Best Apprenticeships

How to write an apprenticeship personal statement

If you know what career or industry you want to work in, an apprenticeship might be the best way to get a foot in the door.

There are thousands of apprenticeships across the country, and finding the right one for you is the first step. The second step? Writing your application.

Here’s everything you need to know to help you feel confident and prepared before you write your apprenticeship personal statement.

What is a personal statement?

A personal statement is a brief summary of who you are and your background.

It helps interviewers get to know you, and is a great way to show your skills, experience, education and personality to potential apprenticeship employers. If you’re interested in an apprenticeship that’s especially popular, your personal statement could be the make or break between getting accepted or not.

Do you need a personal statement for an apprenticeship?

It depends. it’s very common for apprenticeships and interviewers to ask for a personal statement, and this is a good thing – it gives you the opportunity to demonstrate what a great candidate you are.

Some apprenticeships will just ask for your CV, personal details, academic certificates or portfolio, or they might ask you to complete a test. Others might expect you to apply on employer career portals, where you type your information directly into the website.

What should I include in my apprenticeship personal statement?

An apprenticeship personal statement is usually less than one A4 page long, so you don’t need to delve into extreme detail. What you write will vary between applications, but here are the fundamental topics that you should include:

Employment/volunteering experience

Discuss any work experience, part-time jobs or volunteering that you have done. Focus on the skills and knowledge you learned, what you gained from the experience, or what you contributed. If your work/volunteering experience isn’t directly relevant to the apprenticeship, make sure you still include it – instead, try to focus on the transferable skills.

Academic background and qualifications

The chances are that you will have more academic experience than work experience, but this isn’t a problem. Write a few sentences about what you have learned from your studies, what skills you have developed, where you succeeded and what you enjoyed.

Show your enthusiasm

Don’t be afraid to be enthusiastic and show your interest – after all, interviewers will want to know that you are excited about this course and ready to learn.

Hobbies/interests

You don’t always need to include your hobbies and interests, but it can be a useful addition to your personal statement. You could discuss what skills you have learned from your extracurricular hobbies and how these are applicable to the apprenticeship or your future.

Future goals

There’s one big question that interviewers will ask: what do you want to do in the future? Briefly discuss what your future goals are, e.g. what job, industry or company you are working towards. Then, link it back to how the apprenticeship can help you achieve these goals.

What do I need to know before writing my apprenticeship personal statement?

Before you even put pen to paper (or finger to keyboard!) brainstorm your responses to the following questions. Try to briefly answer all, if not most, of them in your personal statement:

  • Why do you want to work in this industry?
  • What is it about this specific apprenticeship or company that interests you? Do some further research on their websites.
  • What skills are required for this apprenticeship? And do you have them?
  • When have you demonstrated the relevant skills? Think of some examples.
  • What are your top 3 strengths or qualities?
  • Why do you think an apprenticeship is right for you?

Not only will your answers help you write a high-quality personal statement, but this is a good reflective exercise to help you feel confident you’re on a path that you feel passionate and excited about.

How many apprenticeship applications should I send?

There’s no right or wrong answer. Each application should be personalised and relevant to the specific job or course that you’re applying for. Even if you apply for 5 accounting apprenticeships, don’t assume that every application can be the same just because they are all for the accounting industry.

But personalisation takes time, so don’t expect to spam 50 apprenticeships with your application if you want to be successful. In summary, there’s no limit to how many apprenticeships you can apply for, as long as you put the time and effort into personalising each application. 

Extra personal statement tips

Plan, plan, plan.

You know what they say: ‘fail to prepare, prepare to fail’. Once you’ve brainstormed your answers, organise them in a cohesive, concise manner so you know what you are going to say about each topic, and how you will link them together. This will help you to fit everything in without writing too much.

Check for errors

Once you’ve written your personal statement, make sure your proofread it for any typos, spelling mistakes or other errors. If you’re not confident that you’ll spot the mistakes, ask a friend, family member or a teacher to read it for you.

What’s the best thing you can do if you don’t have the right skills or subjects for a particular apprenticeship? Tell the truth. Don’t lie about what you have and haven’t done. Instead, describe any similar experience that you have, and explain why you want to learn new skills.

Apprenticeship personal statements take time to write. So don’t leave it until the night before the application closes – start early and give yourself enough days, weeks or even months to write an application that you’ll be proud of.

Use key words

Key words aren’t a necessity, but you could think about what words are frequently used to describe the apprenticeship. E.g. if you’re applying for a hairdressing apprenticeship, you might use words like ‘customer-focused’, ‘friendly’ and ‘creative’. You can usually identify keywords by reading job descriptions for the apprenticeship or similar jobs in that industry.

Re-read the apprenticeship description

Have you addressed the skills and experience that the apprenticeship is asking for? Have they asked you to write about something specific that you may have missed out? Re-read the apprenticeship description to make sure you’ve included everything.

If you haven’t heard back about your application, send a polite email or give the relevant person a call. Not only is this a great way to demonstrate your enthusiasm, but it will help you build a relationship with your potential employer.

