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Students shouldn’t have homework on weekends.

Jonathan Kuptel '22 , Staff Writer | November 7, 2021

MC+senior+Imari+Price+works+on+a+assignment+for+21st-Century+Media+class.

Jonathan Kuptel

MC senior Imari Price works on a assignment for 21st-Century Media class.

Teachers and students have different opinions about homework. Saying it is not fair is the usual argument, but being fair is not the issue. It is about students being prepared. Daily homework assignments can be difficult, and weekends homework assignments are worse. Students operate best when they are well-rested and ready to go. A weekend with no homework would help them to be fresh and ready on Monday morning. Weekend assignments tend to be longer and more difficult. 

The students have a difficult day with classes, practices, and going to school. By Friday, (test day) they are near exhaustion. Most tests are given on Fridays. Homework on Monday-Thursday is time-consuming. Some weekends will include assignments in more than 1 class. Those who go to Mount Carmel are near the end of their rope by 2:40 PM on Friday. I have had other discussions with the senior class and we all feel pretty tired at the end of the day at 2:40 PM. A free weekend helps to get prepared for the next grind to start. No homework weekends assures better sleep cycles and a body that has recovered and refreshed. Weekends include chores around the house and family commitments. This plus weekends assignments lead to a lack of sleep. This means Monday will have a positive attitude. No homework on weekends also means more family time. This is a bonus. 

Alfie Kohn in his book The Homework Myth: Why Are Kids Get Too Much Of A Bad Thing says, “There is no evidence to demonstrate that homework benefits students.” The homework on weekends starts in elementary school and continues throughout high school. 

Mr. Kohn states that homework on weekends starts in elementary school and continues throughout high school. This supports the argument that weekend homework starts in elementary school and now students at Mount Carmel High School have to deal with weekend assignments. The weekend assignments take too much time and are a waste of students’ time. 

Nancy Kalish , author of The Case Against Homework: How Homework Is Hurting Our Children And What We Can Do About It, says “simply busy work” makes learning “a chore rather than a positive, constructive experience.” 

Receiving weekend homework that is not discussed in class and counts only as “busy work” is counterproductive. Students finish the assignments because they are required to be done. When the homework is not reviewed on Monday, it leads to frustration. Busy homework that serves no purpose is never a good idea. 

Gerald LeTender of Penn State’s Education Policy Studies Department points out the “shotgun approach to homework when students receive the same photocopied assignment which is then checked as complete rather than discussed is not very effective.” Some teachers discuss the homework assignments and that validates the assignment. Some teachers however just check homework assignments for completion. LeTender goes on to say, “If there’s no feedback and no monitoring, the homework is probably not effective.” Researchers from the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia had similar findings in their study “ When Is Homework Worth The Time?” Researchers reported no substantive difference in the grades of students who had homework completion. Adam Maltese, a researcher , noted , “Our results hint that maybe homework is not being used as well as it could be. Even one teacher who assigns busy shotgun homework is enough to be a bad idea. 

Students come to know when homework is the “shotgun approach.” They find this kind of assignment dull. Students have no respect for assignments like this. Quality assignments are appreciated by students. 

Etta Kralovec and John Buell in their book How Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, And Limits Learning assert that homework contributes to a corporate style, competitive U.S. culture that overvalued work to the detriment of personal and familial well being. They go on to call for an end to homework, but to extend the school day. 

Cooper, Robinson, and Patalc, in 2006 warned that homework could become counter productive. Homework is counterproductive when it is a (shotgun) assignment. To reiterate, not all homework is bad. Bad homework which is not reviewed in class just plain “busy work” is not positive and could be counterproductive. 

Sara Croll, Literacy Coach and Author, believes too much homework causes stress for students. Diana Stelin, teacher, artist, and mother says, “I’m absolutely in favor of this ban. Homework is homework, it doesn’t matter what class it comes from. What it does is create negative associations in students of all ages, takes away their innate desire to learn, and makes the subject a dreaded chore.” 

