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The 6 types of presentation (and why you need them)

Hrideep barot.

  • Presentation , Public Speaking

kinds of presentation information

We all have been exposed to different types of presentations right from school years.

Group presentations, lectures by teachers and professors, seminars, webinars or online presentations, e-learning, e-conferences, etc., are all different types of presentations that we come across in our daily lives.

But each of them work for different settings.

In this article, we will take a look at 6 such types of presentations and when and why you need them.

1. Informative Presentations

This is the most common type of presentation, be it in an educational setting or business or corporate setting.

The aim of an informative presentation is to give detailed information about a product, concept, or idea to a specific kind of audience.

They are often analytical or require a rational analysis of the data presented.

Training sessions or one-day workshops are good examples where this kind of presentation is used.

Here is an example of an informative presentation on public speaking and presentations.

Now, there are different situations where you can use informative presentations.

a) Reporting

Learn from observing the reporters!

Although a report is a written explanation of an event, it can also be verbal.

A perfect place to use informative presentations is news reporting , as it requires the presenter to present information systematically.

b) Briefing

kinds of presentation information

This involves explaining both positive and negative aspects of a particular topic in a few words.

It is providing information quickly and effectively about an issue to influence decisions or to come to solutions.

Hence, the decision-making bodies of an organization can make use of this kind of presentation to save time and effectively come to conclusions.

c) Research

Informative presentations are often used to present research findings to a specific audience , as it involves reporting the findings and briefing it to the audience.

Hence, almost everywhere where research takes place, be it in an educational context or occupational , can make use of this kind of presentation.

Tips for giving informative presentations

  • As there would be a lot of technical information and statistics, focus on the main points or agenda first and if you have more time, you can add them at the end
  • Keep your presentation simple and clear . Avoid complex sentence structures and graphics
  • Tell the outline of your presentation briefly in the introduction for a better flow
  • Make sure that your presentation does not stretch for too long. 10-15 minutes is what your audience can concentrate on
  • Restate your keyphrase at the end and briefly summarize all the important points of your presentation

Speech topics for an informative presentation

  • Cropping techniques
  • Organic Farming
  • Corporate Farming
  • Hydroponics
  • Sustainable Agriculture, etc
  • Climate change
  • Environmental issues
  • Eco-friendly ways of management
  • Eco-politics
  • Eco-feminism, etc
  • Gender studies
  • Gender and education
  • Religious studies
  • History of education
  • Philosophy of education, etc
  • Ethnic cultures
  • Indigenous cultures
  • Multiculturalism
  • Popular culture
  • Cultural trends, etc
  • Business administration
  • Business ethics
  • Business models
  • Promotion and marketing communications
  • Finance, etc

2. Persuasive presentations

Persuasion is the art of motivating or convincing someone to act or make a change in their actions or thoughts.

If you are planning to give a persuasive presentation, and are looking for how to give a persuasive speech, check out our article on A Comprehensive Guide to Writing a Persuasive Speech to gain in-depth knowledge about the art of giving persuasive presentations.

Persuasive presentations are also widely used form after informative presentations.

There are various circumstances where persuasive presentations can be used.

a) Policy-making

Avoid taking too much time when you want to persuade any decision!

Government bodies make use of persuasion almost every time, be it the legislative or decision-making bodies, executive bodies, or even courts.

Even election campaigns involve using persuasive presentations as an instrument of their pre-determined goals of swaying the citizens.

For that matter, any executive or management body of an organization can make use of these kinds of presentations.

b) Value judgment

Give personal examples if you want to persuade someone's viewpoints!

This kind involves answering the question “why” and supplementing it with possible benefits.

Most Ted talks and YouTube videos try to persuade the audience and fall into the persuasive presentation category.

Even religious heads use this as a means of persuading their believers to follow their belief system.

Deciding on a procedure or telling an audience the correct procedure of doing something is another situation.

An example of a persuasive presentation

Bailey parnell: is social media hurting your mental health.

This TED talk by Bailey Parnell is a good example of a persuasive presentation.

She starts strong by asking rhetorical questions that set the mood for her further points.

We can also see how the speaker is genuinely concerned regarding the issue, engaging the audience till the end.

Tips for giving a persuasive presentation

  • Start your presentation with a relevant quote or statistics about your topic to establish credibility
  • Tell personal anecdotes and examples wherever necessary to develop an emotional connection with your audience
  • Deliver your presentation with passion and genuine interest to motivate your audience to think
  • Answer the question “why” for better understanding and clarity in your presentation
  • State your viewpoint clearly and clarify doubts if your audience seems to have any

Speech topics for persuasive presentations

  • Is animal testing ethical?
  • Should cosmetic surgery be banned?
  • Can the death penalty be the only solution to the rising crime rates?
  • Should the legal age be 18?
  • Should immigration laws be revised?
  • Why you should never add your parents on Facebook
  • Guys are more interested in gossip than girls
  • It is your major duty to annoy your parents
  • You are not enjoying student life if you are not procrastinating
  • Endless memes can be made on my life, etc
  • Is taming wild and exotic animals ethical?
  • The importance of emotional support animals
  • Why are bunnies the perfect pet?
  • Why do animals make the best companions?
  • Why there is a need for patients to have emotional support animals, etc
  • How and why there is a need to do business analysis before opening your business?
  • Why small businesses are successful and more profitable?
  • Why do sales and customer service departments need to be paid more?
  • Why does the HR department need to be polite and understanding?
  • Why should you not do business with a family member?
  • How charity is a means of converting black money to white?
  • Why is detaining people on the suspicion of terrorism justified?
  • Should euthanasia be made legal?
  • Should violent crime offenders be sentenced to death?
  • Should foreigners be allowed to buy a property?

3. Demonstrative presentations

This involves demonstrating a process or the functioning of a product in a step-by-step fashion.

So, a master class on communication skills or making a product model is an example of a demonstrative presentation.

Usually, the audience is an active part of such presentations and these can work in any context where you want the audience to learn a new skill.

a) Instructions

Take it slow when instructing!

This involves giving guidelines or steps of a process or work .

Teaching how to make a car model step-by-step is a good example where you can use this kind of informative presentation to guide your audience.

Another instance can be at the workplace , to train the employees or introduce them to a new product at work.

This type also works with demonstrating recipes and cooking workshops.

An example of demonstrative presentation

The easy guide on making just about any smoothie.

In this recipe demonstration, he tells his audience how many ingredients are involved and briefs them about the outline of his presentation at the start of his speech.

He also shows all steps in real-time so that the audience have a better understanding of the process and keeps them engaged.

Tips to give a demonstrative presentation

  • Introduce your product and its function to your audience before telling them how to go about with the steps
  • Explain the steps with diagrams or show them in real-time along with the audience
  • Give equal time to every person in the audience for clearing doubts, if any
  • Keep your introduction short. Not more than 5 minutes
  • Discuss options or variations that the audience can try at the end of the presentation

Speech topics for demonstrative presentations

  • How to administer CPR
  • How to wrap a gift professionally
  • How to budget your monthly income
  • How to choose a car insurance
  • How to restore a piece of antique furniture

4. Inspirational presentations

As the name suggests, this type of presentation involves inspiring others!

The main aim of an inspirational presentation is to motivate or move your audience and is also known as a motivational presentation.

Using techniques like storytelling, narrating personal anecdotes , or even humor work wonders as your audience develops an emotional connection to the message.

This TED talk by Luvvie Ajayi Jones is humorous but a lot more inspirational. Check it out!

Tips for giving an inspirational presentation

  • Start with a question that will leave the audience thinking. Pause for some time and then begin with your presentation
  • Develop a sense of connection by narrating personal incidents and experiences to grow empathy
  • Have some main points that you want to emphasize on
  • Make use of humor ! It instantly builds a connection with the listener
  • Non-verbal elements like paralanguage, body language, speech modulations, tone, etc., makes a huge difference

Speech topics for an inspirational presentation

  • Importance of diversity and inclusion
  • Building mental resilience
  • Need for change management
  • Valuing small victories in life
  • How procrastinating is your enemy

5. Business presentations

In the corporate world, presentations are the go-to solution to do anything: planning or strategizing, articulating company goals, screening candidates, status reports , and many more.

Let us take a dive into the different types of business presentations.

a) Sales presentation

Make sure to practice before giving a sales presentation!

Also known as sales pitches , sales presentations involve providing information about a product or a service to sell it.

It has a pre-defined strategy of initiating and closing the sales deal.

This can be done in person or nowadays, on the phone, or via e-communication .

b) Training sessions

Make training sessions interesting by interacting with the audience!

Often employees have on-the-job training sessions that are aimed to increase the knowledge and skills of the employees.

This kind can also involve the audience to participate , like in demonstrative presentations.

c) Meetings

Take everyone's opinion before concluding a point!

Meetings can be called for for different reasons and can be of different forms as well.

Conferences ( both video and in-person), board meetings, informal team meetings, daily reporting, etc., are all various contexts of meeting in a business setting.

d) E- presentations

E- presentations existed before the COVID pandemic as well but were used seldom.

But, with the ongoing pandemic, e-presentations or remote presentations have replaced all other types of presentations and will be with us for a while longer.

However, on the brighter side, it is an eco-friendly alternative to normal face-to-face kind of a set-up, and it also saves transportation and other costs !

e) Seminars

Give ample time of breaks in a seminar to make it less tiring!

Seminars are widely used in the health sector , usually involving a panel of speakers on a topic. The audience is anywhere between 10 to 100.

It ends with a question and answers session , and the audience gets to take handouts with them.

f) One-on-one or 1:1

Pay attention to your body language, especially in an interview!

Interviews are usually one-on-one and involve presenting your achievements and capabilities to your prospective employer.

Apart from interviews, 1:1 meetings are also used in sales and marketing to crack a business deal.

Tips for giving business presentations

  • Include key phrases and other important details on your slides and make them bold
  • Avoid casual slangs and informal tone of speech
  • If you are giving a sales presentation, explain your product or service in simple and clear words , and list the reasons why it is beneficial for your potential clients
  • Make sure to be on time ! Delaying your audience will work against you and leave a bad impression on you and your company
  • Know your material or content thoroughly to answer the questions asked by your audience

Speech topics for business presentations

  • Implementing an Agile Project
  • Introduction to data modeling
  • Introduction to UML(Unified Modeling Language)
  • Social Media strategies for a successful business
  • Business writing for managers

6. Powerpoint presentations

PowerPoint presentations or PPTs are the most effective ones among all types of presentations simply because they are convenient and easy to understand .

They are available in different formats and are suitable to use in practically any type of presentation and context, be it business, educational, or for informal purposes.

There are various types of PowerPoint presentations that you can use depending on the context.

a) PPTs for general audience

Use inclusive language when addressing to a general audience.

  • For general audiences, avoid using jargon terms

If you feel that you need to use them, provide the audience some background information about the field or topic being covered

  • Avoid using more than 8 words per line, as anything more than that becomes difficult to remember
  • Use bullets or a numbered list for better retention
  • Try not to read from your PPT
  • Give handouts or record your presentation in case anyone wants it

b) PPTs for teaching

Include pictures when teaching through a ppt.

  • In this case, the PowerPoint is content-based
  • Make sure that the words on the slides are visible
  • Use bigger font and avoid fancy fonts
  • Add relevant pictures and graphics to keep your audience engaged
  • You can also add documentaries or relevant videos to aid in understanding

c) Repurpose PPTs

  • This involves reinventing an earlier ppt or combining 1 or more than 1 PowerPoints
  • Giving new touches to an earlier PPT or changing the format
  • You can take any slide of your PPT and upload it on social media for growing your brand or business
  • You can even convert your PPT into mp4 , i.e, video format
  • You can even add voice and save the mp4 format, and you have a good marketing plan!

d) PechaKucha

Chat for only 6 minutes and 40 seconds!

  • This type of PowerPoint presentation comes from the Japanese word PechaKucha meaning sound of a conversation or chit-chat
  • This involves changing slides every 20 seconds
  • There can be a maximum of 20 slides , which means your presentation lasts for only 6 minutes and 40 seconds
  • The PPT mostly has graphics and fewer words
  • This type of presentation is best suited for telling a story or a personal anecdote

e) Multimedia presentations

Make full use of the multimedia ppt!

  • This is the best kind of PPT to engage your audience
  • It contains texts along with pictures, videos, infographics, music, illustrations, GIFs , and many more
  • Add higher resolution images and videos , or even a 360-degree snapshot if you are in the sales and marketing industry
  • Adding infographics such as charts and graphs makes the process of understanding easier and saves time
  • Music in a PPT helps your audience to be relaxed, at the same time making them alert and engaged

Types of slides in a presentation

PowerPoint presentation slides are broadly classified into 3 categories: Text, Visual, and Mixed slides.

1. Text slides

As the name suggests, this category of slides involve words or texts.

You can format the text as plain sentences or pointers.

You may even arrange them all in a single slide or one line per slide.

The slide seen below is an example where every point is mentioned in a single slide.

Archived Material (Presentations): Not too much text

2. Visual slides

This type of slide has visual elements such as images or videos , and are better known as conceptual slides since they are a better option than text slide to explain a particular concept.

You can use them at the start of the presentation to better visualize and grasp the meaning of the presentation.

The slide right below is a good example of a visual slide.

Illustration 1 exercise: Visual Metaphor | David Howcroft's OCA Art Journey

3. Mixed slides

Mixed slides combine the texts and visuals to give a comprehensive understanding of any concept or a speech.

Graphs and charts are the best examples of mixed slides.

Mixed slides have an advantage over the other slides; they keep your audience engaged, listening and participating more actively!

Presentation Design: A Visual Guide to Creating Beautiful Slides [Free  E-Book]

Types of Oral presentations

So far we came across 6 types of presentations, and they all share one common feature. They are all one of the types of oral presentations.

