Speech vs. presentation: What’s the difference?

  • Written by: Joby Blume
  • Categories: Visual communication , Industry insights
  • Comments: 6

difference between presentation and a speech

What’s the difference between a presentation and a speech? Many people use the words interchangeably, but there are two main areas of difference according to the dictionary definitions. Whether one accepts the dictionary definition is another matter – my four year-old daughter sometimes refuses – but that makes further discussion pretty difficult.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), a speech is defined as:

a formal address or discourse delivered to an audience

According to the Scrabble fan’s choice – the Collins English Dictionary – a speech is:

a talk or address delivered to an audience

Note that in the Collins definition, the part about being formal is missing.

Presentation

Both the Oxford English and Collins dictionaries define presentation as including some sort of visual element. The OED definition is:

a speech or talk in which a new product, idea, or piece of work is shown and explained to an audience

Note that this includes the word ‘shown’. The Collins definition is even clearer in explicitly mentioning the use of illustrative material:

a verbal report presented with illustrative material, such as slides, graphs, etc

The Collins Dictionary also notes how the word presentation is used more generally to talk about how things are  shown – ‘ the manner of presenting, esp the organization of visual details to create an overall impression’.

Presentations and speeches

Does the distinction hold perfectly? No. Firstly, people use the terms interchangeably, so of course the real world is full of speeches that are called presentations and presentations that are called speeches. Which leads to a natural blurring of the boundaries. Second, some presentations are very formal indeed, and some set-piece speeches (e.g. The State of the Union Address ) can have visuals added to them but without the orator interacting with them.

The boundaries aren’t sharp. But, according to the definition, a speech is a talk or address, and a presentation is a talk  with the use of some sort of visual aid. 

Speech vs. presentation

Why does this matter? Because giving a speech – for a lot of people – seems harder than giving a presentation. Bad slides are actually worse than no slides . But the reason so many speakers want slides or props is because they find it too hard to deliver speeches, and because effective visual aids makes it easier for them to get their points across.

Effective visuals – that  support  a speaker – make delivering presentations easier than delivering speeches for most people. Not everyone feels they can hold an audience with simply the sound of their own voice.

Great speeches are, well… great. But they aren’t the same as presentations, and shouldn’t be held up as examples of what those giving presentations should emulate.

P.S. For more on words and definitions, see Meaning and Necessity by Saul Kripke.

difference between presentation and a speech

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Deference between speech and presentation

Speech Vs Presentation Vs Debate Compitation? Speech: Speech Eleborate In Your Ideas That You Have Crammed(Ratafication). Presetation:To Suggest Anything Infront Of All Student By Using Your Slides Its Own Way That You Have Worked For Project. Debate Compitation:To Disscuss Your Ideas With One Another..

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First of all the deck looks great, once again you guys have done an outstanding job. Second, I’d like to comment on the quality of the training provided by your colleagues - quite simply it was exceptional. I have spoken to the whole team and that view is unanimous. Please pass this on. James Bagan MyLife Digital

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Speech Vs Presentation: Get The Main Difference In 2023

In the world of communication, there are different ways we express ourselves: through speeches and presentations. But wait, what’s the difference between a speech and a presentation? Let’s break it down!

Imagine you’re standing in front of an audience, sharing your thoughts and ideas. That’s a speech! It’s like having a conversation with a large group of people, where you have the stage all to yourself.

On the other hand, a presentation is like a visual aid that accompanies your speech. It can include slides, videos, and other multimedia elements that help to enhance your message and make it more engaging. So, while a speech relies mainly on your words, a presentation adds that extra visual element.

Now that we know the basics, let’s dive deeper into the world of speeches and presentations and uncover their unique features and purposes. Get ready to conquer the stage and captivate any audience with your powerful words and eye-catching visuals!

Looking to communicate effectively? While both speech and presentation are forms of conveying information, they differ in style and purpose.

  • Speech: Typically delivered orally with a focus on storytelling and engaging the audience.
  • Presentation: Visual aids such as slideshows accompany the speaker’s message to enhance understanding.
  • Speech emphasizes the spoken word, while presentations provide a visual component.
  • Speeches often involve more improvisation, while presentations are carefully planned and structured.
  • Ultimately, the choice between speech and presentation depends on the context and desired impact on the audience.

speech vs presentation

Table of Contents

Principales puntos clave

1. Una presentación es cuando muestras visualmente información mientras hablas, mientras que un discurso se enfoca principalmente en transmitir información verbalmente. 2. Las presentaciones pueden incluir diapositivas, gráficos o videos, mientras que los discursos se basan principalmente en el habla. 3. En una presentación, el objetivo es captar la atención del público de manera visual, mientras que en un discurso, el objetivo es transmitir el mensaje de manera clara y persuasiva. 4. En una presentación, las habilidades de diseño gráfico y el uso efectivo de multimedia son importantes, mientras que en un discurso, las habilidades de oratoria y la organización del contenido son fundamentales. 5. Tanto las presentaciones como los discursos requieren práctica y preparación, pero el enfoque principal de cada uno es diferente: visual para las presentaciones y verbal para los discursos.

Comparing Speech vs. Presentation

Speech and presentation are two different methods of communication that serve distinct purposes and have their own unique characteristics. While both involve conveying information to an audience, they differ in terms of format, delivery, and overall objectives. In this article, we will compare speech and presentation, exploring their key features, user experience, pros and cons, price points, and ultimately determine which is better suited for different situations.

Overview of Speech

Speech, in its simplest form, is the act of delivering a spoken message to an audience. It is typically performed by a speaker using their voice, body language, and gestures to convey their ideas and connect with the listeners. Whether it’s a formal address, an inspirational talk, or a persuasive argument, speeches are designed to engage, inform, entertain, and influence.

In a speech, the focus is primarily on the speaker’s delivery and their ability to captivate the audience. The content of the speech is often carefully crafted, incorporating rhetorical devices, storytelling techniques, and persuasive elements to create an impactful message. Public speaking skills, such as voice modulation, articulation, and stage presence, are essential for delivering a compelling speech.

Overview of Presentation

A presentation, on the other hand, is a visual and auditory communication tool used to convey information in a structured and visually appealing format. It typically involves the use of slides, graphics, videos, and other multimedia elements to support the speaker’s message. Presentations can be created using software like Microsoft PowerPoint or Apple Keynote, allowing the presenter to showcase data, visuals, and key points in a streamlined manner.

The emphasis in a presentation lies not only on the speaker’s delivery but also on the visual aids and supporting materials used. Presentations often follow a clear structure, with an introduction, main body, and conclusion, allowing the audience to easily follow the flow of information. The visual elements in a presentation can enhance understanding, clarify complex topics, and make the content more engaging for the audience.

Key Features Compared

Speech and presentation have distinct features that set them apart in terms of their format, delivery, and overall impact. Let’s explore these key features and compare the two:

Speech: A speech is primarily an oral presentation delivered by a speaker, relying on their voice, body language, and facial expressions to convey the message. The content of a speech is usually written down and rehearsed, but the delivery can be more spontaneous and interactive.

Presentation: A presentation is a visual and auditory communication tool that incorporates slides, visuals, and multimedia elements to support the speaker’s message. The content of a presentation is organized into a structured format, often using software programs, and relies on both the speaker’s delivery and the visual aids.

Speech: The delivery of a speech is focused on the speaker’s voice, tone, and overall stage presence. The speaker’s ability to connect with the audience through their delivery plays a crucial role in the impact of the speech. However, there is often less emphasis on the visual aspects of the presentation.

Presentation: In a presentation, the delivery encompasses both the speaker’s verbal communication and their ability to effectively utilize visual aids and technology. The presenter must synchronize their speech with the slides, ensuring a cohesive and engaging delivery that incorporates the visual elements.

Speech: The primary objective of a speech is often to inform, persuade, or inspire the audience. Whether it’s a motivational speech, an educational lecture, or a persuasive argument, the goal is to captivate the listeners and convey a compelling message.

Presentation: Presentations are commonly used for informative purposes, such as sharing research findings, giving product demonstrations, or delivering business proposals. The objective is to present information in a visually appealing and organized manner that enhances audience understanding.

Visual Elements

Presentations typically include various visual elements that enhance the delivery and understanding of information. These elements can include:

– Slides: Slides are the backbone of a presentation, containing text, images, charts, graphs, and other visual representations of information. They provide a structure and guide the presenter and audience through the content.

– Multimedia: Presentations often incorporate multimedia elements, such as videos and audio clips, to add variety and enhance engagement. These elements can help illustrate concepts, provide real-life examples, or showcase product demonstrations.

– Animations: Animations and transitions can be used to add visual interest and create seamless transitions between slides or elements within a slide. When used effectively, they can enhance the overall flow and engagement of the presentation.

– Graphics and Icons: Visual elements like icons, illustrations, and infographics can simplify complex information, making it more accessible and visually appealing to the audience.

Interactivity

Speech: Speeches can often involve a level of interactivity with the audience, depending on the style and purpose of the speech. This can include engaging in a question-and-answer session, encouraging audience participation, or incorporating interactive activities.

Presentation: Interactivity in presentations can vary depending on the delivery method and audience. In some cases, presentations may include interactive elements, such as polls, quizzes, or audience participation through live feedback systems. However, presentations are generally more structured and less interactive compared to speeches.

User Experience

Speech: The user experience of a speech largely depends on the speaker’s ability to deliver a captivating message and engage the audience. A successful speech should leave the audience feeling inspired, informed, or moved by the speaker’s words.

Presentation: The user experience of a presentation is influenced by the visual appeal, organization, and clarity of the content. Well-crafted presentations that effectively convey information and engage the audience can leave a positive impression and enhance the overall user experience.

Pros and Cons

Pros: – Powerful delivery: A well-delivered speech has the potential to captivate and move the audience through the speaker’s voice, gestures, and stage presence. – Personal connection: A speech allows the speaker to establish a personal connection with the audience, as they can see and hear the speaker in real-time. – Flexibility: Speeches can be tailored to different audiences and occasions, allowing for adaptability and customization.

Cons: – Limited visual aids: Speeches rely primarily on the speaker’s delivery and the power of their words, which may limit the use of visuals and multimedia elements. – Less structured format: Speeches can be more spontaneous and less rigid in terms of structure, which can sometimes lead to less clarity or organization in the content. – Lack of visual appeal: As speeches focus on the spoken word, they may not offer the same level of visual appeal or engagement as presentations.

Presentation

Pros: – Visual impact: Presentations leverage visual elements to enhance the delivery of information, making it more engaging and memorable for the audience. – Clarity and organization: Presentations often follow a structured format, making it easier for the audience to follow the flow of information and understand complex concepts. – Multimedia integration: Presentations allow for the seamless integration of multimedia elements, such as videos, charts, and images, which can enhance audience understanding.

Cons: – Dependency on technology: Presentations rely heavily on technology and visual aids, which can be subject to technical glitches or equipment failures. – Potential for information overload: If a presentation is poorly designed or overloaded with information, it can overwhelm the audience and make the content difficult to absorb. – Less personal connection: Compared to speeches, presentations may have a less personal and intimate connection with the audience, as they primarily focus on the visual and auditory aspects of communication.

Price Comparison

When it comes to the cost of implementing speech and presentations, several factors come into play. Here are some considerations for price comparison:

– Software: The cost of presentation software can vary depending on the provider and the specific features included in the package. Popular presentation software options include Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple Keynote, and Google Slides. – Equipment: To deliver a presentation or speech effectively, certain equipment may be required, such as a laptop, projector, microphone, and speakers. The cost of these equipment items can range depending on the brand, quality, and features. – Professional services: If you require assistance with presentation creation, design, or speechwriting, you may need to consider the cost of hiring professionals or consultants who specialize in these areas.

It’s important to note that the cost comparison will vary depending on individual needs, preferences, and the scale of the presentation or speech. It’s advisable to research and consider different options to determine the most cost-effective solution for your specific requirements.

