Body Positivity as an Answer to Body Shaming Essay

Introduction, adverse trends in social media and their impact, body positivity as an optimal solution, works cited.

Living in a present-day society means following its trends, which are frequently completely irrational and, what is more important, harmful to young people. One of them is the establishment of beauty standards and their fast development, which is conditional upon the involvement of social media platforms, such as Instagram or Twitter. This phenomenon leads to body shaming as a response to one’s unwillingness or inability to adjust to these imaginary rules. As a result, individuals begin to suffer from low self-esteem, which adversely affects their functioning as citizens, whereas highlighting their uniqueness might have the opposite outcome. Therefore, the best solution for eliminating the unrealistic expectations for one’s looks is the emphasis on body positivity, which can contribute to a shift from the need to conform to self-appreciation regardless of external factors.

The mentioned adverse trends in social media are connected to the erroneous perceptions of individuality by people. They are especially critical for adolescents who pay particular attention to their appearance in their pursuit of being unique compared to their families or friends. However, the failure to follow the instilled standards leads to their dissatisfaction with their bodies, which complicates the already challenging process of pubertal adjustment (Gam et al. 1325). In this case, the problem is in the fact that common views on beauty do not correlate with individuality, as it might seem to youngsters. Consequently, their distorted understanding of this aspect and the desire to express themselves are in conflict. In addition, all teenagers are susceptible to body shaming stemming from non-compliance with ideals, and children from prosperous families struggle as much as their less fortunate peers. Therefore, a change is required for ensuring their mental health and well-being in the future.

Another circumstance contributing to the negative impact of beauty standards in social media on people’s lives is the increased possibility of personal conflicts, which emerge on these grounds. It can be dangerous for the socialization of young citizens and disrupt the process of their personality formation, which, in turn, will result in their inability to find their place in life (Martínez-González et al. 6630). Even though the creation of the desired image is a necessary task for everyone, it should not be based on any rules other than the freedom of self-expression and the emphasis on individuality. In this situation, body positivity seems an excellent solution since it corresponds to the above provisions. Thus, the described problems, which are the inability to distinguish between irrational standards and individuality and the issues with one’s image, are the basis of why body-shaming is a negative phenomenon in society.

The significance of body positivity for addressing the challenges describes above can be explained by its capability to resist the influence of irrational beauty standards. The latter is well-developed and widely supported by social media, which means that they can be overcome only through a movement, which is efficient and publicly known. At present, there are no other alternatives except for the introduction of body positivity for this purpose, and this conclusion is supported by scholars. Thus, for example, they claim that listening to body-positive music adds to women’s self-esteem, whereas the preference for appearance-related songs has the opposite effect (Coyne et al. 5). These findings indicate the effectiveness of the selected approach in changing the stereotypes, which are proved to be harmful to young people. Therefore, the emphasis on cultural products reflecting individuality rather than the need to conform to beauty standards might eliminate the risks of body shaming.

Moreover, the attitudes of individuals towards appearance and the appropriateness of specific trends are frequently transmitted through popular types of physical activity, which should also be addressed with regard to the principles of body positivity. According to Pickett and Cunningham, the introduction of body-positive yoga is one of the methods, which can be suitable for this objective (336). It contributes to the creation of inclusive physical activity spaces based on people’s individuality rather than shared standards and body shaming for non-compliance with them (Pickett and Cunningham 336). In this way, this aspect of human life can be viewed as one of the most influential areas, which should be highlighted by facilities providing similar services to the population. Their focus on the promotion of acceptance and individuality of visitors is beneficial for the formation of a positive body image. It also adds to the fact that the shift in attitudes can resolve the issues emerging due to the spread of unrealistic standards.

In conclusion, the introduction of body positivity practices in societal institutions can help eliminate the risks of low self-esteem for young people, which emerge due to beauty standards and body shaming. This population group is especially vulnerable due to their desire to be unique and the dissatisfaction following the impossibility to fulfill it at the time of their personality formation. As a result, they are guided by erroneous perceptions, which worsen their self-esteem and the efficiency of their communication with peers. Meanwhile, body positivity in different areas, such as music or physical activity, was reported to be advantageous for addressing the mentioned problems. Therefore, it should be emphasized by facilities providing services for the population.

Coyne, Sarah, et al. “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: The Effect of Listening to Body Positive Music on Implicit and Explicit Body Esteem.” Psychology of Popular Media , vol. 10, no. 1, 2021, pp. 2–13. doi: 10.1037/ppm0000273.

Gam, Rahul Taye et al. “Body Shaming among School-Going Adolescents: Prevalence and Predictors.” International Journal of Community Medicine and Public Health , vol. 7., no. 4, 2020, pp. 1324–1328. doi: 10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20201075.