Oral presentations involve the use of verbal and non-verbal elements to deliver a speech to a particular or general audience.

All the types we discussed fall into these 4 broad categories:

1. Extemporaneous presentations

This type of presentation involves making short pointers or key phrases to aid while speaking.

You do not memorize, but organize the points and structure the speech way in advance.

Hence, on the day of your presentation, by just looking at the key points , you expand on them and move to the next point.

2. Impromptu presentations

Impromptu presentations are spoken without any preparation . It can be nerve-wracking for many, and hence not many are in favor of it.

There is a valid reason for their fear, as you have to make your speech as you say it!

However, those who are experts in their fields and are called upon to share a few words can easily give this type of presentation.

3. Manuscript presentations

The other extreme of the spectrum is manuscript presentations.

Here you have a script and you speak from it, word by word.

News anchors and show announcers usually engage in this type, since there are a lot of specific details that cannot be said wrong, and also, time constraints.

Usually, a prompter is used, from which the speaker speaks to their audience.

Nowadays, there are teleprompters , that are heavily used in the entertainment and media industry.

It is a digital screen that displays the contents, and the speaker speaks from it.

4. Memorized presentations

This type does not have any notes or cues , but you memorize or rote learn the whole speech.

School and some presentations at the workplace involve using this kind of presentation.

In most cases, we recommend not to memorise your speech in most cases. We’ve made a video on the same and how it could lead to you potentially blanking out on stage. Highly recommend you view this quick vid before choosing memorisation as a presentation path:

But, if you do choose it for whatever reason, since you are free from notes, you are free to focus on other aspects, such as body language and gestures.

Types of presentation styles

There are various presenting styles, but they do not work for all types of presentations.

Let us get familiar with them, and know which style works with which type.

a) The storyteller

There's a reason why we all love to hear stories!

This style of presentation involves the speaker narrating stories and engaging the audience emotionally .

This technique works best with persuasive and inspirational types of presentation.

So, how to tell a story in a presentation?

  • Understand and know your audience : Knowing your audience will help you with how you will frame your story, at the same time gauging the relevance of your narrative
  • Know your message : Be clear with what you want to convey through your story or how you are connecting the story with your actual presentation
  • Try narrative a real-life story : Inspiring presenters often take their own stories or the stories of people whom they know as a supplement to their presentation. When the audience listens to your real-life examples, they become genuinely interested in your story
  • Add visual aids : Using visual aids such as pictures, videos, multimedia, etc., increases the memory retention and engagement of your audience
  • Use the “you” attitude : Tell the story keeping your audience in mind because ultimately they are going to be the receivers and hence, the story should be relevant and should include their point of view as well

Want more storytelling tactics? Mystery, characterisation and the final takeaway are some more key elements of a good story for your next presentation. We’ve gone deeper into this topic in this video if you would like to know more:

b) The Visual style

Make use of the visual aids to keep your audience engaged.

Most of us are visual learners, making visual information easy to understand and retain.

Visual aids like graphics, images, diagrams, key pointers or phrases , etc., are very useful when giving any type of presentation.

Some tips of presenting with visual style:

  • Include only important pointers in your PowerPoint presentation and highlight or bold them
  • Try including visuals that complement what you are saying and use them as a supplementary tool to aid in understanding your audience
  • If you are giving a business presentation and want to include visuals, instead of plain texts, include graphics and charts to make information simpler to present and understand
  • Avoid overly complex visuals as it will confuse the audience more
  • Avoid using more than 6 lines per slide

c) Analytic style

Provide examples to support your data findings!

If you have data records or statistical information to be presented, an analytic style will be more helpful.

It works best for Informative and Business types of presentations.

Tips to deliver in analytic style:

  • Give handouts so that the audience is on track with your presentation and the information will be easier to comprehend
  • Focus and speak on selected data as too much data statistics can be overwhelming for the audience
  • You can make use of humor and personal anecdotes to keep the presentation interesting and engaging
  • If you have too much data and are worried that you will not be able to explain it in the time frame given, avoid writing content of more than 2000 words

Quick tip: In case you have a PDF to present and want to edit the data points, there are multiple software programs that you can use to allow you to easily do this. Check out this list of the Best Free Recording Software Programs to know more.

d) The Connector

Make an impactful presentation by simply connecting with your audience!

The connector style of presentation involves the speaker establishing a connection with the audience by pointing out similarities between them and the listeners.

This style works well with Sales and marketing presentations.

How to give a presentation using connector style?

  • Have a Q & A round with the audience at the end of your presentation for clarifying any doubts and avoiding miscommunication
  • Use audience polls at the start of your presentation to know your audience and tailor your speech accordingly
  • Make use of body language and gestures for delivering your presentation effectively. If you are confused or want to know more about the aspects of how to use body and gestures, check out our article on To walk or stand still: How should you present when on stage?
  • Ask questions to your audience at regular intervals for a better audience engagement
  • Make use of multimedia sources to keep your audience engaged and entertained

Which type of presentation is best?

Although all the presentation types have their own bonuses and are suitable for certain circumstances, some are universal and can be used with a little bit of modification almost everywhere!

These are persuasive presentations!

You can use them in various settings; from political, business to educational.

Just remember to choose the right topic for the right audience, and a style that you think is the most suitable and you are good to go!

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To conclude

We saw 6 types of presentation and understood it in detail.

We also gained some tips on how to make our presentation more engaging and also came across things to avoid as well.

We then explored the types of slides that you can use, and also the types of presenting orally.

We also gave you some tips and a few topic ideas that you can incorporate in your next speech!

Hrideep Barot

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Different types of presentations

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Meghan Ryan July 29, 2022

Before you start building a presentation, you need a good structure. Ask yourself the purpose of your presentation – why are you getting in front of your audience? Are you trying to convince them to care about an issue and take action? Who are you speaking to – colleagues, customers, or investors? Asking yourself these questions will help you start to determine the type of presentation and structure it accordingly. Read on to discover different types of presentations and how to structure them.

Persuasive presentations

What is a persuasive presentation.

A persuasive presentation is one that tries to convince the audience to accept a certain position and to take action. It uses facts, logic, and emotion to help the audience understand the impact of a certain situation and see it from a different perspective.

How to make a persuasive presentation

  • Start your presentation off strong and make the first 30 seconds of your presentation count. This presentation type needs a good hook that draws the audience in and starts getting them invested in the topic.
  • Introduce the problem that needs to be solved and compare it with your solution.
  • Build a narrative around your solution. Use evidence, back up your ideas with statistics and findings, and use emotion to pull your audience through the narrative. You should be building to a strong conclusion at this point.
  • End with a summary of your points and relate them back to the actions that your audience takes.

This type of presentation requires confidence. Show that you feel passionate about your topic and believe in your solution to your audience. They need to feel trust in you to follow your ideas. Rehearse your presentation, but not to the point that you have every single line memorized. You want to sound authentic, not as though you’re rattling off facts and figures.

Persuasive presentation examples

Some of the most common types of persuasive presentations are product or business pitches, but there are so many more out there. Seeing how someone persuades their audience might give you some inspiration, so here we’ve compiled a few of our favorite examples of this type of presentation.

Watch this product pitch by Thriftplan, a workspace-saving solution helping companies retain their talent and employees manage their long-term savings.

This presentation on deforestation shows the effects that deforestation has had on the planet and introduces ways to become a “tree hugger” and combat it:

Learn more about what goes into an effective persuasive speech by reading our article on the topic.

Informative presentations

What is an informative presentation.

An informative presentation is a type of presentation that is just there to provide information. Unlike a persuasive presentation, you’re not necessarily delivering it to get your audience to take action or change their minds. This type of presentation is often analytical. It may just “report the facts,” but you might also want to include some analysis of the information.

How to make an informative presentation

  • This type of presentation needs to be about a specific topic, so research your topic thoroughly. Whether that means gathering data from your team or colleagues, or going to the library or interviewing experts, you’ll want to take every step you can in order to seem like an expert in front of your audience.
  • Consider your crowd and write this presentation type for them. If your audience knows a lot about your topic, you can skip some of the background information, like when you deliver a report to your team. A teacher will want to go into much more detail if they’re preparing a lesson plan, though.
  • Write a thesis statement and organize the presentation around that. This will help you structure all the data and information that you’re discussing, rather than just doing a data dump.
  • End on a call to action. This type of presentation is of course different from a persuasive presentation, but it’s good practice to give your audience something to do with the information you just presented.

Informative presentation examples

You have likely come across this type of presentation often throughout your workday. Here’s one by Devin Banerjee describing parental leave policies in the financial sector.

Motivational presentations

What is a motivational presentation.

Motivational speaking might be one of the most enviable types of presentations for people. Motivational presentations can turn a mere story into an inspiring tale. Very similar to a persuasive presentation, a good motivational presentation will convince you to do something, rather than just waiting for it to happen. It has a clear purpose, often pulling from a personal story written for a specific audience, and inspires the audience to make a change in their lives.

How to make a motivational presentation

  • Know your purpose. This is important for any type of presentation, but none more so than for this presentation type. You need to know the purpose of your presentation and build upon a singular message.
  • Understand your audience and write your content for them.
  • Start your presentation with a strong hook, like a question, a personal story, or a compelling statistic.
  • Include a personal narrative or a story that your audience can closely relate to. This helps them understand the core message of your presentation and feel more compelled to take action at the end.
  • Conclude your presentation with a call to action. Your audience is motivated to make a change, so they need an outlet to do so.

Motivational presentation examples

There are so many motivational presentations out there, and many of them live here on Prezi. Look at this presentation on climate change, which compels you to take action and combat climate change on your own.

Instructive presentations

What is an instructive presentation.

An instructive presentation provides specific directions to accomplish a task. It might be a little longer than most types of presentations because you’ll need to discuss it step by step. In the end, your audience should walk away from this type of presentation more informed and with a new skill.

How to make an instructive presentation

  • Determine exactly what you want your audience to learn at the end of your presentation. This type of presentation goes beyond just sharing facts. People want to learn how to do something, so make sure you have a clear idea of what that is.
  • Map out the steps. Be clear about all ideas and information that is packed into your presentation.
  • Have an understanding of your audience’s level of knowledge. Are they an informed audience or fresh to the topic you’re presenting? This type of presentation will be different depending on the audience you’re with.
  • Use visuals and examples throughout your presentation so people new to the topic can more easily follow along.

Instructive presentation examples

Teacher Nucleo Vega teaches how to play and understand eighth-note subdivisions in his instructional video:

For even more examples of instructional presentations, read our article on the best instructional videos on Prezi.

Training presentation

What is a training presentation .

A training presentation is like a lesson that uses pictures and talking to teach something. People use it to help others learn about a specific topic or how to follow a certain process. It’s like a teacher’s tool to share information, show examples, and make sure everyone understands. You might see these types of presentations in school, at work, or in workshops to help people get better at something or understand new subjects. 

How to make a training presentation

  • Start by clarifying the main goal of your presentation. Are you teaching a new skill, explaining a process, or sharing important information? Understanding your purpose will help you structure your content effectively.
  • Consider who your audience is and what they already know about the topic. Tailor your presentation to their knowledge level, interests, and needs. This will make your training more relevant and engaging.
  • Structure your presentation logically with a clear beginning, middle, and end. Use headings, subheadings, or an outline to create a coherent flow of information. Make sure your key points are easy to follow.
  • Use visuals like images, charts, and diagrams to complement your text. Visuals help explain concepts and make your presentation more visually appealing. However, keep visuals simple and uncluttered to avoid overwhelming your audience.

Discover more insights and tips on online training and Prezi’s impact.

Training presentation examples

This Prezi on effective onboarding for PMs is a great example of a training presentation. It goes into detail about onboarding methods. This would be useful training material for product managers or their supervisors looking to provide instructional advice when taking on a new role. 

Status update presentation

What is a status update presentation .

A status update presentation typically includes information about what has been done, what is currently being worked on, and any challenges or issues that need attention. It’s a way for a team or organization to communicate openly about the state of their projects and ensure everyone is on the same page. These types of presentations are often given in meetings to keep stakeholders informed and make decisions based on the project’s progress.

How to make a status update presentation

  • Clearly communicate the specific timeframe covered in your status update, whether it’s a weekly, monthly, or project milestone report. This ensures your audience understands the context and timeline of the information presented.
  • Identify and focus on the most relevant Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for your project, such as completion rates, milestone achievements, or budget status. These metrics should succinctly convey the essential aspects of your project’s progress.
  • Employ charts, graphs, or visuals to illustrate progress effectively. Visual representations, like Gantt charts depicting project timelines and task dependencies, aid in conveying complex information clearly and concisely.
  • Proactively address potential risks or challenges that may impact the project’s timeline or goals. Clearly communicate any issues and provide mitigation strategies to demonstrate transparency and preparedness in managing project uncertainties.
  • Clearly outline the next steps for the project and assign responsibilities. Summarize key action items, including upcoming milestones, tasks, and deadlines, to make it easy for your audience to understand what requires attention or action in the upcoming period.

Example of a status update presentation

The structure of this Prezi provides a comprehensive year plan. It includes dynamic segments that offer a creative outlet for setting goals. The presentation covers setting goals, tracking progress, and getting started with your plans, which also makes a great base structure for a well-rounded status update presentation.

Pitch presentation

What’s a pitch presentation .

A pitch presentation is like a quick talk where someone explains their business idea, product, or service to persuade others to get on board. It shows why the idea is good, who it helps, and how it can succeed. People often use these types of presentations when they want support, financial investments, or to team up with others. They share key details about the problem their idea solves, who it’s for, and why it’s a great opportunity. The goal is to grab the audience’s interest and convince them it’s worth backing or investing in. You often see these types of presentations in startups or when someone is trying to get support for a new project.