Start writing your application today

This might seem like a lot of info, but once you have written a couple of personal statements it will feel much easier. Plus – it will be worth it when you secure your apprenticeship and dive into an exciting career.

Still not sure what to apply for? Take a look at our industry guides . From beauty to paramedics , science to tattooing , we’ve got everything you need to know about apprenticeships in your dream industry. 

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StandOut CV

Apprenticeship CV example

Andrew Fennell photo

When you’re pursuing apprenticeship opportunities, your CV needs to attract the best employers.

A strong CV should highlight your marketable skills, using a visually pleasing and clear structure  to really sell you.

I’ve created this comprehensive guide (and example apprenticeship CV), that will walk you through the process of producing an engaging and eye-catching CV and move one step closer to landing a top apprenticeship role.

Guide contents

  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Your education
  • Vital skills for your apprenticeship CV

CV templates 

Apprenticeship CV

The above CV example displays how to structure your CV when you have limited or no work experience, documenting your core skills and how they can help you transition into an apprenticeship.

As the guide continues, I’ll support you in producing your own interview winning CV.

CV builder

CV structure & format

Your CV needs to facilitate ease of reading through a clear and well-defined structure, allowing recruiters to easily identify your suitability for apprenticeships .

A strong structure will enable recruiters to simply navigate your details, pinpointing your potential with ease.

This infographic will give you the tools to write a CV that is well formatted , detailing what sections to include.

CV structure

Formatting Tips

  • Keep to a clear, professional CV structure, sticking to a muted colour pallet and easy to read font
  • Maintain a CV length of between 1 to 2 sides of A4 to tell your story quickly to busy employers
  • Avoid adding imagery to your CV such as company logos or headshots, these aren’t needed in the decision making process and just waste space

Structuring your CV

Make your CV easy for recruiters to navigate by breaking it up into clearly defined sections, working to the below order:

  • Contact details – have your contact details handy at the top of the page
  • Profile – engage recruiters at first glance, with an opening paragraph that summarises your suitability for apprenticeship roles
  • Education – documenting your educational history, focusing on the qualifications/courses most related to the apprenticeship you’re pursuing
  • Work experience –  detail any employment, voluntary experience or personal pursuits undertaken
  • Interests and hobbies – add hobbies that showcase your transferable skills

I will now talk you through what to include  within each of these sections.

CV contact details

Contact details

Add your contact details to the top of your CV, ensuring recruiters and employers can easily reach you.

Look only to include essential information:

  • Phone number
  • Email address

Avoid adding supplementary information such as your date of birth, headshots or your full home address – as the city you live within is enough detail.

Top Tip –  use a professional email address and even consider setting up an account solely to use for apprenticeship applications.

Your CV profile (or personal statement ) is a short opening paragraph, which should grab recruiters’ attention and engage them to read further.

Like a blurb to a book it should give an overview of your CV, detailing your voluntary experience, educational history and applicable skills.

Showcasing at first glance why you’re the ideal candidate for apprenticeship positions.

CV profile

Use these tips to help you produce your CV profile:

  • Your profile needs to be between 5-10 lines, a succinct paragraph to entice recruiters, you’ll be able to elaborate elsewhere in your CV
  • Research the industry you’re looking to pursue and tailor your profile to those types of apprenticeships, making yourself custom fit
  • Stand out from the crowd and avoid using overused statements such as “I give 110%”, recruiters read these types of phrases in hundreds of CVs and they only make you blend into the crowd

What to include in your CV profile?

  • Qualifications – your educational history should be a focal point, specifically highlighting any qualifications needed to commence an apprenticeship
  • Core skills –  feature your transferable skills, consider strengths such as communication, team work, organisation and interpersonal skills
  • Passions –  explain why you’re looking to gain an apprenticeship role and your interest in that field

Core skills & achievement section

Beneath your profile, include a core skills and achievement section that is comprised of two to three columns of bullet points.

Use your industry research to tailor the skills you include to those required for apprenticeship opportunities, emphasising your relevancy for roles at first glance.

Core skills section CV

Consider strengths gained within your education, extra curriculum activities or any voluntary experience.

Education

If you have limited work experience, your education should be highlighted throughout your CV, but your education section will allow you to provide more depth on these courses.

List each qualification obtained in bullet point form, documenting the course title, year obtained and the establishment you attended.

Factor in GCSE’s, A Levels, any vocational courses or short/online courses you have achieved, starting with those most related to the apprenticeship sector you’re applying to.

Clubs and Memberships

Also, look to include any club involvement or memberships acquired within your education section.

Consider any sporting clubs you have been part of, drama groups or whether you were a prefect or school champion whilst in education.

See also: Graduate CV – School leaver CV

Work experience

Your work experience isn’t limited to just full time paid employment, you should look to include any voluntary work undertaken, freelancing or even any personal pursuits.

Structuring your roles

When structuring your work experience, you need to break up large blocks of text, enabling recruiters to easily navigate your experience.