Comparison Table

| Feature | Speech | Presentation | |——————–|—————————–|————————| | Visual Elements | Limited visuals | Multimedia integration | | Delivery | Focus on speaker | Speaker and visuals | | Interactivity | Potential for Q&A | Level of interactivity | | User Experience | Impactful delivery | Visual appeal | | Pros and Cons | Pros and cons of speech | Pros and cons of presentation | | Price Points | Cost considerations for speech | Cost considerations for presentation |

Which is Better – Speech or Presentation?

When deciding whether a speech or presentation is better suited for a particular situation, several factors need to be considered, including the objectives, audience, and context. Here are three reasons why one might be preferred over the other:

1. Information delivery: If the primary goal is to convey a message in a highly personalized and engaging manner, a speech may be the better choice. A well-delivered speech can establish a strong emotional connection with the audience and leave a lasting impact.

2. Visual impact: If the content to be presented relies on visual aids, such as data, graphics, or multimedia elements, a presentation would be more suitable. Presentations allow for the seamless integration of visuals, enhancing the audience’s understanding and engagement with the information.

3. Structure and organization: If the content needs to be presented in a clear and organized manner, with a predefined structure and flow, a presentation is the better option. The structured format of a presentation ensures that information is presented in a logical and digestible manner, making it easier for the audience to follow and comprehend.

Ultimately, the choice between a speech and a presentation depends on the specific objectives, audience, and context of the communication. Both methods have their strengths and can be highly effective when used appropriately. It is essential to consider the key features, pros, and cons of each to determine the best approach for your specific needs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are you confused about the differences between a speech and a presentation? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered! Check out these commonly asked questions to gain a better understanding of speech versus presentation.

1. What is the main difference between a speech and a presentation?

A speech and a presentation are both forms of communication, but they differ in their intent and delivery style. A speech is typically a verbal address given by one person, often without visual aids, and is more focused on delivering a message or conveying emotions. On the other hand, a presentation combines speech with visual aids, such as slides or graphics, and is more concerned with sharing information or persuading an audience.

Think of a speech as a heartfelt talk meant to inspire or motivate, while a presentation is a more structured and informative way to convey facts or ideas.

2. When should I use a speech and when should I use a presentation?

The choice between using a speech or a presentation depends on your purpose and audience. Use a speech when you want to connect on a deeper emotional level, such as during a graduation ceremony or a motivational event. The lack of visual aids allows for a stronger emphasis on your words and delivery style.

On the other hand, use a presentation when you need to present information in a clear and organized manner. This is useful in educational settings, business meetings, or conferences where you want to enhance audience understanding using visual aids and slides. Additionally, a presentation can be helpful when you need to convince or persuade others by illustrating key points with supporting visuals.

3. How should I prepare for a speech?

To prepare for a speech, start by identifying your main message and purpose. Think about the emotions you want to convey and the impact you want to make on your audience. Craft a clear and concise outline, organizing your speech into an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Practice delivering your speech aloud, paying attention to your tone, pacing, and body language. Use personal stories or anecdotes to engage and connect with your audience. It can also be helpful to rehearse in front of a mirror or record yourself to identify areas for improvement and build confidence in your delivery.

4. How should I prepare for a presentation?

To prepare for a presentation, start by clarifying your main objective and identifying the key points you want to convey. Create visually appealing slides that support your message, using clear and concise text, relevant images, and graphs or charts if necessary.

Practice your presentation multiple times to ensure a smooth and confident delivery. Pay attention to your tone of voice, body language, and eye contact with the audience. Familiarize yourself with the technology or equipment you will be using, such as a projector or microphone, to avoid any technical difficulties during your presentation.

5. How can I engage my audience during a speech or presentation?

To engage your audience during a speech or presentation, consider using storytelling techniques to make your content relatable and memorable. Incorporate interactive elements, such as asking questions or encouraging audience participation, to create a sense of involvement.

Additionally, maintain eye contact with your audience, vary your vocal tone and gestures to keep their attention, and use visual aids effectively to support your message. Encouraging questions or discussion after your speech or presentation also allows for further engagement and interaction with your audience.

speech vs presentation 2

Differences between a speech and a presentation (With examples)

In a nutshell, speeches and presentations both involve talking to an audience, but there are some key differences between them. A speech is typically longer and more formal, like the kind you might give at a special event or ceremony. Presentations, on the other hand, are shorter and often involve visual aids like slides or props. They are usually given in a business or educational setting.

When giving a speech, it’s important to use clear and concise language, as well as to connect with the audience on an emotional level. This helps to capture their attention and make your message memorable. In contrast, presentations rely on visual elements to support the information being shared. This can include graphs, pictures, or even videos. These visual aids help to make complex ideas easier to understand.

Remember, whether you’re giving a speech or a presentation, practice is key. The more you rehearse, the more confident and comfortable you’ll feel in front of an audience. Don’t forget to maintain eye contact, speak clearly, and engage with your listeners. By following these tips, you’ll be well on your way to becoming a confident and effective speaker or presenter.

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What Is the Difference Between a Speech & a Presentation?

by Barbara Bean-Mellinger

Published on 22 Oct 2018

Many people use the words "speech" and "presentation" interchangeably since both involve speaking in front of a group. It's true that both can be dreaded for that very reason. Others note the difference is that speakers in a presentation use visual aids, while those in a speech typically don't. While that's true enough, there are many other distinct differences between the two.

Formal or Not So Formal

Don't tell the speaker giving a presentation in front of the company CEO and other bigwigs that it isn't a formal occurrence. His sweaty palms say otherwise. But, nervousness aside, presentations are given many times throughout the year in business, from sales meetings to conferences, while speeches are reserved for high profile, public events and special occasions like retirement parties and company mergers. Because of this, speeches are more formal. Not that the speaker has to wear formal attire; if only it were that simple to pull off a great speech! Also, the audience is more interested in what your presentation will show them, than they are in you and how you present. Whereas in a speech, it’s just you up there, so all eyes and ears are on you.

Emotional or Just the Facts?

If you think speeches tug at the listeners' emotions while presentations present the facts with visual backup, you're partially right. Speeches make use of anecdotes that pull you in. As you listen you may be thinking, "That's happened to me too!" Or, if the story is unique or outlandish, it leaves you feeling amazed that such a thing happened to the speaker. Stories people can relate to can help presentations, too, but they're not as critical and they can even be distracting. You're already talking and showing visuals; adding stories can seem like too much of a diversion.

Caring Versus Passion

Caring about your work always makes it better. But in a presentation, you can and should dazzle people with your visuals. They're not your backup; they're as critical to your presentation as your explanations. It's a lot like show-and-tell. Without the things to show, you'd have nothing to tell. If you make sure all the charts and graphs you show are easy to understand, your audience will get your messages. A speech, on the other hand, is just you. This is where your passion really comes through, or your lack of it turns your speech into a dud. It's important to decide what your speech's core message is, then build out from that with quotes, anecdotes and humor to convey your message in a memorable way.

Speech and Presentation and More

You may be wondering about other types of public speaking. What's the difference between a seminar and a presentation; or a speech and a lecture? How about the difference between a speech and a debate?

A seminar is different from a presentation in that it's more interactive. While a presentation is given by one person, a seminar involves the participants in some way. It could include small group discussions or a panel. Since seminars are typically several hours in length, they often have many parts that vary in structure to keep people interested.

A lecture is similar to a speech because both are rather formal and one person is doing the talking. Lectures are more often used to teach something, particularly in a college class. Since lectures are typically given during every class period, they aren't expected to be as dramatic or dynamic as a speech, though it might be more motivating if they were!

A debate differs from both a speech and a presentation because it's between two sides that are equally involved. Each side usually takes an opposing view on the debate question or subject. It's often like a contest where, at the end of it, a vote is taken to decide who won the debate.

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Speech vs. Presentation — What's the Difference?

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Difference Between Speech and Presentation

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Public Speaking and Presentations: Tips for Success

This resource includes tips and suggestions for improving your public speaking skills.

Even if you’ve never spoken in front of a large group before, chances are you will encounter public speaking sometime during your life. Whether you’re giving a presentation for your classmates or addressing local politicians at a city council meeting, public speaking allows you to convey your thoughts and feelings in clear ways. Having the right tools can prepare you for successful public speaking and equip you with high-quality communication skills.

Know Your Audience

Different audiences require different modes of public speaking. How you address a room full of preschoolers will vary from how you address a group of professors at an academic conference. Not only will your vocabulary change, but you might alter your pacing and tone as well.

Knowing your audience also helps you decide the content of your speech. For example, if you’re presenting research to a group of scientists, you might not need to define all your scientific language. However, if you present that same research to a group of individuals who are unfamiliar with your scientific field, you may need to define your terms or use simpler language.

Recognizing the extent to which your audience is familiar with your topic helps you center your presentation around the most important elements and avoid wasting time on information your audience either 1) already knows or 2) does not need to know for the purpose of your speech.

Knowing your audience also means tailoring your information to them. Try to keep things straight and to the point; leave out extraneous anecdotes and irrelevant statistics.

Establish Your Ethos and Feel Confident in Your Subject

It’s important to let your audience know what authority you have over your subject matter. If it’s clear you are familiar with your subject and have expertise, your audience is more likely to trust what you say.

Feeling confident in your subject matter will help establish your ethos. Rather than simply memorizing the content on your PowerPoint slides or your note cards, consider yourself a “mini expert” on your topic. Read up on information related to your topic and anticipate questions from the audience. You might want to prepare a few additional examples to use if people ask follow-up questions. Being able to elaborate on your talking points will help you stay calm during a Q & A section of your presentation.

Stick to a Few Main Points

Organizing your information in a logical way not only helps you keep track of what you’re saying, but it helps your audience follow along as well. Try to emphasize a few main points in your presentation and return to them before you conclude. Summarizing your information at the end of your presentation allows your audience to walk away with a clear sense of the most important facts.

For example, if you gave a presentation on the pros and cons of wind energy in Indiana, you would first want to define wind energy to make sure you and your audience are on the same page. You might also want to give a brief history of wind energy to give context before you go into the pros and cons. From there, you could list a few pros and a few cons. Finally, you could speculate on the future of wind energy and whether Indiana could provide adequate land and infrastructure to sustain wind turbines. To conclude, restate a few of the main points (most likely the pros and cons) and end with the most important takeaway you want the audience to remember about wind energy in Indiana.

Don't be Afraid to Show Your Personality

Delivering information without any sort of flourish or style can be boring. Allowing your personality to show through your speaking keeps you feeling relaxed and natural. Even if you’re speaking about something very scientific or serious, look for ways to let your personality come through your speech.

For example, when Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek announced in March of 2019 that he had stage 4 pancreatic cancer, he still let his trademark dignity and professionalism set the tone for his address. He began his announcement by saying “it’s in keeping with my long-time policy of being open and transparent with our Jeopardy! fan base.” Later, he joked that he would need to overcome his illness in order to fulfill his contract, whose terms required him to host the show for three more years. Though the nature of Trebek's announcement could easily have justified a grim, serious tone, the host instead opted to display the charm that has made him a household name for almost thirty-five years. In doing so, he reminded his audience precisely why he is so well-loved.

Use Humor (When Appropriate)

Using humor at appropriate moments can keep your audience engaged and entertained. While not all occasions are appropriate for humor, look for moments where you can lighten the mood and add some humor.

For example, just two months after the assassination attempt on Ronald Reagan, Reagan was in the middle of giving a speech when a balloon loudly popped while he was speaking. Reagan paused his speech to say “missed me,” then immediately continued speaking. This off-the-cuff humor worked because it was appropriate, spontaneous, and did not really distract from his message.

