The Japanese Tale of Momotaro | Momotaro Story Summary

The japanese tale of momotaro, introduction:.

In the rich tapestry of Japanese folklore, the legend of Momotaro stands tall as a timeless tale of courage, friendship, and triumph over evil. It revolves around the extraordinary story of a boy who emerged from a giant peach and embarked on a perilous journey to confront demons plaguing the land. This captivating narrative brims with emotions, painting a vivid picture of valor, determination, and the power of unity. Let us delve into the captivating world of Momotaro and his epic battle against the malevolent forces that threatened his homeland.

title of your essay momotaro

The Miraculous Birth of Momotaro: A Gift from the Heavens

The tale begins in a small village, where a humble elderly couple discovers a giant peach floating down the river. As they cut open the peach, to their astonishment, a beautiful boy emerges from its core. Overwhelmed with joy and gratitude, the couple names him Momotaro, symbolizing the precious gift they received from the heavens. The emotions of wonder, excitement, and parental love abound as they raise the peach-born boy as their own.

Momotaro’s Childhood: Kindness and Bravery Shine Through

As Momotaro grows, he proves to be a kind-hearted and fearless young boy. The village embraces him, and he becomes a source of inspiration for the other children. The emotions of warmth, camaraderie, and the innocence of childhood friendships are beautifully depicted in this phase of the story. Momotaro’s charisma and natural leadership become evident as he stands up against bullies and helps those in need, earning him the affection of all who know him.

The Call to Adventure: Demons Threaten the Land

One day, as the village faces a terrible crisis, news spreads that demons have invaded the neighboring lands. The malicious creatures are wreaking havoc, stealing crops, and terrorizing the villagers. The emotions of fear, uncertainty, and a growing sense of responsibility grip Momotaro’s heart. Determined to protect his loved ones and his homeland, he resolves to confront the demons and vanquish them once and for all.

The Journey Begins: Allies Found in Unlikely Places

Momotaro sets out on his perilous journey to defeat the demons, armed only with his courage and determination. Along the way, he meets three faithful companions – a dog, a monkey, and a pheasant – each with unique abilities that complement his own. Though from different backgrounds, they forge a deep bond, and the emotions of friendship, trust, and unity come to the fore. Together, they create an unbreakable team, bound by a shared purpose and camaraderie.

Confrontation with the Demons: The Battle of Good vs. Evil

Finally, Momotaro and his loyal companions reach the demons’ stronghold. The emotions of anticipation, trepidation, and adrenaline-fueled excitement fill the air as the epic battle commences. With unwavering determination and the combined strength of his companions, Momotaro confronts the demons head-on, showcasing bravery in the face of overwhelming odds.

Victory and Redemption: The Triumph of Goodness

Through sheer grit and courage, Momotaro and his companions emerge victorious, defeating the demons and driving them out of the land. The emotions of triumph, relief, and redemption reverberate through the village as they welcome the heroes back as saviors. Momotaro’s selfless bravery and his companions’ loyalty become legendary, inspiring generations to come.

What is the Japanese story of Momotaro ?

The Japanese story of Momotaro, often referred to as “Momotaro the Peach Boy,” is a beloved and famous folktale from Japan. It revolves around the extraordinary tale of a boy who is born from a giant peach and goes on a courageous quest to confront and defeat a band of demons that are terrorizing his homeland. Here’s a summary of the story:

Once upon a time, in a small village in Japan, an elderly couple lived. They were kind and loving but longed for a child to call their own. One day, while the old woman was washing clothes in the river, she noticed a massive peach floating downstream. She was amazed and quickly retrieved the peach from the water to take home to her husband.

When the old couple cut open the peach, they were astonished to find a beautiful baby boy nestled inside. They named him Momotaro, which means “Peach Boy” in Japanese and raised him with love and care.

As Momotaro grew older, he became a strong, brave, and kind-hearted young boy, adored by everyone in the village. The village faced a crisis as demons started to appear and terrorize the land, stealing crops and causing havoc. The villagers lived in fear, unsure of how to protect themselves from the malevolent creatures.

One day, Momotaro decided to take a stand against the demons and protect his village. He told his parents about his plan to go on a journey to the island where the demons lived and defeat them. His parents were worried about his safety but knew they had to let him go.

Before leaving, Momotaro’s parents prepared provisions for his journey, including special millet dumplings called “kibi dango.” These dango were meant to give him strength and courage on his quest.

As he set out on his journey, Momotaro encountered a dog, a monkey, and a pheasant, each of whom had also suffered at the hands of the demons. They joined him on his mission, forming a loyal group of companions.

Together, Momotaro and his animal companions faced numerous challenges, including crossing treacherous seas and battling demons along the way. Momotaro’s bravery and the companions’ teamwork led them to the demon’s island.

Upon reaching the demon’s stronghold, a fierce battle ensued. With the help of his loyal companions and the power of the kibi dango, Momotaro defeated the demons, driving them away from the island and restoring peace to the land.

Upon their victorious return, the village celebrated Momotaro and his companions as heroes. The demons’ reign of terror was finally over, thanks to the bravery and determination of the Peach Boy.

The story of Momotaro symbolizes courage, bravery, and the triumph of good over evil. It is a tale that has been cherished in Japan for generations and continues to be a significant part of the country’s cultural heritage.

Who wrote the story of Momotaro ?

The story of Momotaro is part of Japanese folklore and is considered a traditional folktale rather than a work attributed to a specific author. As with many folktales, their origins are not attributed to a single writer but have been passed down orally through generations.

Momotaro’s legend has been a beloved part of Japanese culture for centuries and has been retold in various forms, including picture books, theater performances, and animated films. As with most folktales, the story of Momotaro has evolved over time with contributions from multiple storytellers, making it a cherished and enduring part of Japan’s cultural heritage.