When students come to dread their homework, they do not do a great job on these assignments. Making students do a lot of homework isn’t beneficial because they get drowsy when they work at it for hours and hours at a time. It is hard for the brain to function properly when it is tired and boring. 

Pat Wayman, Teacher and CEO of HowtoLearn.com says, “Many kids are working as many hours as their overscheduled parents and it is taking a toll.” “Their brains and their bodies need time to be curious, have fun, be creative and just be a kid.” 

No homework on weekends is not just a wish, but it is supported by all of these educators and authors. They all champion limiting homework are totally opposed to homework assignments. Educators and students agree that no homework on weekends is a good idea. Meaningful homework, a longer school day, and discussion of homework are what these educators and authors encourage. 

when the teacher gives you homework on the weekend

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Homework should not be assigned on weekends or breaks

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Alice Ottolino , Reporter December 6, 2017

Imagine you are back in elementary school, playing outside in the snow with your old neighborhood friends. Making a snowman, having a snowball fight, drinking hot chocolate and all of a sudden you hear your mom or dad yell for you because you have homework to do. That is one of the worst feelings ever when you are young and playing outside with your friends.

There are so many different studies debating if teachers should give out homework over the weekends, or if it should just be given on weekdays. According to Eastside Online, on a weeknight students will spend up to two hours a night working on homework. Teachers should only give homework out Monday through Thursday. There are so many different reasons as to why teachers shouldn’t be permitted to hand out homework over the weekends and especially over breaks.

Having a heavy workload on weekends or on breaks will take time away from friends and family. Having time with your friends and family is a crucial aspect in a childhood. According to My Homework Help, students need to be able to relax after a busy scheduled week. While some kids get to have fun, there are others who have to stay home and do homework, this will make them feel left out and not wanted. It’s not their fault that their teacher gave them homework on the weekends. We could avoid this entire problem if teachers just left the homework for the weekdays.

Kids need to be kids. In order for that to happen, teachers need to stop giving out so much homework on weekends. According to My Homework Help, too much homework can have a negative effect on kids and their learning experiences, which will often lead them to hate school work in general. Knowing that there will most likely be homework on the weekdays, the weekends need to be left open for kids to enjoy their free time and the activities they like to do.

Students just need time to relax. They have enough stress  during the week with homework, and if that carries into the weekend it could cause an issue.  

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Tiiu Tak • Aug 17, 2021 at 2:41 am

Great writing! This helped me a lot. Thanks!

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My 8-Year-Old’s Teacher Wants Him to Do Schoolwork Over Spring Break

Care and Feeding is Slate’s parenting advice column. In addition to our traditional advice, every Thursday we feature an assortment of teachers from across the country answering your education questions. Have a question for our teachers? Email [email protected] or post it in the  Slate Parenting Facebook group .

My second grader has been doing hybrid for most of this year, and his school is getting ready to return to full-time, in-person instruction after spring break. Despite the challenges, I think he’s been doing well. At times it’s a struggle to get him to focus, but I think that’s pretty normal for an 8-year-old. He’s been feeling pretty emotional, though, and he’s been pretty hard on himself whenever he makes mistakes.

He’s in the gifted program, and his gifted teacher tells me that he can be a perfectionist. His grade level teacher, however, told me at a conference that she doesn’t think he’s making enough effort, is easily upset and frustrated, and that he hasn’t made as much progress as she wants him to. She gives the students quotas for how many lessons they should complete, and she suggests that students who don’t get them done should work over spring break.

My son is a good student, but he hasn’t met her quota, and I feel like kids should be able to enjoy their time off. I know his teacher is just trying to keep kids on track, but I’m concerned about how much pressure she’s putting on my child. I know he’s working hard to keep up with the amount of work assigned. I know I’m not the only parent who worries about the workload. Should I approach his teacher with my concerns, or let it go and privately tell my son to just do his best and not worry about it? I’m worried all of this will even be more to handle when he’s back at school full-time—my son has already told me he’s fed up with this teacher.