Similarly, at the end of his final White House Correspondents Dinner, Barack Obama concluded his speech by saying “Obama out” and dropping the mic. Once again, the humor did not distract from his message, but it did provide a light-hearted shift in his tone.  

Don't Let Visual Aids Distract From Your Presentation

Visual aids, such as PowerPoints or handouts, often go alongside presentations. When designing visual aids, be sure they do not distract from the content of your speech. Having too many pictures or animations can cause audience members to pay more attention to the visuals rather than what you’re saying.

However, if you present research that relies on tables or figures, having many images may help your audience better visualize the research you discuss. Be aware of the ways different types of presentations demand different types of visual aids.

Be Aware of Your Body Language

When it comes to giving a presentation, nonverbal communication is equally as important as what you’re saying. Having the appropriate posture, gestures, and movement complement the spoken element of your presentation. Below are a few simple strategies to make you appear more confident and professional.

Having confident posture can make or break a presentation. Stand up straight with your shoulders back and your arms at your sides. Slouching or crossing your arms over your chest makes you appear smaller and more insecure. However, be sure you’re not too rigid. Just because you’re standing up tall does not mean you cannot move around.

Eye contact

Making eye contact with your audience not only makes them feel connected to you but it also lets you gauge their response to you. Try to look around the room and connect with different audience members so you’re not staring at the same people the whole time. If you notice your audience starting to nod off, it might be a good time to change your tone or up your energy. 

Avoid distracting or compulsive gestures

While hand gestures can help point out information in a slide or on a poster, large or quick gestures can be distracting. When using gestures, try to make them feel like a normal part of your presentation.

It’s also easy to slip into nervous gestures while presenting. Things like twirling your hair or wringing your hands can be distracting to your audience. If you know you do something like this, try to think hard about not doing it while you’re presenting.

Travel (if possible)

If you are presenting on a stage, walking back and forth can help you stay relaxed and look natural. However, be sure you’re walking slowly and confidently and you’re using an appropriate posture (described above). Try to avoid pacing, which can make you appear nervous or compulsive.

Rehearse (if Possible)

The difference between knowing your subject and rehearsing comes down to how you ultimately present your information. The more you rehearse, the more likely you are to eliminate filler words such as like and um . If possible, try practicing with a friend and have them use count the filler words you use. You can also record yourself and play back the video. The more you rehearse, the more confident you will feel when it comes time to actually speak in front of an audience.

Finally, Relax!

Although public speaking takes time and preparation, perhaps one of the most important points is to relax while you’re speaking. Delivering your information in a stiff way prevents you from appearing natural and letting your personality come through. The more relaxed you feel, the more confident your information will come across.

difference between presentation and a speech

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What’s the difference between a speech and a presentation.

Some people make a great deal out of two words — ‘speech’ and ‘presentation’.  I don’t give speeches, they may say, only presentations.  A speech is a big deal.  A presentation is what I do in front of my team, or the Board, or some sales prospects.

OK, if that distinction helps you feel less nervous for that thing that you have to give next Wednesday, fair enough.  But it’s a false disctinction.

The essential principles of speech-giving and presentation-giving are the same.  Maybe, in common parlance, speeches are more formal, or to larger audiences, or more important, than presentations.  But each is an opportunity to change the world.  Each involves putting yourself in front of some people and holding forth.  Each should be taken very seriously.

There may be a further implication in some business circles that a presentation involves Power Point, and a speech, especially a keynote speech, typically will not.  But that’s to make a distinction where there is none.  Most people use Power Point badly, as a crutch, or speaker notes, not as illustrations to help the audience get a few key points of the talk.  Using Power Point badly will mar both speeches and presentations. 

So don’t hide behind Power Point, and don’t hide behind the terminology.  A presentation is a speech, and worth taking seriously.  Prepare it thoughtfully, rehearse it fully, and give it with passion. The only reason to give a speech is to change the world.   

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Difference Between

Speech vs. Presentation: Know the Difference

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Key Differences

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Primary focus, engagement style, typical context, preparation, audience interaction, speech and presentation definitions, presentation, repeatedly asked queries, what are the key elements of a presentation, how do speech and presentation differ in audience engagement, do presentations always require technology, what is a speech, is a speech always scripted, what skills are essential for an effective presentation, what settings are typical for presentations, can a speech include visual aids, what's the role of storytelling in speeches, how important is body language in a speech, how can technology enhance a presentation, what's the difference in preparation time for speeches vs. presentations, is it necessary to memorize a speech, what are common mistakes in presentations, how can nervousness be managed during a speech, how do you prepare for a speech, can anyone give a speech, how do you handle questions during a presentation, what makes a presentation successful, are there different types of presentations, share this page.

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So you’ve been asked to give a speech. Or was it “remarks”? And what’s the difference, anyway? Here at Spring Green Communications, we are experts at drafting speeches and remarks for our clients — oh, and presentations, too. Here’s what you need to know if you’re asked to deliver any of them. 

Speech : 

WHAT IT IS: A speech is the most formal of these three types of public speaking, and it tends to be the longest and most carefully scripted. Speeches are often given to an external audience on a planned occasion, and they frequently cover “big ideas” about which you or your company are considered experts. 

TO BE SUCCESSFUL:   

  • Consider your audience, the venue and the occasion before you get started. Your communications team should track down answers to logistical questions in advance. 
  • Will there be a podium and microphone (and what kind of mic)? Will there be water available? Will the speech be livestreamed or recorded?  
  • What are the main points you need to hit?  
  • What’s your time limit? For most people, a 10-minute speech will run about 1,500 words. 
  • Practice. Read it aloud in a normal cadence to make sure you’re comfortable and it sounds like you. 
  • Will there be time for questions? If so, consider “planting” a question with an audience member to get the session started. 
  • Have a printout of the speech in large font, because technology sometimes fails.

Remarks : 

WHAT IT IS: Remarks tend to be shorter than speeches and more informal. You may be introducing someone else, or giving or receiving an award. 

  • You can SOUND impromptu, but you should BE scripted and in your intended “voice.” Don’t let the informality fool you — you need to prepare in advance. 
  • Again, consider the venue. Will you need to climb up to a podium and back down again? Make sure the space is accessible if this will be a challenge. 
  • Two minutes of remarks is only about 250-300 words, so make them count. 
  • Consider putting your main points on a notecard in case you lose track of your thoughts — but don’t read straight from the cards! 

Presentation : 

WHAT IT IS: A presentation typically uses slides to make a specific point for both internal and external audiences. It can be long or short — but it gives you the opportunity to draw in (or lose) your audience visually. 

  • Don’t just slap your words onto a few PowerPoint slides and call it a day. We work with clients to design slides that are visually appealing but don’t allow the audience to read ahead. 
  • Both the words and the visuals must be scripted to fit your intended voice. 
  • What’s your point? Make sure you have a beginning, middle and end so your audience can follow your story. 
  • Will you be advancing the slide deck yourself, or will someone else be doing it on your cue? Your comms team can find this out for you. They should also work with the event organizers to download your presentation and run through it in advance at the venue. 
  • How big is the room? Will your slides be visible to everyone in the room? Will any video clips you want to drop in be both seen and heard?

If this sounds like a lot of work, well, we won’t lie: It is! But if you want to make a name for yourself and your company, you need to get comfortable telling your story in an intentional way in all sorts of settings and to a wide variety of audiences. We have experience with all these types of storytelling, so if you need help putting together a speech, presentation or remarks, reach out. Together, we can tell your story. 

by Donna Gorman

Art of Presentations

9 Differences between Presentation and Public Speaking?

By: Author Shrot Katewa

9 Differences between Presentation and Public Speaking?

People often confuse presentation with public speaking. After all, both require you to speak in front of an audience. But, there are subtle and important differences between a presentation and public speaking. It is better to understand this difference so that we can prepare accordingly and get the best results!

So, in this article, I will be sharing with you a few key differences between a presentation and public speaking. So, let’s get started!

1. Communication Format

Traditionally, Public Speaking is giving a speech face to face to a live audience. It comprises various forms of spoken communication skills ranging from imparting a speech or debate to motivational speaking to storytelling to Ted talks to entertaining such as a standup comedian.

However, with technological advancements, such as video conferencing, the concept evolved. In modern times, public speaking can be defined as any form of speaking between the speaker and the audience.

On the other hand, a presentation comprises spoken and visual communication. It may be a slide show or an audiovisual presentation. The topic is presented not only verbally but also by displaying content in writing supported with charts, tables, images, or text. 

2. Skills Required

Image showing crowd responding to the presentor

Public speaking is the act of presenting a topic verbally. It is often used as a medium to transfer information, but most importantly, to motivate and encourage the audience.

That said, the only input that goes into public speaking is the speaker, his or her verbal talent and style of communication, all elements displayed collectively as a package.

Whereas presentation requires the presenter to combine verbal and written content and to work with visual presentation programs such as Microsoft power point or Google slides.

3. Time for Preparation

Public speaking is more of an art than just a skill. While you are expected to do a good job when you have time at hand, but a good orator is the one who has the skills to resonate with the audience even when he or she is put on the spot!

At times public speaking may be spontaneous such as extempore. Extempore is a speech that is delivered without preparation. The speaker is given a topic on the spot and is given a minute or two to prepare on the same.

Compared with this presentation is a prepared act. Before the presentation, the presenter is ready with all the required information and facts intertwined in a pre-defined sequence. More often than not, a presentation is on a specific topic and the presenter is given ample amount of time for preparation.

4. Creativity Index

Public speaking is an art that is creative. It may be formal or informal in nature. The style of delivery of every individual is different from others. Every speaker possesses few unique qualities and has complete freedom to design his or her communication style.

Presentation is usually a formal offering. It is a form or act that has to be delivered according to certain pre-set instructions and guidelines. The presenter has limited scope and freedom to divert and add creativity to the presentation. For instance, the most common scope of limitation is the amount of time available to deliver a presentation.

5. Purpose of the Speaker

difference between presentation and a speech

One of the forms of public speaking is debate. In a debate, every participant speaks either in favor or against the topic. The participant has to convince the audience to agree with his stance – whether right or wrong!

Most forms of public speaking work in a similar fashion. The purpose of the speaker is to convince the audience to agree with the stance of the speaker.

However, in a presentation, a topic is presented comprehensively. The topic is explained in detail highlighting various related points such as advantages, disadvantages, improvement areas, resolution plan, targets, or rewards. The primary aim of the presenter is to educate the audience on the topic, and perhaps drive a call to action.

6. Elements for Effectiveness

Effective public speaking requires the speaker to deliver so efficiently that at the end the audience stands out thrilled, amazed, and persuaded.

An impressive delivery secures more marks than intelligent content. A number of elements such as spontaneity, presence of mind, voice modulations, facial expressions, eye contact, or body language go into the making of an effective speaker. For example, in a singing reality show a participant is judged not only on the basis of his voice quality but also on the way he presents himself while singing, popularly known as the X factor.

Unlike public speaking, a presentation focuses more on content rather than on communication style. The key responsibility of the presenter is to provide the audience with detailed information on the topic covering all its aspects.

An example that may be quoted is that of an author narrating a story through a kid’s YouTube video. In the video, the author narrates the story using various voice modulations to make it entertaining for the kids and to make them feel every emotion of the characters. This case portrays the modern form of public speaking where face-to-face interaction has been eliminated.

At the same time the author presents the story using text, pictures, animations or effects in the video to make the kids visualize the characters and understand the flow of the story. 

7. Size of the Audience 

In public speaking, a speaker can address an audience ranging from a group of few people to a large gathering with thousands or millions of people. An interview wherein two people are in conversation with each other or a motivational speaker addressing a huge crowd may both be considered examples of public speaking.

On the other hand, a presentation is made to a defined set of people organized together in a small or mid-sized group with a limited number of members. To cite an example, students presenting a case study to the classmates or an advertising agency presenting to its prospective client.