Conclusion:

The Japanese tale of Momotaro, the boy born from a peach, and his battle with demons transcends time, captivating hearts with its profound depiction of human emotions. It serves as a powerful reminder that even the most extraordinary feats can be achieved through courage, friendship, and the unyielding determination to protect what we hold dear. The legend of Momotaro continues to resonate, a timeless beacon of hope and a testament to the indomitable human spirit.

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FAQs of Japanese Momotaro Peach Boy

Momotaro is a legendary figure in Japanese folklore. He is a boy who was born into a giant peach and raised by an elderly couple. Momotaro’s name translates to “Peach Boy” in Japanese.

The main theme of the Japanese tale of Momotaro revolves around courage, bravery, friendship, and the triumph of good over evil. Momotaro embarks on a perilous journey to defeat demons that are terrorizing his homeland, showcasing his bravery and forming strong bonds with his loyal companions.

Momotaro confronted the demons by going on a journey to their island stronghold, accompanied by three loyal animal companions: a dog, a monkey, and a pheasant. With the help of his companions and the power of special millet dumplings called “kibi dango,” Momotaro bravely battled the demons and drove them away, restoring peace to the land.

The Japanese story of Momotaro evokes a range of emotions, including wonder at his miraculous birth, excitement as he grows into a brave young boy, fear and uncertainty as demons threaten the land, warmth and camaraderie as Momotaro forms strong friendships, and triumph and relief as he emerges victorious in the battle against evil.

Yes, the story of Momotaro is a traditional folktale from Japan. It has been passed down through generations and is considered an essential part of Japanese cultural heritage. However, it is not attributed to a specific author as it is a part of oral storytelling and has evolved over time through various retellings.

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The Legend of Momotaro

Momotarô densetsu folktale.

Momotarô is a very popular hero of the Japanese folklore, whose story was presumably first put in writing during Edo period (1603-1868).

As many tales that were passed down orally during centuries, the original story was probably modified and several versions exist today.

The most frequent rendition

Once upon a time, a woman was washing laundry in the river when she saw a giant peach floating toward her. She brought it back to her husband, and when they opened it, they discovered a child, who explained being sent from Heaven to become their son. They named him Momotarô 桃太郎 ( momo meaning "peach" and Tarô being a very common name for firstborn sons in Japan).

Growing up, Momotaro became very strong, but also very lazy , and spent his days sleeping. One day, he heard that demons were living on Onigashima Island (鬼ヶ島). The villagers urged him to go fight the demons. On the way to the battle, Momotaro met and befriended three animals, a dog, a monkey  🐒 and a pheasant, that could speak human language. The group of four arrived in Onigashima where they defeated the demons.

Momotaro and his friends came back to the village after the capture of the demons’ boss, with its treasures and a large quantity of food . They then lived together happily and rich ever after.

Variation of the tale

The second part of the story is often told the same way, but according to another version of the legend, the childless woman was old. She took a bite of the giant peach, which gave her back immediately her youth and beauty. Her husband was surprised when he came back home, but after hearing her explanations, he also ate the fruit, with the same consequence.

The rejuvenated couple then gave birth to Tarô 太郎, a boy who grew up to meet his parents’ expectations: he was kind, brave, strong and friendly (the perfect role model for children ’s tales!).

Legend of Momotaro, Momotaro and friends, the demon and the peach

Posterity of the legend

During the Second World War, Momotaro was largely used in movies and cartoons as a representation of the Japanese government, the animals being the people, and the demons the United States. Onigashima may have been a symbol of Pearl Harbor.

Nowadays, the legend is often linked to Okayama City, from which it probably originates. The demons’ island is said to be Megijima in Seto Inland Sea, near Takamatsu, a place renowned for its wide caves. Statues of demons were even carved there in reference to the tale.

The legend of Momotaro is a normal encounter in daily life in Japan:

  • The children’s song Momotarō-san no Uta (1911) is frequently taught in Japanese schools.
  • Inuyama City holds a "Momotaro Festival" at the eponymous shrine each year on May 5, and celebrates the hero throughout the town with Momotaro-related decorations, especially on manholes.
  • A Momotaro doll is a common gift for boys on Kodomo no Hi , the children’s day on May 5.

title of your essay momotaro

The Japanese popular culture also took over the legend and Momotaro’s character is featured in many manga and video games:

  • He appears for example in Akira Toriyama’s Dr Slump ,
  • In One Piece , Wanokuni arc and Onigashima battle are direct references to the legend, including the role of the kibi dango  🍡 dumplings,
  • In Hozuki no reitetsu ( Hozuki’s Coolheadedness ), Momotaro is first introduced as an opportunist and a bragger. His animal friends become zealous employees of Hell.

It is also possible that Roald Dahl’s novel, and consequently the adapted animated movie James and the Giant Peach (Henry Selick – 1996), were freely inspired from Momotaro’s tale.

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USC Digital Folklore Archives

A database of folklore performances, the story of momotaro–a japanese tale.

Main Piece: This is a Japanese tale my friend told me about.

Long ago an elderly couple who lived in the mountains were doing their laundry as usual, and the grandmother saw a huge peach floating in the river, the grandmother took the peach home and cut it to eat it. But a baby boy came out from the peach. They named the baby boy Momotaro (momo= peach Taro= a very classic name for boys). The boy grew so fast and very strong. One day. Momotaro said to the elderly couple he will go to the devils’ island to defeat the devils. The elderly couple gave Momotaro dumplings (きびだんご)so he could eat it on the trip. On the way to the island, he met a dog and a monkey. Momotaro gave them きびだんご and they joined him to the island. Later on, he met a pheasant , also gave it a きびだんご and it also joined the party. The crew grew (like avengers). They all successfully arrived at the devil’s island and cooperated with animals to get rid of the devils. He went back to his house and lived with the grandpa and grandma happily ever after.