Using the below three sections.

Role descriptions

Give context to recruiters with an overview of your role and the organisation you were within.

“Working in a local cafe, serving customers at the till as well as supporting the kitchen with serving food ”

Key responsibilities

Documenting any duties in bullet point form.

  • Taking customer orders, advising them which choices are best from the menu
  • Helping to clean tables, counters and supporting in the kitchen when needed

Key achievements

Record your key achievements , adding any relevant figures to strengthen your examples.

  • Received a 10 out of 10 score from a customer feedback form

Interests and hobbies

When you have limited work experience, your hobbies section is a great way to support your application by describing your transferable skills.

Avoid cliche hobbies  like “socialising” and instead include interests that confirm strengths such as team work, communication or organisation.

For example, playing for a sports club, being part of the debate team or being creative through a blog or YouTube channel you have created.

Essential skills for your CV

Feature the key strengths you have gained within your time in either education, extra curriculum activities or skills you acquired from voluntary experience.

Communication –  having the confidence to clearly communicate with people of all levels

Commitment and Drive –  display your commitment towards pursuing this training programme and career path

Organisational Skills –  whether juggling studies, voluntary work or other commitments

Team Work –  working with others, either in sporting teams or class projects

Writing your apprenticeship CV

When you’re applying to apprenticeship positions it’s essential for your CV to highlight your transferable skills, as well as your passion for the apprenticeships you’re applying to.

Using a clear, strong CV structure will help you grab recruiters’ attention, exciting them to delve deeper into your CV.

By using this guide, you’ll be able to produce your own eye-catching CV that’ll help you get hired.

G ood luck in your next application!

RateMyApprenticeship.co.uk

21 September 2023

Apprenticeship CV: Your Guide & Template

Alt Text!

Are you struggling to write a CV for an apprenticeship? What a nightmare! If you’ve just stumbled across this page, you are incredibly fortunate.

Keep reading for a step-by-step guide to writing a CV for an apprenticeship application.

How to Write an Apprenticeship CV

Before we begin…

There’s no need to put ‘Curriculum Vitae’ at the top of your CV. It’s just stating the obvious. It can be difficult to spell too. So why risk it?

Just use your name.

Now that’s out the way, you’re probably wondering if an apprenticeship is even for you. Let’s break it down a little.

Why should I do an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is a great option for any school leaver who wants the qualifications to start a career in a wide range of industries, but doesn’t want to tread the path of university.

If you’re dead set on uni, and you like the idea of apprenticeships – there’s a way. They’re called degree apprenticeships , and you don’t need to take out a student loan to do one. The government and your employer will pay your fees. So no debt for you. Score.

To find out more about the different types of apprenticeships and their entry requirements, read our overview of apprenticeship programmes .

Apprenticeship CV Guide

Step 1: your details.

After your name, you need to provide the employer with relevant contact information. Contact information is crucial. How will an employer get in touch to say ‘come in for an interview’ without your phone number or email address?

Step 2: PERSONAL STATEMENT

Keep it brief. Keep it focused.

Nobody cares for a long, rambling statement, which details your fondness for summer walks, soft cheese and watching re-runs of Friends.

In no more than five sentences, explain who you are, why you’re interested in this particular apprenticeship, and your career aspirations.

Apprenticeships train candidates to perform a specific job. Or for a role in that wider industry. Your personal statement should relate to that job or industry, and be tailored around the apprenticeship you’re applying for.

If you’re struggling with your personal statement, try and answer this question…

* How will you benefit the company during your apprenticeship? *

Step 3: KEY SKILLS

There can be an unholy number of applicants for each apprenticeship. And that means an unholy amount of CVs. Employers are unlikely to read each one from start to end.

A good apprenticeship CV has to grab the employer by the ears and scream ‘EMPLOY ME!’ within twenty seconds.

The best way to make an impression in such haste is with a series of bullet points listing your key skills. See it as a summary of your strengths. You can include things like…

  • Time-management
  • Excellent verbal and written communication
  • Working as part of a team.

Meet some of the RateMyApprenticeship team and find out some of their CV faux pas so you don’t make the same mistakes.

@ratemyapprenticeship We made the mistakes so you dont have to ✨👏🤝 #apprenticeships #cv #students #advice #gcses #alevels #school #jobs #exams #freshers2023 #examtimetable ♬ original sound – Ratemyapprenticeship

Step 4: EDUCATION

The first thing to remember in the education section of your apprentice CV is to put your most recent qualifications first. Put your A-Levels before your GCSEs.

Any modules studied during your A-Levels or GCSEs that are relevant to the apprenticeship are also worth a mention.

If you’re applying for an accounting apprenticeship, and you completed a project or a piece of coursework that focused on collecting and analysing data, let the employer know!

We’ve designed a template for an apprenticeship CV. This CV template is downloadable. And you can use it for any type of apprenticeship. 

If you follow our step-by-step guide to writing a CV for apprenticeships, you can use the template to create a CV that will have employers chasing you through the streets. 

