Making Presentations With LaTeX

Last updated: November 6, 2022

add video to latex presentation

1. Introduction

Currently, multiple programs enable us to create presentations. However, most of these programs are proprietary. It means that the presentations may depend on resources available only in particular versions of these programs.

To avoid problems with proprietary software versioning, we can employ open-source and holistic programs to create presentations.  This category of programs enables the user to focus on the presentation content instead of its theme.

So, we can choose the presentation theme after defining the presentation content. Furthermore, we can apply the different themes by only modifying a few lines in the presentation document.

An example of such a program is LaTeX/Beamer. Beamer is a LaTeX package that enables users to create presentations through a LaTeX fashioned document.

In this tutorial, we’ll explore the LaTeX/Beamer program. First, we’ll have a brief conceptual review on Latex and a presentation of the Beamer package. So, we’ll investigate several resources provided by Beamer to create presentations. Moreover, we’ll create a sample Beamer presentation to see how Beamer’s resources work in practice.

2. LaTeX and Beamer

LaTeX is a well-known program for typesetting typically employed to write medium-large scientific documents. However, LaTeX also supports importing packages that extend its resources and enables the user to use LaTeX for several purposes.

An example of these packages is TikZ. TikZ is a graphical package that makes it possible to create images with LaTeX. Through TikZ, we can easily, for instance, draw charts , flowcharts , and graphs .

Another relevant LaTeX package is Beamer . Beamer consists of a powerful package to make presentations with LaTeX. With Beamer, we can use straightforward and clean themes or create new themes with particular and exclusive designs for the presentations.

Beamer was developed to be fully compliant with LaTeX. So, the presentations created with Beamer are provided to the user as PDF files.

Employing PDF files for rendering presentations is a great choice since most hardware (computers, printers, smartphones, …) and software (Windows, Linux, macOS, …) support this file format.

2.1. A Little Bit Deeper on Beamer

There are many advantages to using Beamer for creating presentations.  Among them, we can cite, for instance, Beamer compatibility with different LaTeX compilers, such as pdflatex, dvips, and lualatex.

Furthermore, most of the widely known LaTeX commands and packages are available to use with Beamer. In this way, we have excellent resources for, for example, mathematical and source code typesetting.

Finally, Beamer provides a library with different themes. Thus, we can customize the presentation layout by changing just a few lines in the LaTeX code. It is also possible to create and import new themes, making the presentation customization process even more powerful.

The most challenging about Beamer is that the learning curve is steeper. This challenge gets higher proportions if the user is not familiar with LaTeX. So, the user may find it hard to give the first steps with this package.

Another typical challenge is the syntax of the Beamer/LaTeX commands, which are quite unusual when compared to other text/presentation editing programs.

Furthermore, Beamer uses coordinates to position graphical resources. So, the positioning is very precise but can be harder to define for non-experienced users.

In such a way, this tutorial will present the first steps on Beamer, discussing multiple challenges of this package and showing how to tackle them.

3. Beamer in Practice

In this section, we’ll study the process of creating LaTeX/Beamer presentations from scratch. First, we’ll have an explanation of the Beamer basic structure. Thus, we’ll see some particular Beamer resources.

3.1. Beamer Basics

So, we opened an empty LaTeX document, and we want to create a Beamer presentation.  The very first thing to do is define our document class as a Beamer document.  We do that by adding the following line to the document:

Next, we do the definition of the presentation core information. The most common information in this step consists of the presentation title, the authors’ name, the institute or company name, and the date. We can do these definitions using the lines below:

With these predefinitions done, we can finally start to build our presentation frames. So, we insert the following line to the LaTeX document:

The aforementioned line indicates to the LaTeX compiler that the following commands, flags, and text should be present as part of the presentation. Similarly, we show that the presentation ended with the line next (which is typically the last line of the document):

Between the beginning and end flags, we build the presentation itself.  A Beamer presentation is organized with frames (slides).  Usually, the first frame is the presentation title one. Thus, with the previously stated information, we create the presentation title frame with the following line:

Compiling the document at this point will generate the following frame:

BeamerTitle

Other frames ( let’s call them content frames ) are quite different: they require a beginning and end flag to delimitate their scope. So, we define a content frame with the lines next:

Inside a frame, we have its content. The frame content is from text to images, besides other flags and commands to define some frame features. In the following subsection, we’ll explore the building of a frame from scratch.

