminated may request that the Vice President/Chief Human Resources Officer, or designee, review the denial or termination. The scope of the review will be limited to determining whether the action was arbitrary, capricious, or did not follow the existing procedure.

No. HRSTM will no longer accept paper or email submissions of telework agreements.

Most of the College’s employee documents and records are now in a digital format and maintained electronically. Submitting your agreement through the online submission form will provide HRSTM greater tracking and reporting capabilities.

As a general rule, employees need to reapply for telework approval and submit their agreement each fiscal year (July 1 – June 30). However, changes in a department or unit’s work demands, staffing levels, and supervision may result in the need for new or updated telework plans and agreements on a more regular basis. It is up to supervisors and area administrators to make that determination based on their unit/area needs.

No, it is important that the employee communicate and receive approval from their supervisor and next level supervisor if they are changing their selected telework days.

Maintaining your health and wellness are important. The college offers various types of leave new window to support your wellbeing. If an employee is not feeling well, we encourage them to take the time off needed to get better.

However, if an employee is feeling well enough to work, but is potentially contagious condition ( e.g. , a cold), a situational telework day may be appropriate. It is important that employees communicate with their supervisors and receive guidance in these circumstances.

If the College is CLOSED, all onsite and remote operations/instruction/services are suspended.

If the College is OPEN but some or all of onsite operations/instruction/services are limited or suspended, employees in positions with the capacity to telework will be required to telework or use their relevant leave ( i.e. , annual, sick, or personal). Hourly employees in positions that are ineligible for telework should report their time as Operational Status Change Time Off in Workday. Visit closure and delays for more information.

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Official Worksite for Location-Based Pay Purposes

Fact sheet: official worksite for location-based pay purposes.

Certain location-based pay entitlements (such as locality payments, special rate supplements, and nonforeign area cost-of-living allowances) are based on the location of the employee's official worksite associated with the employee's position of record. The official worksite generally is the location where the employee regularly performs his or her duties. If the employee's work involves recurring travel or the employee's work location varies on a recurring basis, the official worksite is the location where the work activities of the employee's position of record are based, as determined by the employing agency, subject to the requirement that the official worksite must be in a locality pay area in which the employee regularly performs work. An agency must document an employee's official worksite on the employee's Notification of Personnel Action (Standard Form 50 or equivalent). (See "Duty Station" blocks 38 and 39 of the Standard Form 50 showing the city/county and state in which the official worksite is located.)

Temporary Changes in Work Location

An employee's work location may change on a temporary basis. Such a change may or may not affect the employee's official worksite, as explained in the following paragraphs:

  • If an employee is in temporary duty travel status away from the official worksite for his or her position of record, the employee's official worksite and associated pay entitlements are not affected.
  • If an employee is temporarily detailed to a position in a different location, the employee's official worksite and associated pay entitlements are not affected.
  • If an employee is authorized to receive relocation expenses under 5 U.S.C. 5737, in connection with an extended assignment resulting in temporary change of station, the worksite associated with the extended assignment is the official worksite. (See 41 CFR 302-1.1.)
  • If an employee is temporarily reassigned or promoted to another position in a different geographic area, the temporary work location is considered the official worksite for pay purposes.

Teleworkers

An agency must determine and designate the official worksite for an employee covered by a telework agreement on a case-by-case basis using the following criteria:

  • The official worksite for an employee covered by a telework agreement is the location of the regular worksite for the employee's position (i.e., the place where the employee would normally work absent a telework agreement), as long as the employee is scheduled to report physically at least twice each biweekly pay period on a regular and recurring basis to that regular worksite.
  • In the case of a telework employee whose work location varies on a recurring basis, the employee need not report at least twice each biweekly pay period to the regular worksite established by the agency as long as the employee is performing work within the same geographic area (established for the purpose of a given pay entitlement) as the employee's regular worksite. For example, if a telework employee with a varying work location works at least twice each biweekly pay period on a regular and recurring basis in the same locality pay area in which the established official worksite is located, the employee need not report at least twice each biweekly pay period to that official worksite to maintain entitlement to the locality payment for that area.
  • The official worksite for an employee covered by a telework agreement who is not scheduled to report at least twice each biweekly pay period on a regular and recurring basis to the regular worksite is the location of the telework site (i.e., home, telework center, or other alternative worksite), except in certain temporary situations, as explained under "Temporary Telework Arrangements," below.