Step 5: EMPLOYMENT HISTORY/WORK EXPERIENCE

If you have a job, list your key responsibilities and any awards or achievements you have been given.

If you’ve never had a paid job, this is a fantastic opportunity to discuss any unpaid or voluntary work you have under your belt. Detailing previous work experience is a great way of providing evidence of the key skills you have said you possess.

Anyone can write on their CV that they have a strength in customer service. How does an employer work out who is telling porkies? If you can point to your fortnight of work experience at Sainsbury’s, in which you dealt with a number of customer inquiries, you will look like royalty.

Some employers will hire apprentices even if they don’t have the required grades, but have completed relevant work experience. Not only is it crucial to finding an apprenticeship, but can make a difference when applying for jobs.

If you don’t have any work experience in the field of your apprenticeship, it’s a good idea to try and find some. Even just a week-long work experience placement in a role that is similar to the apprenticeship is valued highly by employers.

PRO TIP: When listing your responsibilities, it’s better to use words that convey action and a sense of purpose. Writing ‘I made a new pricing system’ is not going to inspire a prospective employer. However, if you change it to ‘I introduced and developed a new pricing system’, it sounds like you had a more active role.

Step 6: INTERESTS

If you don’t have the qualifications or relevant work experience, the interests section is the most important part of your apprenticeship CV.

Here, you can use your outside interests and extra-curricular activities to show an employer why you are an ideal candidate for an apprenticeship.

If you play in a sports team, now’s the time to convince the employer that you work well in a team. If you are a team captain, you can feed in your leadership qualities.

If you have any extra-curricular activities or interests that relate to the apprenticeship, highlight them. What you do with your free time is valuable information to an employer.

It tells them about your passions. If you can assure an employer that you are passionate about accounting, engineering or design, they are more likely to employ you.

Employers invest time and money in apprenticeship schemes. They would rather employ an apprentice who is enthusiastic about the course, rather than someone who is more qualified, but doesn’t care.

writing a personal statement for apprenticeship

Step 7: REFERENCES

‘References are available on request’.

Unless an employer asks for your references ASAP, put this at the end of your CV.

You usually have to pick two referees. It’s a good idea to pick a person who knows you academically – perhaps a teacher in a subject that is similar to the apprenticeship.

If you have a job, your second referee could be your manager. They can testify to all the skills you have outlined throughout your CV. If you haven’t worked, choose someone you know from any work experience or volunteering you have done.

It’s better to choose referees that know you well. And who you share a good relationship with.

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CV Template For Apprenticeship

Finding the right apprenticeship to start your career can be a daunting process. To help you stand out and maximize your chances of success, having an effective CV is essential – a CV template for apprenticeship applications can be a useful tool. Discover our CV template for apprenticeship here.

There’s power in upskilling

Do you need a cv for apprenticeship.

Just like for any other job, you will need a CV to apply for an apprenticeship. Having a professional-looking and well-written apprenticeship CV shows employers that you are serious about getting an apprenticeship and demonstrates your commitment to learning new skills. It also gives them a clear picture of your qualifications, experience, abilities, and potential. Your CV should include information such as work history, education background, awards or certificates received and references. Additionally, it should be tailored specifically to the apprenticeship position applied for in order to show how your skills match up with what they are looking for. You can simplify the process for yourself by following the CV template for apprenticeship that we’ve outlined here.

Apprenticeship CV example

Below is an apprenticeship CV example that you can refer to while writing your own apprenticeship CV.

Structure and format

Your apprenticeship CV should facilitate ease of reading through a clear and well-defined structure. A strong structure will enable your reader to navigate your details, pinpointing your potential with ease.

Formatting tips

When writing your CV for apprenticeship, keep to a clear CV structure, sticking to a muted colour pallet and easy to read font. Maintain a length of between 1 to 2 sides of A4 to tell your story quickly. Avoid adding imagery like logos or headshots, as these aren’t needed in the decision making process.

Structuring your CV

Break your CV up into clearly defined sections, working to the below order:

  • Contact details – have your contact details handy at the top of the page
  • Profile – engage recruiters at first glance, with an opening paragraph that summarises your suitability for apprenticeship roles
  • Education – documenting your educational history, focusing on the qualifications/courses most related to the apprenticeship you’re pursuing
  • Work experience – detail any employment, voluntary experience or personal pursuits undertaken
  • Interests and hobbies – add hobbies that showcase your transferable skills

What to include in your CV profile

When creating your profile, be sure to include key information such as your current job title, relevant industry experience and any specialist qualifications which make you suitable for the role in question. You should also write about any particular career highlights or successes that show off your strengths in relation to the position applied for. Additionally, it’s important that you demonstrate how these experiences have prepared you for this new opportunity by detailing how they gave you transferable skills which will benefit this role in particular.

Core skills and achievement section

Beneath your profile, include a core skills and achievement section that is comprised of two to three columns of bullet points. Use your industry research to tailor these skills to those required for your apprenticeship opportunities.