How to make a pitch presentation

  • Start with a strong intro to grab attention. Clearly state the problem your idea solves, keeping it brief and impactful.
  • Explain the problem your idea tackles and introduce your solution. Keep it straightforward, emphasizing how your idea provides a solution.
  • Present info about the market opportunity, including target audience, market size, and relevant trends. Use data to show that there’s a real need for your solution.
  • Highlight your idea’s Unique Selling Proposition (USP). Clearly state the benefits your solution offers, focusing on what makes it stand out.
  • End with a clear call to action. Summarize key points and provide a way for your audience to follow up or get involved.

Remember, keep it simple, engaging, and tailored to your audience’s interests and needs. Discover more tips on how to create a successful pitch presentation and investor pitch deck .

Pitch presentation examples

The Elevator Pitch Prezi is a good example of a pitch presentation. The presentation starts by stating the problem and then providing a solution, ending with a call to action – which is great for persuading potential investors. Discover more good sales pitch examples in this article.

Crisis communication presentation 

What’s a crisis communication presentation .

A crisis communication presentation is like a talk that happens when there’s a serious issue or emergency. It’s a way to share important information and updates with people who need to know—like employees, stakeholders, or the public. In these types of presentations, you’d cover what the crisis is, what steps are being taken to deal with it, and what the next moves are. It’s about keeping everyone informed and on the same page during challenging times. The goal is to be transparent, provide clarity on the situation, and let people know what’s being done to handle the crisis. It’s a crucial tool in managing and addressing unexpected and difficult situations.

How to create a crisis communication presentation

  • Identify the nature of the crisis and tailor your message to the concerns of your specific audience.
  • Your presentation should address what happened, its impact, ongoing resolution efforts, and preventive measures for the future. Keep the language simple and direct.
  • Demonstrate understanding and empathy for those affected. Maintain transparency about the situation, including uncertainties, and commit to providing updates.
  • Anticipate and prepare for potential questions, including difficult ones, to maintain control of the message.
  • Support your message with helpful visuals like charts or timelines. Practice delivering your presentation confidently, with attention to non-verbal cues like body language.

By combining these elements, you can create a sense of trust with your audience and convince them you’re handling the situation effectively. Remember, honesty is key when it comes to these types of presentations. 

Prezi for all types of presentations

Prezi is a presentation platform that stands out for its dynamic features, making it ideal for various presentations. Its unique zooming user interface allows presenters to create visually engaging presentations, moving easily between ideas and topics.

The versatility of Prezi enables presenters to convey various moods and emotions effectively. Whether you’re delivering a corporate report, an educational lesson, or a personal story, Prezi’s array of templates and design options can be tailored to fit lots of different types of presentations. This flexibility means that your presentation aligns perfectly with your content, from serious and formal to playful and informal.

Moreover, different types of presentations require different presentation styles. Learn about presentation styles and explore what suits best for you and your presentation type by watching the following video.

Prezi Video

Prezi Video adds another layer of engagement by allowing you to present live alongside your content virtually. This feature is particularly useful in today’s hybrid work environments, as it fosters a more personal connection with your audience. With Prezi Video, you can interact with your visuals in real-time, creating a more immersive experience across all types of presentations. This blend of visual storytelling and live presentation helps to keep the audience engaged and improves the overall impact of your message.

Prezi Video

Prezi’s AI text editing tool

Creating Prezi presentations just got even easier! With Prezi’s AI text editing tool , you can easily create all types of presentations in less time. This feature helps you shorten, expand, highlight, and summarize content to help you communicate your ideas better. It simplifies the process by offering relevant suggestions, making it easier to create cohesive presentations. 

Prezi with all its accessible features makes it easy to create content for any industry, from different types of business presentations to classroom and learning environments, Prezi’s versatility makes it a great platform for all. 

Final thoughts on different types of presentations

There are a lot of types of presentations out there, but they’re only effective if you understand the structure of each and utilize the structure to your advantage. Find more examples of presentations in our presentation gallery , or check out Prezi to start creating your own presentation today.

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13.2 Types of Presentations to Inform

Learning objective.

  • Provide examples of four main types of speech to inform.

Speaking to inform may fall into one of several categories. The presentation to inform may be

  • an explanation,
  • a description, or
  • a demonstration of how to do something.

Let’s explore each of these types of informative speech.

Explanation

Have you ever listened to a lecture or speech where you just didn’t get it? It wasn’t that you weren’t interested, at least not at first. Perhaps the professor used language and jargon, or gave a confusing example, or omitted something that would have linked facts or concepts together. Soon you probably lost interest and sat there, attending the speech or lecture in body but certainly not in mind. An effective speech to inform will take a complex topic or issue and explain it to the audience in ways that increase audience understanding. Perhaps the speech where you felt lost lacked definitions upfront, or a clear foundation in the introduction. You certainly didn’t learn much, and that’s exactly what you want to avoid when you address your audience. Consider how you felt and then find ways to explain your topic—visually, using definitions and examples, providing a case study—that can lay a foundation on common ground with your audience and build on it.

No one likes to feel left out. As the speaker, it’s your responsibility to ensure that this doesn’t happen. Also know that to teach someone something new—perhaps a skill that they did not posses or a perspective that allows them to see new connections—is a real gift, both to you and the audience members. You will feel rewarded because you made a difference and they will perceive the gain in their own understanding.

As a business communicator, you may be called upon to give an informative report where you communicate status, trends, or relationships that pertain to a specific topic. You might have only a few moments to speak, and you may have to prepare within a tight time frame. Your listeners may want “just the highlights,” only to ask pointed questions that require significant depth and preparation on your part. The informative report is a speech where you organize your information around key events, discoveries, or technical data and provide context and illustration for your audience. They may naturally wonder, “Why are sales up (or down)?” or “What is the product leader in your lineup?” and you need to anticipate their perspective and present the key information that relates to your topic. If everyone in the room knows the product line, you may not need much information about your best seller, but instead place emphasis on marketing research that seems to indicate why it is the best seller.

Perhaps you are asked to be the scout and examine a new market, developing strategies to penetrate it. You’ll need to orient your audience and provide key information about the market and demonstrate leadership as you articulate your strategies. You have a perspective gained by time and research, and your audience wants to know why you see things the way you do, as well as learn what you learned. A status report may be short or long, and may be an update that requires little background, but always consider the audience and what common ground you are building your speech on.

Description

Have you ever listened to a friend tell you about their recent trip somewhere and found the details fascinating, making you want to travel there or visit a similar place? Or perhaps you listened to your chemistry teacher describe a chemical reaction you were going to perform in class and you understood the process and could reasonably anticipate the outcome. Describing information requires emphasis on language that is vivid, captures attention, and excites the imagination. Your audience will be drawn to your effective use of color, descriptive language, and visual aids. An informative speech that focuses description will be visual in many ways. You may choose to illustrate with images, video and audio clips, and maps. Your first-person experience combined with your content will allow the audience to come to know a topic, area, or place through you, or secondhand. Their imagination is your ally, and you should aim to stimulate it with attention-getting devices and clear visual aids. Use your imagination to place yourself in their perspective: how would you like to have someone describe the topic to you?

Demonstration

You want to teach the audience how to throw a fast pitch in softball or a curveball in baseball. You want to demonstrate how to make salsa or how to program the applications on a smartphone. Each of these topics will call on your kindergarten experience of “show and tell.” A demonstrative speech focuses on clearly showing a process and telling the audience important details about each step so that they can imitate, repeat, or do the action themselves. If the topic is complicated, think of ways to simplify each step.

Consider the visual aids or supplies you will need. You may have noticed that cooking shows on television rarely show the chef chopping and measuring ingredients during the demonstration. Instead, the ingredients are chopped and measured ahead of time and the chef simply adds each item to the dish with a brief comment like, “Now we’ll stir in half a cup of chicken stock.” If you want to present a demonstration speech on the ways to make a paper airplane, one that will turn left or right, go up, down or in loops, consider how best to present your topic. Perhaps by illustrating the process of making one airplane followed by example on how to make adjustments to the plane to allow for different flight patterns would be effective. Would you need additional paper airplanes made in advance of your speech? Would an example of the paper airplane in each of the key stages of production be helpful to have ready before the speech? Having all your preparation done ahead of time can make a world of difference, and your audience will appreciate your thoughtful approach.

By considering each step and focusing on how to simplify it, you can understand how the audience might grasp the new information and how you can best help them. Also, consider the desired outcome; for example, will your listeners be able to actually do the task themselves or will they gain an appreciation of the complexities of a difficult skill like piloting an airplane to a safe landing? Regardless of the sequence or pattern you will illustrate or demonstrate, consider how people from your anticipated audience will respond, and budget additional time for repetition and clarification.

Informative presentations come in all sizes, shapes, and forms. You may need to create an “elevator speech” style presentation with the emphasis on brevity, or produce a comprehensive summary of several points that require multiple visual aids to communicate complex processes or trends. The main goal in an informative presentation is to inform, not to persuade, and that requires an emphasis on credibility, for the speaker and the data or information presented. Extra attention to sources is required and you’ll need to indicate what reports, texts, or Web sites were sources for your analysis and conclusions.

Here are additional, more specific types of informative presentations:

  • Biographical information
  • Case study results
  • Comparative advantage results
  • Cost-benefit analysis results
  • Feasibility studies
  • Field study results
  • Financial trends analysis
  • Health, safety, and accident rates
  • Instruction guidelines
  • Laboratory results
  • Product or service orientations
  • Progress reports
  • Research results
  • Technical specifications

Depending on the rhetorical situation, the audience, and the specific information to be presented, any of these types of presentation may be given as an explanation, a report, a description, or a demonstration.

Key Takeaway

An informative speech may explain, report, describe, or demonstrate how to do something.

  • Watch a “how-to” television show, such as one about cooking, home improvement, dog training, or crime solving. What informative techniques and visual aids are used in the show to help viewers learn the skills that are being demonstrated?
  • Prepare a simple “how-to” presentation for the class. Present and compare your results.
  • Compare and contrast two television programs, noting how each communicates the meaning via visual communication rather than words or dialogue. Share and compare with classmates.

Business Communication for Success Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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8 Types of Presentations and Examples of When You Can Use Them

8 Types of Presentations and Examples of When You Can Use Them

Presentations help you communicate ideas in a simple way that sticks with your target audience. here’s what you need to know to have success with all types of presentations..

For your presentation to be effective, you need to choose the right format and recognize the nuances of each one. Here’s a look at eight types of presentations you can use to share your knowledge.

8 Types of Presentations

Successful businesswoman on stage giving a presentation

1. Providing Information

The primary purpose of any type of presentation is to provide information to an audience. The difference between this method and others is that there are many elements you have to consider in order to be effective. That includes slide design , talking points, and usually, a time limit.

2. Teaching

When you’re educating, use several examples to illustrate your points. If your audience doesn’t understand something you’re talking about, give them specific examples so they can see for themselves what you mean.

Repetition is key when you teach a new concept. It’s important to include a variety examples throughout your slide deck to reinforce your information. This helps combat your audience getting bored or tired from hearing the same thing over and over again.

3. Reporting

You can use presentations when reporting by showing research findings and conclusions. The most important thing to remember is that you need to design your slides to highlight your most critical data. That way, your audience will walk away understanding its high points.

It’s important to know your audience before you jump into your presentation and start selling. Research must be the first step of the process, so you can design a presentation that speaks to your people.

Also, be sure to not overwhelm yourself or others by packing too much information into one slide.

5. Problem-Solving

While it’s a less common use case, you can also use presentations to sort out problems. This is especially useful when you’re working with a team. It acts as a simple way to get everyone on the same page before making a decision.

6. Decision Making

Once you come to an agreement that something is an issue and discover some ways to solve it, there are still choices you need to make. You can use presentations to explore and explain different options before you finalize your next step forward.

7. Entertaining

Creating a presentation with entertainment in mind is a nice way to break up any potential monotony and deliver important information, at the same time.

The entertainment factor doesn’t necessarily have to be goofy or fun, but it should be compelling for the audience and capture their attention. Visuals are particularly important here.

8. Motivational

Stories are good tools for bringing any message home. Use personal anecdotes and examples that illustrate points. This will help people remember your message when they need it most, and it also makes it easier for the audience to connect with you.

3 Presentation Use Cases

Presentation showing on laptop and desktop

Want to take your information and put it in presentation format for your audience? Before you start, use these examples to gain inspiration.

1. Business Presentation Examples

Business presentations don’t have to be boring. Take these tips to wow your colleagues and your audience. 

Conferences

There are many different companies and ideas competing for attention at conferences. Use storytelling and bold design choices to stand out.

Raising Awareness

Getting a new initiative going in an organization is no easy feat. Use a presentation to fill in stakeholders on what you want to do and get their approval.

Sales Decks

Selling has a direct impact on revenue goals, so it’s critical for your presentation to support that. Include questions, pain points, and supporting data to let your potential customers know you “get” them.

2. Presentation Ideas for Kids and Students

Education requires a lot of listening and absorbing information. Help kids and students show what they know with these presentation formats.

All About Them

For younger or new students, this is an easy presentation idea. They can create slides that explain details about themselves to learn the art of public speaking. It also helps their peers get to know them better.

Charts and Graphics

Facts and data play a key role in understanding a concept. However, keeping track of them all can be intimidating. Take them through the process of communicating complex ideas visually, with this presentation idea for students.

Storytelling

Stories are an important part of early learning but, eventually, we all learn there’s a place for stories outside of a book. Students and kids can create presentations that focus on this skill.

3. Virtual Presentation Ideas

Virtual presentations are more prevalent than ever, but engaging an audience when you aren’t in the same room isn’t easy.