Background:

My informant is a 25-year-old Japanese woman who grew up mostly in Hong Kong and Korea. She currently works in Japan. AI remembers hearing about this story on TV program about Japanese folktales. She isn’t sure if they tell this story in Japanese schools because she didn’t attend school in Japan. She says the story doesn’t mean much to her and it’s a popular tale in Japan. AI is also not sure of the meaning, but she thinks it has to do with working together to fight your devils.

I don’t know any Japanese tales, but I have always been interested in Japanese culture and language. I think this story about a boy working with other animals to defeat the devil is an important message, if this is something that is told to children in Japanese schools. It tells them that they shouldn’t fight with their friends and that if they ever have problems, they should work together to figure it out. I think the message is common in other cultures as well.

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Student's corner, the legend of momotaro.

title of your essay momotaro

Once upon a time there lived an old man and woman. The old man went up into the mountains to gather firewood, while the old woman went down to the river to wash their clothes. One day, as the woman was doing the wash, a giant peach came bobbing along in the current. She pulled the giant peach out and carried it back home. When her husband came back, they began to cut the peach open for dinner. To their surprise, there was a healthy young baby boy inside! The couple had no children, so they were overjoyed to have a baby to call their own. They named him Momotaro, which means "Peach Boy." Momotaro quickly grew up into a strong young lad. Around that time, some nasty ogres started harassing the village. One day, Momotaro told his parents he would go to the ogres' island and get rid of them for good. His mother fixed him some tasty millet dumplings, called kibi-dango , for his journey. Along the way, Momotaro met a dog. "Momotaro, where are you going?" "I'm going to the ogres' island, to stop them for good." "What's that tied to your belt?" "It's a pouch full of the finest dumplings in Japan." "Please give me one. I'll help you on your quest." The dog received a dumpling and accompanied Momotaro. Before long, the pair met a monkey. "Momotaro, where are you going?" "I'm going to the ogres' island, to stop them for good." "What's that tied to your belt?" "It's a pouch full of the finest dumplings in Japan." "Please give me one. I'll help you on your quest." And so he did. Then they met a pheasant. "Momotaro, where are you going?" "I'm going to the ogres' island, to stop them for good." "What's that tied to your belt?" "It's a pouch full of the finest dumplings in Japan." "Please give me one. I'll help you on your quest." The pheasant gratefully received a dumpling and joined the group. With dog, monkey and pheasant companions at his side, Momotaro finally reached the ogres' island. The ogres were in the middle of merrymaking. They had piled up the food and treasures they stole from nearby villages and were having a party. "Attack the fiends!" Momotaro shouted. The dog bit the ogres' bottoms, the monkey jumped onto their backs and scratched, and the pheasant pecked at their eyes. Momotaro, brandishing his sword, charged into the lot. Finally the ogre chief threw up his hands and said, "Enough, enough! We give up!" Momotaro, the dog, the monkey and the pheasant collected the treasures and returned triumphantly to the village. His mother and father were delighted to see that Momotaro had returned safely. The three lived happily ever after.

The home of the Momotaro legend

Okayama Prefecture in western Honshu is well known as the birthplace of the Momotaro legend. Kibitsuhiko Shrine and Kibitsu Shrine are dedicated to Kibitsu-hiko-no-mikoto, a legendary prince on whom Momotaro is supposedly based. The millet dumplings ( kibi-dango ) that Momotaro brought on his quest are sold everywhere in Okayama as a regional specialty. A statue of Momotaro and his companions stands proudly in front of Okayama Station, so why not pretend you're one of his traveling companions and snap a photo with them?

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Momotaro, or the Peach Boy: Japan's Best-Loved Folktale as National Allegory.

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Japanese Folktale

If you’ll believe me there was a time when the fairies were none so shy as they are now. That was the time when beasts talked to men, when there were spells and enchantments and magic every day, when there was great store of hidden treasure to be dug up, and adventures for the asking.

At that time, you must know, an old man and an old woman lived alone by themselves. They were good and they were poor and they had no children at all.

One fine day, “What are you doing this morning, good man?” says the old woman.

“Oh,” says the old man, “I’m off to the mountains with my billhook to gather a faggot of sticks for our fire. And what are you doing, good wife?”

“Oh,” says the old woman, “I’m off to the stream to wash clothes. It’s my washing day,” she adds.

So the old man went to the mountains and the old woman went to the stream.

Now, while she was washing the clothes, what should she see but a fine ripe peach that came floating down the stream? The peach was big enough, and rosy red on both sides.

“I’m in luck this morning,” said the dame, and she pulled the peach to shore with a split bamboo stick.

By-and-by, when her good man came home from the hills, she set the peach before him. “Eat, good man,” she said; “this is a lucky peach I found in the stream and brought home for you.”

But the old man never got a taste of the peach. And why did he not?

All of a sudden the peach burst in two and there was no stone to it, but a fine boy baby where the stone should have been.

“Mercy me!” says the old woman.

“Mercy me!” says the old man.

The boy baby first ate up one half of the peach and then he ate up the other half. When he had done this he was finer and stronger than ever.

“Momotaro! Momotaro!” cries the old man; “the eldest son of the peach.”

“Truth it is indeed,” says the old woman; “he was born in a peach.”

Both of them took such good care of Momotaro that soon he was the stoutest and bravest boy of all that country-side. He was a credit to them, you may believe. The neighbours nodded their heads and they said, “Momotaro is the fine young man!”