Martínez-González, Marina, et al. “Women Facing Psychological Abuse: How Do They Respond to Maternal Identity Humiliation and Body Shaming?” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2021, vol. 18, no, 12, pp. 6627–6644. doi: 10.3390/ijerph18126627.

Pickett, Andrew, and George Cunningham. “Creating Inclusive Physical Activity Spaces: The Case of Body-Positive Yoga.” Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport , vol. 88, no. 3., 2016, pp. 329–338. doi: 10.1080/02701367.2017.1335851.

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Changing the Conversation: Body Shaming

Body shaming is a growing epidemic, rising to a fevered pitch in recent years alongside social media. Photos and advertisements of perfectly shaped and airbrushed bodies plaster the cities we live in, setting an unrealistic stigma for perfection. Even social media can play a role as people choose to share the best shots online, utilizing filters and editing apps to touch up their “reality.”

Within our current culture, there is an overwhelmingly negative attitude when it comes to individuals who live in larger bodies.  Weight stigma and discrimination is a serious problem in a wide variety of contexts including work, school and care settings.

Katie Loth, Ph.D., M.P.H. , an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota Medical School, sees one major factor leading to the  weight bias in our society.

“We live in a culture placing enormous value on thinness and physical beauty. Pop culture perpetuates this perceived importance by limiting the images we see to only those including individuals who match society’s high, often unattainable, expectations for physical appearance,” said Loth. “We need to demand the images we view are respectful and honest portrayals of real people, representing the full range of diversity within our culture.”

Research continually shows children and adults who experience body shaming are vulnerable to many long-lasting psychological and physical health consequences, including:

  • Higher rates of depression and anxiety,
  • Low self-esteem and low body satisfaction,
  • Increased risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors,
  • Higher risk for disordered eating behaviors,
  • More likely to avoid healthy behaviors such as physical activity.

According to Loth, it is important for parents, coaches and health professionals to stray away from having weight-focused conversations. Instead, she encourages conversations about setting behavioral goals, including encouraging healthy eating and regular physical activity. These conversations are more likely to result in positive long-term behavior change.

“We need to take a stand for our bodies,” concludes Loth. “We need to shift the public conversation away from the number on the scale and focus more on a much broader view of overall health.”

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Body Shaming: an Exploratory Study on its Definition and Classification

  • Original Article
  • Published: 09 November 2021
  • Volume 5 , pages 26–37, ( 2023 )

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thesis statement of body shaming

  • Constanze Schlüter 1 ,
  • Gerda Kraag 1 &
  • Jennifer Schmidt 2  

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Body shaming (BS) is a popular term for a type of negative social interaction, which frequently occurs in social media. However, there is a lack of a clear scientific definition of BS and data on its relation to other concepts in social aggression research. The present study therefore aimed at providing a definition and classification of BS. In an exploratory online-study, 25 participants (60%) provided personal definitions of BS and rated the fit of a suggested definition. In addition, they reported similarities with and differences to related concepts (appearance teasing, cyberbullying, trolling). We conducted qualitative analyses of the verbal definitions guided by the Grounded Theory approach and quantified the fit to existing concepts in the field of social aggression. The results show that BS is perceived as an unrepeated act in which a person expresses unsolicited, mostly negative opinions/comments about a target’s body, without necessarily intending to harm him/her. Still, the target perceives the comments as negative. BS can range from well-meant advice to malevolent insults and it can occur online and offline. Participants saw similarities between BS and appearance teasing. BS can be a tool for trolling and can evolve to cyberbullying with repetition over time. Altogether, BS is a form of social aggression that has a negative impact on individuals. The definition and classification help to investigate BS and its effects on body image and mental health in future research.

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Appendix 1. Open-ended questions to gain insights in people’s understanding of body shaming

  • Q2-Q4 (bold print) were presented in randomized order to avoid effects caused by sequence and/or order. To prevent later editing of statements, participants could not return to previous questions

Appendix 2. Overview on exemplary statements regarding similarities and differences of the targeted concepts (body shaming, appearance teasing, cyberbullying, trolling)

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Schlüter, C., Kraag, G. & Schmidt, J. Body Shaming: an Exploratory Study on its Definition and Classification. Int Journal of Bullying Prevention 5 , 26–37 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s42380-021-00109-3

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Accepted : 18 October 2021

Published : 09 November 2021

Issue Date : March 2023

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/s42380-021-00109-3

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Home — Essay Samples — Social Issues — Discrimination and Prejudice — Public Shaming

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Essays on Public Shaming

Body shaming essay topics and outline examples, essay title 1: body shaming in the age of social media: impact and solutions.

Thesis Statement: The prevalence of body shaming on social media platforms negatively affects individuals' mental health and self-esteem, and this essay explores the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to combat online body shaming.