Temporary Telework Arrangements

In certain temporary situations, an agency may designate the location of the regular worksite as the official worksite of an employee who teleworks on a regular basis at an alternative worksite, even though the employee is not able to report at least twice each biweekly pay period on a regular and recurring basis to the regular worksite. The intent of this exception is to address certain situations where the employee is retaining a residence in the commuting area for the regular worksite but is temporarily unable to report to the regular worksite for reasons beyond the employee's control. The fact that an employee may receive lesser pay or benefits if the official worksite is changed to the telework location is not a basis or justification for using this temporary exception. A key consideration is the need to preserve equity between the telework employee and non-telework employees who are working in the same area as the telework location. Also, the temporary exception should generally be used only in cases where (1) the employee is expected to stop teleworking and return to work at the regular worksite in the near future, or (2) the employee is expected to continue teleworking but will be able to report to the regular worksite at least twice each biweekly pay period on a regular and recurring basis in the near future. Examples of appropriate temporary situations include:

  • Recovery from an injury or medical condition;
  • Emergency situations preventing an employee from regularly commuting to the regular official worksite, such as a severe weather emergency or a pandemic health crisis. (For instance, in the aftermath of a hurricane or flood, an employee may be forced to temporarily relocate, making commuting to the regular worksite twice each biweekly pay period on a regular and recurring basis not possible. If the employing agency sets up telework arrangements for the employee, a temporary exception to the twice-a-pay-period requirement would be appropriate.);
  • An extended period of approved absence from work (e.g. paid leave);
  • A period during which the employee is in temporary duty travel status away from the official worksite; or
  • A period during which an employee is temporarily detailed to work at a location other than a location covered by a telework agreement.

An exception is not appropriate in all time-limited situations. For example, assuming there are no additional circumstances such as those described above that would make an exception appropriate, an agency should designate the employee's telework site as the official worksite in situations such as the following:

  • The agency hires an employee under a temporary or time-limited appointment and authorizes the employee to telework, but the employee is never scheduled to work at, or report at least twice each biweekly pay period to, the regular worksite (or expected to do so in the near future); or
  • An employee changes his or her place of residence to a distant location where commuting at least twice each biweekly pay period on a regular and recurring basis to the regular worksite is not possible (i.e., the employee no longer has a residence in the commuting area for the regular worksite and thus cannot reasonably be viewed as being part of the local labor market for the regular worksite).

Other Benefits

The location of an employee's official worksite may affect other benefits. Information on an employee's travel, transportation, and relocation benefits and entitlements based on his or her "official duty station" (as defined by the General Services Administration (GSA)) may be obtained from at GSA's website . Information on an employee's entitlements to overseas allowances and benefits may be obtained from the Department of State's website .

  • Guide to Processing Personnel Actions - Chapter 23
  • Locality-based comparability payments - 5 CFR part 531, subpart F
  • Special rate schedules - 5 CFR part 530, subpart C
  • Cost-of-living allowances and post differentials, nonforeign areas - 5 CFR part 591, subpart B
  • Pay and Hours of Work Fact Sheets

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Flexible Work Arrangements

Human Resources

Campus: Hill Hall 3rd Floor

Mail: Dept. 3422

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071-2000

Phone: 307.766.2377

Fax: 307.766.5607

Email: [email protected]

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The University of Wyoming recognizes that the implementation of a work arrangement can offer an important approach to meeting the operational needs of the University, attracting and maintaining talented staff, and supporting employees’ needs. This website describes the types of Work Arrangements that may be available to certain University employees, the process for evaluating a request for a Work Arrangement and the approval process for such a request.