If you’re sharing ideas with a group, make it interactive by giving a workshop-style presentation. Be sure to leave room to ask and answer questions, as well as save space for group discussions.

Ask Me Anything

The question and answer format is a popular presentation type, but you can add even more interest with slides. Use images, fonts , and colors that are on brand and increase engagement. 

Information and Gamification

Gamification results in 14% higher scores on skill-based assessments. To amplify people’s understanding of the concepts you present, use gamification throughout your slide deck.

How to Put Together Presentation Ideas without PowerPoint

Vector of female speaker pointing at presentation on whiteboard

If you’re looking for creative presentation ideas without PowerPoint , Shutterstock Create’s slideshow presentation maker is easy to use. Our designer-crafted templates are super-simple to customize and make your own in just a few clicks. 

We have thousands of graphics in a multitude of styles, shapes, and sizes you can use to create designs that others will notice. We also offer gorgeous stock photos to help you communicate exactly what you need to with each visual. Everyone has something to teach, now it’s your turn. Use these ideas to create all types of presentations and communicate effectively.

Need some more presentation inspo? We’ve got you covered:

  • How to Make a Professional Video Presentation
  • 10 Fun “Presentation Night” Ideas
  • Google Slides vs. PowerPoint: Which Is Best to Make a Slideshow?

License this cover image via AlexandrWell .

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6 Different Types of Presentations

Blog Post Hero:

Everyone from those who present in front of large audiences on a stage to managers who need to pitch their ideas to co-workers can improve their delivery and impact of their message.

6 Types of Presentations:

1) Providing Information. This format encompasses anything from a team meeting that gives updates on a project or upcoming event to a demonstration that shows product functions.

2) Teaching a Skill. Your company just installed a new system or implemented a new process that requires people to learn how to use the new tool and apply the process.

3) Reporting Progress. As you integrate the new system into your daily routine, your boss wants to know how it’s working. You might schedule a divisional meeting or group off-site to share the progress.

4) Selling a Product or Service. A briefing like this might include a recap of the product or service, next steps and action items, or a discussion of needs and improvements before the product is ready to sell.

For these examples and more, attend our Presentation Skills Workshop

5) Making a Decision. It’s time for the annual holiday party and ideas are being tossed around the office. When giving your input on the location, make sure to share the must-haves and nice-to-haves for the event. When it’s time for the final decision, you can see how your idea stacks up to the other options.

6) Solving a Problem. This could be in a panel setting or other meeting where the problem is identified, the facts of the problem are presented and a list of causes is generated. From here, you lay out the ideal outcome, present solutions and discuss your recommendation.

With any presentation, know your objectives. If your purpose is to inform or update, you will most likely use one of the first three types of presentations. On the other hand, if you’re on a mission to persuade someone, use one of the last three presentation types. Not every presentation has to mold itself into a traditional presentation; it can be an interview, status report, program, pitch, speech or demonstration, for example.

Editor's Note: This post was originally published in November 2014 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

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kinds of presentation information

6 Different Types of Presentations

6 Different Types of Presentations

Presentations should be as unique as your business and the information you’re trying to present. However, there are certain types of presentations that are common across industries and teams. Before you worry about which slides to include or how to organize your information, you’ll need to determine which type of presentation is best for your audience. 

To figure this out, ask yourself: Are you entertaining or informing? Are you speaking to colleagues, investors, or potential customers? Asking these questions will help you choose the type of presentation that supports you best. Beautiful.ai is here to make this even easier with a description of different types of presentations to help you choose.

Informative Presentations

An informative presentation is educational, concise, and to the point. While other presentations may entertain or inspire, the main goal of an informative presentation is to share information.

A good example of an informative presentation is a human resources benefits presentation. Human resources needs to explain what benefits employees receive, how benefits work, which important dates employees need to remember, where employees can find more information, and so on. 

An HR benefits presentation for new hires (or any informational presentation) should be short, straightforward, and easy to understand so that new employees will remember the information they’re given. 

Instructive Presentations

A presentation that teaches something is similar to an informative presentation, but it goes beyond sharing facts. It also instructs the audience on a specific topic. People attend or view an instructive presentation with the intention to learn, and they leave with a better understanding of the topic of the presentation.

There are many examples of instructive presentations. Workshops, training sessions, or webinars teach audiences a new skill or procedure by offering specific information or instructions. Explaining new policies to a company is another type of instructive presentation. For example, an HR benefits presentation for new employees may be informative, but a presentation for existing employees about policy changes might lean more towards instructive, especially if employees have to take action or need to ask questions.     

Persuasive Presentations

Many presentations hope to sell something or persuade the audience to take certain actions. Persuasive presentations often present a problem and explain their solution using data. Examples of persuasive presentations include business pitches or sales proposals.

For example, a startup company looking for initial funding may need a startup pitch deck or a Series A presentation to convince investors to back their idea. A startup pitch deck would explain a problem in the market, how their startup will solve that problem, and how they’ll monetize their business. A Series A presentation can help a startup secure more rounds of funding to grow their company and pursue further goals.

Motivational Presentations

One of the most prominent examples of inspiring presentations? TEDTalks. Many motivational speakers use TEDTalks to inspire people to think or change their behavior. 

Motivational presentations in the business world may not be as dramatic or life-changing as a TEDTalk, but they still aim to generate interest or gain an audience’s approval. A company overview presentation is a good example of a motivational presentation. It may present the information of a company — how it was founded, who is leading it, what the company does — but more importantly, it tells the company’s story. 

A company overview presentation connects with the audience. A manager may use it to boost morale at a team meeting. Or an executive may present a company overview to convince potential customers or investors to work with them. Or, an HR rep may use it to make new hires feel welcome and excited to join the company.

Decision-making Presentations

Need to make a decision within the company? A presentation that shares a problem, solution options, and their outcomes can help speed along the process. Decision making presentations might be found in business meetings, government meetings, or all-hands meetings.

For example, let’s say a company wants to improve engagement on their social media channels. There are many ways they might achieve their goal, including hosting giveaways, dedicating more resources to creating Facebook posts or Instagram stories, and researching their audience or competitors to see how they can improve. A marketing campaign plan template for a presentation would keep details of the problem, different options, and possible outcomes organized in one place. It would inform and guide everyone involved in the meeting, helping them make informed decisions on how to move forward.

Progress Presentations

Imagine our hypothetical company decided on a marketing strategy to meet their goals. Now that they have a campaign in place, they need to report on the progress of said campaign. This sixth presentation type shares status updates, progress towards deadlines, collected data so far, any obstacles popping up, and tasks that need to be added or adjusted.

A team stand up presentation is a great example of this type of presentation. Team stand up presentations usually include an agenda, talking points, deliverable updates, discussion topics, and time for questions at the end. This presentation keeps everyone organized and focused, ensuring that everyone is still on the same page and working towards the same end goal.

Whichever Presentation Type You Choose, Create it With Beautiful.ai

Now that you know which presentation type is right for your project, it’s time to create a beautiful and effective presentation. With Beautiful.ai , you don’t need to set aside hours of time to build your presentation, nor do you need design expertise to do it. Use one of our many presentation templates that can be customized for your needs in minutes. No matter what type of presentation you create, Beautiful.ai can help you do it.

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The 8 Types of Presentation Styles: Which Category Do You Fall Into?

Meg Prater (she/her)

Updated: December 16, 2020

Published: September 24, 2018

Types of Presentations

  • Visual Style
  • Freeform Style
  • Instructor Style
  • Coach Style
  • Storytelling Style
  • Connector Style
  • Lessig Style
  • Takahashi Style

Everyone on the internet has an opinion on how to give the “perfect” presentation.

types-of-presentation-styles

One group champions visual aids, another thinks visual aids are a threat to society as we know it. One expert preaches the benefits of speaking loudly, while another believes the softer you speak the more your audience pays attention. And don’t even try to find coordinating opinions on whether you should start your presentation with a story, quote, statistic, or question.

But what if there wasn’t just one “right” way to give a presentation? What if there were several? Below, I’ve outlined eight types of presentation styles. They’re used by famous speakers like Steve Jobs and Al Gore -- and none of them are wrong.

Check out each one and decide which will be most effective for you.

→ Free Download: 10 PowerPoint Presentation Templates [Access Now]

Types of Presentation Styles

1. visual style.

What it is: If you’re a firm believer slides simply exist to complement your talking points, this style is for you. With this speaking style, you might need to work a little harder to get your audience engaged, but the dividends can be huge for strong public speakers, visionaries, and storytellers.

When to use it: This style is helpful when speaking to a large audience with broad interests. It’s also great for when you need to throw together slides quickly.

Visual style presenter: Steve Jobs

2. Freeform Style

What it is: This impromptu style of presenting doesn’t require slides. Instead, the speaker relies on strong stories to illustrate each point. This style works best for those who have a short presentation time and are extremely familiar with their talking points.

When to use it: Elevator pitches, networking events, and impromptu meetings are all scenarios in which to use a freeform style of speaking. You’ll appear less rehearsed and more conversational than if you were to pause in the middle of a happy hour to pull up your presentation on a tablet.

Freeform style presenter: Sir Ken Robinson

3. Instructor Style

What it is: This presentation style allows you to deliver complex messages using figures of speech, metaphors, and lots of content -- just like your teachers and professors of old. Your decks should be built in logical order to aid your presentation, and you should use high-impact visuals to support your ideas and keep the audience engaged.

When to use it: If you’re not a comfortable presenter or are unfamiliar with your subject matter (i.e., your product was recently updated and you’re not familiar with the finer points), try instructor-style presenting.

Instructor style presenter: Al Gore

4. Coach Style

What it is: Energetic and charismatic speakers gravitate towards this style of presenting. It allows them to connect and engage with their audience using role play and listener interaction.

When to use it: Use this presentation style when you’re speaking at a conference or presenting to an audience who needs to be put at ease. For example, this style would work well if you were speaking to a group of executives who need to be sold on the idea of what your company does rather than the details of how you do it.

Coach style presenter: Linda Edgecombe

5. Storytelling Style

What it is: In this style, the speaker relies on anecdotes and examples to connect with their audience. Stories bring your learning points to life, and the TED’s Commandments never let you down: Let your emotions out and tell your story in an honest way.

When to use it: Avoid this style if you’re in the discovery phase of the sales process. You want to keep the conversation about your prospect instead of circling every point or question back to you or a similar client. This style is great for conference speaking, networking events, and sales presentations where you have adequate time to tell your stories without taking minutes away from questions.

Storytelling style presenter: Jill Bolte Taylor

6. Connector Style

What it is: In this style, presenters connect with their audience by showing how they’re similar to their listeners. Connectors usually enjoy freeform Q&A and use gestures when they speak. They also highly encourage audience reaction and feedback to what they’re saying.

When to use it: Use this style of presenting early in the sales process as you’re learning about your prospect’s pain points, challenges, and goals. This type of speaking sets your listener at ease, elicits feedback on how you’re doing in real time, and is more of a dialogue than a one-sided presentation

Connector style presenter: Connie Dieken

7. Lessig Style

What it is: The Lessig Style was created by Lawrence Lessig , a professor of law and leadership at Harvard Law School. This presentation style requires the presenter to pass through each slide within 15 seconds. When text is used in a slide, it’s typically synchronized with the presenter’s spoken words.

When to use it: This method of presentation is great for large crowds -- and it allows the speaker to use a balance of text and image to convey their message. The rapid pace and rhythm of the slide progression keeps audiences focused, engaged, and less likely to snooze.

Lessig style presenter: Lawrence Lessig

8. Takahashi Style

What it is: This method features large, bold text on minimal slides. It was devised by Masayoshi Takahashi , who found himself creating slides without access to a presentation design tool or PowerPoint. The main word is the focal point of the slide, and phrases, used sparingly, are short and concise.

When to use it: If you find yourself in Takahashi’s shoes -- without presentation design software -- this method is for you. This style works well for short presentations that pack a memorable punch.

Takahashi style presenter: Masayoshi Takahashi

Slides from one of Takahashi’s presentations:

Whether you’re speaking on a conference stage or giving a sales presentation , you can find a method that works best for you and your audience. With the right style, you’ll capture attention, engage listeners, and effectively share your message. You can even ask an  AI presentation maker  tool to create presentations for you in your preferred style

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13.2: Types of Presentations to Inform

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Learning Objectives

  • Provide examples of four main types of speech to inform.

Speaking to inform may fall into one of several categories. The presentation to inform may be

  • an explanation,
  • a description, or
  • a demonstration of how to do something.

Let’s explore each of these types of informative speech.

Explanation

Have you ever listened to a lecture or speech where you just didn’t get it? It wasn’t that you weren’t interested, at least not at first. Perhaps the professor used language and jargon, or gave a confusing example, or omitted something that would have linked facts or concepts together. Soon you probably lost interest and sat there, attending the speech or lecture in body but certainly not in mind. An effective speech to inform will take a complex topic or issue and explain it to the audience in ways that increase audience understanding. Perhaps the speech where you felt lost lacked definitions upfront, or a clear foundation in the introduction. You certainly didn’t learn much, and that’s exactly what you want to avoid when you address your audience. Consider how you felt and then find ways to explain your topic—visually, using definitions and examples, providing a case study—that can lay a foundation on common ground with your audience and build on it.

No one likes to feel left out. As the speaker, it’s your responsibility to ensure that this doesn’t happen. Also know that to teach someone something new—perhaps a skill that they did not posses or a perspective that allows them to see new connections—is a real gift, both to you and the audience members. You will feel rewarded because you made a difference and they will perceive the gain in their own understanding.