—Isn’t Our Best Good Enough?

Dear Isn’t Our Best Good Enough,

Yes, it is.

Tell the teacher that you’ve decided to give your child the vacation he deserves. Your son is far too young to be learning that vacations are only partial escapes from the demands of the workday. This is always the case but never more true than in the midst of a pandemic.

I would thank your son’s teacher for her concern but inform her that vacations are a time for human beings of all ages to rest, relax, and recharge. That is what your son will be doing because that is far more important than any arbitrarily determined quota that your district has assigned.

Then, release yourself of any worry or guilt over this decision. It is unquestionably the right thing to do.

—Mr. Dicks (fifth grade teacher, Connecticut)

Slate needs your support right now. Sign up for Slate Plus to keep reading the advice you crave every week.

I am a high school English teacher, and this is my fifth year teaching. I’m wondering if you have any advice about classroom management in a virtual space. My school is hybrid this year, but I have some students who attend school entirely virtually.

When online students don’t participate or don’t meet expectations, I try to check in with them via private chat, but I often don’t get a response. If they don’t respond, I email them, and sometimes their parents, after class. I struggle with these emails. For example, if a student hasn’t participated in a breakout room or responded when I send them a private message, I may try to follow up with them later.

I haven’t met many of these kids in person, and while I try to establish a good rapport with them online, it’s not the same as having them in my classroom. I worry that I am being too harsh or that the proper tone isn’t coming across. If they were at school, I would pull them aside after class and could have a quick conversation, but having to comment on their behavior or participation over email seems to drag the issue out, and I worry that it gives students more anxiety since it’s in writing. If I email parents, it often becomes a game of tag between communicating with the student and parent. Any tips on how to make this less stressful and more effective for me and my students?

—Anybody Out There?

Dear Anybody,

You have my sympathy—I relate to this problem and so does every other high school teacher I know. My advice? Stop emailing and put your energy toward trying new breakout room strategies and building relationships.

There are lots of great ideas out there for how to manage breakout rooms (like here and here ). I have found many of these tips to be successful, such as assigning a clear task for the group to complete and then share when we come back together as a whole group. Some of my colleagues have had success letting students choose their group-mates (with your approval, of course) and then setting up permanent breakout rooms . That said, temper your expectations. There will still be students who log in to Zoom and then fall asleep, leave the room to go make a snack, or watch YouTube instead of participate. And there will also be some students who cannot participate through no fault of their own (their audio isn’t working, their connection is slow, their Chromebook crashes, etc.). Don’t beat yourself up. Just keep doing your best to offer good instruction.

While managing participation in Zoom is challenging, building relationships can feel even more daunting. Yet, as I’m sure you know, positive student-teacher relationships are the bedrock of learning. One strategy that has worked well for me is creating individual breakout rooms so that I can talk with students one-on-one. For example, my students recently wrote an essay, and I made individual breakout rooms so we could have writing conferences. I always start the conversation with small talk (“How was your weekend? How did your debate tournament go last Friday?” etc.) before moving into the academic conversation. These discussions help me to get to know my students and build rapport. While some students are still reticent, most will open up when I’m the only one listening.

Pick a new strategy and give it a go! Afterward, get feedback from your students on which of these strategies is working for them. At the end of the last semester, I gave students a survey and received lots of great information; some students also shared what other teachers are doing that they find helpful.

Finally, don’t underestimate Zoom fatigue. It’s OK to mix it up, especially with older students. Sometimes we stay together in Zoom for the entire block, but there are also days where I do a short Zoom lesson and then give the students asynchronous work (which also allows time for me to have those individual conversations). My students told me they appreciated having a change of pace on the aforementioned survey.