  • Work Arrangement Quick Reference Table

Flexible Work Arrangement (Non-Remote)

Remote Work Arrangement

Work Arrangement Types

There are two types of work arrangements, Flexible Work Arrangements and Remote Work Arrangements. Each arrangement is distinct and utilizes a separate form. Forms are available below under Work Arrangement Process. 

Flexible Work Arrangements (FWA)

A Flexible Work Arrangement (FWA) is an arrangement between the employee and supervisor that contains no element of remote work. FWA forms are maintained by the immediate supervisor and the employee. Human Resources does not require a copy unless arrangement is part of reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

The FWA form is used for the following:

  • Compressed Work Week:   Compressed workweek refers to a schedule wherein the total number of hours worked each week are conducted in less than five full workdays. The most common compressed schedule is four 10-hour workdays per week.
  • Flexible work:   Flexible work refers to an arrangement that permits variations in starting and departure times but does not alter the total number of hours worked in a work week.

Remote Work Arrangements (RWA)

A Remote Work Arrangement (RWA) is an arrangement between employee and supervisor that contains elements of remote or distance work. Remote work may have varying percentages based upon the amount of off-site work. RWA's can be hybrid including elements of compressed or flexible work. 

The RWA form is used for the following:

  • Remote Work:   A work arrangement in which some or all work is regularly performed at a location other than the employee's primary (usual and customary) workplace, such as the employee’s home or a satellite office. 
  • Hybrid Work:  Work that includes varying elements flexible and compressed work and remote work. 

Work Arrangement Duration and Approval 

A Flexible Work Arrangement or Remote Work Arrangement may be temporary, short-term or long-term in duration. The approval depends upon the duration of the arrangement. 

Temporary Work Arrangements (45 days or less) -  Requests by employees for episodic or non-recurring work arrangements of less than 45 days may be approved by the employee’s immediate supervisor. These temporary arrangements do not require a form or completion of online training. Consecutive Temporary Work Arrangements are not permitted. It is recommended the supervisor document start and end date of agreement. 

Short-Term Work Arrangements (45 days up to 6 months) - Requests by employees for work arrangements ranging from 45 days up to 6 months due to personal or work circumstances may be approved by the employee’s immediate supervisor if the supervisor determines that the work arrangement will not negatively affect University operations. These temporary arrangements require a signed formed by the employee and the immediate supervisor and completion of online training by both the employee and the supervisor. 

Long-Term Flexible Work Arrangements (over 6 months) - Requests by employees for work arrangements greater than 6 months require a form signed by the employee, immediate supervisor and their respective Appointing Authority or Alternate Primary Appointing Authority . Remote Work Arrangements over 6 months require completion of online training by both the employee and the supervisor.

It is highly recommended that immediate supervisors review work arrangements regularly but at a minimum annually. Work Arrangements without adjustments do not require new form or renewal. Work Arrangements that are adjusted require submission of new document through the Work Arrangement Process.

Read University of Wyoming  Flexible Work Arrangement Policy . 

Have a conversation with your supervisor. 

Review the Work Arrangement Quick Reference Table .

Work Arrangements that are less than 45 days do not require a form or training. Consecutive Temporary Work Arrangements are not permitted.

Work Arrangements longer then 45 days but less than 6 months and over 6 months require the appropriate form.

Acquire the appropriate signatures per duration of work agreement.

45 days up to 6 months require signatures from employee and immediate supervisor.

Over 6 months require signatures from employee, immediate supervisor and Appointing Authority or Alternate Primary Appointing Authority .

Employee and Supervisor maintain Flexible Work Arrangement.

Adjustments to Flexible Work Arrangement will require submission of a new form. 