“Mother,” says Momotaro one day to the old woman, “make me a good store of kimi-dango ” (which is the way that they call millet dumplings in those parts).

“What for do you want kimi-dango ?” says his mother.

“Why,” says Momotaro, “I’m going on a journey, or as you may say, an adventure, and I shall be needing the kimi-dango on the way.”

“Where are you going, Momotaro?” says his mother.

“I’m off to the Ogres’ Island,” says Momotaro, “to get their treasure, and I should be obliged if you’d let me have the kimi-dango as soon as may be,” he says.

So they made him the kimi-dango , and he put them in a wallet, and he tied the wallet to his girdle and off he set.

“ Sayonara , and good luck to you, Momotaro!” cried the old man and the old woman.

“ Sayonara! Sayonara! ” cried Momotaro.

He hadn’t gone far when he fell in with a monkey.

“Kia! Kia!” says the monkey. “Where are you off to, Momotaro?”

Says Momotaro, “I’m off to the Ogres’ Island for an adventure.”

“What have you got in the wallet hanging at your girdle?”

“Now you’re asking me something,” says Momotaro; “sure, I’ve some of the best millet dumplings in all Japan.”

“Give me one,” says the monkey, “and I will go with you.”

So Momotaro gave a millet dumpling to the monkey, and the two of them jogged on together. They hadn’t gone far when they fell in with a pheasant.

“Ken! Ken!” said the pheasant. “Where are you off to, Momotaro?”

“What have you got in your wallet, Momotaro?”

“I’ve got some of the best millet dumplings in all Japan.”

“Give me one,” says the pheasant, “and I will go with you.”

So Momotaro gave a millet dumpling to the pheasant, and the three of them jogged on together.

They hadn’t gone far when they fell in with a dog.

“Bow! Wow! Wow!” says the dog. “Where are you off to, Momotaro?”

Says Momotaro, “I’m off to the Ogres’ Island.”

“Give me one,” says the dog, “and I will go with you.”

So Momotaro gave a millet dumpling to the dog, and the four of them jogged on together. By-and-by they came to the Ogres’ Island.

“Now, brothers,” says Momotaro, “listen to my plan. The pheasant must fly over the castle gate and peck the Ogres. The monkey must climb over the castle wall and pinch the Ogres. The dog and I will break the bolts and bars. He will bite the Ogres, and I will fight the Ogres.”

Then there was the great battle.

The pheasant flew over the castle gate: “Ken! Ken! Ken!”

Momotaro broke the bolts and bars, and the dog leapt into the castle courtyard. “Bow! Wow! Wow!”

The brave companions fought till sundown and overcame the Ogres. Those that were left alive they took prisoners and bound with cords—a wicked lot they were.

“Now, brothers,” says Momotaro, “bring out the Ogres’ treasure.”

So they did.

The treasure was worth having, indeed. There were magic jewels there, and caps and coats to make you invisible. There was gold and silver, and jade and coral, and amber and tortoise-shell and mother-of-pearl.

“Here’s riches for all,” says Momotaro. “Choose, brothers, and take your fill.”

“Kia! Kia!” says the monkey. “Thanks, my Lord Momotaro.”

“Ken! Ken!” says the pheasant. “Thanks, my Lord Momotaro.”

“Bow! Wow! Wow!” says the dog. “Thanks, my dear Lord Momotaro.”

Green willow and other Japanese fairy tales

Green willow and other Japanese fairy tales

Notes : Contains 38 Japanese folktales Author : Grace James Published : 1912 Publisher : Macmillan And Co., Limited, London

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Momotaro Story - The Tale of A Brave Young Boy

Story of momotaro in english for kids.

Are you fond of folktales? Do you like to read adventurous short stories? Well, then here’s a Japanese folktale of the brave and adventurous Momotaro, abridged as a short story for kids in English. This short story of Momotaro brings several amusing creatures to life and takes us to the land of the menacing devils and ogres. So let us see how Momotaro, the son of a peach, emerges victorious on the devils’ island and restores peace in his village.

Momotaro: The Son of a Peach

Once upon a time, there lived an old man with his wife in a village, in Japan. The old couple had a small farm where they cultivated rice. In the morning, the old man used to go up the mountains to cut grass. While he went to the mountains, his wife was busy with the daily household chores and worked in their small field. It was just the two of them as they did not have any children. 

The Old Man and His Wife Going for Work

The Old Man and His Wife Going for Work

One fine summer morning, as the old man was climbing up the mountain for work, he could feel the breeze gently touching his cheeks. He couldn’t reason why he felt very happy as he moved ahead. His wife, carrying a basket full of soiled clothes, was on her way to the river, to wash them. As she walked on the velvety green grass on the river banks, she saw the soft willows dancing to and fro waving their tassels in the soft breeze. The soft cool breeze brushing through her hair and cheeks somehow made her unusually happy that morning. She chose a nice spot on the river bank and sat down to wash the clothes. She started to rub the clothes against the stones on the river bank, one after another. 

As she washing the clothes in the clear blue waters of the river, she saw a tiny fish moving in a strange pattern near the pebbles at the bottom of the river. Soon after she looked up from the clothes to find a peach, quite big in size, flowing in the river. The old woman was surprised by the great size of the peach, and thought to herself that she has never seen such a big peach in her whole life. She stretched her hands out to get it, but it was beyond her reach. She tried to find a broken tree branch or a twig to pull the peach towards her but none was to be found there. 

As she kept thinking how to get the peach, she remembered a verse that was believed to do charms. She clapped her hands and sang the verse,

“Distant water is bitter,

The near water is sweet;

Pass by the distant water

And come into the sweet.”