3.2. Frame Building

At first, we should consider that all the commands, flags, and content defined in this subsection are included in the scope of a frame.

In such a way, the first thing that we typically define in a frame is its title. We can do that in Beamer by using the following line:

After defining the frame title, we can work on the frame content. By default, only typing into a frame scope results in a justified text vertically centralized in the frame after being compiled. Thus, let’s consider the following content of a frame:

So, this frame has three lines. It is relevant to note that the symbol \\ indicates a line breaking for the LaTeX compiler. Furthermore, we can see basic text formatting with a bold line (\textbf{}) and an italic line (\textit{}).

Moreover, it is possible to change the text alignment in the frame. We can do that by inserting the text between begin (\begin{}) and end (\end{}) flags defining the scope of a different alignment. The available alignments are right (flushright), left (flushleft), and center (center). Let’s see the example below:

At last, we can add images to a presentation frame. We do that by using the standard figure scope of LaTeX. An example is provided next:

This example includes a centered image called Lena.png (available in the same folder of the LaTeX project) in the frame. The caption appears below the image, and we can employ the label to refer to the figure in any presentation frame.

So, the following image shows the compiled frame with the previously presented texts and images:

Frame

3.3. Theme Gallery

Besides the default theme (employed in the examples of the previous sections), the Beamer package natively provides a set of themes.  This set encompass 25 themes:  AnnArbor; Antibes; Bergen, Berkeley, Berlin, Boadilla, CambridgeUS, Copenhagen, Darmstadt, Dresden, Frankfurt, Goettingen, Hannover, Ilmenau, JuanLesPins, Luebeck, Madrid, Malmoe, Marburg, Montpellier, Pittsburgh, Rochester, Singapore, Szeged, and Warsaw.

To change the presentation theme, we need to add a theme flag before the beginning of the document scope (\begin{document}). Let’s see this flag for the Frankfurt theme:

In this way, the previously presented frames with the Frankfurt theme are shown next:

FrankfurtTitle

In addition to the native Beamer themes, we can use custom themes from third-party repositories, such as the Overleaf repository .

4. Conclusion

In this tutorial, we learned about how to create presentations with LaTeX.  We took into account a popular LaTeX package to build presentations: the Beamer package. In this way, we first reviewed some fundamental concepts about LaTeX and, especially, about Beamer. So, we in-depth explored the process of building presentations in practice. 

Specifically, we studied the basic structure of a LaTex/Beamer presentation, the creation of frames, inserting and formatting the frame content, and how to change the Beamer default theme.

We can conclude that LaTeX and Beamer compose a powerful solution to build presentations. The main benefits of using them consist of a generic and precise way to define graphical resources and the compiling process that automatically generates a PDF file with the presentation.

How to embed video and animation in LaTeX and LaTeX beamer step by step

In addition to Karl's students answers ( Can we use media9 to show a video on a PDF but the video is not embedded to the PDF? ) and this other question: gif image in beamer presentation I can suggest what I did for my thesis presentation:

In the preamble of the beamer:

And then I included my file like this:

As you can see, I used the .swf file extension. I too had a .avi file and in order to convert it to .swf I used AnyVideoConverter .

I hope this helps

Below is the code about how I solved it using multimedia package. Someone can add an image also to avoid a black spot in the allocated space for the video.