As a business communicator, you may be called upon to give an informative report where you communicate status, trends, or relationships that pertain to a specific topic. You might have only a few moments to speak, and you may have to prepare within a tight time frame. Your listeners may want “just the highlights,” only to ask pointed questions that require significant depth and preparation on your part. The informative report is a speech where you organize your information around key events, discoveries, or technical data and provide context and illustration for your audience. They may naturally wonder, “Why are sales up (or down)?” or “What is the product leader in your lineup?” and you need to anticipate their perspective and present the key information that relates to your topic. If everyone in the room knows the product line, you may not need much information about your best seller, but instead place emphasis on marketing research that seems to indicate why it is the best seller.

Perhaps you are asked to be the scout and examine a new market, developing strategies to penetrate it. You’ll need to orient your audience and provide key information about the market and demonstrate leadership as you articulate your strategies. You have a perspective gained by time and research, and your audience wants to know why you see things the way you do, as well as learn what you learned. A status report may be short or long, and may be an update that requires little background, but always consider the audience and what common ground you are building your speech on.

Description

Have you ever listened to a friend tell you about their recent trip somewhere and found the details fascinating, making you want to travel there or visit a similar place? Or perhaps you listened to your chemistry teacher describe a chemical reaction you were going to perform in class and you understood the process and could reasonably anticipate the outcome. Describing information requires emphasis on language that is vivid, captures attention, and excites the imagination. Your audience will be drawn to your effective use of color, descriptive language, and visual aids. An informative speech that focuses description will be visual in many ways. You may choose to illustrate with images, video and audio clips, and maps. Your first-person experience combined with your content will allow the audience to come to know a topic, area, or place through you, or secondhand. Their imagination is your ally, and you should aim to stimulate it with attention-getting devices and clear visual aids. Use your imagination to place yourself in their perspective: how would you like to have someone describe the topic to you?

Demonstration

You want to teach the audience how to throw a fast pitch in softball or a curveball in baseball. You want to demonstrate how to make salsa or how to program the applications on a smartphone. Each of these topics will call on your kindergarten experience of “show and tell.” A demonstrative speech focuses on clearly showing a process and telling the audience important details about each step so that they can imitate, repeat, or do the action themselves. If the topic is complicated, think of ways to simplify each step.

Consider the visual aids or supplies you will need. You may have noticed that cooking shows on television rarely show the chef chopping and measuring ingredients during the demonstration. Instead, the ingredients are chopped and measured ahead of time and the chef simply adds each item to the dish with a brief comment like, “Now we’ll stir in half a cup of chicken stock.” If you want to present a demonstration speech on the ways to make a paper airplane, one that will turn left or right, go up, down or in loops, consider how best to present your topic. Perhaps by illustrating the process of making one airplane followed by example on how to make adjustments to the plane to allow for different flight patterns would be effective. Would you need additional paper airplanes made in advance of your speech? Would an example of the paper airplane in each of the key stages of production be helpful to have ready before the speech? Having all your preparation done ahead of time can make a world of difference, and your audience will appreciate your thoughtful approach.

By considering each step and focusing on how to simplify it, you can understand how the audience might grasp the new information and how you can best help them. Also, consider the desired outcome; for example, will your listeners be able to actually do the task themselves or will they gain an appreciation of the complexities of a difficult skill like piloting an airplane to a safe landing? Regardless of the sequence or pattern you will illustrate or demonstrate, consider how people from your anticipated audience will respond, and budget additional time for repetition and clarification.

Informative presentations come in all sizes, shapes, and forms. You may need to create an “elevator speech” style presentation with the emphasis on brevity, or produce a comprehensive summary of several points that require multiple visual aids to communicate complex processes or trends. The main goal in an informative presentation is to inform, not to persuade, and that requires an emphasis on credibility, for the speaker and the data or information presented. Extra attention to sources is required and you’ll need to indicate what reports, texts, or Web sites were sources for your analysis and conclusions.

Here are additional, more specific types of informative presentations:

  • Biographical information
  • Case study results
  • Comparative advantage results
  • Cost-benefit analysis results
  • Feasibility studies
  • Field study results
  • Financial trends analysis
  • Health, safety, and accident rates
  • Instruction guidelines
  • Laboratory results
  • Product or service orientations
  • Progress reports
  • Research results
  • Technical specifications

Depending on the rhetorical situation, the audience, and the specific information to be presented, any of these types of presentation may be given as an explanation, a report, a description, or a demonstration.

Key Takeaway

An informative speech may explain, report, describe, or demonstrate how to do something.

  • Watch a “how-to” television show, such as one about cooking, home improvement, dog training, or crime solving. What informative techniques and visual aids are used in the show to help viewers learn the skills that are being demonstrated?
  • Prepare a simple “how-to” presentation for the class. Present and compare your results.
  • Compare and contrast two television programs, noting how each communicates the meaning via visual communication rather than words or dialogue. Share and compare with classmates.
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What Are Effective Presentation Skills (and How to Improve Them)

Presentation skills are essential for your personal and professional life. Learn about effective presentations and how to boost your presenting techniques.

[Featured Image]: The marketing manager, wearing a yellow top, is making a PowerPoint presentation.

At least seven out of 10 Americans agree that presentation skills are essential for a successful career [ 1 ]. Although it might be tempting to think that these are skills reserved for people interested in public speaking roles, they're critical in a diverse range of jobs. For example, you might need to brief your supervisor on research results.

Presentation skills are also essential in other scenarios, including working with a team and explaining your thought process, walking clients through project ideas and timelines, and highlighting your strengths and achievements to your manager during performance reviews.

Whatever the scenario, you have very little time to capture your audience’s attention and get your point across when presenting information—about three seconds, according to research [ 2 ]. Effective presentation skills help you get your point across and connect with the people you’re communicating with, which is why nearly every employer requires them.

Understanding what presentation skills are is only half the battle. Honing your presenting techniques is essential for mastering presentations of all kinds and in all settings.

What are presentation skills?

Presentation skills are the abilities and qualities necessary for creating and delivering a compelling presentation that effectively communicates information and ideas. They encompass what you say, how you structure it, and the materials you include to support what you say, such as slides, videos, or images.

You'll make presentations at various times in your life. Examples include:

Making speeches at a wedding, conference, or another event

Making a toast at a dinner or event

Explaining projects to a team 

Delivering results and findings to management teams

Teaching people specific methods or information

Proposing a vote at community group meetings

Pitching a new idea or business to potential partners or investors

Why are presentation skills important? 

Delivering effective presentations is critical in your professional and personal life. You’ll need to hone your presentation skills in various areas, such as when giving a speech, convincing your partner to make a substantial purchase, and talking to friends and family about an important situation.

No matter if you’re using them in a personal or professional setting, these are the skills that make it easier and more effective to convey your ideas, convince or persuade others, and experience success. A few of the benefits that often accompany improving your presentation skills include:

Enriched written and verbal communication skills

Enhanced confidence and self-image

Boosted critical thinking and problem-solving capabilities

Better motivational techniques

Increased leadership skills

Expanded time management, negotiation, and creativity

The better your presenting techniques, the more engaging your presentations will be. You could also have greater opportunities to make positive impacts in business and other areas of your life.

Effective presentation skills

Imagine yourself in the audience at a TED Talk or sitting with your coworkers at a big meeting held by your employer. What would you be looking for in how they deliver their message? What would make you feel engaged?

These are a few questions to ask yourself as you review this list of some of the most effective presentation skills.

Verbal communication

How you use language and deliver messages play essential roles in how your audience will receive your presentation. Speak clearly and confidently, projecting your voice enough to ensure everyone can hear. Think before you speak, pausing when necessary and tailoring the way you talk to resonate with your particular audience.

Body language

Body language combines various critical elements, including posture, gestures, eye contact, expressions, and position in front of the audience. Body language is one of the elements that can instantly transform a presentation that would otherwise be dull into one that's dynamic and interesting.

Voice projection

The ability to project your voice improves your presentation by allowing your audience to hear what you're saying. It also increases your confidence to help settle any lingering nerves while also making your message more engaging. To project your voice, stand comfortably with your shoulders back. Take deep breaths to power your speaking voice and ensure you enunciate every syllable you speak.

How you present yourself plays a role in your body language and ability to project your voice. It also sets the tone for the presentation. Avoid slouching or looking overly tense. Instead, remain open, upright, and adaptable while taking the formality of the occasion into account.

Storytelling

Incorporating storytelling into a presentation is an effective strategy used by many powerful public speakers. It has the power to bring your subject to life and pique the audience’s curiosity. Don’t be afraid to tell a personal story, slowly building up suspense or adding a dramatic moment. And, of course, be sure to end with a positive takeaway to drive your point home.

Active listening

Active listening is a valuable skill all on its own. When you understand and thoughtfully respond to what you hear—whether it's in a conversation or during a presentation—you’ll likely deepen your personal relationships and actively engage audiences during a presentation. As part of your presentation skill set, it helps catch and maintain the audience’s attention, helping them remain focused while minimizing passive response, ensuring the message is delivered correctly, and encouraging a call to action.

Stage presence

During a presentation, projecting confidence can help keep your audience engaged. Stage presence can help you connect with your audience and encourage them to want to watch you. To improve your presence, try amping up your normal demeanor by infusing it with a bit of enthusiasm. Project confidence and keep your information interesting.

Watch your audience as you’re presenting. If you’re holding their attention, it likely means you’re connecting well with them.

Self-awareness

Monitoring your own emotions and reactions will allow you to react well in various situations. It helps you remain personable throughout your presentation and handle feedback well. Self-awareness can help soothe nervousness during presentations, allowing you to perform more effectively.

Writing skills

Writing is a form of presentation. Sharp writing skills can help you master your presentation’s outline to ensure you stay on message and remain clear about your objectives from the beginning until the end. It’s also helpful to have strong writing abilities for creating compelling slides and other visual aids.

Understanding an audience

When you understand your audience's needs and interests, you can design your presentation around them. In turn, you'll deliver maximum value to them and enhance your ability to make your message easy to understand.

Learn more about presentation skills from industry experts at SAP:

How to improve presentation skills

There’s an art to public speaking. Just like any other type of art, this is one that requires practice. Improving your presentation skills will help reduce miscommunications, enhance your time management capabilities, and boost your leadership skills. Here are some ways you can improve these skills:

Work on self-confidence.

When you’re confident, you naturally speak more clearly and with more authority. Taking the time to prepare your presentation with a strong opening and compelling visual aids can help you feel more confident. Other ways to improve your self-confidence include practicing positive self-talk, surrounding yourself with positive people, and avoiding comparing yourself (or your presentation) to others.

Develop strategies for overcoming fear.

Many people are nervous or fearful before giving a presentation. A bad memory of a past performance or insufficient self-confidence can contribute to fear and anxiety. Having a few go-to strategies like deep breathing, practicing your presentation, and grounding can help you transform that fear into extra energy to put into your stage presence.

Learn grounding techniques.

Grounding is any type of technique that helps you steer your focus away from distressing thoughts and keeps you connected with your present self. To ground yourself, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and imagine you’re a large, mature tree with roots extending deep into the earth—like the tree, you can become unshakable.

Learn how to use presentation tools.

Visual aids and other technical support can transform an otherwise good presentation into a wow-worthy one. A few popular presentation tools include:

Canva: Provides easy-to-design templates you can customize

Powtoon: Animation software that makes video creation fast and easy

PowerPoint: Microsoft's iconic program popular for dynamic marketing and sales presentations

Practice breathing techniques.

Breathing techniques can help quell anxiety, making it easier to shake off pre-presentation jitters and nerves. It also helps relax your muscles and get more oxygen to your brain.  For some pre-presentation calmness, you can take deep breaths, slowly inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth.

While presenting, breathe in through your mouth with the back of your tongue relaxed so your audience doesn't hear a gasping sound. Speak on your exhalation, maintaining a smooth voice.

Gain experience.

The more you practice, the better you’ll become. The more you doanything, the more comfortable you’ll feel engaging in that activity. Presentations are no different. Repeatedly practicing your own presentation also offers the opportunity to get feedback from other people and tweak your style and content as needed.

Tips to help you ace your presentation

Your presentation isn’t about you; it’s about the material you’re presenting. Sometimes, reminding yourself of this ahead of taking center stage can help take you out of your head, allowing you to connect effectively with your audience. The following are some of the many actions you can take on the day of your presentation.

Arrive early.

Since you may have a bit of presentation-related anxiety, it’s important to avoid adding travel stress. Give yourself an abundance of time to arrive at your destination, and take into account heavy traffic and other unforeseen events. By arriving early, you also give yourself time to meet with any on-site technicians, test your equipment, and connect with people ahead of the presentation.

Become familiar with the layout of the room.

Arriving early also gives you time to assess the room and figure out where you want to stand. Experiment with the acoustics to determine how loudly you need to project your voice, and test your equipment to make sure everything connects and appears properly with the available setup. This is an excellent opportunity to work out any last-minute concerns and move around to familiarize yourself with the setting for improved stage presence.

Listen to presenters ahead of you.

When you watch others present, you'll get a feel for the room's acoustics and lighting. You can also listen for any data that’s relevant to your presentation and revisit it during your presentation—this can make the presentation more interactive and engaging.

Use note cards.

Writing yourself a script could provide you with more comfort. To prevent sounding too robotic or disengaged, only include talking points in your note cards in case you get off track. Using note cards can help keep your presentation organized while sounding more authentic to your audience.

Learn to deliver clear and confident presentations with Dynamic Public Speaking from the University of Washington. Build confidence, develop new delivery techniques, and practice strategies for crafting compelling presentations for different purposes, occasions, and audiences.

Article sources

Forbes. “ New Survey: 70% Say Presentation Skills are Critical for Career Success , https://www.forbes.com/sites/carminegallo/2014/09/25/new-survey-70-percent-say-presentation-skills-critical-for-career-success/?sh=619f3ff78890.” Accessed December 7, 2022.