It is highly recommended that immediate supervisors review Work Arrangements regularly but at a minimum annually. Work Arrangements without adjustments do not require new form or renewal. Work Arrangements that are adjusted require submission of new documents through the Flexible Work Arrangement Process. 

Remote Work Arrangement Process

Remote Work Arrangements that are less than 45 days do not require a form or training.

Remote Work Arrangements 45 days to up to 6 months and over 6 Months require the appropriate form.

Remote Work Arrangements 45 days to up to 6 months and over 6 Months require one time training on the following:

Employee Completes - Remote Work for Employees

Supervisor Completes - Leading and Managing Remote Teams

Update Personal Contact and Emergency Contact Information in HCM.

45 days up to 6 months require signatures from the employee and immediate supervisor.

Over 6 months require signatures from employee, immediate supervisor and Appointing Authority or Alternate Primary Appointing Authority.

Submit completed form to Human Resources .

Adjustments to Remote Work Arrangement will require submission of a new form. 

It is highly recommended that immediate supervisors review Remote Work Arrangements regularly but at a minimum annually. Work Arrangements without adjustments do not require new form or renewal. Work Arrangements that are adjusted require submission of new documents through the Remote Work Arrangement Process.

Resolving Disputes

Disputes are inevitable; they are a fact of life. Situations may arise where the supervisor and employee either (a) cannot agree on whether remote work/flexible schedule is applicable, or (b) cannot finalize the terms of the arrangement.

In either case, the first step is to involve the supervisor’s manager. The manager is responsible for hearing both sides of the argument and rendering a decision. If this step does not satisfy both parties, the final decision-making authority will be the applicable Dean/Director (for Academic Affairs) or Vice President (for other Units) and HR will work with the final decision-maker, as necessary, to render a final, binding decision.

The Administration feels this process will ensure that every effort is taken to apply the spirit of this policy to the situation at hand.

If you're new to working remotely 100% of the time or even just part-time, this could be a significant adjustment. Below are some tips and best practices to help you adjust successfully to a flexible work arrangement.

Tips and Additional Training

What if you could be there more for your family, exercise outside in the daylight, prioritize important things that are not doable after hours, and choose how often you come into your office? Having work flexibility means that you have a say in how—and where—you get your work done. As part of a strategic business plan, work flexibility can actually help save a company money. So, how do you negotiate this win-win scenario at your current job? In the course, Negotiating Work Flexibility , (31 min) learn how to create and prepare to pitch a work-flexibility proposal to your boss or HR department. Find out how to build a compelling argument by identifying common work flex options, selecting the right type for your role, and conveying business benefits. Discover how to compare your needs with company policy and earn yourself a trial period.

Moving your workday from an office building to the quietest corner of your own home was likely jarring at first—but now, you've found your groove. Maybe you've even grown to like remote work. But with many organizations prepping for a hybrid work environment in which employees split their time between remote and in-person working, you'll likely need to adjust your mindset yet again. In the course, Enhance Productivity in a Hybrid Work Environment (17 min) productivity author and Emmy-winning producer Paula Rizzo shows you how. Learn how to revamp your productivity style to help you stay on task when switching between locations. Discover how to rethink your physical spaces so that they are mirrored at home and at work, as well as how to prepare both your regular and home office for productivity whenever you're working there. Plus, learn how to stay one step ahead of productivity challenges, including how to deal with new disruptions at home and in the office.

As millions of people head back to schools and workplaces, the world hopes for a return to normal. But work may never be quite the same. In the course, Navigating New Professional and Social Norms When Offices Reopen , join etiquette expert, Jodi Smith, as she shares tips, tricks, strategies, and ideas for making your return to the workplace as positive as possible. Explore how to navigate new expectations for social distancing, setting and communicating boundaries, and interacting with colleagues when offices reopen. Plus, learn tips for being flexible, reducing stress, and re-establishing relationships with coworkers.