Most large forms of presentations won’t usually exceed an audience that can fill an auditorium often limited to a few hundreds. Whereas, for public speaking, the audience can be a large gathering of thousands of people in a ground!

8. Type of Audience

difference between presentation and a speech

Generally speaking, the type of audience present during a public speaking event is usually a group or a mass of unknown people. The speaker is neither acquainted with the audience nor related to it in any way. For instance, when a spiritual speaker addresses a group of people he is not familiar with the members of the audience.

As against it, in case of presentation the audience comprises a set of people who are familiar with the speaker. Citing the example of a business presentation, say a supervisor presenting to his team the road map to be followed to meet the annual targets, the presenter and every individual in the audience are connected to each other in professional capacity.

9. Motive of the Audience

In public speaking, the people listening to the speaker do not have a common vested interest and every individual in the audience has his own personal motive to fulfill. To elaborate, using the prior example of a spiritual speaker, it is possible that one individual may have resorted to spirituality to overcome his condition of depression and another individual may be listening to the speaker to learn how to control his anger.    

Contrary to the above, in the case of a presentation, all the members participating in the presentation and the speaker have a common vested interest towards which they all intend to work collectively. Drawing from the prior example of a business presentation, the supervisor and all the team members have a common goal of achieving the annual targets.

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What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

  • Carmine Gallo

difference between presentation and a speech

Five tips to set yourself apart.

Never underestimate the power of great communication. It can help you land the job of your dreams, attract investors to back your idea, or elevate your stature within your organization. But while there are plenty of good speakers in the world, you can set yourself apart out by being the person who can deliver something great over and over. Here are a few tips for business professionals who want to move from being good speakers to great ones: be concise (the fewer words, the better); never use bullet points (photos and images paired together are more memorable); don’t underestimate the power of your voice (raise and lower it for emphasis); give your audience something extra (unexpected moments will grab their attention); rehearse (the best speakers are the best because they practice — a lot).

I was sitting across the table from a Silicon Valley CEO who had pioneered a technology that touches many of our lives — the flash memory that stores data on smartphones, digital cameras, and computers. He was a frequent guest on CNBC and had been delivering business presentations for at least 20 years before we met. And yet, the CEO wanted to sharpen his public speaking skills.

difference between presentation and a speech

  • Carmine Gallo is a Harvard University instructor, keynote speaker, and author of 10 books translated into 40 languages. Gallo is the author of The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman  (St. Martin’s Press).

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The difference between presentation & public speaking.

The Difference Between Presentation & Public Speaking

Believe It Or Not, They’re Very Similar

What do public speakers and presenters have in common? Well, in the first instance, they face the same challenges. Overcoming ‘ stage fright ,’ pitching their voice at the right level, understanding their audience, and researching content to ensure their facts are correct, are just some of the skills needed for anyone interested in public speaking or building presentations.

Overall, though, the ambitions of the two are almost identical; and so it stands to reason that the novice public speaker will benefit from attending courses originally designed with the professional presenter in mind.

Read more: 5 Pitching & Presentation Tips

What Are The Similarities?

If you are considering – or perhaps even practicing – public speaking, then you already have one thing in common with the person looking to learn presentation skills: an audience . The remaining similarities are a little more complex – but certainly not difficult to understand or learn given the right mentor and learning environment.

The points we’ve outlined below have been taken directly from some of our best-selling presentation courses and underline the extent to which they overlap with the objectives of an aspiring public speaker:

1. You Need An Objective

Whether you’re selling, explaining – or just want to improve your self-confidence – you’ll need to have an aim. This could be teaching your audience something new, pitching a product or service, or even telling them a funny story. Public speakers, like presenters, must, therefore, structure their dialogue around this central ‘theme’ to ensure they get their point across clearly.

2. Who Are You Presenting To?

This dovetails in with the above point. In fact, arguably, this should be your first consideration. Before you agree on your core objective you need to ask yourself whether it’s thematically compatible with the audience coming to listen to you speak. Will your choice of the topic be relevant – and, above all, interesting to them? Will it grab their attention? Building presentations effectively as a public speaker in this manner is extremely important.

3. How Will You Get Their Attention?

Just as with the delivery of presentations, you’ll be faced with the alarming prospect of walking into a roomful of people who’ll be expecting you to deliver something clear, powerful, and memorable. The repeated use of key phrases will help re-enforce the central theme of your speech and find common ground with your audience – a skill that’s essential to building presentations too.

What Are The Differences?

There are, in fact, very few discrepancies to be found when comparing public speaking with the delivery of presentations. The primary challenge faced when considering this transition is that of the environment: as a presenter, you’ll often be sitting down with people you know in an intimate setting where you can share your ideas openly.

A public speaker will, conversely, find themselves in larger settings and talking to their audience, with little interaction occurring until the very end when the speech is curtailed (and your efforts hopefully rewarded by a healthy round of applause). The other difference is that the public speaker will be judged on the timbre and cadence of their voice, which will be on display for a longer period of time than with the professional presenter.

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7.2: Four Types of Speeches

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Speeches can be categorized into four broad areas depending on the amount of preparation that is undertaken and depending upon the nature of the occasion.  The four types of speeches are manuscript, memorized, extemporaneous, and impromptu.  Our aim is to acquaint you with these four different modes of delivery, to provide suggestions for when you are asked to make impromptu remarks, and then to focus most your time on the preparation, practice, and presentation of extemporaneous speeches.

Manuscript Speech

When you listen to the President deliver a State of the Union message, you listen to a well-crafted speech being read from a teleprompter. The speech has been polished by a staff of speechwriters and has been practiced many times. The President will know how to anticipate the reaction of the audience and will know when to pause for applause and when to expect laughter. This form of speaking is used when the exact words matter and when much time and energy is expended on getting everything just right. There are times when people who are not leaders of countries deliver manuscript speeches as well. They are used when people testify before Congress, when people read important statements in a public setting, or when people deliver reports at professional meetings. All call for exact words in the correct order.

While the President has access to a staff of speech writers and a teleprompter, most of us do not. If you were given this type of assignment, you would have to read your manuscript speech from printed notes. In that case, you would want to ensure that you had prepared your manuscript carefully, using large fonts so you could read it easily without burying your nose in the pages. Reading the speech does not allow you to skimp on the preparation. Practice the speech many times. This allows you to make changes, if needed, and to select the best words to communicate your exact meaning. Remember to speak clearly and naturally -strive for a conversational tone. It shouldn’t sound read -even if you are reading. Also, remember to speak slowly; there is a natural tendency to speed up when we speak in public. Delivering a speech is not a race; you do not receive bonus points for finishing early.

Unless you are specifically told by your instructor to prepare and deliver a manuscript speech, you should never write out the entire speech. Spend your time developing your outline, organizing your ideas, and determining where you can best insert your supports. Then practice using the outline while speaking.

Memorized Speech

When you were in elementary school, did you ever have to memorize a poem or a part of a speech? If you are like most students, the answer is “Yes. ” There is nothing wrong with memorization. But if you try to memorize a speech, you risk forgetting what you planned to say and coming across as completely unprepared. Memorizing your speech is even worse than reading it. All the objections that apply to the read speech also apply to the memorized speech. Spontaneity is gone. The speech can sound stilted. Often, delivery is too rapid. Concentration is on the words, not the ideas. Sometimes the speech sounds too formal, like a written essay. There is minimal feedback or other contact with the audience. And what happens if your mind goes completely blank or if an audience member interrupts? The entire presentation will likely fall apart. Memorizing a speech puts entirely too much pressure on the speaker.

That said, there are a couple of parts of the speech that you may want to have memorized -or practiced so well that you can deliver them almost as if memorized. These include:

Your introduction:  It sets the stage for the entire speech. The words should be well chosen and rehearsed. You may find that as you repeat this portion of the speech during your rehearsals you do come to memorize it word for word. If so, this is fine. After all, once you have determined the best way of saying something, why not use it? Just make sure the presentation does not sound memorized.

Your conclusion:  The summary and call to action are the final words that your audience will hear. As with the introduction, if you practice this repeatedly you will develop the best way to say what you want and you will probably have perfected this portion of the speech.

Impromptu Speech

There will come a time for all of us when we are asked to “say a few words ” without much preparation.  You haven’t prepared any notes, you haven’t practiced what you’ll say, and you’re being asked to “wing it. ” While this may seem incredibly scary, impromptu presentations are the most common type of public speaking. You’re in class and suddenly the professor wants to hear how group projects are going. You, as the leader of your group, are asked to stand and briefly discuss what the group is doing and how much you’ve completed so far. That’s an impromptu speech. You didn’t know when you headed to class that day that you’d be speaking in public, but you did it. No sweat! Or maybe you’re in a meeting at work and the boss announces that he wants you to brief everyone in the meeting on the new equipment being installed that afternoon. Again, no prior planning, no notes, you just do it. That’s impromptu speaking.

Extemporaneous Speech

The focus of most college courses in public speaking is the extemporaneous speech.  This is because this is the type of speech used most in business, education, preaching, and political affairs. Few of us will ever have a professional staff of speechwriters or ever deliver a speech with the aid of a teleprompter. But when you do have a speech or presentation to deliver, you’ll want to sound prepared, authoritative, and clear.

Simply stated, an extemporaneous speech is one where you will have time for preparation and practice but will not be expected to read from a manuscript or to have the speech memorized.  The question most students ask is, “How much time should be spent in preparation and practice? ” Perhaps Mark Twain said it best. When speaking about preparing for an impromptu speech, he noted, “It usually takes more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech ” (King). While celebrated as a humorist, there is much truth in his words. To appear to be speaking off the cuff, and to do it well, you must prepare thoroughly and practice to perfection. When you speak extemporaneously, it means you’ve had ample time to prepare and research and that you have rehearsed your speech (many times) using an outline or notes to remind you of the progression of ideas you wish to present. You will follow all the normal steps outlined in the earlier chapters. Choose a topic, narrow appropriately, analyze your audience, choose your supports, and create an outline. You will know your speech so well and will amaze your audience!

  • Provided by : Florida State College at Jacksonville. License : CC BY: Attribution

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Difference Between Public Speaking And Presentation: Explained

Delve into the world of Difference Between Public Speaking and Presentation. Gain insights into the fundamental distinctions between public speaking and presentation skills. Explore the nuances of each, uncover the key differences, and highlight the surprising similarities. Discover strategies to master both public speaking and presentation skills.

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So, by gaining a deeper understanding of the Difference Between Public Speaking and Presentation, you can leverage these skills appropriately in various scenarios. But how are they different, and how can they enhance your ability to influence others? Worry no more. 

Read this blog to learn about the Difference Between Public Speaking and Presentation. Also, explore the key elements and techniques that make each of these unique. 

Table of contents  

1) Understanding Public Speaking 

2) Exploring Presentation skills 

3) Public Speaking and Presentation Skills – Key differences 

4) Similarities between Public Speaking and Presentations 

5) How can you master Public Speaking and Presentation skills? 

6) Conclusion 

Understanding Public Speaking  

Public Speaking is a powerful form of communication that allows individuals to deliver a message, express their thoughts and ideas, and engage with an audience. It is a skill that plays a significant role in various aspects of life, from personal relationships to professional success. 

Public Speaking is the act of speaking to a group of people in a formal or informal setting to convey information, persuade, inspire, or entertain. It involves effectively delivering a message through verbal communication, utilising language, tone, and body language to captivate and engage the listeners. 

Importance of Public Speaking Skills  

Developing strong Public Speaking Skills is crucial for several reasons. Firstly, it empowers individuals to articulate their ideas confidently and clearly. Delivering a Presentation in the workplace, speaking at a conference, or even expressing oneself in social settings, the ability to communicate effectively can greatly impact how ideas are perceived and understood. 

Secondly, Public Speaking Skills are essential for professional growth and success. Many leadership positions require individuals to be able to address and inspire teams, present ideas to clients, and represent their organisations in public forums. Mastering the art of Public Speaking can significantly enhance career prospects and open doors to new opportunities.  