Hang in there! Summer will be here before we know it, and I am hopeful that next fall will bring more normalcy.

—Ms. Holbrook (high school teacher, Texas)

My grandson is 12 years old and has an IEP. He used to have seizures, but is now on medication and so hasn’t had a problem with seizures for a year. But because of his seizures, he has forgotten much he learned at school. His reading is a struggle, and spelling is even more of a struggle. What can I do to try and help him with this? I’ve tried tutoring for him, but I haven’t found anyone with enough patience.

—Forget-It-Not

What can you do? Connect him with experts. Folks who are not trained in this specific disability will not be able to handle your grandson’s needs.

Memory loss is a medical consequence of seizures, so your first stop should be your grandson’s doctor. The doctor may prescribe medication to help but will likely also refer him to a neuropsychologist, who will give him tests to determine the breadth and scope of the issue.

Once the neuropsychologist understands the roadblocks to your grandson’s memory, you can work together to remove them. The neuropsychologist might suggest your grandson see a psychotherapist, speech therapist, occupational therapist, and/or tutor who is trained in exceptional children, or EC. These experts can determine which strategies will help improve his memory and offer you exercises you can do with him.

Speaking of EC, I assume he has an individualized education plan at school. If not, request testing for learning disabilities posthaste. He should be receiving specialized education, push-in services, pull-out services, accommodations, test modifications, etc.

Most importantly, tell your grandson that this challenge is extremely common in patients who have seizures—he’s not alone. Remind him that his memory problems don’t mean anything about his intelligence. If he’s doing the best he can with the hand he’s been dealt, that’s enough.

—Ms. Scott (eighth grade teacher, North Carolina)

My daughter is in second grade in a large, urban public school that’s been fully remote since spring. In first grade, she tested as an advanced learner overall but especially in reading/verbal aptitude. We got the results a few weeks after schools went remote, and she hasn’t received any specific advanced learner programming. She’s doing well, though she has a tendency to do the bare minimum. For example, when she does a reading worksheet she’ll answer questions using the shortest possible sentences, then read a chapter book until the next lesson starts.

I’m not too worried about her not pushing herself, since she reads constantly and her teachers say she’s on track. But there are areas where I think she is behind. Her work is all done online, so she rarely writes anything by hand. Her handwriting is awful and slow (she makes each part of a letter shape by shape and hasn’t progressed to more fluid writing). Occasionally she still makes some letters backward, and her writing is a mix of upper- and lowercase. I would love to work with her on these things, but by the end of the day she’s burned out and extremely resistant. I’ve encouraged her to write letters to friends, and she does occasionally, but it takes a lot of nagging.

Should I be making her practice? Ideas for how to get her on board? There are other areas, like telling time, where she also needs more practice and is similarly resistant to my teaching her, so general strategies would help too. But writing seems the most pressing.

—Pencil Pusher

I think that one of the biggest goals that parents of young kids undertaking an extended period of virtual learning should have is to support them in getting through it with their confidence and interest in learning relatively intact. It sounds like your daughter is, generally, doing fine, and under the circumstances, fine is great. All you can ask for, really. Nagging, resistance, and conflict is not what either of you needs right now, especially if it might sour her on an educational experience that sounds like, all things considered, is going pretty well. So in general, I’d follow her lead and tread lightly. I do think there are a couple of things you can try, but in going forward with them, I’d make sure to keep it light and low-pressure.

Since she’s doing everything online right now, it wouldn’t surprise me if her fine motor skills have lagged some, which is probably contributing to the laboriousness of her writing. Fortunately, there are lots of fun activities you can offer that will help strengthen the small muscles in her hands and fingers and improve her general dexterity without her ever cluing in to the fact that she’s doing a therapeutic exercise. She could try making jewelry—stringing beads, tying knots, and braiding bracelets with embroidery floss are all great. You could offer her a book of sticker mosaics, a Lite-Brite (those are back now!), or a relatively simple diamond puzzle, which will have her carefully placing and arranging small objects with accuracy. Legos, clay, playing Jenga—really, whatever floats her boat and gets her to practice skillfully manipulating things with her hands would be great to encourage.