Beautiful.ai. “ 15 Presentation and Public Speaking Stats You Need to Know , https://www.beautiful.ai/blog/15-presentation-and-public-speaking-stats-you-need-to-know. Accessed December 7, 2022.

Keep reading

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This content has been made available for informational purposes only. Learners are advised to conduct additional research to ensure that courses and other credentials pursued meet their personal, professional, and financial goals.

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Presentation Skills

Presenting information clearly and effectively is a key skill in getting your message across. Today, presentation skills are required in almost every field, and most of us are required to give presentations on occasions. While some people take this in their stride, others find it much more challenging.

It is, however, possible to improve your presentation skills with a bit of work. This section of SkillsYouNeed is designed to help.

Many people feel terrified when asked to talk in public, especially to bigger groups. However, these fears can be reduced by good preparation, which will also lay the groundwork for making an effective presentation.

There are Different Types of Presentations, but They’re All Presentations

There are any number of occasions when you may be asked to speak in public or to a group of people. They include:

  • Presenting or making a speech at a conference or event.
  • Objecting to a planning proposal at a council meeting.
  • Making a speech at a wedding.
  • Proposing a vote of thanks to someone at a club or society.
  • On behalf of a team, saying goodbye and presenting a gift to a colleague who is leaving.
  • Seeking investment or a loan to help you set up a new business.

These can all be considered presentations.

They do not, however, all require the same approach. You would not, for example, use PowerPoint to thank a colleague who was leaving. It would be unusual (though it has been done) to use it in a speech at a wedding. However, a conference audience would be somewhat surprised NOT to see slides projected onto a screen.

It follows, therefore, that there is no single set of rules that apply to all presentations. There are, however, some things that every presentation opportunity has in common. These include:

You will present better if you have prepared effectively . This does NOT necessarily mean that you have written out your speech verbatim and rehearsed it until you know it off by heart—although that might work for some people. It does, however, mean that you have to be confident that you are saying the right thing, in the right way, to the right people.

You need to be clear about your audience and your message . Every presentation will be better if you have clearly considered the message that you want or need to convey, and how best to convey it to your audience. These two pieces of information drive your style, structure, content, and use of visual aids.

You must never overrun your allocated time .  In other words, don’t outstay your welcome. Almost every speech or presentation is better if it is shorter. Nobody minds going for coffee early or finishing before they expected to do so. Everybody minds being held up.

Generally speaking, your audience starts on your side. As a rule, your audience is there (more or less) voluntarily. They have chosen to listen to you, and they want to enjoy your presentation. The occasion is yours to lose.

An Important Point

There is one very important point to remember: if what you’re doing or saying is not working, do something else.

One of the worst feelings as a presenter is that you have lost your audience. You know that’s happened, but you continue to stumble through your remaining PowerPoint slides for the next 15 minutes, as your audience checks their phones and wishes it was coffee time. You think you have no choice, but that’s not actually true.

When you present, you are in charge of the room . The audience has effectively handed you control and is sitting back waiting for you to do something. You may have prepared a specific talk, but if you see that isn’t working, you can always change it. You are, after all, the expert.

You can, for example:

  • Skip through some slides to a section that they may find more interesting;
  • Ask your audience whether there is particular information that they were expecting that you are not providing;
  • Suggest that everyone looks a bit sleepy, and maybe it would be better to start questions early, or have a discussion; or
  • Ask the audience at the start of the presentation what they are expecting and what they want you to cover. That way, you can tailor the presentation to fit their expectations.

Just as when you are facilitating, you want to help your audience get the most out of your presentation. The best way to do that is to accept feedback—which may include smiles, nods of interest, or people getting their phones out.

Quick Guide to Effective Presentations

If you need to improve your presentation skills quickly, then a really good place to start is with our Top Tips for Effective Presentations .

This will give you some ‘quick wins’ that will help you improve your presentations. If you’re already an experienced presenter, this page should be a useful refresher, or even take your skills from good to great.

Our tips include general ideas about connecting with your audience, information about the importance of voice and body language, and detailed tips about preparing slide-shows.

The most important tip of all, however, is to remember that it's all about your audience.

Keep that in mind, and your presentation skills will almost instantly improve.

If you have more time to develop your presentation skills…

…then the Presentation Skills section of SkillsYouNeed is designed to help.

Our Presentation Skills section is split into two parts.

  • The first gives you a step-by-step guide to putting together and delivering a professional and effective presentation .
  • The second provides more detailed information about presenting and communicating in particular circumstances .

You can either use our step-by-step guide to walk you through the presentation preparation and delivery process, or you can focus on particular areas that are an issue for you.

Preparing for Your Presentation

The guide starts by explaining What is a Presentation?

We define a presentation as a means of communication that can be adapted to various speaking situations, such as talking to a group, addressing a meeting or briefing a team. Effective presentations usually require careful thought and preparation—although this preparation need not take very long.

Preparation is the most important part of making a successful presentation.  Our page on Preparing For A Presentation explains what information you need before you can really start to plan your presentation and decide what you are going to say. The most important aspects include the objective of the presentation, the subject, and the audience.

Irrespective of whether the occasion is formal or informal, you should always aim to give a clear, well-structured delivery. To do so, you need to organise your presentation material . You can either do this in your head, or use a technique like mind-mapping to help you identify links and good flow.

By the time you come to write your presentation , you should know exactly what you want to say and the order in which you want to say it. You may want to use one of the standard presentation structures, such as ‘What, Why, How?’. You will also find it helpful to consider how to tell your story most effectively, and to use stories in your presentation to illustrate points. There is more about this in our page on writing your presentation .

You also need to decide on your presentation method . Presentations range from the formal to the informal. Your choice of presentation method will depend on many factors, including the audience, the venue, the facilities, and your own preferences.

Visual aids can add another dimension to your presentation, helping to hold your audience’s attention, and also act as a reminder of what you wanted to say. However, they need handling with care. Only use visual aids if they are necessary to maintain interest and assist comprehension . If visual aids are not used well, they can ruin a presentation.

See Working with Visual Aids to avoid falling into the trap of the dreaded ‘ Death by PowerPoint’ .

A particular case of visual aids is the use of data in a presentation.

There are times when using data in a presentation can really help you to tell the story better. It is, however, important not to blind your audience with statistics. You also need to remember that many people find numbers difficult to understand. Our page on Presenting Data gives some hints and tips about using data effectively in a presentation situation.

On the Day of the Presentation

There are a number of aspects to delivering your presentation on the day.

The practicalities of how you manage your presentation can make a significant difference to its success, and to your nerves! For example, turning up early means that you have will have a chance to see the room, and ensure that you can operate all the necessary equipment. There is more about how to cope, including managing sound systems, audio-visual equipment and lecterns in our page on Managing the Presentation Event .

Many people also feel very nervous before and during a presentation. This is entirely normal, and can even be helpful if you can channel it in the right way. There are some tried and tested strategies and techniques to manage your nerves so that you can concentrate on delivering an effective and engaging presentation.

See Coping with Presentation Nerves for some ideas that will help.

How you present yourself can also affect how your audience responds to your presentation.

You need to fit with your audience's expectations if they are not going to spend quite a large chunk of your presentation dealing with the differences between expectations and reality.

For more about aspects of self-presentation, see our page on Self-Presentation in Presentations .

You also need to consider how to manage your presentation notes .

Few people are able to give a presentation without notes. You will need to know your own abilities and decide how best to make the presentation. You might manage your talk by using full text, notes on cue cards, keywords on cue cards, or mind maps. There is more about this in our page on Managing your Presentation Notes .

After the presentation, you may be faced with a question-and-answer session. For many people, this is the worst part of the event.

Decide in advance how and when you wish to handle questions. Some speakers prefer questions to be raised as they arise during the presentation whilst others prefer to deal with questions at the end. At the start of your presentation, you should make clear your preferences to the audience. See our page on Dealing with Questions for more ideas about how to make the question session pleasant and productive, rather than something to dread.

Presenting Under Particular Circumstances

You may find that you need to give a presentation under certain circumstances, where your previous experience is less helpful.

Circumstances that may be new to you include:

  • Giving a Speech , for example, at a wedding.

One particular special case is attending public consultation meetings.

Our pages on Attending Public Consultation Meetings , and Managing Public Consultation Meetings provide information to help whether you are a concerned member of the public, or responsible for organising a public meeting.

You may also find yourself required to organise or manage a press conference.

Although this may not strictly be what you would describe as a ‘presentation’, it is nonetheless an event at which you are required to present your organisation in a particular light.

Our page on Managing a Press Conference gives some ideas about how best to do that.

Finally, should you be unlucky enough to be involved in a serious crisis or disaster that affects your organisation, our page on Crisis Communications gives some ideas about how to manage press and public relations on these occasions.

Start with: What is a Presentation? Top Tips for Effective Presentations

See also: Personal Appearance Interpersonal Communication Skills

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6 Types of Presentation You Must Know (+ Tips)

6 Types of Presentation You Must Know (+ Tips)

Are you tired of giving the same old boring presentation, using the same format every time? Have you ever wondered if there are different types of presentations to achieve different objectives?

If any of these questions resonate with you, this blog is the perfect resource.

In today’s world, presentations are an essential part of almost every profession. At some point in your life, whether you are a student, business professional, or teacher, you will have to deliver a presentation. But do you know there are different types of presentations, each with a specific purpose and objective?

This blog will cover the six essential types of presentation that you should be familiar with. We will explain each type, its purpose, and some tips to deliver it effectively.

Let us delve into the different types of presentation and explore them together.

Why Do We Need Different Types of Presentations?

Different types of presentations effectively communicate ideas and information in a variety of settings and for different audiences. The purpose of a presentation can vary depending on the goals of the presenter and the needs of the audience. For example, a sales pitch may require a persuasive and visually appealing presentation to convince potential customers to buy a product, while a training session may need a more instructional and detailed approach.

The choice of presentation type depends on several factors, such as the purpose of the presentation, audience’s needs and preferences, and the presenter’s strengths and weaknesses. By selecting the appropriate type of presentation, the presenter can effectively communicate their message and achieve their desired outcome.

What are Different Types of Presentations?

To effectively communicate ideas and information, it is important to understand the different types of presentations that can be used for different purposes and audiences. Below is a list of different types of presentations:

Informative Presentations

Demonstrative presentations, persuasive presentations, instructional presentations, inspirational presentations, entertaining presentations.

Let’s explore them one by one:

Informative presentations, as the name implies, provide information or knowledge to the audience about a specific topic.

This type of presentation is often used in educational settings or business environments where information needs to be communicated clearly.

Tips for Creating Effective Informative Presentations:

  • Know Your Audience: Understanding your audience is the key to creating an effective informative presentation. This means knowing their level of knowledge on the topic and what information will be most relevant and useful to them.
  • Choose a Clear Topic: A clear and concise topic is essential for an informative presentation. This ensures that the audience understands the presentation’s focus and helps keep the content organized and easy to follow.
  • Organize Your Content: Organizing your content into a logical structure can help to make the presentation easier to follow and understand. This means starting with an introduction, providing background information, and then moving into the main content of the presentation.

Demonstrative presentations are one of the many types of presentation methods that aim to show or demonstrate how something works or how a particular process is completed. 

These presentations are highly effective in technical or scientific fields but can also be used in other industries where hands-on demonstrations are necessary.

Tips for Creating Effective Demonstrative Presentations

  • Choose the Right Props: Choosing the right props or models is essential for an effective demonstrative presentation. Ensure that the props accurately represent the topic and are easy to understand and use.
  • Highlight Key Points: To make a demonstrative presentation effective, it is crucial to emphasize the critical points. This can help maintain the audience’s attention and concentration on the presented topic.
  • Use Visual Aids: Incorporating visual aids like videos or images can significantly improve a demonstrative presentation. They can assist in simplifying intricate procedures or processes and increase audience engagement.

The purpose of persuasive presentations is to convince the audience to take a specific action or adopt a particular point of view. This type of presentation is focused on influencing the audience’s beliefs or behavior by presenting arguments, evidence, and emotional appeals.

These types of PowerPoint presentations are often used in sales, marketing, and advocacy, but they can also be used in other industries where persuasion is necessary.

The key to creating an effective persuasive presentation is to know your audience and tailor your message to their needs and interests.

Tips for Creating Effective Persuasive Presentations

  • Use Emotional Appeals: Emotional appeals such as fear, guilt, or empathy can effectively persuade the audience. Ensure that your emotional appeals are relevant and not manipulative to the topic.
  • Use Statistics and Facts: Using statistics and facts can add credibility to your persuasive presentation. Ensure that your statistics and facts are accurate and relevant to the topic.
  • Use Stories: Using stories can be effective in persuading the audience. Stories can help to create an emotional connection with the audience and make your message more memorable.
  • Provide a Clear Call to Action: Ensure your call to action is clear, actionable, and directly related to the topic.

kinds of presentation information

Instructional presentations provide step-by-step instructions on how to perform a task or complete a process.

These presentations are often used in training, education, and technical fields.

Whether you’re teaching a new software program, demonstrating a manufacturing process, or explaining a complex concept, instructional presentations can be an effective tool for breaking down information into digestible pieces.

Tips for Creating Effective Instructional Presentations

  • Identify Your Objectives: Identifying your objective is important for an effective instructional presentation. This helps you to focus your presentation on the most critical information and ensure that you are meeting the needs of your audience.
  • Keep It Simple: Use simple language, avoid technical jargon, and break down complex procedures into manageable steps.
  • Provide Examples: Use real-world examples relevant to your audience and demonstrate how the concepts or procedures can be applied.