  • Introduction
  • Defining Body Shaming and Its Manifestations Online
  • The Psychological Toll: Self-Esteem, Anxiety, and Depression
  • Social Media Platforms and Their Role in Amplifying Body Shaming
  • Promoting Body Positivity: Strategies for Change

Essay Title 2: Media Influence and Body Shaming: The Portrayal of Beauty Standards

Thesis Statement: Media representations of beauty standards contribute to body shaming by perpetuating unrealistic ideals, and this essay examines the media's role in shaping perceptions of beauty and the resulting impact on individuals.

  • Media's Portrayal of Beauty: Magazines, Advertisements, and Entertainment
  • The Link Between Media Exposure and Body Dissatisfaction
  • The Role of Celebrities and Influencers in Shaping Beauty Norms
  • Media Literacy and Empowerment: Countering Negative Influences

Essay Title 3: Body Shaming and Its Intersectionality: Addressing Multiple Forms of Discrimination

Thesis Statement: Body shaming is often compounded by other forms of discrimination such as racism, sexism, and LGBTQ+ discrimination, and this essay explores the intersectionality of body shaming and advocates for inclusive and empathetic approaches to combating it.

  • Understanding Intersectionality and Its Impact on Body Image
  • Body Shaming Within Marginalized Communities
  • Advocacy and Allyship: Supporting Those Affected by Intersectional Body Shaming
  • Fostering Inclusivity and Empathy in Society

Public Shaming as a Form of Punishment

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The Issue of Public Shaming on The Internet

Pluses and minuses of public shaming, advantages of public shaming as a punishment, the notion of body-shaming and its causes, let us write you an essay from scratch.

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Impact of Public Shaming on Children

Public shaming as an appropriate form of criminal punishment, cultural dilemma due to the prom tweet, analysis of the politics of 'cancel culture' in the philippines, cancel culture as a form of support or the cause of depression, relevant topics.

  • Racial Profiling
  • Discrimination
  • Gender Discrimination
  • Hate Speech
  • Fat Shaming
  • Political Correctness

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thesis statement of body shaming

thesis statement of body shaming

Marjorie Taylor Greene Loses It After Viral Diss Trademark

Representative Jasmine Crockett is doubling down on her viral jab against far-right Representative Marjorie Taylor-Greene by beating the firebrand at her own game: Crockett filed a trademark on the phrase “bleach blonde bad-built butch body” and is producing a “Crockett Clapback Collection” featuring phrases the freshman lawmaker has said.

Crockett, a representative from Texas, posted a mockup of a shirt featuring the phrase “bleach blonde bad-built butch body,” which Crockett refers to as “B6” for its alliteration. On announcing the line of swag—which trademark filings note will include hats, hoodies, socks, and t-shirts—Crockett says proceeds “will go to ensuring that we have a Democratic House!”

The diss came during a House Oversight Committee meeting after Greene inexplicably insulted Crockett’s appearance while ranting about Judge Juan Merchan ’s daughter. The committee meeting was reviewing a vote on whether to file articles of contempt against U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland for refusing to provide confidential recordings between Biden and special counsel Robert Hur. During Greene’s tirade, Representative Crockett asked her, “Do you know what we’re here for?” to which Greene responded, “I don’t think you know what you’re here for. I think your fake eyelashes are messing up what you’re reading.”

In response to the trademark and merch launch by Crockett, Greene made the incredibly normal decision to publish a video of herself working out . “Yes my body is built and strong,” Greene wrote. “NOT with nips, tucks, plastic, or silicone, but through a healthy lifestyle.”

Leaning into white fragility , Greene appeared on Fox News to decry body shaming against herself while doubling down on body shaming others, griping to the outlet notorious for cookie-cutter bleach blonde, Botoxed hosts, “I think no matter what shape, size or how we look, we need to be ourselves, not telling women the only way to be attractive or accepted is to have fake boobs, fake hair, fake lashes, and injected faces.”

Marjorie Taylor Greene Loses It After Viral Diss Trademark

COMMENTS

  1. Body Shaming: an Exploratory Study on its Definition and Classification

    Body shaming (BS) is a popular term for a type of negative social interaction, which freq uently occurs in social media. Howev er, there is a lack of a clear scientific definition of BS and data ...

  2. (PDF) The Unspoken Emotions: The Body Shaming ...

    The purpose of this study is aimed to explore the bod y. shaming experiences of senior high school students in their. struggles, distress, coping mechanisms, and re alizations. and insights. This ...

  3. Argumentative Essay On Body Shaming

    Argumentative Essay On Body Shaming. 729 Words3 Pages. Body shaming is one of the biggest problems in today's generation. It is the practice of making critical, potentially humiliating comments about a person's body, size or weight. It is obvious that all of us come in different shapes and sizes but society and the media puts a lot of ...