I do think you can prompt her to keep working specifically on letter formation, but there are a lot of ways to do so without making it a chore. (You definitely don’t want to sit her down with a page of handwriting drills at the end of her school day when she’s drained and resisting!) I would offer some interesting materials—bath crayons, shaving cream, a bit of paint squished around in a plastic baggie, the black paper you can scratch to reveal colors underneath, even dragging a paper clip through Play-Doh or slime—and prompt her to try some letters, especially if you can model it for her. I wouldn’t ask her to practice any more than five to seven minutes at a time—quit while you’re well ahead, and then just let her play. I think that some consistent but quick practice that she enjoys will, in the long run, get you further than a real nose-to-the-grindstone work session that she fights the whole time.

I’m crossing every extremity that your district reopens in the fall. You can definitely raise your various concerns with her teacher then, and perhaps ask for an evaluation by an occupational therapist—but also know that it is not possible for kids or teachers to be hewing to the typical benchmarks right now, and everyone’s going to need extra support in something or other by the time this is all over. She’ll be OK.

—Ms. Bauer (middle and high school teacher, New York)

More Advice From Slate

My daughter is a freshman in high school, and she recently got an assignment in life sciences that seems inappropriate. The assignment is for the kids to identify someone in their family who died of cancer, and then students are supposed to research that kind of cancer and create a poster presentation to display for the entire school. This seems like a terrible idea, and an invasion of privacy. Should I talk to the teacher?

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Should More Schools Adopt a “No Homework on Weekends” Policy?

stressed kid doing homework

“No homework tonight!” From time to time, some teachers surprise their students with that announcement at the closing bell of class. In some schools, though, that’s becoming the norm rather than the exception—at least on specially designated weekends.

A Seasonal Gift for Some

Fall is the season to give thanks and be merry. It’s also the countdown to college admissions due dates. And it’s a great time to land a seasonal job and make some extra money at the end of the year. In states such as Maryland , several schools have designated homework-free weekend periods this fall. It allows over-stressed kids to catch up with other responsibilities—or simply take a breather. The main reason for the break, though, is that college priority and early admissions deadlines for many top colleges in the region occur in the fall.

Schools in Princeton, New Jersey, began implementing one homework-free weekend each semester in 2015, in part to give students more time to pursue interests and passions outside of school. Other New Jersey schools limit the number of minutes students should spend on homework each night. In Hinsdale, Illinois , one high school began offering seniors one homework-free weekend in October “to give harried seniors a little break to prepare for their futures . . . and make sure they have enough time to work on their college applications.” Similarly, schools across the country offer a no-homework weekend at year’s end.

Not Without Downsides

Unfortunately, homework-free weekends sometimes create an unwelcome side effect: extra-homework weekdays. Teachers are still tasked with finishing their lesson plans, and homework is often an important part of that. For students who are working on projects with pending due dates, not working on those projects for an entire weekend may not be feasible. And there’s always the risk that students who are afforded extra time to catch up on college admissions and pursue positive endeavors may simply waste the free time bestowed upon them.

Is homework helpful or harmful?

Some teachers and school districts have taken a blanket approach and banned homework entirely. The value of homework as a whole has been a topic of much debate. In one study , researchers at University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education concluded that math and science homework didn’t lead students to achieve better grades , but it did lead to better standardized test results.

A Stanford researcher concluded that excess homework increases kids’ stress and sleep deprivation. She emphasized that homework shouldn’t be assigned simply as a routine practice; it should have a concrete purpose and benefit. Homework, especially thoughtful homework, is valuable, and eliminating it entirely may be counterproductive to the goal of attending school in the first place: mastering the subject matter.

What do you think?