Inspirational presentations are those types of presentations that aim to motivate, inspire, and uplift the audience. These presentation types are often used in business, education, and personal development.

These presentations are meant to help the audience see things from a new perspective, feel empowered to take action, and believe in their ability to make positive life changes.

Tips for Creating Effective Inspirational Presentations

  • Use Personal Stories: Personal stories can help connect with the audience personally and inspire them to take action. Share your own experiences and struggles, and demonstrate how you overcame challenges and achieved success.
  • Use Quotes and Examples: Using quotes and examples can help to reinforce your message and inspire the audience. Use quotes from influential personalities and provide examples of successful individuals who have achieved their goals.
  • Provide Actionable Steps: Provide specific steps for the audience to achieve their goals and overcome challenges.

As the name suggests, entertaining presentations are meant to engage and captivate the audience with humor, storytelling, or other entertaining elements.

The primary goal of this type of presentation is to entertain the audience, leaving a lasting impression and making the presentation memorable.

Different types of PowerPoint presentations have specific goals, and entertaining presentations are often used in settings such as events, social gatherings, etc.

Tips for Creating Effective Entertaining Presentations

  • Use Humor: Humor is a powerful tool that helps to engage and entertain the audience. Use jokes, puns, and witty remarks to add a touch of humor to your presentation.
  • Tell a story: Use anecdotes, personal experiences, or fictional stories to create a narrative the audience can relate to.
  • Use interactive elements: Incorporating interactive elements such as quizzes, polls, and games can effectively interrupt the monotony of the presentation and enhance audience engagement. Use these elements to encourage audience participation and create a more dynamic experience.
  • Practice timing: Timing is everything when it comes to entertaining presentations. Make sure your presentation is well-timed, and avoid going over time, as this can disrupt the flow of the presentation and cause the audience to lose interest.
  • Engage the audience: Engage the audience throughout the presentation by asking questions, encouraging participation, and creating a relaxed and enjoyable atmosphere.

READ MORE: 10 Practical Ways To Improve Your Presentation Skills Today

Wrapping It Up

Understanding the different kinds of presentations is crucial for delivering an impactful and compelling message. By knowing the forms of presentation and their specific goals, you can tailor your content and delivery to achieve your desired outcome.

Whether you’re looking to inform, demonstrate, persuade, instruct, inspire, or entertain, the key is to know your audience and engage them through your content and delivery. By implementing the tips for each type of presentation, you can create a powerful and engaging presentation that leaves a lasting impression.

Remember, practice makes perfect. Take the time to rehearse and refine your presentation to ensure you deliver it confidently and clearly.

People Are Also Reading:

  • PowerPoint Presentation Tips: How To Make A Good PowerPoint Presentation
  • 9 Best Presentation Ideas That Your Viewers Will Adore
  • 3 Most Important Presentation Tips To Make Your Presentation StandOut
  • How To Make A Presentation: A Comprehensive Guide
  • How To Start A Presentation: Make A Strong First Impression

9 Box Talent Review Explained [Detailed 9 Box Matrix Guide]

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15 Effective Visual Presentation Tips To Wow Your Audience

By Krystle Wong , Sep 28, 2023

Visual Presentation Tips

So, you’re gearing up for that big presentation and you want it to be more than just another snooze-fest with slides. You want it to be engaging, memorable and downright impressive. 

Well, you’ve come to the right place — I’ve got some slick tips on how to create a visual presentation that’ll take your presentation game up a notch. 

Packed with presentation templates that are easily customizable, keep reading this blog post to learn the secret sauce behind crafting presentations that captivate, inform and remain etched in the memory of your audience.

Click to jump ahead:

What is a visual presentation & why is it important?

15 effective tips to make your visual presentations more engaging, 6 major types of visual presentation you should know , what are some common mistakes to avoid in visual presentations, visual presentation faqs, 5 steps to create a visual presentation with venngage.

A visual presentation is a communication method that utilizes visual elements such as images, graphics, charts, slides and other visual aids to convey information, ideas or messages to an audience. 

Visual presentations aim to enhance comprehension engagement and the overall impact of the message through the strategic use of visuals. People remember what they see, making your point last longer in their heads. 

Without further ado, let’s jump right into some great visual presentation examples that would do a great job in keeping your audience interested and getting your point across.

In today’s fast-paced world, where information is constantly bombarding our senses, creating engaging visual presentations has never been more crucial. To help you design a presentation that’ll leave a lasting impression, I’ve compiled these examples of visual presentations that will elevate your game.

1. Use the rule of thirds for layout

Ever heard of the rule of thirds? It’s a presentation layout trick that can instantly up your slide game. Imagine dividing your slide into a 3×3 grid and then placing your text and visuals at the intersection points or along the lines. This simple tweak creates a balanced and seriously pleasing layout that’ll draw everyone’s eyes.

2. Get creative with visual metaphors

Got a complex idea to explain? Skip the jargon and use visual metaphors. Throw in images that symbolize your point – for example, using a road map to show your journey towards a goal or using metaphors to represent answer choices or progress indicators in an interactive quiz or poll.

3. Visualize your data with charts and graphs

The right data visualization tools not only make content more appealing but also aid comprehension and retention. Choosing the right visual presentation for your data is all about finding a good match. 

For ordinal data, where things have a clear order, consider using ordered bar charts or dot plots. When it comes to nominal data, where categories are on an equal footing, stick with the classics like bar charts, pie charts or simple frequency tables. And for interval-ratio data, where there’s a meaningful order, go for histograms, line graphs, scatterplots or box plots to help your data shine.

In an increasingly visual world, effective visual communication is a valuable skill for conveying messages. Here’s a guide on how to use visual communication to engage your audience while avoiding information overload.

kinds of presentation information

4. Employ the power of contrast

Want your important stuff to pop? That’s where contrast comes in. Mix things up with contrasting colors, fonts or shapes. It’s like highlighting your key points with a neon marker – an instant attention grabber.

5. Tell a visual story

Structure your slides like a storybook and create a visual narrative by arranging your slides in a way that tells a story. Each slide should flow into the next, creating a visual narrative that keeps your audience hooked till the very end.

Icons and images are essential for adding visual appeal and clarity to your presentation. Venngage provides a vast library of icons and images, allowing you to choose visuals that resonate with your audience and complement your message. 

kinds of presentation information

6. Show the “before and after” magic

Want to drive home the impact of your message or solution? Whip out the “before and after” technique. Show the current state (before) and the desired state (after) in a visual way. It’s like showing a makeover transformation, but for your ideas.

7. Add fun with visual quizzes and polls

To break the monotony and see if your audience is still with you, throw in some quick quizzes or polls. It’s like a mini-game break in your presentation — your audience gets involved and it makes your presentation way more dynamic and memorable.

8. End with a powerful visual punch

Your presentation closing should be a showstopper. Think a stunning clip art that wraps up your message with a visual bow, a killer quote that lingers in minds or a call to action that gets hearts racing.

kinds of presentation information

9. Engage with storytelling through data

Use storytelling magic to bring your data to life. Don’t just throw numbers at your audience—explain what they mean, why they matter and add a bit of human touch. Turn those stats into relatable tales and watch your audience’s eyes light up with understanding.

kinds of presentation information

10. Use visuals wisely

Your visuals are the secret sauce of a great presentation. Cherry-pick high-quality images, graphics, charts and videos that not only look good but also align with your message’s vibe. Each visual should have a purpose – they’re not just there for decoration. 

11. Utilize visual hierarchy

Employ design principles like contrast, alignment and proximity to make your key info stand out. Play around with fonts, colors and placement to make sure your audience can’t miss the important stuff.

12. Engage with multimedia

Static slides are so last year. Give your presentation some sizzle by tossing in multimedia elements. Think short video clips, animations, or a touch of sound when it makes sense, including an animated logo . But remember, these are sidekicks, not the main act, so use them smartly.

13. Interact with your audience

Turn your presentation into a two-way street. Start your presentation by encouraging your audience to join in with thought-provoking questions, quick polls or using interactive tools. Get them chatting and watch your presentation come alive.

kinds of presentation information

When it comes to delivering a group presentation, it’s important to have everyone on the team on the same page. Venngage’s real-time collaboration tools enable you and your team to work together seamlessly, regardless of geographical locations. Collaborators can provide input, make edits and offer suggestions in real time. 

14. Incorporate stories and examples

Weave in relatable stories, personal anecdotes or real-life examples to illustrate your points. It’s like adding a dash of spice to your content – it becomes more memorable and relatable.

15. Nail that delivery

Don’t just stand there and recite facts like a robot — be a confident and engaging presenter. Lock eyes with your audience, mix up your tone and pace and use some gestures to drive your points home. Practice and brush up your presentation skills until you’ve got it down pat for a persuasive presentation that flows like a pro.

Venngage offers a wide selection of professionally designed presentation templates, each tailored for different purposes and styles. By choosing a template that aligns with your content and goals, you can create a visually cohesive and polished presentation that captivates your audience.

Looking for more presentation ideas ? Why not try using a presentation software that will take your presentations to the next level with a combination of user-friendly interfaces, stunning visuals, collaboration features and innovative functionalities that will take your presentations to the next level. 

Visual presentations come in various formats, each uniquely suited to convey information and engage audiences effectively. Here are six major types of visual presentations that you should be familiar with:

1. Slideshows or PowerPoint presentations

Slideshows are one of the most common forms of visual presentations. They typically consist of a series of slides containing text, images, charts, graphs and other visual elements. Slideshows are used for various purposes, including business presentations, educational lectures and conference talks.

kinds of presentation information

2. Infographics

Infographics are visual representations of information, data or knowledge. They combine text, images and graphics to convey complex concepts or data in a concise and visually appealing manner. Infographics are often used in marketing, reporting and educational materials.

Don’t worry, they are also super easy to create thanks to Venngage’s fully customizable infographics templates that are professionally designed to bring your information to life. Be sure to try it out for your next visual presentation!

kinds of presentation information

3. Video presentation

Videos are your dynamic storytellers. Whether it’s pre-recorded or happening in real-time, videos are the showstoppers. You can have interviews, demos, animations or even your own mini-documentary. Video presentations are highly engaging and can be shared in both in-person and virtual presentations .

4. Charts and graphs

Charts and graphs are visual representations of data that make it easier to understand and analyze numerical information. Common types include bar charts, line graphs, pie charts and scatterplots. They are commonly used in scientific research, business reports and academic presentations.

Effective data visualizations are crucial for simplifying complex information and Venngage has got you covered. Venngage’s tools enable you to create engaging charts, graphs,and infographics that enhance audience understanding and retention, leaving a lasting impression in your presentation.

kinds of presentation information

5. Interactive presentations

Interactive presentations involve audience participation and engagement. These can include interactive polls, quizzes, games and multimedia elements that allow the audience to actively participate in the presentation. Interactive presentations are often used in workshops, training sessions and webinars.

Venngage’s interactive presentation tools enable you to create immersive experiences that leave a lasting impact and enhance audience retention. By incorporating features like clickable elements, quizzes and embedded multimedia, you can captivate your audience’s attention and encourage active participation.

6. Poster presentations

Poster presentations are the stars of the academic and research scene. They consist of a large poster that includes text, images and graphics to communicate research findings or project details and are usually used at conferences and exhibitions. For more poster ideas, browse through Venngage’s gallery of poster templates to inspire your next presentation.

kinds of presentation information

Different visual presentations aside, different presentation methods also serve a unique purpose, tailored to specific objectives and audiences. Find out which type of presentation works best for the message you are sending across to better capture attention, maintain interest and leave a lasting impression. 

To make a good presentation , it’s crucial to be aware of common mistakes and how to avoid them. Without further ado, let’s explore some of these pitfalls along with valuable insights on how to sidestep them.

Overloading slides with text

Text heavy slides can be like trying to swallow a whole sandwich in one bite – overwhelming and unappetizing. Instead, opt for concise sentences and bullet points to keep your slides simple. Visuals can help convey your message in a more engaging way.

Using low-quality visuals

Grainy images and pixelated charts are the equivalent of a scratchy vinyl record at a DJ party. High-resolution visuals are your ticket to professionalism. Ensure that the images, charts and graphics you use are clear, relevant and sharp.

Choosing the right visuals for presentations is important. To find great visuals for your visual presentation, Browse Venngage’s extensive library of high-quality stock photos. These images can help you convey your message effectively, evoke emotions and create a visually pleasing narrative. 

Ignoring design consistency

Imagine a book with every chapter in a different font and color – it’s a visual mess. Consistency in fonts, colors and formatting throughout your presentation is key to a polished and professional look.

Reading directly from slides

Reading your slides word-for-word is like inviting your audience to a one-person audiobook session. Slides should complement your speech, not replace it. Use them as visual aids, offering key points and visuals to support your narrative.

Lack of visual hierarchy

Neglecting visual hierarchy is like trying to find Waldo in a crowd of clones. Use size, color and positioning to emphasize what’s most important. Guide your audience’s attention to key points so they don’t miss the forest for the trees.

Ignoring accessibility

Accessibility isn’t an option these days; it’s a must. Forgetting alt text for images, color contrast and closed captions for videos can exclude individuals with disabilities from understanding your presentation. 

Relying too heavily on animation

While animations can add pizzazz and draw attention, overdoing it can overshadow your message. Use animations sparingly and with purpose to enhance, not detract from your content.

Using jargon and complex language

Keep it simple. Use plain language and explain terms when needed. You want your message to resonate, not leave people scratching their heads.

Not testing interactive elements

Interactive elements can be the life of your whole presentation, but not testing them beforehand is like jumping into a pool without checking if there’s water. Ensure that all interactive features, from live polls to multimedia content, work seamlessly. A smooth experience keeps your audience engaged and avoids those awkward technical hiccups.