Elements of Effective Public Speaking  

To become an effective Public Speaker, several elements should be considered: 

a) Clear and concise message delivery: A successful Public Speaker communicates their message clearly, ensuring the audience understands the main points and takeaways. 

b) Engaging storytelling techniques: Storytelling captivates an audience and helps them connect emotionally with the speaker's message. Incorporating anecdotes, examples, and narratives can make the speech more memorable and impactful. 

c) Effective use of vocal variety and body language: Public Speaking is not just about words; it’s about how they are delivered. Skilful use of the vocal variety, such as tone, pace, and emphasis, can add depth and meaning to the speech. Similarly, utilising appropriate body language, such as gestures and facial expressions, enhances the speaker’s credibility and engagement with the audience. 

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Exploring Presentation skills  

Presentations are a common and essential form of communication in various professional and educational settings. It can be defined as a structured communication process that involves delivering information to an audience using visual aids such as slides, charts, or multimedia. 

It serves as a tool to enhance understanding, engage listeners visually, and support the speaker’s message. Further, Presentations can occur in boardrooms, classrooms, conferences, or any setting where information needs to be effectively communicated. 

Importance of Presentation skills  

Developing strong Presentation skills is essential in today’s fast-paced and visually-oriented world. Whether in business, academia, or other professional fields, the ability to deliver compelling Presentations can make a significant impact. 

Effective Presentation skills enable individuals to organise content, engage the audience, and leave a memorable impression. To deliver an impactful Presentation, several components should be considered: 

a) Clear structure and organisation: A well-structured Presentation follows a logical flow, with a clear introduction, main points, and conclusion. It allows the audience to follow along easily and comprehend the key ideas being presented. 

b)  Engaging visual design and layout: Visual design plays a crucial role in capturing the audience's attention and conveying information effectively. Using consistent colour schemes, appropriate fonts, and visually appealing layouts can enhance the visual impact of the Presentation. 

c) Effective use of multimedia elements : Integrating multimedia elements such as images, videos, or audio clips can enhance understanding and engage the audience on multiple sensory levels. These elements should be relevant, well-timed, and used sparingly to avoid overwhelming the audience. 

d) Skillful delivery and timing: A successful Presentation requires effective delivery skills. This includes maintaining eye contact, speaking clearly and audibly, and utilising appropriate pacing and pauses. The timing of the Presentation should be well-managed to ensure audience engagement throughout. 

Public Speaking and Presentation Skills – Key differences  

While Public Speaking and Presentations are related forms of communication, they have distinct characteristics that set them apart. Understanding these differences can help individuals navigate various communication scenarios effectively. Let’s explore the key differences between Public Speaking and Presentations: 

Level of interactivity  

One significant Difference Between Public Speaking and Presentations lies in the level of interactivity with the audience. In Public Speaking, there is often direct engagement with the audience, allowing for questions, discussions, and active participation. The speaker may seek audience feedback, encourage dialogue, or facilitate interactive activities to foster engagement. 

Presentations, on the other hand, typically have a more one-way communication style. While there might be opportunities for questions at the end, the focus is primarily on delivering the content in a structured manner. Presenters often rely on visual aids and slides to support their message, aiming to inform or educate the audience rather than actively engage them in a dialogue. 

Time frame and structure  

Public Speaking engagements can vary significantly in terms of duration. They can range from brief speeches delivered in a few minutes to longer keynote addresses that span an hour or more. Public Speakers have the flexibility to adapt their content and delivery style based on the time allotted and the specific needs of the audience. 

Presentations, on the other hand, are typically more time-bound and follow a structured format. They often have a designated time limit, requiring presenters to plan and organise their content within that timeframe carefully. Presentations commonly follow a clear beginning, middle, and end, with a predefined agenda or outline to guide the flow of information. 

Use of visual aids  

Visual aids are crucial in Presentations, supporting the content being delivered. Presenters often rely on slides, charts, graphs, or other visual elements to enhance understanding and engage the audience visually. These visual aids serve as a complementary tool, reinforcing key points and visual representation of data or concepts. 

In Public Speaking, the use of visual aids is not as prevalent. While speakers may incorporate visual elements sparingly, the focus is primarily on the verbal delivery and the speaker’s ability to captivate the audience through storytelling, rhetoric, or personal connection. Public Speakers rely more on their communication skills and the power of their words to convey their message effectively. 

Emphasis on persuasion vs. information  

Another Difference Between Public Speaking and Presentations lies in the emphasis on persuasion versus information. Public Speaking often aims to persuade and influence the audience. Whether it’s convincing them to adopt a certain viewpoint, take action, or change their perspective, Public Speakers utilise persuasive techniques such as rhetoric, emotional appeals, and logical arguments to sway the audience’s opinions or attitudes. 

Presentations, on the other hand, primarily focus on providing information and delivering content clearly and concisely. While there may be elements of persuasion involved, such as influencing the audience’s understanding or decision-making process, the primary goal of a Presentation is to convey information accurately and effectively. 

Degree of formality  

Public Speaking and Presentations also differ in terms of formality. Public Speaking can encompass a wide range of settings, from formal events such as conferences or academic lectures to more informal gatherings or impromptu speeches. The level of formality may vary depending on the context and the expectations of the audience. 

On the other hand, presentations tend to be more structured and formal. They often involve preparing and delivering information professionally, such as in business meetings, educational settings, or corporate Presentations. Presenters are expected to adhere to certain guidelines and standards of professionalism in their delivery. 

Enhance your Public Speaking skills and become a confident speaker with our Public Speaking Training .  

Similarities between Public Speaking and Presentations  

While Public Speaking and Presentations have distinct characteristics, they also share several similarities that contribute to effective communication. Understanding these commonalities can help individuals enhance their skills in both areas. So, Let’s learn about the similarities between Public Speaking and Presentations: 

Effect on the audience  

Both Public Speaking and Presentations can be measured in terms of their effectiveness. In both scenarios, the speaker's ability to engage the audience, convey the intended message clearly, and leave a lasting impact are crucial factors. 

Evaluating the audience's response, feedback, and level of understanding can provide insights into the effectiveness of both Public Speaking and Presentations. 

Communication skills  

Effective communication skills are vital in both Public Speaking and Presentations. Clear articulation, proper use of body language, tone of voice, and the ability to engage the audience are essential elements for success. Whether it's capturing the attention of the listeners during a Public Speaking engagement or delivering a compelling Presentation, honing communication skills is critical in both scenarios. 

Audience size  

The size of the audience can vary in both Public Speaking and Presentations. While Public Speaking often involves addressing a larger audience, such as in conferences or seminars, Presentations can range from small groups to larger gatherings. In both cases, speakers need to adapt their communication style, engage the audience, and tailor their content to meet the expectations and needs of the listeners. 

Creativity window  

Both Public Speaking and Presentations provide an opportunity for speakers to showcase their creativity. Whether using storytelling techniques, incorporating visual aids, or employing rhetorical devices, creativity plays a significant role in capturing the audience’s attention and conveying the message effectively. The ability to think outside the box and present ideas in an engaging and innovative manner can elevate both Public Speaking and Presentations. 

The overall goal of the speaker  

While the specific objectives may vary, the overall goal of the speaker remains consistent in both Public Speaking and Presentations. It is to effectively communicate a message, share knowledge, influence opinions, or inspire action. Whether it's delivering a motivational speech or presenting a business proposal, the speaker aims to engage the audience, leave an impact, and achieve the desired outcome. 

Gain in-depth knowledge of communicating through interactive diagrams with our Visual Communication Training .  

How to master Public Speaking and Presentation skills?   

How to master Public Speaking and Presentation skills

a) Research and analyse your audience to tailor your content and delivery to their interests and needs. 

b) Craft concise messages that are easy to understand, avoiding jargon or complex language. 

c) Rehearse your speech or Presentation multiple times to build confidence and improve delivery. 

d)Use appropriate gestures, maintain eye contact, and control your vocal tone to enhance communication. 

e) Incorporate visual elements such as slides or props to enhance understanding and engagement. 

f) Encourage interaction, ask rhetorical questions, or use storytelling techniques to captivate the audience. 

g) Be flexible in adapting your communication style to different formal or informal settings. 

h) Be yourself and let your passion and enthusiasm shine through in your delivery. 

Conclusion  

Understanding the Difference Between Public Speaking and Presentation skills is a valuable asset that can greatly enhance your communication abilities. By understanding these differences, you can become a confident and compelling communicator, making a lasting impact on your personal and professional endeavours. Learn how to communicate effectively and become a catalyst of change with our Communication Skills Training .  

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13.1 Functions of the Presentation to Inform

Learning objectives.

  • Describe the functions of the speech to inform.
  • Explain the difference between exposition and interpretation.

Informative presentations focus on helping the audience to understand a topic, issue, or technique more clearly. You might say, “Is that all?” and the answer is both yes and no. An affirmative response underscores the idea that informative speeches do not seek to motivate the audience to change their minds, adopt a new idea, start a new habit, or get out there and vote. They may, however, inform audiences on issues that may be under consideration in an election or referendum. On the other hand, a negative response reaffirms the idea that to communicate a topic, issue, or subject clearly is a challenge in itself and shouldn’t be viewed as a simplistic process. There are distinct functions inherent in a speech to inform, and you may choose to use one or more of these functions in your speech. Let’s take a look at the functions and see how they relate to the central objective of facilitating audience understanding.

The basic definition of communication highlights the process of understanding and sharing meaning. An informative speech follows this definition in the aspect of sharing content and information with an audience. You won’t be asking the audience to actually do anything in terms of offering a response or solving a problem. Instead you’ll be offering to share with the audience some of the information you have gathered relating to a topic. This act of sharing will reduce ignorance, increase learning, and facilitate understanding of your chosen topic.

Increase Understanding

How well does your audience grasp the information? This should be a guiding question to you on two levels. The first involves what they already know—or don’t know—about your topic, and what key terms or ideas might be necessary for someone completely unfamiliar with your topic to grasp the ideas you are presenting. The second involves your presentation and the illustration of ideas. A bar chart, a pie graph, and a video clip may all serve you and the audience well, but how will each ingredient in your speech contribute to their understanding? The audience will respond to your attention statement and hopefully maintain interest, but how will you take your speech beyond superficial coverage of content and effectively communicate key relationships that increase understanding? These questions should serve as a challenge for your informative speech, and by looking at your speech from an audience-oriented perspective, you will increase your ability to increase the audience’s understanding.

Change Perceptions

How you perceive stimuli has everything to do with a range of factors that are unique to you. We all want to make sense of our world, share our experiences, and learn that many people face the same challenges we do. Many people perceive the process of speaking in public as a significant challenge, and in this text, we have broken down the process into several manageable steps. In so doing, we have to some degree changed your perception of public speaking. When you present your speech to inform, you may want to change the audience member’s perceptions of your topic. You may present an informative speech on air pollution and want to change common perceptions such as the idea that most of North America’s air pollution comes from private cars, or that nuclear power plants are a major source of air pollution. You won’t be asking people to go out and vote, or change their choice of automobiles, but you will help your audience change their perceptions of your topic.

Gain Skills

Just as you want to increase the audience’s understanding, you may want to help the audience members gain skills. If you are presenting a speech on how to make salsa from fresh ingredients, your audience may thank you for not only the knowledge of the key ingredients and their preparation but also the product available at the conclusion. If your audience members have never made their own salsa, they may gain a new skill from your speech. In the same way, perhaps you decide to inform your audience about eBay, a person-to-person marketplace much like a garage sale in which items are auctioned or available for purchase over the Internet. You may project onto a screen in class the main Web site and take the audience through a step-by-step process on how to sell an item. The audience may learn an important skill, clean out the old items in their garage, and buy new things for the house with their newfound skills. Your intentions, of course, are not to argue that salsa is better than ketchup or that eBay is better than Amazon, but to inform the audience, increasing their understanding of the subject, and in this case, gaining new skills.