It’s a safe assumption that most students would strongly favor a homework-free-weekends policy. We’re curious how parents feel about the idea. How would you feel if your child’s school implemented a “no homework on the weekends” policy? Would you worry that your children might fall behind peers in other schools without a similar policy? Or do you think it would encourage your children to engage in more valuable extracurricular activities, get jobs, spend more time completing their college admissions packets, or simply catch up on much-needed sleep? We’d love to know what you think.

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School Life Balance , Tips for Online Students

The Pros and Cons of Homework

The-Pros-and-Cons-Should-Students-Have-Homework

Homework is a word that most students dread hearing. After hours upon hours of sitting in class , the last thing we want is more schoolwork over our precious weekends. While it’s known to be a staple of traditional schooling, homework has also become a rather divise topic. Some feel as though homework is a necessary part of school, while others believe that the time could be better invested. Should students have homework? Have a closer look into the arguments on both sides to decide for yourself.

A college student completely swamped with homework.

Photo by  energepic.com  from  Pexels

Why should students have homework, 1. homework encourages practice.

Many people believe that one of the positive effects of homework is that it encourages the discipline of practice. While it may be time consuming and boring compared to other activities, repetition is needed to get better at skills. Homework helps make concepts more clear, and gives students more opportunities when starting their career .

2. Homework Gets Parents Involved

Homework can be something that gets parents involved in their children’s lives if the environment is a healthy one. A parent helping their child with homework makes them take part in their academic success, and allows for the parent to keep up with what the child is doing in school. It can also be a chance to connect together.

3. Homework Teaches Time Management

Homework is much more than just completing the assigned tasks. Homework can develop time management skills , forcing students to plan their time and make sure that all of their homework assignments are done on time. By learning to manage their time, students also practice their problem-solving skills and independent thinking. One of the positive effects of homework is that it forces decision making and compromises to be made.

4. Homework Opens A Bridge Of Communication

Homework creates a connection between the student, the teacher, the school, and the parents. It allows everyone to get to know each other better, and parents can see where their children are struggling. In the same sense, parents can also see where their children are excelling. Homework in turn can allow for a better, more targeted educational plan for the student.

5. Homework Allows For More Learning Time

Homework allows for more time to complete the learning process. School hours are not always enough time for students to really understand core concepts, and homework can counter the effects of time shortages, benefiting students in the long run, even if they can’t see it in the moment.

6. Homework Reduces Screen Time

Many students in North America spend far too many hours watching TV. If they weren’t in school, these numbers would likely increase even more. Although homework is usually undesired, it encourages better study habits and discourages spending time in front of the TV. Homework can be seen as another extracurricular activity, and many families already invest a lot of time and money in different clubs and lessons to fill up their children’s extra time. Just like extracurricular activities, homework can be fit into one’s schedule.

A female student who doesn’t want to do homework.

The Other Side: Why Homework Is Bad

1. homework encourages a sedentary lifestyle.

Should students have homework? Well, that depends on where you stand. There are arguments both for the advantages and the disadvantages of homework.

While classroom time is important, playground time is just as important. If children are given too much homework, they won’t have enough playtime, which can impact their social development and learning. Studies have found that those who get more play get better grades in school , as it can help them pay closer attention in the classroom.

Children are already sitting long hours in the classroom, and homework assignments only add to these hours. Sedentary lifestyles can be dangerous and can cause health problems such as obesity. Homework takes away from time that could be spent investing in physical activity.

2. Homework Isn’t Healthy In Every Home

While many people that think homes are a beneficial environment for children to learn, not all homes provide a healthy environment, and there may be very little investment from parents. Some parents do not provide any kind of support or homework help, and even if they would like to, due to personal barriers, they sometimes cannot. Homework can create friction between children and their parents, which is one of the reasons why homework is bad .