You’ve settled into the rhythm of remote work. Having a full schedule of virtual team meetings, presentations, and even social events no longer seems quite so peculiar. But even at this stage, there’s so much more you can do to create a more engaged, positive, and inclusive environment for your remote team. In the course, Level Up Your Remote Team Experience , (37 Min) remote work consultant and educator Mike Gutman shows you how. Mike covers a variety of advanced strategies for working remotely, including how to transform a culture of micromanagement into a culture of trust; make your tasks, projects, and timelines transparent to other members of your team; and keep your team bonds strong by sharing your communication style and preferences. Plus, get tips for building empathy, embracing diverse working conditions within your remote teams, and creating a psychologically safe environment where people feel encouraged to bring their voice and ideas to the table.

Working from home removes distractions, but also eliminates important face-to-face interactions. Home-based workers often report feeling disconnected, isolated, and alone. The course, Building Relationships While Working from Home (22 Min) teaches us how to create professional yet personal connections with remote team members and how to satisfy that missing element of closeness that people get when they are together at work. Productivity expert Dave Crenshaw explains how to reach out to others, be authentic online, build a great reputation, and make meaningful connections with your peers. These tips are invaluable for anyone working from home—and particularly relevant for those working under the challenging conditions brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. Take the time to watch this course and invest the time and skills it takes to rekindle your most valuable relationships at work.

Managing flex or remote workers is an opportunity to grow and expand your skill set as a manager. It is estimated that 30% of the workforce will be working from home by 2022. Managers that show competence in leading hybrid teams will be more in demand as the number of organizations grow that hire remote workers to staff their organizations. Managers that do not exhibit the ability to lead and manage remote workers could find themselves falling behind their peers and other line managers. 

This does not mean however that remote work is best for every worker or environment. You must balance your employees needs against those of the mission and respond accordingly. Managing remote employees can be difficult. Managers will have to adjust to decreased employee visibility and embrace software they may be uncomfortable with to manage your team. The video, Challenges to achieving high performance virtually (4m 22s) will provide quick tips on how to overcome these challenges. 

Employees: 

Flexible work arrangements can cut down on commuting costs, provide autonomy, work life balance and increase productivity. However, it is important to remain reachable, well organized and at times you may feel isolated from your team. The course Tips for working Remotely (28m) can help you to overcome these challenges. 

Communicate often with your remote staff employees. Consider which communication tool best fits your teams' culture—e-mail, texts, phone calls, video chats, and find that delicate balance between constantly pinging employees with texts and e-mail and radio silence. 

There will be questions; be accessible and provide clarity on priorities, milestones, performance goals and more. The video, Private chat in Teams (3m) will show you a great way to stay connected with your remote workers. 

It is essential for a successful remote working relationship that your supervisor and leadership can reach you easily in a consistent manner. Your boss needs to be confident that he/she can reach you on a moment’s notice should the need arise. For these reasons we suggest a conversation with your supervisor on how best to reach you throughout the day.

Using the Private Chat feature (3m) in Microsoft Teams is one way you can maintain communication. If you step away from the computer, tell your supervisor an alternate means to reach you. This could include text message or accessing email through your phone. 

A quick 15-minute meeting at the start of each morning can help determine task priorities for the day and allow you and your manager to track progress on projects. Set dates that task will be accomplished by review dates and progress at your start of day meeting. The video, Frequency and style of meetings (2m 48s) will help you and your team check in with each other, report progress and collaborate.

Frequently Asked Questions

If your standard work location is not the Laramie campus AND you are not requesting a flexible work arrangement from that location, no form or update of HCM is needed.

Ron works at a research facility in Powell, WY. He has not requested to complete a percentage or all his work away from that facility. Thus, no flexible work agreement is needed. His assignment in HCM should remain at the default “On Campus” designation.

Sally works for the Casper Clinic. She works full time at the clinic with no remote hours. She does not need a flexible work agreement. Her assignment in HCM should remain at the default “On Campus” designation.