Exposition versus Interpretation

When we share information informally, we often provide our own perspective and attitude for our own reasons. But when we set out to inform an audience, taking sides or using sarcasm to communicate attitude may divide the audience into groups that agree or disagree with the speaker. The speech to inform the audience on a topic, idea, or area of content is not intended to be a display of attitude and opinion. Consider the expectations of people who attend a formal dinner. Will they use whatever fork or spoon they want, or are there expectations of protocol and decorum? In any given communication context there are expectations, both implicit and explicit. If you attend a rally on campus for health care reform, you may expect the speaker to motivate you to urge the university to stop investing in pharmaceutical companies, for example. On the other hand, if you enroll in a biochemistry course, you expect a teacher to inform you about the discipline of biochemistry—not to convince you that pharmaceutical companies are a good or bad influence on our health care system.

The speech to inform is like the classroom setting in that the goal is to inform, not to persuade, entertain, display attitude, or create comedy. If you have analyzed your audience, you’ll be better prepared to develop appropriate ways to gain their attention and inform them on your topic. You want to communicate thoughts, ideas, and relationships and allow each listener specifically, and the audience generally, to draw their own conclusions. The speech to inform is all about sharing information to meet the audience’s needs, not your own. While you might want to inform them about your views on politics in the Middle East, you’ll need to consider what they are here to learn from you and let your audience-oriented perspective guide you as you prepare.

This relationship between informing as opposed to persuading your audience is often expressed in terms of exposition versus interpretation. Exposition means a public exhibition or display, often expressing a complex topic in a way that makes the relationships and content clear. Expository prose is writing to inform; you may have been asked to write an expository essay in an English course or an expository report in a journalism course. The goal is to communicate the topic and content to your audience in ways that illustrate, explain, and reinforce the overall content to make your topic more accessible to the audience. The audience wants to learn about your topic and may have some knowledge on it as you do. It is your responsibility to consider ways to display the information effectively.

Interpretation and Bias

Interpretation involves adapting the information to communicate a message, perspective, or agenda. Your insights and attitudes will guide your selection of material, what you focus on, and what you delete (choosing what not to present to the audience). Your interpretation will involve personal bias. Bias is an unreasoned or not-well-thought-out judgment. Bias involves beliefs or ideas held on the basis of conviction rather than current evidence. Beliefs are often called “habits of the mind” because we come to rely on them to make decisions. Which is the better, cheapest, most expensive, or the middle-priced product? People often choose the middle-priced product and use the belief “if it costs more it must be better” (and the opposite: “if it is cheap it must not be very good”). The middle-priced item, regardless of actual price, is often perceived as “good enough.” All these perceptions are based on beliefs, and they may not apply to the given decision or even be based on any evidence or rational thinking.

By extension, marketing students learn to facilitate the customer “relationship” with the brand. If you come to believe a brand stands for excellence, and a new product comes out under that brand label, you are more likely to choose it over an unknown or lesser-known competitor. Again, your choice of the new product is based on a belief rather than evidence or rational thinking. We take mental shortcuts all day long, but in our speech to inform, we have to be careful not to reinforce bias.

Bias is like a filter on your perceptions, thoughts, and ideas. Bias encourages you to accept positive evidence that supports your existing beliefs (regardless of whether they are true) and reject negative evidence that does not support your beliefs. Furthermore, bias makes you likely to reject positive support for opposing beliefs and accept negative evidence (again, regardless of whether the evidence is true). So what is positive and what is negative? In a biased frame of mind, that which supports your existing beliefs is positive and likely to be accepted, while that which challenges your beliefs is likely to be viewed as negative and rejected. There is the clear danger in bias. You are inclined to tune out or ignore information, regardless of how valuable, useful, or relevant it may be, simply because it doesn’t agree with or support what you already believe.

Point of View

Let’s say you are going to present an informative speech on a controversial topic like same-sex marriage. Without advocating or condemning same-sex marriage, you could inform your audience about current laws in various states, recent and proposed changes in laws, the number of same-sex couples who have gotten married in various places, the implications of being married or not being able to marry, and so on. But as you prepare and research your topic, do you only read or examine information that supports your existing view? If you only choose to present information that agrees with your prior view, you’ve incorporated bias into your speech. Now let’s say the audience members have different points of view, even biased ones, and as you present your information you see many people start to fidget in their seats. You can probably anticipate that if they were to speak, the first word they would say is “but” and then present their question or assertion. In effect, they will be having a debate with themselves and hardly listening to you.

You can anticipate the effects of bias and mitigate them to some degree. First, know the difference between your point of view or perspective and your bias. Your point of view is your perception of an idea or concept from your previous experience and understanding. It is unique to you and is influenced by your experiences and also factors like gender, race, ethnicity, physical characteristics, and social class. Everyone has a point of view, as hard as they may try to be open-minded. But bias, as we’ve discussed previously, involves actively selecting information that supports or agrees with your current belief and takes away from any competing belief. To make sure you are not presenting a biased speech, frame your discussion to inform from a neutral stance and consider alternative points of view to present, compare and contrast, and diversify your speech. The goal of the speech to inform is to present an expository speech that reduces or tries to be free from overt interpretation.

This relates to our previous discussion on changing perceptions. Clearly no one can be completely objective and remove themselves from their own perceptual process. People are not modern works of minimalist art, where form and function are paramount and the artist is completely removed from the expression. People express themselves and naturally relate what is happening now to what has happened to them in the past. You are your own artist, but you also control your creations.

Objectivity involves expressions and perceptions of facts that are free from distortion by your prejudices, bias, feelings or interpretations. For example, is the post office box blue? An objective response would be yes or no, but a subjective response might sound like “Well, it’s not really blue as much as it is navy, even a bit of purple, kind of like the color of my ex-boyfriend’s car, remember? I don’t care for the color myself.” Subjectivity involves expressions or perceptions that are modified, altered, or impacted by your personal bias, experiences, and background. In an informative speech, your audience will expect you to present the information in a relatively objective form. The speech should meet the audience’s need as they learn about the content, not your feelings, attitudes, or commentary on the content.

Here are five suggestions to help you present a neutral speech:

  • Keep your language neutral and not very positive for some issues while very negative for others.
  • Keep your sources credible and not from biased organizations. The National Rifle Association (NRA) will have a biased view of the Second Amendment, for example, as will the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on civil rights.
  • Keep your presentation balanced. If you use a source that supports one clear side of an issue, include an alternative source and view. Give each equal time and respectful consideration.
  • Keep your audience in mind. Not everyone will agree with every point or source of evidence, but diversity in your speech will have more to offer everyone.
  • Keep who you represent in mind: Your business and yourself.

Key Takeaways

  • The purpose of an informative speech is to share ideas with the audience, increase their understanding, change their perceptions, or help them gain new skills.
  • An informative speech incorporates the speaker’s point of view but not attitude or interpretation.
  • Consider the courses you have taken in the past year or two, and the extent to which each class session involved an informative presentation or one that was more persuasive. Do some disciplines lend themselves more to informing rather than interpretation and attitude? Discuss your findings with your classmates.
  • Visit a major network news Web site and view a video of a commentator such as Rachel Maddow or Keith Olbermann (MSNBC) or Glenn Beck or Bill O’Reilly (Fox News). Identify the commentator’s point of view. If you were giving a presentation to inform, would you express your point of view in a similar style?
  • On the same network news Web site you used for Exercise no. 2, view a video reporting a news event (as opposed to a commentator’s commentary). Do you feel that the reporter’s approach conveys a point of view, or is it neutral? Explain your feelings and discuss with your classmates.
  • What is the difference between an informative presentation and a persuasive one? Provide an example in your response.
  • Consider a sample speech to inform on a topic where you have a strong opinion. In what ways would you adjust your key points so as not to persuade your listeners? Discuss your ideas with a classmate.

Business Communication for Success Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Learning Objectives

  • Describe the functions of the speech to inform.
  • Explain the difference between exposition and interpretation.

Informative presentations focus on helping the audience to understand a topic, issue, or technique more clearly. You might say, “Is that all?” and the answer is both yes and no. An affirmative response underscores the idea that informative speeches do not seek to motivate the audience to change their minds, adopt a new idea, start a new habit, or get out there and vote. They may, however, inform audiences on issues that may be under consideration in an election or referendum. On the other hand, a negative response reaffirms the idea that to communicate a topic, issue, or subject clearly is a challenge in itself and shouldn’t be viewed as a simplistic process. There are distinct functions inherent in a speech to inform, and you may choose to use one or more of these functions in your speech. Let’s take a look at the functions and see how they relate to the central objective of facilitating audience understanding.

The basic definition of communication highlights the process of understanding and sharing meaning. An informative speech follows this definition in the aspect of sharing content and information with an audience. You won’t be asking the audience to actually do anything in terms of offering a response or solving a problem. Instead you’ll be offering to share with the audience some of the information you have gathered relating to a topic. This act of sharing will reduce ignorance, increase learning, and facilitate understanding of your chosen topic.

Increase Understanding

How well does your audience grasp the information? This should be a guiding question to you on two levels. The first involves what they already know—or don’t know—about your topic, and what key terms or ideas might be necessary for someone completely unfamiliar with your topic to grasp the ideas you are presenting. The second involves your presentation and the illustration of ideas. A bar chart, a pie graph, and a video clip may all serve you and the audience well, but how will each ingredient in your speech contribute to their understanding? The audience will respond to your attention statement and hopefully maintain interest, but how will you take your speech beyond superficial coverage of content and effectively communicate key relationships that increase understanding? These questions should serve as a challenge for your informative speech, and by looking at your speech from an audience-oriented perspective, you will increase your ability to increase the audience’s understanding.

Change Perceptions

How you perceive stimuli has everything to do with a range of factors that are unique to you. We all want to make sense of our world, share our experiences, and learn that many people face the same challenges we do. Many people perceive the process of speaking in public as a significant challenge, and in this text, we have broken down the process into several manageable steps. In so doing, we have to some degree changed your perception of public speaking. When you present your speech to inform, you may want to change the audience member’s perceptions of your topic. You may present an informative speech on air pollution and want to change common perceptions such as the idea that most of North America’s air pollution comes from private cars, or that nuclear power plants are a major source of air pollution. You won’t be asking people to go out and vote, or change their choice of automobiles, but you will help your audience change their perceptions of your topic.

Gain Skills

Just as you want to increase the audience’s understanding, you may want to help the audience members gain skills. If you are presenting a speech on how to make salsa from fresh ingredients, your audience may thank you for not only the knowledge of the key ingredients and their preparation but also the product available at the conclusion. If your audience members have never made their own salsa, they may gain a new skill from your speech. In the same way, perhaps you decide to inform your audience about eBay, a person-to-person marketplace much like a garage sale in which items are auctioned or available for purchase over the Internet. You may project onto a screen in class the main Web site and take the audience through a step-by-step process on how to sell an item. The audience may learn an important skill, clean out the old items in their garage, and buy new things for the house with their newfound skills. Your intentions, of course, are not to argue that salsa is better than ketchup or that eBay is better than Amazon, but to inform the audience, increasing their understanding of the subject, and in this case, gaining new skills.

Exposition versus Interpretation

When we share information informally, we often provide our own perspective and attitude for our own reasons. But when we set out to inform an audience, taking sides or using sarcasm to communicate attitude may divide the audience into groups that agree or disagree with the speaker. The speech to inform the audience on a topic, idea, or area of content is not intended to be a display of attitude and opinion. Consider the expectations of people who attend a formal dinner. Will they use whatever fork or spoon they want, or are there expectations of protocol and decorum? In any given communication context there are expectations, both implicit and explicit. If you attend a rally on campus for health care reform, you may expect the speaker to motivate you to urge the university to stop investing in pharmaceutical companies, for example. On the other hand, if you enroll in a biochemistry course, you expect a teacher to inform you about the discipline of biochemistry—not to convince you that pharmaceutical companies are a good or bad influence on our health care system.