Work experience

This shouldn’t be limited to just full-time paid employment – you should also include any voluntary work undertaken, freelancing or even any personal pursuits.

If you have more limited work experience, your education should be highlighted throughout your CV, but provide more in depth information in the education section. List each qualification in bullet point form, documenting the course title, year obtained and the establishment you attended.

Clubs and memberships

Look to include any club involvement or memberships acquired within your education section. Consider any sporting clubs you have been a part of, drama groups or whether you were a prefect or school champion whilst in education.

Interests and hobbies

When you have limited work experience, your hobbies section is a great way to support your application by describing your transferable skills. Avoid cliché hobbies like ‘socialising’ and instead include interests that confirm strengths like team work, communication or organisation.

Essential skills for your CV

First, communication skills are incredibly important in any role and should be mentioned on your CV. This includes written communication – such as emails or reports – verbal communication like presentations or phone calls, and non-verbal communication like body language or facial expressions. Make sure you highlight any relevant experience that demonstrates your ability to communicate effectively with different audiences. Another key skill employers look for is problem solving; being able to think critically and come up with creative solutions when faced with obstacles.

Personal statement for apprenticeship

You may be asked for a personal statement for apprenticeship applications with some companies. A personal statement is your chance to show potential employers that you have the qualifications and enthusiasm needed for the job. It is important to make sure your statement stands out, as it will be read alongside many others.

Your personal statement for apprenticeship should explain what makes you suitable for the role. Include information on why you are interested in the industry or sector, any relevant skills and experience from previous jobs or education, and how this position fits into your overall career aspirations.

How to write a personal statement for apprenticeship

Before you write your apprenticeship personal statement, you should do your research about the company that you are applying for so that you can demonstrate how your own values align with theirs. The personal statement part of your application is a chance to dive deeper into your career history, interests and skills, as well as showing a genuine interest in the work of the company itself.

Your personal statement for apprenticeship should follow a structure like this:

  • Explain why you want to do your chosen apprenticeship and how the apprenticeship aligns with your future career aspirations
  • Give brief examples of any relevant academic or work experience from your past
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the apprenticeship and pinpoint reasons why you would be well-suited to the course
  • Give an overview of any hobbies and interest you’ve had and societies or teams you have been a part of, especially those which might be of relevance to the course.
  • Proofread your personal statement in full before sending, checking carefully for spelling and grammar mistakes.

You should try to keep your personal statement clear and concise, between 350 and 500 words.

Find an apprenticeship with Estio

Estio is a leading provider of digital and technology apprenticeship programmes, offering a comprehensive apprenticeship course informed by industry expertise, and delivered remotely to ensure enough flexibility for your apprentice’s needs to be suited. 

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Automotive engineering personal statement example 1.

It all began when I was very young and I used to see my father fixing pipes, changing the car's motor oil, repairing electric devices” that I said I want to be like him. My father had studied Industrial Engineering, so I grew up thinking that I had to follow in my father's footsteps.

While I was getting older I used to help him and I found that mechanics were interesting. Some years later, when I was 9 years old, I started exploring the world of applied mechanics to automobiles. By then I began requesting a gas RC model to my parents, who bought it for me at the age of 11, it was a source of knowledge and the turning point that settled my life long dream.

Since then I have been expanding my knowledge, from detaching and rebuilding 2 and 4 stroke engines to building from scratch something similar to a motorbike to working as a mechanic.

Furthermore, my devotion for discovering and learning has made me self-taught in lots of things, especially engine and transmission technology. Thanks both to the specialised books I buy and the membership with STA, which provides me with really interesting and updated magazines, I have learnt a lot.

In fact, I have always wanted to break the boundaries that limit my opportunities, for instance starring in two school plays not only helped to gain confidence in public but refined my communicative skills, besides travelling abroad to perfect my English made me much more open-minded.

My reading preferences range from science fiction to historical novels with Orson Scott Card and Ken Follett being two of my favourite authors.

The high school once organised a thinking games competition which I finally won thanks to being competitive and constant. Meeting new people and keeping old friends is one of my priorities. Indeed, if they are interested in motor sport we will learn from each other and can attend motorshows, rallies” together.

Sport has always played a key role in my spare time activities. Basketball helped me improve my team spirit and nowadays I am member of a local fitness centre which I attend on a regular basis. At weekends I tend to ride across the hills surrounding my town to strengthen my stamina and recharge my batteries.

Studying Industrial Engineering has developed my problem-solving and work-planning skills. By now I have passed Basic Computer Science, Basic Mechanics, Chemistry I, Chemistry II, Graphic Representation Techniques I and Infinitesimal Calculus I.

In June I am confident I will have passed Basic Thermodynamics, Geometry, Infinitesimal Calculus II and Linear Algebra. Although I enjoy the challenging and rewarding my degree is I feel Iike it is not going to give me the job opportunities I am really interested in.