So here is my workaround for this. It opens your standard video player when you click on the image.

p/s: add a curly bracket

Related videos on Youtube

Making a Pro Presentation with LaTeX's Beamer!

prashanta_himalay

I want to know the procedure to embed video and animation in LaTeX step by step. I tried to follow the instructions from this forum and wrote a LaTeX file. This is my code for embedding a video in LaTeX beamer ...an icon is visible in the third slide but when I am clicking that video is not playing...I have tried with .avi file also. I do not know what went wrong

I would be really grateful if someone helps me out.

Martin Scharrer

We love good questions

Skip to content

LaTeX.org on Twitter - follow us

  • Impressum and Privacy Policy
  • About LaTeX
  • Board index LaTeX Graphics, Figures & Tables
  • Ask a question LaTeX    Text Formatting    Graphics, Figures & Tables    Math & Science    Fonts & Character Sets    Page Layout    Document Classes    General LaTeX's Friends    BibTeX, biblatex and biber    MakeIndex, Nomenclature, Glossaries and Acronyms    Conversion Tools    Viewers for PDF, PS, and DVI    XeTeX    Others LaTeX Distributions    Decision Guidance    MiKTeX and proTeXt    TeX Live and MacTeX    Others LaTeX Editors    Decision Guidance    AUCTeX    Kile    LEd    LyX    Scientific Word/Workplace    Texmaker and TeXstudio    TeXnicCenter       Announcements       General       Templates, Wizards & Tools       Feature Suggestions       Development    TeXShop    TeXworks    WinEdt    WinShell    Others LaTeX Templates    Articles, Essays, and Journal Templates    Theses, Books, Title pages    Letters    Presentations and Posters    Curricula Vitae / Résumés    Assignments, Laboratory books and reports    Calendars and Miscellaneous LaTeX Community    Announcements    Community talk    Comments & Wishes    New Members LaTeX Books    LaTeX Beginner's Guide    LaTeX Cookbook

LaTeX forum ⇒ Graphics, Figures & Tables ⇒ Video in a Presentation

Video in a presentation.

Post by balure_1986a » Tue Mar 04, 2014 7:13 am

Post by alex » Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:23 pm

Re: Video in a Presentation

Post by balure_1986a » Thu Mar 20, 2014 9:49 am

Return to “Graphics, Figures & Tables”

  •     Text Formatting
  •     Graphics, Figures & Tables
  •     Math & Science
  •     Fonts & Character Sets
  •     Page Layout
  •     Document Classes
  •     General
  • LaTeX's Friends
  •     BibTeX, biblatex and biber
  •     MakeIndex, Nomenclature, Glossaries and Acronyms
  •     Conversion Tools
  •     Viewers for PDF, PS, and DVI
  •     XeTeX
  •     Others
  • LaTeX Distributions
  •     Decision Guidance
  •     MiKTeX and proTeXt
  •     TeX Live and MacTeX
  • LaTeX Editors
  •     AUCTeX
  •     Kile
  •     LEd
  •     LyX
  •     Scientific Word/Workplace
  •     Texmaker and TeXstudio
  •     TeXnicCenter
  •        Announcements
  •        General
  •        Templates, Wizards & Tools
  •        Feature Suggestions
  •        Development
  •     TeXShop
  •     TeXworks
  •     WinEdt
  •     WinShell
  • LaTeX Templates
  •     Articles, Essays, and Journal Templates
  •     Theses, Books, Title pages
  •     Letters
  •     Presentations and Posters
  •     Curricula Vitae / Résumés
  •     Assignments, Laboratory books and reports
  •     Calendars and Miscellaneous
  • LaTeX Community
  •     Announcements
  •     Community talk
  •     Comments & Wishes
  •     New Members
  • LaTeX Books
  •     LaTeX Beginner's Guide
  •     LaTeX Cookbook