Note:   Departments which are fully away from the Laramie campus continue to be removed from the possibility of being included in 3% sample COVID-19 Testing, no matter their designation in HCM.

Tiffany works for a department that is mostly based on the Laramie campus. However, she was hired to do 100% field-based research in another state. Since Tiffany’s work agreement is fully in the field and she is not requesting a percentage of this work to be done away from the research location, no flexible work agreement or update of HCM is needed.

Flexible and Remote Work Arrangements are available to both benefited and non-benefited employees.

Some employees were currently approved for Telework through UW's previous Telework Agreement Policy. UW will grandfather these agreements until December 31st, 2021. Employees that had a previous Telework Agreement will need to transition to a Flexible Work Arrangement at the beginning of the new Calendar Year.

IMAGES

  1. 16 Benefits of Flexible Work Schedules That Prove It’s Worth It

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  2. The rise of flexible work arrangements

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  3. Flexible Work Location

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  4. 8 Flexible Work Arrangements (FWA) and why SEMs need them

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  5. A Quick Guide To Managing Flexible Work Arrangements| 2023

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  6. Looking at flexible work arrangements

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COMMENTS

  1. Flexible Work Arrangements: Types and Benefits

    Flexible work arrangements (FWAs) are employment options involving giving employees significant leeway in fulfilling their responsibilities. For example, an FWA may allow employees to choose start and end times and work locations that are convenient for them.

  2. Flexible Work Frequently Asked Questions

    Hybrid What is a hybrid work arrangement? What is hoteling and how do I reserve a workspace for a temporary period of time? As a hybrid worker will I have a dedicated office space at my designated campus location? Remote employees may be required to return to the campus location for designated training, projects, etc.

  3. PDF Work Location Decision Guide

    1. Plan to have the physical office staffed during all business hours so that drop-in visitors can be assisted during those hours. 2. If there are roles which might improve services by utilizing alternate work scheduling, consider some of the options listed in HR0480: flexible schedules, flex year, job sharing, and/or telecommuting. 3.

  4. Flexible Working That Actually Works

    Flexible working is a style of work that gives employees greater control over their hours, frequency of work, work location, and other factors. Types of flexible working can include part-time hours, remote work, flextime, a compressed workweek, hybrid remote work, or any other similar structure. Flexible working examples may include the following:

  5. Implementing Flexible Work Arrangements: Strategies for Success

    Conclusion. Implementing flexible work arrangements can revolutionize the way we work, providing employees with the freedom to balance their professional and personal lives. By understanding the concept, embracing the benefits, and implementing key strategies, organizations can create a more productive and engaged workforce.

  6. What Is Workplace Flexibility?

    Workplace flexibility is a strategy for responding to changing circumstances and expectations. Employees who approach their job with a flexible mindset are typically more highly valued by employers. Similarly, employers who cultivate a flexible work environment are attractive to employees.

  7. How to Make Flexible Work the Way of the Future (Blog Post)

    Catalyst has long argued that Flexible Work Arrangements (FWAs) are the foundation of an inclusive work culture and a central tool to achieve diversity, equity, and inclusion. FWAs enable women and others with caregiving responsibilities to fully participate in their work environment and succeed. They provide accommodations regarding the time ...

  8. PDF Flexible Work Location Guide

    Flexible Work Location Guide A companion to Interior Health's Flexible Work Location policy for employees and managers October 2022 Table of Contents Promoting Flexibility at Work Why offer flexible work location options? Trust and accountability Flexible Work Principles Who is eligible? Where can I work? What options are available?

  9. How to Take Advantage of Flexible Work Arrangements

    Take breaks when you need them. One perk of remote work is the flexibility to step away from work when you need to. Go for a walk on a nice day to give your eyes a rest from staring at your ...

  10. 3505 Out-of-State Work Locations

    Out-of-State Work Location Committee. Reviews requests for work assignments and flexible work arrangements in not yet approved states and locations outside the United States. Provides recommendations to the Controller and to the Vice President for Human Resources & Administration for final approval.