After having seen your curricular programmes, facilities and international prestige I decided to apply because I have no hesitation that I have to get involved with all that knowledge and experience to achieve the assured future and highly promising career I have always desired.

Once graduated I would love to work with an OEM, especially, in the design and tests department. And, hopefully, joining a F1 motor-racing team one day. What is more, since economy is tightly linked to the automotive sector I might apply for an MBA later on.

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This personal statement was written by marc89 for application in 2009.

marc89's Comments

I liked the fact of describing myself!!!

Related Personal Statements

Stephen hewetson.

Fri, 10/09/2010 - 09:34

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Teaching personal statement examples

Giving you the chance to show why you'd be a great teacher, your personal statement is an important part of your application and worth taking the time over

What is a teaching personal statement?

Your personal statement is used to explain why you want to become a teacher and your suitability for the role. While your application form briefly outlines your qualifications, skills and work experience, your teaching personal statement is where your personality shines through.

Take your time with it. Many candidates often spend a few weeks on this part of the application as you don't have to write it all at once. You should get someone to read over it and be prepared to receive constructive feedback and write a few drafts before you send it off.

It's important to:

  • use examples based on your recent teaching experience
  • tailor your personal statement according to the school/age group
  • use good, clear, written English, using first person terms such as 'my' and 'I'
  • be original and honest
  • avoid clichés and general statements, such as 'I've always wanted to teach'
  • demonstrate a passion for teaching.

While it's crucial to get it right, your teaching personal statement is only a small part of the application process. Find out how else you'll need to prepare to  get a teaching job .

How to write a personal statement for teaching

Your personal statement should be between 500 and 1,000 words. It's crucial that you  don't copy  and that the statement you provide is  your own work .

This is your opportunity to:

  • write about any relevant skills and experience you have
  • explain your understanding of why teaching is important
  • detail why you want to become a teacher
  • list any extra skills or experience you have, such as volunteering or first aid.

See  personal statements for postgraduate applications  for more guidance.

The nature of your personal statement will vary, depending on the type of teaching you'd like to pursue. Take a look at some of our example personal statements to get an idea of how they differ.

Personal statement for PGCE primary

As well as focusing on roles in which you've gained experience with primary-age children, a PGCE primary personal statement should demonstrate your well-rounded personality and any skills that could be useful for the range of extra-curricular activities primary schools provide (such as the ability to read music for recorder lessons, or drama experience to help with school plays).

Personal statement for PGCE secondary

Many good PGCE secondary personal statements acknowledge the challenges involved in teaching older pupils and provide examples of where the candidate has worked to overcome these problems. As secondary teaching roles are geared towards teaching a specific subject, training providers are looking for more evidence of your subject and degree knowledge.

Personal statement for School Direct

If you're applying for the salaried School Direct route, you should discuss the experience you've gained in the classroom prior to your application. One of your references will need to be from an employer, or someone who can comment on your work ethic and suitability for teaching. Don't worry if your degree is unrelated to the subject you'd like to teach - you may still be able to apply by completing a subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course .

Find out more

  • Discover how to structure a teaching CV .
  • Find out what it's really like to be a primary or secondary school teacher .
  • Search postgraduate courses in teaching .

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A 10-Step Guide to Writing an Outstanding Personal Statement

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Applying to college can be daunting, especially when it comes to writing a personal statement. This essay showcases not just your writing skills but also your unique personality, achievements, and aspirations. Understanding that while grades are crucial, a personal statement often becomes the differentiating factor in your application. To navigate this essential component, we’ve compiled a ten-step guide, replete with examples, to ensure your personal statement leaves a lasting impression on admissions officers.

Applying to college can be a daunting task, especially when it comes to writing a personal statement. This essay not only showcases your writing skills but also highlights your unique personality, achievements, and aspirations. While it may seem unnecessary, tedious, time-consuming, and just another tick-the-box, know that as each application is processed, grades are just one of the criteria of selection, more often than not a personal statement becomes the differentiating factor.

A diverse group of smiling students looking down into the camera, holding a speech bubble sign that says 'THIS IS MY STORY' at a gathering, symbolizing individuality and shared experiences in crafting personal narratives.

To help you navigate this crucial component of your application, we’ve compiled a ten-step guide, complete with inspiring examples to ensure your personal statement makes a lasting impression on admissions officers.