The Old Woman Trying to Get the Peach

The Old Woman Trying to Get the Peach

The peach drew nearer as she kept singing the verse. Finally, she delighted to get hold of it. The old woman realized that the peach was even bigger than she had fathomed from afar. She was so excited that she put all the clothes in her basket and headed back home with the peach in her hand. As she reached home, she placed the peach in the cupboard and waited for her husband to return from the mountains. At sunset, she could finally see the old man walking slowly down to their home. He had a huge bundle of grass on his back so he used his scythe as a walking stick. On seeing the old man approach home, his wife called out, “O Fii San, I have been waiting for so long today for you to return.”.

Seeing her eagerness, the old man asked his wife the reason of her impatience. She told him that she had brought him a present. She ran inside the house to get the peach and the old man washed off his feet before he stepped up onto the verandah. When the old woman took the peach out from the cupboard, it appeared to be bigger and heavier. 

She took it to her husband waiting outside and said, “Look at this peach! Have you ever seen a peach this big in your life?” 

The old man looked at it with astonishment and replied, “It is the biggest peach that I have ever seen, my dearest. Where did you get it?” His wife told him the entire story and then they decided to cut the peach and eat it. Right when they were about to cut it, the peach split into two halves, by itself. A serenely beautiful child came out of the peach. 

Momotaro Coming Out of the Peach

Momotaro Coming Out of the Peach

The child said, “Do not be scared of me. I am not a demon nor am I a fairy. I am the son of your oldage. As you lamented every day and night for not having any child, the heaven has been compassionate and sent me to you.” 

The old man and his wife were overwhelmed to see the child and hear what he said. At last their prayers were answered. They had shed tears every morning and every night for being childless. They would get upset by the mere thought of being lonely at their old age. Now, that the heaven had sent them a son, their happiness knew no bounds. They took the little child up in their arms, and decided to name him Momotaro. It means the son of a peach. 

The old couple happily raised the child with all they had. The child was also very happy. When Momotaro was fifteen years old, he looked stronger and taller than the other boys of his age in the village. The old man observed him to be wiser for his age. Momotaro had an amazing charm and courage. The old couple found him as brave and handsome as some hero.   

One day Momotaro came up to the old man and earnestly said,

“Father, the heaven has strewn us as a father and son. I don’t know how to thank you, as you have loved me so much and your goodness towards me has been deeper than the rivers and higher than the mountain grasses.” 

The old man was a little startled, and he told Momotaro that as they raised him with love and goodness, Momotaro would also get the opportunity to take care of them when they would be older. Therefore, they would all be equal, so Momotaro need not thank him. 

Momotaro replied, “I hope that you and mother will be patient with me. I have come to you with a request, Father, and I hope you will grant my request as you have given me everything else.”.

He further added, “To the north-east of Japan, there lies an island in the sea. It is the island of devils. They often come and invade our village, kill our people, and take away every piece wealth they can find here. I want to go to the island of these wicked devils, teach them a lesson, and bring back all that he they had taken away from our land. So I request you to let me go there.”.  

The old man was taken aback to hear these words of Momotaro. He was surprised at the thoughts of this young boy of fifteen years. As the fearless and strong Momotaro was not a common child, and was sent from the heaven as a gift to the old couple, the old man thought it to be the best to let him go on his way.  

The old man said to Momotaro, “I am really surprised with what you say and how determined you are for this journey. I say go as soon as you can, destroy the devils and restore the peace of this village.”. 

The old couple prepared some rice cakes for Momotaro to take along on his journey. As they parted, they wished him luck and said that they expected him to return victorious. Momotaro bid them good bye and began his journey to the devils’ island. 

Momotaro Leaving for the Devils’ Island

Momotaro Leaving for the Devils’ Island

It was nearly midday when Momotaro sat down under a tree by the road to have some rice cakes. A dog as big as a colt emerged from the high grasses behind the road and approched Momotaro. He offered some rice cake to the dog and it sat down by his feet to devour the cake. When Momotaro told the dog about his mission, the dog was willing to accompany him to the devils’ island. So he took him along. 

As they walked through the hills and green valleys, they encountered a monkey beneath a tree. The monkey said that it was hungry, so Momotaro gave some of his delicious rice cakes to it. The monkey asked if it could come along with them and help Momotaro on his mission. Momotaro agreed to it and took the monkey along with them. 

On their way, they were to cross a large field. As they were walking across the field, a wonderful bird alighted before them. The vibrant pheasant had five colourful robes of feather on its body and a bright scarlet cap. Momotaro was amazed as it was the most beautiful bird he had ever seen. He gave it some of his rice cakes and asked the pheasant if it would come along with them on their mission. The pheasant agreed all at once and from there on Momotaro and his companions headed for the devils’ island. 

On their way, they had to cross the great north-eastern sea. When they reached the shore of the sea, Momotaro built a sturdy boat to cross the sea, and they sailed through. As they sailed, wherever they looked, they could only see the waves. The monkey, the dog, and the pheasant soon became amicable to one another and they shared their stories as they sailed through the sea. With the strong wind on their favour, Momotaro and his companions arrived at the devils’ island soon. They could see the devils’ castle.

Momotaro said to the pheasant, “Fly to the castle at once and see what’s there.” The pheasant flew into the castle at once and perched on the top of the castle. There were green ogres and hideous devils roaming about in the castle. As Momotaro tried to break into the castle, the devils gave a tough fight. Yet, Momotaro pressed in along with his companions. Taking down the devils one by one, Momotaro went into the castle and finally met the chief of the devils, Akandoji. There was a tug of war and Momotaro’s army had put up a tough fight. Momotaro had crushed Akandoji down with his mighty blows and tied him up with a rope. 

Akandoji and all the devils surrendered and Momotaro collected back all the riches that belonged to his villagers. He sailed back with his companions and the piles of riches were loaded on their boat. 