Presenting complex data and information in a clear and visually appealing way has never been easier with Venngage. Build professional-looking designs with our free visual chart slide templates for your next presentation.

What software or tools can I use to create visual presentations?

You can use various software and tools to create visual presentations, including Microsoft PowerPoint, Google Slides, Adobe Illustrator, Canva, Prezi and Venngage, among others.

What is the difference between a visual presentation and a written report?

The main difference between a visual presentation and a written report is the medium of communication. Visual presentations rely on visuals, such as slides, charts and images to convey information quickly, while written reports use text to provide detailed information in a linear format.

How do I effectively communicate data through visual presentations?

To effectively communicate data through visual presentations, simplify complex data into easily digestible charts and graphs, use clear labels and titles and ensure that your visuals support the key messages you want to convey.

Are there any accessibility considerations for visual presentations?

Accessibility considerations for visual presentations include providing alt text for images, ensuring good color contrast, using readable fonts and providing transcripts or captions for multimedia content to make the presentation inclusive.

Most design tools today make accessibility hard but Venngage’s Accessibility Design Tool comes with accessibility features baked in, including accessible-friendly and inclusive icons.

How do I choose the right visuals for my presentation?

Choose visuals that align with your content and message. Use charts for data, images for illustrating concepts, icons for emphasis and color to evoke emotions or convey themes.

What is the role of storytelling in visual presentations?

Storytelling plays a crucial role in visual presentations by providing a narrative structure that engages the audience, helps them relate to the content and makes the information more memorable.

How can I adapt my visual presentations for online or virtual audiences?

To adapt visual presentations for online or virtual audiences, focus on concise content, use engaging visuals, ensure clear audio, encourage audience interaction through chat or polls and rehearse for a smooth online delivery.

What is the role of data visualization in visual presentations?

Data visualization in visual presentations simplifies complex data by using charts, graphs and diagrams, making it easier for the audience to understand and interpret information.

How do I choose the right color scheme and fonts for my visual presentation?

Choose a color scheme that aligns with your content and brand and select fonts that are readable and appropriate for the message you want to convey.

How can I measure the effectiveness of my visual presentation?

Measure the effectiveness of your visual presentation by collecting feedback from the audience, tracking engagement metrics (e.g., click-through rates for online presentations) and evaluating whether the presentation achieved its intended objectives.

Ultimately, creating a memorable visual presentation isn’t just about throwing together pretty slides. It’s about mastering the art of making your message stick, captivating your audience and leaving a mark.

Lucky for you, Venngage simplifies the process of creating great presentations, empowering you to concentrate on delivering a compelling message. Follow the 5 simple steps below to make your entire presentation visually appealing and impactful:

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Gross Domestic Product, Fourth Quarter and Year 2023 (Advance Estimate)

  • News Release
  • Related Materials
  • Additional Information

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 3.3 percent in the fourth quarter of 2023 (table 1), according to the "advance" estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the third quarter, real GDP increased 4.9 percent.

The GDP estimate released today is based on source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency (refer to "Source Data for the Advance Estimate" on page 3). The "second" estimate for the fourth quarter, based on more complete data, will be released on February 28, 2024.

Real GDP: Percent change from preceding quarter

The increase in real GDP reflected increases in consumer spending, exports, state and local government spending, nonresidential fixed investment, federal government spending, private inventory investment, and residential fixed investment (table 2). Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased.

The increase in consumer spending reflected increases in both services and goods. Within services, the leading contributors were food services and accommodations as well as health care. Within goods, the leading contributors to the increase were other nondurable goods (led by pharmaceutical products) and recreational goods and vehicles (led by computer software). Within exports, both goods (led by petroleum) and services (led by financial services) increased. The increase in state and local government spending primarily reflected increases in compensation of state and local government employees and investment in structures. The increase in nonresidential fixed investment reflected increases in intellectual property products, structures, and equipment. Within federal government spending, the increase was led by nondefense spending. The increase in inventory investment was led by wholesale trade industries. Within residential fixed investment, the increase reflected an increase in new residential structures that was partly offset by a decrease in brokers' commissions. Within imports, the increase primarily reflected an increase in services (led by travel).

Compared to the third quarter of 2023, the deceleration in real GDP in the fourth quarter primarily reflected slowdowns in private inventory investment, federal government spending, residential fixed investment, and consumer spending. Imports decelerated.

Current‑dollar GDP increased 4.8 percent at an annual rate, or $328.7 billion, in the fourth quarter to a level of $27.94 trillion. In the third quarter, GDP increased 8.3 percent, or $547.1 billion (tables 1 and 3).

The price index for gross domestic purchases increased 1.9 percent in the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of 2.9 percent in the third quarter (table 4). The personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index increased 1.7 percent, compared with an increase of 2.6 percent. Excluding food and energy prices, the PCE price index increased 2.0 percent, the same change as the third quarter.

Personal Income

Current-dollar personal income increased $224.8 billion in the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of $196.2 billion in the third quarter. The increase primarily reflected increases in compensation, personal income receipts on assets, and proprietors' income that were partly offset by a decrease in personal current transfer receipts (table 8).

Disposable personal income increased $211.7 billion, or 4.2 percent, in the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of $143.5 billion, or 2.9 percent, in the third quarter. Real disposable personal income increased 2.5 percent, compared with an increase of 0.3 percent.

Personal saving was $818.9 billion in the fourth quarter, compared with $851.2 billion in the third quarter. The personal saving rate —personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income—was 4.0 percent in the fourth quarter, compared with 4.2 percent in the third quarter.

GDP for 2023

Real GDP increased 2.5 percent in 2023 (from the 2022 annual level to the 2023 annual level), compared with an increase of 1.9 percent in 2022 (table 1). The increase in real GDP in 2023 primarily reflected increases in consumer spending, nonresidential fixed investment, state and local government spending, exports, and federal government spending that were partly offset by decreases in residential fixed investment and inventory investment. Imports decreased (table 2).

The increase in consumer spending reflected increases in services (led by health care) and goods (led by recreational goods and vehicles). The increase in nonresidential fixed investment reflected increases in structures and intellectual property products. The increase in state and local government spending reflected increases in gross investment in structures and in compensation of state and local government employees. The increase in exports reflected increases in both goods and services. The increase in federal government spending reflected increases in both nondefense and defense spending.

The decrease in residential fixed investment mainly reflected a decrease in new single-family construction as well as brokers' commissions. The decrease in private inventory investment primarily reflected a decrease in wholesale trade industries. Within imports, the decrease primarily reflected a decrease in goods. Current-dollar GDP increased 6.3 percent, or $1.61 trillion, in 2023 to a level of $27.36 trillion, compared with an increase of 9.1 percent, or $2.15 trillion, in 2022 (tables 1 and 3).

The price index for gross domestic purchases increased 3.4 percent in 2023, compared with an increase of 6.8 percent in 2022 (table 4). The PCE price index increased 3.7 percent, compared with an increase of 6.5 percent. Excluding food and energy prices, the PCE price index increased 4.1 percent, compared with an increase of 5.2 percent.

Measured from the fourth quarter of 2022 to the fourth quarter of 2023, real GDP increased 3.1 percent during the period (table 6), compared with an increase of 0.7 percent from the fourth quarter of 2021 to the fourth quarter of 2022.

The price index for gross domestic purchases , as measured from the fourth quarter of 2022 to the fourth quarter of 2023, increased 2.4 percent, compared with an increase of 6.2 percent from the fourth quarter of 2021 to the fourth quarter of 2022. The PCE price index increased 2.7 percent, compared with an increase of 5.9 percent. Excluding food and energy, the PCE price index increased 3.2 percent, compared with 5.1 percent.  

Source Data for the Advance Estimate

The GDP estimate released today is based on source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency. Information on the source data and key assumptions used in the advance estimate is provided in a Technical Note and a detailed " Key Source Data and Assumptions " file posted with the release. The "second" estimate for the fourth quarter, based on more complete data, will be released on February 28, 2024. For information on updates to GDP, refer to the "Additional Information" section that follows.

*          *          *

Next release, February 28, 2024, at 8:30 a.m. EST Gross Domestic Product (Second Estimate) Fourth Quarter 2023 and Year 2023

Full Release & Tables --> (PDF)

Technical note --> (pdf), tables only --> (excel), release highlights --> (pdf), historical comparisons --> (pdf), key source data and assumptions --> (excel), revision information -->.

Additional resources available at www.bea.gov :

  • Stay informed about BEA developments by reading the BEA blog , signing up for BEA's email subscription service , or following BEA on X, formerly known as Twitter @BEA_News .
  • Historical time series for these estimates can be accessed in BEA's interactive data application .
  • Access BEA data by registering for BEA's data Application Programming Interface (API).
  • For more on BEA's statistics, refer to our online journal, the Survey of Current Business .
  • BEA's news release schedule
  • NIPA Handbook : Concepts and Methods of the U.S. National Income and Product Accounts

Definitions

Gross domestic product (GDP), or value added , is the value of the goods and services produced by the nation's economy less the value of the goods and services used up in production. GDP is also equal to the sum of personal consumption expenditures, gross private domestic investment, net exports of goods and services, and government consumption expenditures and gross investment.

Gross domestic income (GDI) is the sum of incomes earned and costs incurred in the production of GDP. In national economic accounting, GDP and GDI are conceptually equal. In practice, GDP and GDI differ because they are constructed using largely independent source data.

Gross output is the value of the goods and services produced by the nation's economy. It is principally measured using industry sales or receipts, including sales to final users (GDP) and sales to other industries (intermediate inputs).

Current-dollar estimates are valued in the prices of the period when the transactions occurred—that is, at "market value." Also referred to as "nominal estimates" or as "current-price estimates."

Real values are inflation-adjusted estimates—that is, estimates that exclude the effects of price changes.

The gross domestic purchases price index measures the prices of final goods and services purchased by U.S. residents.

The personal consumption expenditure price index measures the prices paid for the goods and services purchased by, or on the behalf of, "persons."

Personal income is the income received by, or on behalf of, all persons from all sources: from participation as laborers in production, from owning a home or business, from the ownership of financial assets, and from government and business in the form of transfers. It includes income from domestic sources as well as the rest of world. It does not include realized or unrealized capital gains or losses.

Disposable personal income is the income available to persons for spending or saving. It is equal to personal income less personal current taxes.

Personal outlays is the sum of personal consumption expenditures, personal interest payments, and personal current transfer payments.

Personal saving is personal income less personal outlays and personal current taxes.

The personal saving rate is personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income.

Profits from current production , referred to as corporate profits with inventory valuation adjustment (IVA) and capital consumption (CCAdj) adjustment in the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPAs), is a measure of the net income of corporations before deducting income taxes that is consistent with the value of goods and services measured in GDP. The IVA and CCAdj are adjustments that convert inventory withdrawals and depreciation of fixed assets reported on a tax-return, historical-cost basis to the current-cost economic measures used in the national income and product accounts. Profits for domestic industries reflect profits for all corporations located within the geographic borders of the United States. The rest-of-the-world (ROW) component of profits is measured as the difference between profits received from ROW and profits paid to ROW.

For more definitions, refer to the Glossary: National Income and Product Accounts .

Statistical conventions

Annual-vs-quarterly rates . Quarterly seasonally adjusted values are expressed at annual rates, unless otherwise specified. This convention is used for BEA's featured, seasonally adjusted measures to facilitate comparisons with related and historical data. For details, refer to the FAQ " Why does BEA publish estimates at annual rates? "

Quarterly not seasonally adjusted values are expressed only at quarterly rates.

Percent changes . Percent changes in quarterly seasonally adjusted series are displayed at annual rates, unless otherwise specified. For details, refer to the FAQ " How is average annual growth calculated? " and " Why does BEA publish percent changes in quarterly series at annual rates? " Percent changes in quarterly not seasonally adjusted values are calculated from the same quarter one year ago. All published percent changes are calculated from unrounded data.

Calendar years and quarters . Unless noted otherwise, annual and quarterly data are presented on a calendar basis.

Quantities and prices . Quantities, or "real" volume measures, and prices are expressed as index numbers with a specified reference year equal to 100 (currently 2017). Quantity and price indexes are calculated using a Fisher-chained weighted formula that incorporates weights from two adjacent periods (quarters for quarterly data and annuals for annual data). For details on the calculation of quantity and price indexes, refer to Chapter 4: Estimating Methods in the NIPA Handbook .

Chained-dollar values are calculated by multiplying the quantity index by the current dollar value in the reference year (2017) and then dividing by 100. Percent changes calculated from real quantity indexes and chained-dollar levels are conceptually the same; any differences are due to rounding. Chained-dollar values are not additive because the relative weights for a given period differ from those of the reference year. In tables that display chained-dollar values, a "residual" line shows the difference between the sum of detailed chained-dollar series and its corresponding aggregate.

Updates to GDP

BEA releases three vintages of the current quarterly estimate for GDP. "Advance" estimates are released near the end of the first month following the end of the quarter and are based on source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency. "Second" and "third" estimates are released near the end of the second and third months, respectively, and are based on more detailed and more comprehensive data as they become available.

The table below shows the average revisions to the quarterly percent changes in real GDP between different estimate vintages, without regard to sign.

Annual and comprehensive updates are released in late September. Annual updates generally cover at least the five most recent calendar years (and their associated quarters) and incorporate newly available major annual source data as well as some changes in methods and definitions to improve the accounts. Comprehensive (or benchmark) updates are carried out at about 5-year intervals and incorporate major periodic source data, as well as major conceptual improvements.

Unlike GDP, advance current quarterly estimates of GDI and corporate profits are not released because data on domestic profits and net interest of domestic industries are not available. For fourth quarter estimates, these data are not available until the third estimate.

GDP by industry and gross output estimates are released with the third estimate of GDP.

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