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

  • Board index
  • All times are UTC
  • Text Formatting
  • Graphics, Figures & Tables
  • Math & Science
  • Fonts & Character Sets
  • Page Layout
  • Document Classes
  • BibTeX, biblatex and biber
  • MakeIndex, Nomenclature, Glossaries and Acronyms
  • Conversion Tools
  • Viewers for PDF, PS, and DVI
  • Decision Guidance
  • MiKTeX and proTeXt
  • TeX Live and MacTeX
  • Scientific Word/Workplace
  • Texmaker and TeXstudio
  • Announcements
  • Templates, Wizards & Tools
  • Feature Suggestions
  • Development
  • Articles, Essays, and Journal Templates
  • Theses, Books, Title pages
  • Presentations and Posters
  • Curricula Vitae / Résumés
  • Assignments, Laboratory books and reports
  • Calendars and Miscellaneous
  • Community talk
  • Comments & Wishes
  • New Members
  • LaTeX Beginner's Guide
  • LaTeX Cookbook

IMAGES

  1. How to Make a Presentation in LaTeX

    add video to latex presentation

  2. How to Make a Presentation in LaTeX

    add video to latex presentation

  3. CREATE LATEX PRESENTATION EASY

    add video to latex presentation

  4. Introduction to LaTeX: Creating a Slideshow

    add video to latex presentation

  5. Titles and sections in presentations in LaTeX with overleaf (v2)

    add video to latex presentation

  6. How to Make a Presentation in LaTeX

    add video to latex presentation

VIDEO

  1. Black Latex Presentation.flv

  2. LaTeX Tutorial 3

  3. # 1

  4. Insert LaTeX Style Equation in Microsoft Office Word, Powerpoint

  5. latex tutorial|latex tutorial for beginners

  6. LECTURE 5

COMMENTS

  1. How to embed video and animation in LaTeX and LaTeX beamer step by step

    23 I want to know the procedure to embed video and animation in LaTeX step by step. I tried to follow the instructions from this forum and wrote a LaTeX file. This is my code for embedding a video in LaTeX beamer ...an icon is visible in the third slide but when I am clicking that video is not playing...I have tried with .avi file also.

  2. Embedding videos and animations

    \movie [options] {placeholder box} {movie filename} The placeholder box is some text or other content (could be an image, for example) that determines the size at which the multimedia file is shown.

  3. How to Add a Video to Your Beamer Presentation

    If you're a LaTeX user who wants to add a video to your Beamer presentation, you've come to the right place. In this tutorial, we'll show you how to add a video to your Beamer...

  4. Including Animations Into LaTeX Beamer Presentations

    videos or GIFs. To start, we'll use the animate package in LaTeX together with the \animategraphics command to insert animation into Beamer. Furthermore, if we need to include vector graphics in our Beamer, we'll need the tikz package as well. Let's load the necessary packages: \usepackage {animate} \usepackage {tikz} 4.1.

  5. overleaf

    1 I am using the following code to embed an mp4 to a beamer presentation:

  6. How to include multimedia files in beamer

    There are different ways to include multimedia files in beamer, which one work and which ones do not highly depends on the pdf viewer you use and the operating system you are on. This questions tries to summarize the main information about the different packages which can be used, one answer per package. Packages covered in this Q&A: multimedia

  7. Beamer Presentations: A Tutorial for Beginners (Part 1 ...

    This five-part series of articles uses a combination of video and textual descriptions to teach the basics of creating a presentation using the LaTeX beamer package.

  8. Embedded videos in Latex beamer presentation

    3 Other people have asked this question but the posts are either 10+ years old (i.e., completely obsolete) or no relevant/useable answer. I need to embed a small video (no sound) in a Latex beamer presentation. I write my presentations on Overleaf since it is convenient for packages, but ...

  9. Embedding videos in your LaTeX beamer presentation with ...

    1. Animate package is a rather straightforward sounding package. This package allows you to embed gif-like animation to your LaTeX. One easy way to do this is by using \animategraphics command ...