Victorious Momotaro and His Companions

Victorious Momotaro and His Companions 

Momotaro’s old parents rejoiced and celebrated his victory. Everyone in the village were happy as the devils were defeated and honoured Momotaro and his companions for it. Momotaro thus became a leading man in the village.

Reading stories is one of the best leisure activities that help to improve one’s vocabulary and language skills. Of the various genres of stories, folktales like Momotaro are quite a favourite among kids. Several other wonderful folktales, fables, fairy tales, and bedtime stories are available on Vedantu. So kids can enjoy reading these English short stories with colourful pictures, and enhance their imagination as well as language skills.

FAQs on Momotaro Story - The Tale of A Brave Young Boy

1. Why did the old couple named the child Momotaro?

One day, the old couple received a great peach as a gift from the heaven. The peach had split by itself and a child came out of it. As the meaning of Momotaro is ‘son of a peach’, so they named the little child as Momotaro.

2. Who was Akandoji?

Akandoji was the chief at the devils island. He led all the ogres and devils to invade the village and plundered their goods and riches. Momotaro defeated Akandoji and taught him a lesson for life. 

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  • Culture & Society

Culture   Momotaro

  • Author JREF
  • Publish date 4 Jan 2017
  • Article read time 2 min read
  • Tags folktales momotaro oni peach boy

Momotarō, the Peach Boy

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  • Kaguyahime (竹取物語 Taketori Monogatari , "The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter")
  • Oyayubitarō (おやゆび太郎, "The Boy as Small as a Thumb")
  • Issumbōshi (一寸法師, "One-Inch Boy").

Momotaro-Hasegawa

References:

  • Momotaro and Yamagita (by Dr Gabi Greve)
  • Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric, Japan Encyclopedia , Harvard University Press 2005

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The Roots of Momotaro, the Hero of Justice

The origins of Momotaro, the hero of the famous Japanese folk tale, is said to be here in Okayama. Visitors are sure to find Momotaro in various places throughout the city.

スライド1

Visit Shrines and Historic Sites with Close Ties to the Legend of Momotaro

From shrines dedicated Kibitsuhiko no Mikoto, believed to have inspired the folk tale “Momotaro,” to the ruins of castles where demons once dwelled.

Kibitsu-jinja Shrine

1.吉備津神社

  • Accessible via public transportation

Designated a National Treasure, the shrine’s 360 m long large corridor is an impressive sight. The shrine’s peach-shaped amulets are popular as souvenirs.

More information (English)

Kibitsuhiko-jinja Shrine

2.吉備津彦神社

The statue of Momotaro in the parking is also a popular spot for photography. Be sure to stop by and take a commemorative photo of your trip!

Kinojo Castle

3.鬼ノ城

  • Vehicle recommended

The ruins of this fortress built some 1,300 years ago are believed to have been inhabited by demons.

Come and See the Many Momotaro-Related Objets d’Art and Goods!

Okayama’s numerous Momotaro-themed objets d’art are popular spots for photography. Visitors can also visit a museum dedicated entirely to Momotaro.

Momotaro Statue in front of Okayama Station

5.桃太郎像

Have your picture taken at the gateway to Okayama alongside a statue of Momotaro. This statue is known as a symbol for rendezvous.

Momotaro Karakuri Museum

16.桃太郎のからくり博物館3

This specialty museum is full of fun attractions. Visitors will also find rare Momotaro goods in the museum shop.

Even More Momotaro Experiences

In summer, “demons” are everywhere in Okayama! Summer also marks the start of the delicious white peach season.

Uraja-odori

7.うらじゃ

Okayama’s largest summer event, this festival brings dancers in flashy makeup and costumes parading around as demons.

Peach Picking

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Okayama is a popular destination for visiting fruit farms and picking peaches to eat on the spot. (The season runs from early July to late August.)

Kibi Dango, a Popular Souvenir!

Widely known as a characteristic Okayama souvenir, kibi dango are famous for being the food Momotaro took with him on his demon-hunting adventures.

9.きびだんご1

  • Available year-round

Kibi dango are made with high-quality sticky rice. These sweets come in a variety of flavors, from plain to fruity (including Muscat and white peach) to green tea.

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 Momotaro

The Story of Momotarō

  • Japanese Culture

Okayama City in the Chūgoku region is renowned for its white peaches and the folklore hero Momotarō (桃太郎), the Peach Boy. Several films, books, animated shows, and other media have featured the legendary hero. Each year on the 5th of May, the Momotarō Festival is held in the Momotarō Shrine in Inuyama, Japan. He is a much loved character who exemplifies bravery and honesty.

The story goes . . .

There was once an old man and his wife who lived in a small village. One day, the wife saw a gigantic peach floating down the river. She took the peach and brought it home with her. As the husband and wife were about to cut into the peach to eat it, a small boy emerged from the fruit. The childless couple were overjoyed to see the boy, named him Momotarō , and decided to raise him as their own.

Illustration from Momotaro, of Little Peachling, published in 1885.

Illustration from Momotaro, of Little Peachling, published in 1885.

Still, Momotarō asked his parents to let him fight the oni and free the helpless villagers from this monstrosity. His parents finally relented. Momotarō’s mother made him some Japanese dumplings from millet flour ( kibidango) .

On his way to fight the oni, Momotarō came across a dog who asked him what he was carrying. Momotarō told the dog he was on his way to Onigashima and he was carrying the most delicious kibidango in all of Japan. On hearing this, the dog went with Momotarō to help him fight the oni in exchange for some kibidango. Further along, Momotarō encountered a pheasant and a monkey who also agreed to help him fight the oni for some kibidango.