  • Start Early and Brainstorm Begin the process early to give yourself plenty of time to brainstorm. Reflect on your experiences, achievements, and motivations. Think about what makes you unique, both in terms of personality and life experiences.
  • Understand the Prompt Make sure you clearly understand what the college is asking for. Each institution may have different prompts or questions. Tailor your response specifically to each prompt, ensuring you answer it fully and directly. Be comprehensive and succinct in your answers, choosing words that convey your candidature the best.
  • Create an Outline Draft an outline to organize your thoughts and ensure a coherent flow of ideas. This will help you structure your statement effectively, making sure every part contributes towards presenting a compelling narrative.
  • Exhibit, Don’t Tell Use specific examples to demonstrate your qualities and achievements. Instead of stating that you’re a great leader, describe a situation where you demonstrated leadership. This method makes your statement more engaging and believable.
  • Focus on Your Strengths While it might be tempting to cover a wide range of subjects, focusing on a few key strengths or experiences can have a stronger impact. Depth over breadth is crucial in personal statements.
  • Be Authentic Admissions officers can tell when a statement is genuine. Write honestly about your experiences and passions and let your natural voice shine through. Authenticity is key to making a personal statement stand out.
  • Get Feedback After drafting your statement, seek feedback from teachers, mentors, or friends. They can provide insights on clarity, grammar, and the overall impact of your essay. They all have a perspective of you from an external viewpoint, so do not skip this step.
  • Revise and Edit Use the feedback to revise your statement. Look for areas where you can clarify your points, eliminate redundancy, and correct grammatical errors. This step is crucial for polishing your final submission.
  • Keep It Concise Adhere to the word limit. Being able to express your thoughts concisely and effectively is a skill appreciated by admissions officers.
  • Final Review Before submitting, do a final review. Read your statement out loud to catch any remaining errors or awkward phrasing. Make sure it sounds natural and is easy to read.

Examples of Exemplary Personal Statements:

Example 1: The Innovator Jane’s personal statement begins with a vivid description of her tinkering with a broken radio at age eight, which sparked her interest in technology. She intertwines her personal journey with her academic achievements, such as leading her school’s robotics team to a national competition. Jane uses specific examples, like designing a new robot navigation system, to demonstrate her passion and skill in engineering.

Example 2: The Community Leader John opens his statement with a powerful recount of organizing community relief efforts during a local flood. Highlighting his role in mobilizing volunteers and coordinating with local authorities, he demonstrates strong leadership and commitment to his community. His narrative includes feedback from the community and the personal growth he experienced, providing a well-rounded view of his character.

Example 3: The Attentive Listener Emma’s personal statement explores her profound appreciation for music and its role in shaping her interpersonal connections. She describes an afternoon spent sharing playlists with a group of international students, which turned into a deep discussion about cultural expressions through music. This experience not only highlights her listening skills but also illustrates her ability to forge meaningful relationships through shared interests.

Example 4: The Compassionate Leader David writes about his high emotional quotient and how it spurred him to lead a community initiative focused on animal welfare. His personal statement recounts organizing local workshops to educate people about animal kindness and launching a successful campaign for a local shelter. David’s story reflects his empathy and leadership in translating compassion into actionable community improvement.

Commentary: Every life is extraordinary; it’s how you narrate your story that captures the reader’s eye. Your personal statement should reflect your unique experiences and aspirations.

Conclusion:

In crafting your personal statement, remember, you don’t have to be extraordinary in the usual sense—honesty and transparency are key. Be a dreamer of the art of the possible; dream as big as you can and let those dreams articulate themselves in your words. This approach not only reveals your true self to admissions officers but also shows your potential to contribute meaningfully to their academic community. Start your adventure today! Use these steps as your guide to find the university that best fits your future goals. Dream big and achieve even bigger.

A 10-Step Guide to Picking the Right University

Kumar Jaisingh

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COMMENTS

  1. How to write an apprenticeship personal statement

    Discuss any work experience, part-time jobs or volunteering that you have done. Focus on the skills and knowledge you learned, what you gained from the experience, or what you contributed. If your work/volunteering experience isn't directly relevant to the apprenticeship, make sure you still include it - instead, try to focus on the ...

  2. PDF How to write a personal statement for apprenticeship applications

    • Don't let worry about your personal statement stop you from applying. Be super careful with apprenticeship applications though; ask someone you trust to check your apprenticeship application. Respectful Understanding Logical Enjoys a challenge Problem solver Resourceful Curious Practical Determined Good leader Considerate Team player Good

  3. 16 Winning Personal Statement Examples (And Why They Work)

    Here are 16 personal statement examples—both school and career—to help you create your own: 1. Personal statement example for graduate school. A personal statement for graduate school differs greatly from one to further your professional career. It is usually an essay, rather than a brief paragraph. Here is an example of a personal ...

  4. How To Write An Apprenticeship Personal Statement

    Your apprenticeship personal statement is the first time you'll introduce yourself to an employer. So it's crucial you make a good first impression. Think of it as your moment to shine. An opportunity to highlight your interests and career goals. Employers want to get to know the real you. So don't be afraid to include your thoughts ...

  5. Apprenticeship CV example + writing guide [Get noticed]

    Your CV profile (or personal statement) is a short opening paragraph, which should grab recruiters' attention and engage them to read further. Like a blurb to a book it should give an overview of your CV, detailing your voluntary experience, educational history and applicable skills. ... Writing your apprenticeship CV.

  6. Apprentice Cover Letter Example (With How-to Guide)

    How to write an apprentice cover letter An apprentice cover letter introduces yourself to a potential employer when you're applying for an apprenticeship. In a cover letter, you can explain your qualifications and express your interest in the position. Follow these steps to write a professional, concise cover letter for an apprenticeship: 1.