3. Homework Adds To An Already Full-Time Job

School is already a full-time job for students, as they generally spend over 6 hours each day in class. Students also often have extracurricular activities such as sports, music, or art that are just as important as their traditional courses. Adding on extra hours to all of these demands is a lot for children to manage, and prevents students from having extra time to themselves for a variety of creative endeavors. Homework prevents self discovery and having the time to learn new skills outside of the school system. This is one of the main disadvantages of homework.

4. Homework Has Not Been Proven To Provide Results

Endless surveys have found that homework creates a negative attitude towards school, and homework has not been found to be linked to a higher level of academic success.

The positive effects of homework have not been backed up enough. While homework may help some students improve in specific subjects, if they have outside help there is no real proof that homework makes for improvements.

It can be a challenge to really enforce the completion of homework, and students can still get decent grades without doing their homework. Extra school time does not necessarily mean better grades — quality must always come before quantity.

Accurate practice when it comes to homework simply isn’t reliable. Homework could even cause opposite effects if misunderstood, especially since the reliance is placed on the student and their parents — one of the major reasons as to why homework is bad. Many students would rather cheat in class to avoid doing their homework at home, and children often just copy off of each other or from what they read on the internet.

5. Homework Assignments Are Overdone

The general agreement is that students should not be given more than 10 minutes a day per grade level. What this means is that a first grader should be given a maximum of 10 minutes of homework, while a second grader receives 20 minutes, etc. Many students are given a lot more homework than the recommended amount, however.

On average, college students spend as much as 3 hours per night on homework . By giving too much homework, it can increase stress levels and lead to burn out. This in turn provides an opposite effect when it comes to academic success.

The pros and cons of homework are both valid, and it seems as though the question of ‘‘should students have homework?’ is not a simple, straightforward one. Parents and teachers often are found to be clashing heads, while the student is left in the middle without much say.

It’s important to understand all the advantages and disadvantages of homework, taking both perspectives into conversation to find a common ground. At the end of the day, everyone’s goal is the success of the student.

Related Articles

Why We Should Give Students a Homework Break Over the Holidays

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I have so many fond memories from holiday seasons growing up: the smell of delicious food being made by my Mexican and Filipino families, warm light on the faces of my relatives, and lots of laughter. As I got older, though, things changed—mostly because I had so much homework to do.

Instead of joking with our relatives at the holidays, my brother and I would often sequester ourselves at the edge of the room, thick textbooks open and pens in our hands. Sometimes, we’d miss events altogether. When we did attend, the ramifications could be intense. During one spring break, I chose to go to an Easter party with my family. But by midnight, I was stress-weeping because I had so much work to do by the next day.

As a teacher, I now understand the temptation to give work over school breaks. There never seems to be enough time to do the projects or read the texts I’d like to with my kids, and asking students to work or read during breaks eases that crunch. I also worry that my students will lose some of their learning in the weeks they are gone.

Recently, though, my school created a new homework policy that, among other things, encourages us to avoid giving students work over extended school breaks. Our administration cited studies that raise questions about the benefits of hefty doses of homework.

I worried about how this new plan would affect my curriculum pacing, and about what my students might “lose.” But I realized that my concerns were really about my desires, not what was best for my students.

The new policy led me to re-evaluate my assignments and timing, and I ended up being able to make adjustments so my kids could complete necessary projects without working when they should be recharging. I’d worried about my students’ learning, but recent research challenges our long-held belief that students’ learning “slides” significantly over long breaks.

Taking the stress of homework out of my students’ holiday breaks is important. They deserve an opportunity to relax and rejuvenate as much as I do—particularly if they are overscheduled to begin with. Young or old, we all need rejuvenation time. In addition, more studies are demonstrating the benefits of down time for students. Having unstructured time recharges them, but also allows their brains to build connections that strengthen and improve their executive functioning.

We need to be mindful of other factors that complicate homework assignments over holiday breaks. We don’t always know what our students’ lives are like outside our classrooms. Do they struggle with access to the resources necessary to complete assignments? Do they have stressful home situations?