The determined foursome grew strong upon eating the superb kibidango and easily defeated the oni, who promised never to attack the villagers again. Momotarō gave all the oni’s stolen treasures back to the villagers. The people were so grateful to Momotarō and his companions that they named their main street after him. The people of Okayama also erected statues of Momotarō and his faithful companions to remind future generations of their great deed.

More classic Japanese folktales .

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title of your essay momotaro

Short Kid Stories

Never be short of short kid stories.

title of your essay momotaro

A LONG long time ago there lived an old man and an old woman. One day the old man went to the mountains to cut grass; and the old woman went to the river to wash clothes. While she was washing a great thing came tumbling and splashing down the stream. When the old woman saw it she was very glad, and pulled it to her with a piece of bamboo that lay near by. When she took it up and looked at it she saw that it was a very large peach. She then quickly finished her washing and returned home intending to give the peach to her old man to eat.

When she cut the peach in two, out came a child from the large kernel. Seeing this the old couple rejoiced, and named the child Momotaro, or Little Peachling, because he came out of a peach. As both the old people took good care of him, he grew and became strong and enterprising. So the old couple had their expectations raised, and took still more care on his education.

Momotaro finding that he was better than everybody in strength, determined to cross over to the island of the devils, take their riches, and come back. He at once consulted with the old man and the old woman about the matter, and got them to make him some dumplings. These he put in his pouch. Besides this he made every kind of preparation for his journey to the island of the devils and set out.

Then first a dog came to the side of the way and said, “Momotaro! What have you there hanging at your belt?”

He replied, “I have some of the very best Japanese millet dumplings.”

“Give me one and I will go with you,” said the dog. So Momotaro took a dumpling out of his pouch and gave it to the dog.

Then a monkey came and got one the same way. A pheasant also came flying and said, “Give me a dumpling too, and I will go along with you.” So all three went along with him.

In no time they arrived at the island of the devils, and at once broke through the front gate; Momotaro first; then his three followers. Here they met a great multitude of the devils’ men who showed fight, but they pressed still inwards, and at last encountered the chief of the devils, called Akandoji. Then came the tug of war. Akandoji hit at Momotaro with an iron club, but Momotaro was ready for him, and dodged him cleverly. At last they grappled each other, and without difficulty Momotaro just crushed down Akandoji and tied him with a rope so tightly that he could not even move. All this was done in a fair fight.

After this Akandoji the chief of the devils said he would surrender all his riches.

“Out with your riches then,” said Momotaro laughing. Having collected and ranged in order a great pile of precious things, Momotaro took them, and set out for his home, rejoicing, as he marched bravely back, that, with the help of his three companions, to whom he attributed all his success, he had been able so easily to accomplish his task.

Great was the joy of the old man and the old woman when Momotaro came back. He feasted everybody bountifully, told many stories of his adventure, displayed his riches, and at last became a leading man, a man of influence, very rich and honorable; a man to be very much congratulated indeed!

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  • Age range: 6 to 8 , 9 to12
  • Category: Classic , Fairy Tale , Folk Tale , Japanese
  • Reading time: 01 - 05 mins
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2 thoughts on “ Momotaro ”

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I think this story is different to the original but it is still great thank you so much!!! 🙂

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IMAGES

  1. Momotaró

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  2. What Is The Moral Of Momotaro Story

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  3. Momotaro's Ending

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  4. Momotarō is the protagonist of one the most famous Japanese folk tales

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  5. Momotaro, or the Story of the Son of a Peach: From Japanese Fairy Tales

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  6. Momotarō (Literature)

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COMMENTS

  1. Japanese Folktale: The Tale of Momotaro

    In an article titled "From Folktale Hero to Local Symbol: The Transformation of Momotaro (the Peach Boy) in the Creation of a Local Culture," Nahoko Kahara posits that the oral story dates back to the Muromachi period, which ranged from 1392 to 1573. The written version may be from the Edo period, which ranged from 1603 to 1867.

  2. Momotarō

    Momotarō (桃太郎, "Peach Boy") is a popular hero of Japanese folklore. His name is often translated as Peach Boy, but is directly translated as Peach + Tarō, a common Japanese given name. Momotarō is also the title of various books, films and other works that portray the tale of this hero.

  3. Momotaro, or the Story of the Son of a Peach

    Momotaro, or the Story of the Son of a Peach Additional Information Year Published: 1908 Language: English Country of Origin: United States of America Source: Ozaki, Y.T. (1908). Japanese Fairy Tales. New York: A.L.Burt Company. Readability: Flesch-Kincaid Level: 5.0 Word Count: 4,609 Genre: Fairy Tale/Folk Tale Cite This Share | Downloads Audio

  4. The Japanese Tale of Momotaro

    1.1 Introduction: 1.2 The Miraculous Birth of Momotaro: A Gift from the Heavens 1.3 Momotaro's Childhood: Kindness and Bravery Shine Through 1.4 The Call to Adventure: Demons Threaten the Land 1.5 The Journey Begins: Allies Found in Unlikely Places 1.6 Confrontation with the Demons: The Battle of Good vs. Evil

  5. The Legend of Momotaro

    Japanese Myths and Folktales The Legend of Momotaro Momotarô Densetsu Folktale ⏱ 3 minutes Momotarô is a very popular hero of the Japanese folklore, whose story was presumably first put in writing during Edo period (1603-1868). Contents The most frequent rendition Variation of the tale Posterity of the legend

  6. The Story of Momotaro-A Japanese Tale

    They named the baby boy Momotaro (momo= peach Taro= a very classic name for boys). The boy grew so fast and very strong. One day. Momotaro said to the elderly couple he will go to the devils' island to defeat the devils. The elderly couple gave Momotaro dumplings (きびだんご)so he could eat it on the trip.