  7. Apprenticeship CV Guide & Template

    Apprenticeships train candidates to perform a specific job. Or for a role in that wider industry. Your personal statement should relate to that job or industry, and be tailored around the apprenticeship you're applying for. If you're struggling with your personal statement, try and answer this question…

  8. PDF How to write a personal statement for college/sixth form/apprenticeship

    How to write a personal statement for college/sixth form/apprenticeship applications First, read the course/job description. Take note of anything that interests you. ... an apprenticeship application you should make it clear you have done your research and you are confident this is the right choice for you. You might say "I am planning a ...

  9. PDF Apprenticeships

    An apprenticeship personal statement is written information about you! It puts across relevant skills, experience and attributes that will make ... Dos and don'ts when writing a personal statement • Do use your best English and check your spelling and grammar are correct.

  10. How to write an apprenticeship cover letter (With examples)

    State the specific apprenticeship you wish to apply for and the name of the company or organisation. You can also introduce yourself by name and mention where you heard about the apprenticeship. Related: 7 powerful ways to start a cover letter (With examples) 4. Talk about your relevant qualifications.

  11. CV Template for Apprenticeship

    How to write a personal statement for apprenticeship. Before you write your apprenticeship personal statement, you should do your research about the company that you are applying for so that you can demonstrate how your own values align with theirs. The personal statement part of your application is a chance to dive deeper into your career ...

  12. How to Write a Personal Statement

    Insert a quote from a well-known person. Challenge the reader with a common misconception. Use an anecdote, which is a short story that can be true or imaginary. Credibility is crucial when writing a personal statement as part of your college application process. If you choose a statistic, quote, or misconception for your hook, make sure it ...

  13. 9 winning personal statement examples for a job

    Here are some examples of personal and professional statements: 1. Personal statement for a postgraduate programme. Joan David Personal statement for master's programme in Public Policy and Administration London School of Policy 'I held my first textbook when I was a 23-year-old undergraduate.

  14. Using your personal statement beyond a university application

    Using your personal statement to create tailored CVs and cover letters relevant to the role you're applying for is something we'd highly recommend. An apprenticeship application is similar too, so using the work you've already done to help you apply will save you time and help keep you focused. Whether it's an apprenticeship, university ...

  15. How to Write Your Personal Statement

    Strategy 1: Open with a concrete scene. An effective way to catch the reader's attention is to set up a scene that illustrates something about your character and interests. If you're stuck, try thinking about: A personal experience that changed your perspective. A story from your family's history.

  16. How to write an excellent personal statement in 10 steps

    Use your closing couple of lines to summarise the most important points in your statement. 9. Check your writing thoroughly and get someone else to check it, too. 10. Give your brain a rest by forgetting about your personal statement for a while before going back to review it one last time with fresh eyes.

  17. PDF How to write a personal statement for College/Sixth Form/Apprenticeship

    Don't let worry about your personal statement stop you from applying. Most Colleges and Sixth Forms in Leeds don't turn applications down on the personal statement. Be super careful with apprenticeship applications though. Ask someone you trust to check your apprenticeship application Applications Website for Wakefield Students

  18. Personal Statement Examples For Teaching

    The teacher training personal statement is your opportunity to let training providers know about your qualities, skills and expertise, and why you want to teach. ... To help you write a successful teacher training personal statement, we recommend you include: use examples to back everything up, based on your teaching experience so far ...

  19. Automotive Engineering Personal Statement Example 1

    Automotive Engineering Personal Statement Example 1. It all began when I was very young and I used to see my father fixing pipes, changing the car's motor oil, repairing electric devices" that I said I want to be like him. My father had studied Industrial Engineering, so I grew up thinking that I had to follow in my father's footsteps.

  20. Teacher Training Personal Statement

    How to write it. You can use up to 47 lines of text (4,000 characters) in your personal statement. Some word processing packages calculate line counts differently from the UCAS Teacher Training system, so you might need to redraft your statement if there's a discrepancy between the counts. Write in English (or Welsh if you're applying to ...

  21. Teaching personal statement examples

    use examples based on your recent teaching experience. tailor your personal statement according to the school/age group. use good, clear, written English, using first person terms such as 'my' and 'I'. be original and honest. avoid clichés and general statements, such as 'I've always wanted to teach'. demonstrate a passion for teaching.

  22. A 10-Step Guide to Writing an Outstanding Personal Statement

    Applying to college can be a daunting task, especially when it comes to writing a personal statement. This essay not only showcases your writing skills but also highlights your unique personality, achievements, and aspirations. While it may seem unnecessary, tedious, time-consuming, and just another tick-the-box, know that as each application is processed, grades are just one of the criteria ...

  23. How to start a personal statement: The attention grabber

    2. Write about why you want to study that course. Think about why you want to study the course and how you can demonstrate this in your written statement: 'Your interest in the course is the biggest thing. Start with a short sentence that captures the reason why you're interested in studying the area you're applying for and that ...