The speech to inform is like the classroom setting in that the goal is to inform, not to persuade, entertain, display attitude, or create comedy. If you have analyzed your audience, you’ll be better prepared to develop appropriate ways to gain their attention and inform them on your topic. You want to communicate thoughts, ideas, and relationships and allow each listener specifically, and the audience generally, to draw their own conclusions. The speech to inform is all about sharing information to meet the audience’s needs, not your own. While you might want to inform them about your views on politics in the Middle East, you’ll need to consider what they are here to learn from you and let your audience-oriented perspective guide you as you prepare.

This relationship between informing as opposed to persuading your audience is often expressed in terms of exposition versus interpretation. Exposition means a public exhibition or display, often expressing a complex topic in a way that makes the relationships and content clear. Expository prose is writing to inform; you may have been asked to write an expository essay in an English course or an expository report in a journalism course. The goal is to communicate the topic and content to your audience in ways that illustrate, explain, and reinforce the overall content to make your topic more accessible to the audience. The audience wants to learn about your topic and may have some knowledge on it as you do. It is your responsibility to consider ways to display the information effectively.

Interpretation and Bias

Interpretation involves adapting the information to communicate a message, perspective, or agenda. Your insights and attitudes will guide your selection of material, what you focus on, and what you delete (choosing what not to present to the audience). Your interpretation will involve personal bias. Bias is an unreasoned or not-well-thought-out judgment. Bias involves beliefs or ideas held on the basis of conviction rather than current evidence. Beliefs are often called “habits of the mind” because we come to rely on them to make decisions. Which is the better, cheapest, most expensive, or the middle-priced product? People often choose the middle-priced product and use the belief “if it costs more it must be better” (and the opposite: “if it is cheap it must not be very good”). The middle-priced item, regardless of actual price, is often perceived as “good enough.” All these perceptions are based on beliefs, and they may not apply to the given decision or even be based on any evidence or rational thinking.

By extension, marketing students learn to facilitate the customer “relationship” with the brand. If you come to believe a brand stands for excellence, and a new product comes out under that brand label, you are more likely to choose it over an unknown or lesser-known competitor. Again, your choice of the new product is based on a belief rather than evidence or rational thinking. We take mental shortcuts all day long, but in our speech to inform, we have to be careful not to reinforce bias.

Bias is like a filter on your perceptions, thoughts, and ideas. Bias encourages you to accept positive evidence that supports your existing beliefs (regardless of whether they are true) and reject negative evidence that does not support your beliefs. Furthermore, bias makes you likely to reject positive support for opposing beliefs and accept negative evidence (again, regardless of whether the evidence is true). So what is positive and what is negative? In a biased frame of mind, that which supports your existing beliefs is positive and likely to be accepted, while that which challenges your beliefs is likely to be viewed as negative and rejected. There is the clear danger in bias. You are inclined to tune out or ignore information, regardless of how valuable, useful, or relevant it may be, simply because it doesn’t agree with or support what you already believe.

Point of View

Let’s say you are going to present an informative speech on a controversial topic like same-sex marriage. Without advocating or condemning same-sex marriage, you could inform your audience about current laws in various states, recent and proposed changes in laws, the number of same-sex couples who have gotten married in various places, the implications of being married or not being able to marry, and so on. But as you prepare and research your topic, do you only read or examine information that supports your existing view? If you only choose to present information that agrees with your prior view, you’ve incorporated bias into your speech. Now let’s say the audience members have different points of view, even biased ones, and as you present your information you see many people start to fidget in their seats. You can probably anticipate that if they were to speak, the first word they would say is “but” and then present their question or assertion. In effect, they will be having a debate with themselves and hardly listening to you.

You can anticipate the effects of bias and mitigate them to some degree. First, know the difference between your point of view or perspective and your bias. Your point of view is your perception of an idea or concept from your previous experience and understanding. It is unique to you and is influenced by your experiences and also factors like gender, race, ethnicity, physical characteristics, and social class. Everyone has a point of view, as hard as they may try to be open-minded. But bias, as we’ve discussed previously, involves actively selecting information that supports or agrees with your current belief and takes away from any competing belief. To make sure you are not presenting a biased speech, frame your discussion to inform from a neutral stance and consider alternative points of view to present, compare and contrast, and diversify your speech. The goal of the speech to inform is to present an expository speech that reduces or tries to be free from overt interpretation.

This relates to our previous discussion on changing perceptions. Clearly no one can be completely objective and remove themselves from their own perceptual process. People are not modern works of minimalist art, where form and function are paramount and the artist is completely removed from the expression. People express themselves and naturally relate what is happening now to what has happened to them in the past. You are your own artist, but you also control your creations.

Objectivity involves expressions and perceptions of facts that are free from distortion by your prejudices, bias, feelings or interpretations. For example, is the post office box blue? An objective response would be yes or no, but a subjective response might sound like “Well, it’s not really blue as much as it is navy, even a bit of purple, kind of like the color of my ex-boyfriend’s car, remember? I don’t care for the color myself.” Subjectivity involves expressions or perceptions that are modified, altered, or impacted by your personal bias, experiences, and background. In an informative speech, your audience will expect you to present the information in a relatively objective form. The speech should meet the audience’s need as they learn about the content, not your feelings, attitudes, or commentary on the content.

Here are five suggestions to help you present a neutral speech:

  • Keep your language neutral and not very positive for some issues while very negative for others.
  • Keep your sources credible and not from biased organizations. The National Rifle Association (NRA) will have a biased view of the Second Amendment, for example, as will the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on civil rights.
  • Keep your presentation balanced. If you use a source that supports one clear side of an issue, include an alternative source and view. Give each equal time and respectful consideration.
  • Keep your audience in mind. Not everyone will agree with every point or source of evidence, but diversity in your speech will have more to offer everyone.
  • Keep who you represent in mind: Your business and yourself.

Key Takeaways

  • The purpose of an informative speech is to share ideas with the audience, increase their understanding, change their perceptions, or help them gain new skills.
  • An informative speech incorporates the speaker’s point of view but not attitude or interpretation.
  • Consider the courses you have taken in the past year or two, and the extent to which each class session involved an informative presentation or one that was more persuasive. Do some disciplines lend themselves more to informing rather than interpretation and attitude? Discuss your findings with your classmates.
  • Visit a major network news Web site and view a video of a commentator such as Rachel Maddow or Keith Olbermann (MSNBC) or Glenn Beck or Bill O’Reilly (Fox News). Identify the commentator’s point of view. If you were giving a presentation to inform, would you express your point of view in a similar style?
  • On the same network news Web site you used for Exercise no. 2, view a video reporting a news event (as opposed to a commentator’s commentary). Do you feel that the reporter’s approach conveys a point of view, or is it neutral? Explain your feelings and discuss with your classmates.
  • What is the difference between an informative presentation and a persuasive one? Provide an example in your response.
  • Consider a sample speech to inform on a topic where you have a strong opinion. In what ways would you adjust your key points so as not to persuade your listeners? Discuss your ideas with a classmate.

Business Communication for Success: Public Speaking Edition Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Taiwan's new president.

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12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Perry World House, 3803 Locust Walk

Environmental Justice for All

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The Initiative and Penn Sustainability will bring together leading researchers across disciplines such as health, anthropology, education, and more doing work in the field of environmental justice to share their insights and foster dialogue on the current state of knowledge and what it means for a sustainable, resilient, and just future.

Amado Recital Hall, Irvine Auditorium

Strengthening Families

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1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Free Speech and Universities

College Hall

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Penn Museum, 3260 South St.

Campus & Community

MLK Interfaith Commemoration highlights allyship of Black and Jewish communities

The annual event this year featured a discussion between rabbi david wolpe and alum, actor, writer, and director jonah platt, along with student performances and the presentation of awards..

Keynote at MLK interfaith event.

Addressing members of the University of Pennsylvania community in Houston Hall, Rabbi David Wolpe shared what struck him from the “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” his favorite writing by Martin Luther King Jr. He noted that King begins by saying he doesn’t usually respond to his critics, which Wolpe finds wise because people get caught up telling others why they’re wrong about us. But he added that King still wrote the letter “because the people who were criticizing him were people that he thought could hear.” 

Wolpe was in conversation with actor, writer, and director Jonah Platt as part of the recent MLK Interfaith Commemoration . As a Jewish advocate, Platt said, he tries to reach the people he feels are reachable and “simply don’t know what they don’t know.” Both are Penn alumni, and Wolpe became friends with Platt’s parents in college.  

Platt said King “faced those who would hate him with dignity and self-respect, with head held high,” adding that “it’s such an important lesson of Dr. King’s that if you want others to respect you, you must first respect yourself.” In talking about Jewish hatred and about racism against Black people, Wolpe said the people who engage in hatred “hate minorities of all kinds, so I just think it’s enormously important for all of us to insist not that we’re the same but on the dignity of our differences.”

Moderating their conversation was William Gipson, special advisor to the vice president for social equity and community, who built the MLK Interfaith Commemoration in 1996 when he was serving as university chaplain. The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium Committee, Office of the Chaplain , and Office of the President hosted the event. 

Shabbatones a cappella performs.

“The conversation tonight honors an important part of Dr. King’s legacy, and that is allyship,” said Interim President J. Larry Jameson . He said Jewish leaders stood by King’s side at the March on Washington and at the Edmund Pettus Bridge, and “now it is time for allyship again. We serve a common purpose and the weight of addressing antisemitism shouldn’t fall entirely on the shoulders of the Jewish people. All of us should join in fighting antisemitism and address it as a community.” 

In welcoming remarks, Ranim Albarkawi, a third-year student from Philadelphia studying political science in the College of Arts and Sciences , said, “We must actively work against confining ourselves to comfortable bubbles within our own spheres because, when we choose comfortable silence, someone in our community is silently enduring unthinkable pain.” 

The interfaith commemoration also included the presentation of Community Involvement Awards to Regina Bynum, director of teaching and learning at the Netter Center for Community Partnerships ; Akhenaton Mikell, founder of the nonprofit Imani Star Development ; Sonja Ogden, a Department of Neurology employee who sits on several committees involved in diversity, equity, and inclusion; Talayah Johnson, a bioengineering Ph.D. student; and Om Manghani, a master’s student in the Graduate School of Education and December graduate of the College. 

West African Vibe dance group performs.

The event also included student performances by the West African Vibe dance group, rock and pop a cappella group Off The Beat , and Jewish a cappella group Penn Shabbatones . 

“One thing that I have found over the years is that during times of fear and hate, there have always been individuals who help bring us back to our better selves, with a courageous love. And this is no small thing, especially when one is among those who are receiving that hate,” said Charles “Chaz” Howard, vice president for social equity and community and University chaplain . 

Wolpe recalled that after the Oct. 7 attack on Israel, media personality Van Jones called and said he wanted to put together a service for Black and Jewish people, and that preacher T.D. Jakes prayed for the Jewish community. 

“I don’t think that I’ve ever had tears in my eyes for someone else’s prayers for me in my life, but I did, and it was so powerful,” Wolpe said. He added that he has learned that “the blessing doesn’t come from you, it comes through you, [and] anybody can bless anybody.” 

J. Larry Jameson and award recipients.

At COP28, Penn delegation shares wide-ranging knowledge and builds connections

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Science & Technology

The Singh Center for Nanotechnology turns 10

Since its founding, the Center’s multidisciplinary approach has been a strength, where researchers from Penn Engineering, Arts & Sciences, and more come together in one space.

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Penn’s urban forest

Penn’s West Philadelphia campus is home to 240 different tree species, which put on a show during the fall season.