  10. Beamer

    Beamer is a powerful and flexible LaTeX class to create great looking presentations. This article outlines the basis steps to making a Beamer slideshow: creating the title page, adding a logo, highlighting important points, making a table of contents and adding effects to the slideshow. Contents 1 Introduction 2 Beamer main features

  11. multimedia

    I would like to embed a video in a pdf that starts and stops playing by using the mouse to click the buttons Following Embedding videos and animations I devised a code: \documentclass{beamer} \ ... TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It only takes a minute ...

  12. How to create a basic slideshow presentation in LaTeX with Beamer

    Here we see how to create a very basic presentation in LaTeX, using the beamer document class. We see how to use the \frame command to create slides, and in the next tutorial we'll see how to add a title page and more. The example given in the video is also provided here as a template. To get started, click here to open the 'Presentation' example.

  13. Making Presentations With LaTeX

    Beamer is a LaTeX package that enables users to create presentations through a LaTeX fashioned document. In this tutorial, we'll explore the LaTeX/Beamer program. First, we'll have a brief conceptual review on Latex and a presentation of the Beamer package. So, we'll investigate several resources provided by Beamer to create presentations.

  14. How I Make Presentations Using LaTeX & Beamer

    0:00 / 22:13 Get started with LaTeX using Overleaf: https://www.overleaf.com/?utm_source=yt&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=im22tb. My thanks to Overleaf for sponsoring t...

  15. LaTeX Support

    Videos can be embedded using Beamer's mutlimedia package. This can be done using the \movie tag in LaTeX. Options such as loop and autoplay are currently not supported. You can embed videos from your hard drive or from the web. Note that streaming (like a YouTube video) does not work.

  16. Embed a video in a LaTeX PDF document or Beamer presentation

    6.54K subscribers Join Subscribe Subscribed 253 Share 20K views 2 years ago LaTeX How to embed video into PDFs using a technique that does not rely on Flash. This technique works both in...

  17. LaTeX Tutorial 10: Presentations with Beamer Class

    In this video, I am explaining, how to make simple presentations using the LaTeX beamer class.Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLybgCU6Q...

  18. Adding hyperlink to call a video

    1 Answer Sorted by: 12 For opening a video: \documentclass {beamer} \begin {document} \begin {frame} \href {run:/path/nameofvideo.mp4} {Click for video} \end {frame} \end {document} to open a pdf on a specific page:

  19. [Solved] How to embed video and animation in LaTeX and

    Solution 1. In addition to Karl's students answers (Can we use media9 to show a video on a PDF but the video is not embedded to the PDF?) and this other question: gif image in beamer presentation I can suggest what I did for my thesis presentation: In the preamble of the beamer: %Graphics and Videos \usepackage{graphicx} %The mode "LaTeX => PDF" allows the following formats: .jpg .png .pdf ...

  20. Video in a Presentation

    Here is the sample code i tried to execute: Last edited by localghost on Tue Mar 04, 2014 8:32 am, edited 1 time in total. A minimal example using the media9 package. Video files must be in FLV or H.264 (MP4) formats. Example with video files, it adds two buttons for choosing between the video files.

  21. How can I embed a video in my PDF using LaTeX?

    How can I embed a video in my PDF using LaTeX? It used to be possible via the media9 package but due to Adobe ceasing support for Flash at the end of 2020, versions of the media9 package which rely on Flash should no longer be used to embed video or other multimedia content into LaTeX-generated PDF files, including any projects created on Overleaf.

  22. How to Make a Presentation in LaTeX

    Beamer automatically converts all files with its document class to presentation mode. The rest of the file simply sets all the portions of the theme to the new lucid theme and then returns the file to the normal mode. Each of the .sty files used to create the theme needs to be put in presentation mode in the same way.

  23. Introduction to LaTeX: Creating a Slideshow

    To access the supplemental materials for the Intro to LaTeX video series visit: http://www.odum.unc.edu/odum/contentSubpage.jsp?nodeid=671