  4. Young Perceptions and Experiences of Skinny and Fat Shaming by A thesis

    of body shaming. In total, 500 female students (M age = 20.0 years, SD = 4.7 years) read a vignette depicting an instance of skinny shaming and a vignette depicting an instance of fat shaming. Subsequently, they completed measures of their perceptions of the body shaming depicted in the vignettes, as well as their own experiences, their body

  5. PDF Body Shaming: an Exploratory Study on its Definition and ...

    Body shaming (BS) is a popular term for a type of negative social interaction, which frequently occurs in social media. However, there is a lack of a clear scientific definition of BS and data on its relation to other concepts in social aggression research. The present study therefore aimed at providing a definition and classification of BS.

  6. Body Positivity as an Answer to Body Shaming Essay

    Conclusion. In conclusion, the introduction of body positivity practices in societal institutions can help eliminate the risks of low self-esteem for young people, which emerge due to beauty standards and body shaming. This population group is especially vulnerable due to their desire to be unique and the dissatisfaction following the ...

  7. PDF Unattainable Beauty: An Analysis of the Role of Body Shame and ...

    the boys closer to, and girls further away, from the culturally prescribed ideal body. Moreover, pubertal hormones create conspicuous changes in the female body, which in turn, alter the way girls and women interact with and experience the social world (Brooks-Gunn & Petersen, 1983). A girl's new body, in a sense, becomes "public

  8. Why a Negative Body Image? A Study on Gender, Social Media, and Mass Media

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  9. Social Media Use and its Impact on Body Image: The Effects of Body

    A thesis submitted to the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial ... Body comparisons have been identified as the main mechanism by which media images exert negative influence on body satisfaction. This relationship is thought to be moderated by individual level factors, such as low self-esteem, which predispose ...

  10. PDF Body Shaming: Can We Stigmatize This?

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  11. PDF II. LITERATURE REVIEW A. REVIEW OF RELATED STUDY

    2018), body shaming can occur in communities regardless of age, body shape or specific skin color (Lestari, 2018) so that victims or perpetrators are of various ages. Body shaming is a form of commentary on the appearance of oneself and others (Evans, 2010). Intense body shaming can affect body image (Lestari, 2018). Body image can affect a ...

  12. PDF A Victimological Perspectives On Body Shaming

    understanding of the term "body shaming," a significant number of participants have described the perpetrators' actions as being "the negative behaviour that someone judges over our outward appearances." Most respondents suggested that body-shaming remarks could take the form of negative allusions or evaluations, discrimination, or falsehood.

  13. Changing the Conversation: Body Shaming

    These conversations are more likely to result in positive long-term behavior change. "We need to take a stand for our bodies," concludes Loth. "We need to shift the public conversation away from the number on the scale and focus more on a much broader view of overall health.". Body shaming is a growing epidemic, rising to a fevered ...

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    emotional stress and social trauma. In other severe conditions, body shaming victims might have suicidal ideation due to prolonged depression (Greenleaf et al., 2014; Iftitania, 2021). Problem Statement . Body shaming has recently appeared as a substantial issue in our community due to the idealisation of some specific beauty characteristics.

  15. PDF The Impact of Body Shaming on Female High School Students in China

    No. of papers Context of "body shaming" usage References 3 Impact of the body shaming on self-harm rates of female high school students [1-3] 4 Impact of the body shaming on depression and anxiety of female high school students [4-7] 4 Impact of body shaming on eating disorders of female high school students in China [8-11] 2 Main Body

  16. Body Shaming: an Exploratory Study on its Definition and ...

    Body shaming (BS) is a popular term for a type of negative social interaction, which frequently occurs in social media. However, there is a lack of a clear scientific definition of BS and data on its relation to other concepts in social aggression research. The present study therefore aimed at providing a definition and classification of BS. In an exploratory online-study, 25 participants (60% ...

  17. The Awareness of the Impact of Body Shaming among Youth

    body shaming could lead to suicidal thoughts among its victims. Diagram 4: Possibility of Suicide in Body Shaming Victims. From the above d iagram, it can b e deduced that most of the youth agreed ...

  18. Essays on Public Shaming

    Body Shaming Essay Topics and Outline Examples Essay Title 1: Body Shaming in the Age of Social Media: Impact and Solutions. Thesis Statement: The prevalence of body shaming on social media platforms negatively affects individuals' mental health and self-esteem, and this essay explores the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to combat online body shaming.

  19. Body Shaming

    Body Shaming Thesis Statement: Body shaming, is one of the causes of cyberbullying. Body shaming as defined in Merriam-Webster, that it is the act or practice of subjecting someone to criticism or mockery for supposed bodily faults or imperfections.

  20. Marjorie Taylor Greene Loses It After Viral Diss Trademark

    Leaning into white fragility, Greene appeared on Fox News to decry body shaming against herself while doubling down on body shaming others, griping to the outlet notorious for cookie-cutter bleach ...