  7. The Legend of Momotaro

    The Legend of Momotaro. Once upon a time there lived an old man and woman. The old man went up into the mountains to gather firewood, while the old woman went down to the river to wash their clothes. One day, as the woman was doing the wash, a giant peach came bobbing along in the current. She pulled the giant peach out and carried it back home ...

  8. Momotaro, or the Peach Boy: Japan's Best-Loved Folktale as National

    Chapter Two examines Iwaya Sazanami's (1870-1933) adaptation Momotarō (1894) which is the single best known iteration of the tale. Published just before the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-1895, this adaptation appeared around the time that the tale began to be read as national allegory. In Chapter Three I examine Akutagawa Ryunosuke's (1894 ...

  9. ももたろう

    Perhaps the most beloved of all Japanese folk tales is the story of Momotaro, the boy born from a peach. Momotaro's expedition to the Land of the Demons, accompanied by his faithful companions, the Dog, the Monkey, and the Pheasant, is filled with fun and excitement for all young readers. One of five of the best-loved stories from Kodansha's Children's Classics series, printed in a smaller ...

  10. The Japanese Story Project: "Momotaro"

    The story of the hero Momotaro, whose name derives from momo, Japanese for "peach," is one of the best known in Japan, and references to it appear constantly in Japanese popular culture,...

  11. Momotaro

    "Mercy me!" says the old man. The boy baby first ate up one half of the peach and then he ate up the other half. When he had done this he was finer and stronger than ever. "Momotaro! Momotaro!" cries the old man; "the eldest son of the peach." "Truth it is indeed," says the old woman; "he was born in a peach."

  12. Momotaro, or the Peach Boy: Japan's Best-Loved Folktale ...

    Starting from the Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895), these new political meanings began to be studied in the folktale of Momotaro, but in the 1920s, the interpretation of the folktale became...

  13. Momotaro Story for Kids is a Fun Story with Morals

    They took the little child up in their arms, and decided to name him Momotaro. It means the son of a peach. The old couple happily raised the child with all they had. The child was also very happy. When Momotaro was fifteen years old, he looked stronger and taller than the other boys of his age in the village.

  14. Culture

    Suzuki Harunobu (鈴木 春信; c. 1725-1770): ukiyo-e depicting Momotarō returning with treasures after slaying the demons on Onigashima. The tale existed in various version and became widely popular in its present form in the Edo Era (1600-1868) through a genre of literature called kusazōshi (草双紙). Similar tales of children of unusual birth performing remarkable deeds against all the ...

  15. UKS2 Mythical Stories from Different Cultures: Momotaro (Japan

    The story of Momotaro is a Japanese folktale about an elderly couple who find a baby boy floating down a river, encased in a giant peach. They take the baby home and name him 'Momotaro', which roughly translates to 'peach boy' or 'peach son'. Momotaro grows up to be a strong, kind young man who goes on a journey to retrieve the village's stolen treasure from a group of ogres.

  16. The Roots of Momotaro, the Hero of Justice

    The Roots of Momotaro, the Hero of Justice - The origins of Momotaro, the hero of the famous Japanese folk tale, is said to be here in Okayama. Visitors are sure to find Momotaro in various places throughout the city. ... Be sure to stop by and take a commemorative photo of your trip! More information (English) Kinojo Castle. Vehicle recommended;

  17. Momotaro: The Sword In The Stone

    The heroes Momotaro, from "Momotaro: Boy-of-the-Peach" as retold by Yoshiko Uchida; Arthur, from "The Sword in the Stone" as retold by Keith Baines; and Sir Launcelot, from "Sir Launcelot du Lake" as retold by Keith Baines all display determination. The three heroes exhibit traits of bravery.

  18. The Story of Momotarō

    The Story of Momotarō. Okayama City in the Chūgoku region is renowned for its white peaches and the folklore hero Momotarō (桃太郎), the Peach Boy. Several films, books, animated shows, and other media have featured the legendary hero. Each year on the 5th of May, the Momotarō Festival is held in the Momotarō Shrine in Inuyama, Japan.

  19. PDF Momotaro, or the Story of the Son of a Peach

    One day Momotaro came to his foster-father and said solemnly: "Father, by a strange chance we have be-come father and son. Your goodness to me has been higher than the mountain grasses which it was your daily work to cut, and deeper than the river where my mother wash-es the clothes. I do not know how to thank you enough."

  20. Momotaro

    Momotaro. Text size: A- A A+. A LONG long time ago there lived an old man and an old woman. One day the old man went to the mountains to cut grass; and the old woman went to the river to wash clothes. While she was washing a great thing came tumbling and splashing down the stream. When the old woman saw it she was very glad, and pulled it to ...

  21. Momotaro Story

    Momotaro Story. Momotaro is quite possibly the most famous folk hero in Japan. Born from a peach (yes, a peach!), he went on to save his village from a band of marauding monsters. Read this shortened version of the Momotaro story, then think about what makes a true hero, both in a fairytale and in real life. This is an excerpt from our Asian ...

  22. What Is Momotaro Peach

    What Is Momotaro Peach What Is Momotaro Peach 262 Words 2 Pages Once upon a time, and old woman found a peach on a river when she went there to wash clothes. She then took it home because she wanted to show it to her husband. At home, her husband wanted to eat the peach so he asked her to cut it in half.

  23. Momotarta's Sea Eagles Essay

    Momotarta's Sea Eagles Essay. 478 Words2 Pages. "Momotarō 's Sea Eagles" by Seo Mituyo, which made as a war propaganda, is the completely different story of the tale of "Momotaro," but it uses the Momotaro's characters for showing the figure of multi ethnic empire. "Momotarō 's Sea Eagles" was released in 1943 during Pacific War.