  11. What to consider when implementing flexible work arrangements

    Scenario #3: Incorporate a flexible working policy based on research like this from Gallup, where 54% of software engineers prefer to work virtually, providing increased access to diverse talent across the country. Scenario #4: Demonstrate the tradeoffs of shifting hiring to lower-cost locations vs. high-cost locations over time.

  12. Flexible Work at NC State

    A position must be approved to work from a designated Remote Work Location. Unlike a request submitted by an employee for an alternate work location as part of a flexible work arrangement, the assignment of an employee to a designated Remote Work Location must originate from an employee's supervisor.

  13. The Future of Flexibility at Work

    She studies the role of work-life flexibility practices as a strategic human resource lever for individual and organizational productivity. The Big Idea Series / Rethinking "Back to Work". 01 ...

  14. What Is Workplace Flexibility? Definitions ...

    Flexible scheduling. Employees can set their own hours, shifts, and break times, or could opt for a compressed workweek (i.e., working full-time in four days instead of five). Flexible hours. Employees can switch to part-time or cut hours when needed. Flexible location. Employees can choose to work from home, the office, or other location.

  15. PDF Flexible Work Arrangements

    An on-campus work location other than the employee's primary or standard workplace, such as an alternate office, building, or campus. ... mutual understanding of and agreement on work assignments, expected outcomes, and anticipated timeframes. One big difference between ... Although flexible work arrangement schedules may often allow staff to ...

  16. How To Be Flexible at Work (With Tips and Examples)

    The word "flexibility" technically means the ability to bend without breaking. However, people often use it to describe the ability to adjust to changes in your life without creating stress or drama. Being flexible in life means that you can change your plans and adapt to new situations easily.

  17. Flexible Work Arrangements: A Definition And Examples

    A. Flexibility in Work Scheduling. 1. Alternative Work Schedules: Any schedule other than that which is standard to the work setting. Flextime: Schedules based on worker needs within set parameters approved by a supervisor. Examples: A worker must work 40 hours per week and be present on a daily basis during "core hours".

  18. Dynamic Task Assignment

    Instead of manually assigning work, dynamic task assignment enables flexible allocation based on location, skillset, availability, workload, priorities, and more. Skip to the content. FieldFLEX Mobile. Menu. ... Auditable work records (location, date/time) Improved mobile performance, download only what is needed ...

  19. Flexible Work Assignments

    Flexible Work Assignments There are times when a 9 to 5 routine may not blend with other important priorities in your life. Working with your manager, you may want to consider an alternative work arrangement to provide you with more flexibility in balancing the demands of work and family.

  20. Flexible Work Arrangements

    Upon approval, the employee completes the Approved Flexible Work Arrangement Submission Form and uploads the approved agreement PDF. Allows an employee to perform the duties and responsibilities of the employee's position at a remote work site as their primary work location on a routine basis. STATUS NOTE: Due to the College's return to ...

  21. Official Worksite for Location-Based Pay Purposes

    Certain location-based pay entitlements (such as locality payments, special rate supplements, and nonforeign area cost-of-living allowances) are based on the location of the employee's official worksite associated with the employee's position of record. The official worksite generally is the location where the employee regularly performs his or ...

  22. PDF Sample Flexible Work Program Guidelines

    It is the policy of [Company Name] "COMPANY" to provide a Flexible Work Program as an alternative to the traditional work location and/or work schedule . The program is designed to achieve increased productivity and effective use of staff work time, promote efficient use of resources, and assist in reducing traffic and air quality hazards.

  23. Flexible Work Arrangements

    A Flexible Work Arrangement or Remote Work Arrangement may be temporary, short-term or long-term in duration. The approval depends upon the duration of the arrangement. Temporary Work Arrangements (45 days or less) - Requests by employees for episodic or non-recurring work arrangements of less than 45 days may be approved by the employee's ...