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Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

Measuring the ripple effects of reforestation and sustainable cocoa cultivation

With support from the Penn Global Engagement Fund, Heather Huntington is investigating the impact of reforestation and sustainable agriculture interventions on livelihoods, biodiversity, and human health in Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire.

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Health Sciences

Katalin Karikó and Drew Weissman, Penn’s historic mRNA vaccine research team, win 2023 Nobel Prize in Medicine

The highest honor was bestowed for foundational discoveries that gave the world a vaccine to fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

ISoldMyHouse

Biden Says Trump Wishes For An “Economic Crash”, Mocks That He “Can’t Tell The Difference Between Nikki Haley And Nancy Pelosi”

I n a powerful speech at the First in the Nation Dinner in Columbia, South Carolina, President Biden didn’t hold back in criticizing his predecessor, Donald Trump. The President addressed various issues, including the treatment of veterans, the state of the economy, and even a perplexing mix-up involving prominent political figures.

Proud Commitment to Veterans

Biden began by emphasizing his commitment to veterans, highlighting his efforts to take care of those exposed to toxic materials. He proudly mentioned his role in crafting the PACK Act, underlining the sacred obligation to prepare and care for the military personnel sent into harm’s way.

However, the President took a pointed jab at Trump’s track record as commander-in-chief. He accused Trump of refusing to visit a cemetery outside of Paris for fallen American soldiers, labeling them “suckers” and “losers.” 

Biden expressed his anger and referred to these servicemen and women as patriots and heroes, reserving the term “loser” for Trump himself.

Trump’s Alleged Wish for an Economic Crash

The President didn’t stop there; he delved into recent statements made by Trump regarding the economy. Biden claimed that Trump wished for an economic crash, stating, “I hope there’s a crash in the next 12 months.” 

Biden found this sentiment “unbelievable” and “un-American,” questioning how any former president could desire an event that would devastate millions of Americans.

However, Biden suggested that Trump’s desire for an economic downturn might be rooted in his political motivations. According to Biden, Trump recognizes that a strong economy is good for America but detrimental to him politically. 

The President also drew a historical parallel, asserting that Trump is too late to avoid association with Herbert Hoover, one of the only two presidents in U.S. history who left office with fewer jobs than when they took office.

Trump’s Perceived Confusion

On a lighter but somewhat puzzling note, Biden humorously mentioned Trump’s alleged confusion between Nikki Haley and Nancy Pelosi. 

The President quipped about Trump being “a little confused these days” and unable to differentiate between the two prominent political figures.

People in the comments aren’t convinced: “Funny how they keep saying Trump doesn’t have a chance at winning but this clown finds it necessary to ALWAYS say how he is doing so much better than Trump, looking real confident there Joe”

Others raise some interesting points: “Sir, our vets are struggling to get Healthcare. Are you  sufficiently funding VA? Many of our homeless are vets. I’ve seen video of our vets being denied help while undocumented migrants are getting assistance. The staff turned our vets who were  living in tents in NYC away. Vets don’t need you to visit a monument in France. They need your leadership and action so that they can get the help they deserve and earned.”

Another commenter supports Biden’s words: “I was there at the time at Omaha Beach , it rained and Trump didn’t want to get wet …it was such a disgrace for those young boys that gave their lives  …such a disgrace and it says enough of what type of person we all are dealing with …ME ..MYSELF and I ( Trump )”

One commenter jokingly added: “Disclaimer and Trigger warning:  This video contains copious amounts of truth and common sense.  These values have been found to break whatever Trump supporters use to think with.”

A Glimpse into Ongoing Political Rivalry

As the political landscape continues to evolve, Biden’s speech in South Carolina provides a glimpse into the ongoing rivalry between the current and former presidents, touching on issues ranging from veteran care to the intricacies of economic motivations.

What do you think? Do Trump’s reported comments on fallen soldiers impact your perception of his respect for the military, and how might it influence his political standing? In light of Biden’s accusations, how do you view Trump’s alleged desire for an economic crash? Is it a valid concern or a political strategy?

Do you believe Biden’s assessment of Trump being ‘confused’ about political figures holds weight, and what implications might this have for future political discourse? Considering the economic landscape, do you think Trump’s wish for a crash is rooted in genuine concern or a political agenda? How might it affect public opinion?

Biden Says Trump Wishes For An “Economic Crash”, Mocks That He “Can't Tell The Difference Between Nikki Haley And Nancy Pelosi”

IMAGES

  1. Differences between a speech and a presentation (With examples)

    difference between presentation and a speech

  2. Speech vs. presentation: What's the difference?

    difference between presentation and a speech

  3. presentation and speech what is the difference

    difference between presentation and a speech

  4. Similarities Between a Presentation Technique and Speech

    difference between presentation and a speech

  5. Difference between Speech and Presentation

    difference between presentation and a speech

  6. 9 Differences between Presentation and Public Speaking?

    difference between presentation and a speech

VIDEO

  1. Presentation speech

  2. ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH PRESENTATION B092110005

  3. ARGUMENTATIVE SPEECH OUTLINE PRESENTATION B092110009

  4. Final Presentation Speech

  5. Informative Speech Presentation

  6. What the difference between speech and writing? Quick, short summary!

COMMENTS

  1. Speech vs. presentation: What's the difference?

    Blog 11th Mar 2013 Speech vs. presentation: What's the difference? Written by: Joby Blume Categories: Visual communication, Industry insights Comments: 6 Read comments What's the difference between a presentation and a speech?

  2. Speech vs Presentation: Deciding Between Similar Terms

    A speech is primarily focused on the spoken word, while a presentation relies heavily on visual aids to convey information. Additionally, a speech is usually given in a more informal setting, such as a wedding or graduation ceremony, while a presentation is typically given in a more formal setting, such as a business meeting or academic conference.

  3. The Differences Between Speech and Presentation You May Not Know

    While speech is described as "a formal talk that a person gives to an audience," a presentation is "a meeting at which something, especially a new product or idea, or piece of work, is shown to a group of people." From the definition alone, you can see that one says 'talk' and the other says 'shown.' But what's the meaning of those words?

  4. Speech Vs Presentation: Get The Main Difference In 2023

    Table of Contents Principales puntos clave Comparing Speech vs. Presentation Overview of Speech Overview of Presentation Key Features Compared Format Delivery Objectives Visual Elements Interactivity User Experience Pros and Cons Speech Presentation Price Comparison Comparison Table Which is Better - Speech or Presentation?

  5. What Is the Difference Between a Speech & a Presentation?

    But, nervousness aside, presentations are given many times throughout the year in business, from sales meetings to conferences, while speeches are reserved for high profile, public events and special occasions like retirement parties and company mergers. Because of this, speeches are more formal.

  6. Speeches vs. presentations

    Transcripts Exercise Files Speeches vs. presentations " - You may be wondering what's the difference between a speech and a presentation? While the terms are often used interchangeably,...

  7. Speech vs. Presentation

    ADVERTISEMENT Compare with Definitions Speech Speech is human vocal communication using language.

  8. Differences between a speech and a presentation (With examples)

    In this video, the difference between speeches and presentations is explained. #publicspeaking #presentationskills #speech #presentation, #publicspeaking, #p...

  9. Public Speaking and Presentations

    Academic Writing Public Speaking and Presentations Public Speaking and Presentations Public Speaking and Presentations: Tips for Success This resource includes tips and suggestions for improving your public speaking skills.

  10. What's the difference between a speech and a presentation?

    Using Power Point badly will mar both speeches and presentations. So don't hide behind Power Point, and don't hide behind the terminology. A presentation is a speech, and worth taking seriously. Prepare it thoughtfully, rehearse it fully, and give it with passion. The only reason to give a speech is to change the world.

  11. The Difference Between a Speech, Between Speaking and ...

    A presentation, in contrast to a speech, is a delivery of information, knowledge and ideas on, or about, a specific topic. The main object of a presentation is to inform and convince the audience ...

  12. Speech vs. Presentation: Know the Difference

    Key Differences Speech is often personal and subjective, relying on the speaker's perspective and style. On the other hand, a presentation is usually more objective, presenting data, research findings, or structured information in a visually engaging way. Dec 07, 2023

  13. The Difference Between Speeches, Remarks and Presentations

    Remarks : WHAT IT IS: Remarks tend to be shorter than speeches and more informal. You may be introducing someone else, or giving or receiving an award. TO BE SUCCESSFUL: You can SOUND impromptu, but you should BE scripted and in your intended "voice." Don't let the informality fool you — you need to prepare in advance. Again, consider the venue.

  14. 9 Differences between Presentation and Public Speaking?

    1. Communication Format Traditionally, Public Speaking is giving a speech face to face to a live audience. It comprises various forms of spoken communication skills ranging from imparting a speech or debate to motivational speaking to storytelling to Ted talks to entertaining such as a standup comedian.

  15. What's the difference between a speech and a presentation?

    What's the difference between a speech and a presentation? | Shola Kaye Speech and presentation have become synonyms for many. Here I share what the difference really is, so you can be confident you're using the right term.

  16. What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

    Here are a few tips for business professionals who want to move from being good speakers to great ones: be concise (the fewer words, the better); never use bullet points (photos and images paired ...

  17. The Difference Between Presentation & Public Speaking

    The other difference is that the public speaker will be judged on the timbre and cadence of their voice, which will be on display for a longer period of time than with the professional presenter. Get in the driver's seat and Connect with potential customers with PeaksLead. Written By: Philip Andrews. TAGS : Personal Development Public Speaking.

  18. 7.2: Four Types of Speeches

    Manuscript Speech. Memorized Speech. Impromptu Speech. Extemporaneous Speech. Speeches can be categorized into four broad areas depending on the amount of preparation that is undertaken and depending upon the nature of the occasion. The four types of speeches are manuscript, memorized, extemporaneous, and impromptu.

  19. Difference Between Public Speaking And Presentation Overviews

    Difference Between Public Speaking And Presentation: Explained Sienna Roberts 20 July 2023 Delve into the world of Difference Between Public Speaking and Presentation. Gain insights into the fundamental distinctions between public speaking and presentation skills.

  20. 13.1 Functions of the Presentation to Inform

    What is the difference between an informative presentation and a persuasive one? Provide an example in your response. Consider a sample speech to inform on a topic where you have a strong opinion. In what ways would you adjust your key points so as not to persuade your listeners? Discuss your ideas with a classmate.

  21. 8.1 Functions of the Presentation to Inform

    What is the difference between an informative presentation and a persuasive one? Provide an example in your response. Consider a sample speech to inform on a topic where you have a strong opinion. In what ways would you adjust your key points so as not to persuade your listeners? Discuss your ideas with a classmate.

  22. Online vs. In-Person Presenting: What's the Difference?

    Because of the difference in the importance of body language, the value of the presenter's voice is greater when it comes to online presentations. As mentioned, the giver of an online presentation is likely to dedicate most of the screen time to sharing visual content that illustrates the main points of the talk.

  23. Persuasive and Informative Presentations: A Quick Look at Differences

    A complete understanding of the difference between persuasive and informational speech will help you determine what rhetorical strategies to use for achieving the desired goal. The below table represents the difference between both types of presentation in a summarized manner. Take a look! Parameter: Persuasive Presentation: Informative ...

  24. MLK Interfaith Commemoration highlights allyship of Black and Jewish

    The a cappella group Penn Shabbatones performs at the 2024 MLK Interfaith Commemoration. (Image: Damien Townsville) "The conversation tonight honors an important part of Dr. King's legacy, and that is allyship," said Interim President J. Larry Jameson. He said Jewish leaders stood by King's side at the March on Washington and at the ...

  25. Trump's Alleged Wish for an Economic Crash

    In a powerful speech at the First in the Nation Dinner in Columbia, South Carolina, President Biden didn't hold back in criticizing his predecessor, Donald Trump. The President addressed various ...

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