Here are a few ways we can send our students off on a positive note when they leave us for holiday breaks. I’m trying them myself this winter!

Provide activities that support students reconnecting with themselves, their loved ones, or their community.

While we want to avoid giving mandatory work to students, we can offer opportunities and ideas for learning-friendly activities they can do during their break. Maybe that’s an optional/extra credit project that asks students to interview a family or community member (though we should also provide time after break for those who couldn’t work over break). Or maybe we can offer students some ideas about how they could use their time to take care of themselves or their communities. We could provide reflection questions once they’re back from break, to help them find meaning in the experience. Encouraging students to use their time to volunteer or take care of themselves allows us to help our kids grow not just as students, but as people.

Offer opportunities to find a new passion, set goals, or reflect.

While some students may travel or connect with family, some of our kids may have a lot of free time over their break. We can encourage them to use the time to set goals for the year, dream big and draw or write their five-year plan (remind them this is for fun and plans will change!), or reflect on their year or life so far. We can also encourage students to discover something they’re passionate about, or use the time to pursue something they love.

Deepen your relationships with students and allow them to open up to you.

Sometimes, our kids are simply not given the space to dive deeply into something that lets them tell us who they are. Give students a project that allows them to explore their identity or have them write a story about their lives. This will not only provide some critical thinking, reading, or writing enrichment, but more importantly will provide valuable insight into our students’ lives and help us build deeper connections with our students. We can return the favor by completing the project ourselves or writing a story and sharing it with them.

After the break, see what stuck with students.

Instead of returning from break with the mindset of what was “lost,” give students a chance to share everything they remember from the last unit. Instead of assuming they all had a great time they want to share, welcome kids back with an opportunity to celebrate the experiences that stuck with them from their breaks. Help students generate a class-created study guide so they can review what they learned before the break. This gives them space to support one another and remind each other what they learned, as well as gives us an opportunity to praise students for what they’ve retained. It also provides important feedback for us on what stuck over the break and what we need to reteach.

Ultimately, our students look to us not just for academic growth, but to support their growth as human beings as well. Taking away homework stress over break may cause us to change our short-term plans, but providing them with opportunities and resources instead can have some long-term benefits that can change their self-perception and their lives more than a packet of homework ever could.

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Student Opinion

Should We Get Rid of Homework?

Some educators are pushing to get rid of homework. Would that be a good thing?

when the teacher gives you homework on the weekend

By Jeremy Engle and Michael Gonchar

Do you like doing homework? Do you think it has benefited you educationally?

Has homework ever helped you practice a difficult skill — in math, for example — until you mastered it? Has it helped you learn new concepts in history or science? Has it helped to teach you life skills, such as independence and responsibility? Or, have you had a more negative experience with homework? Does it stress you out, numb your brain from busywork or actually make you fall behind in your classes?

Should we get rid of homework?

In “ The Movement to End Homework Is Wrong, ” published in July, the Times Opinion writer Jay Caspian Kang argues that homework may be imperfect, but it still serves an important purpose in school. The essay begins:

Do students really need to do their homework? As a parent and a former teacher, I have been pondering this question for quite a long time. The teacher side of me can acknowledge that there were assignments I gave out to my students that probably had little to no academic value. But I also imagine that some of my students never would have done their basic reading if they hadn’t been trained to complete expected assignments, which would have made the task of teaching an English class nearly impossible. As a parent, I would rather my daughter not get stuck doing the sort of pointless homework I would occasionally assign, but I also think there’s a lot of value in saying, “Hey, a lot of work you’re going to end up doing in your life is pointless, so why not just get used to it?” I certainly am not the only person wondering about the value of homework. Recently, the sociologist Jessica McCrory Calarco and the mathematics education scholars Ilana Horn and Grace Chen published a paper, “ You Need to Be More Responsible: The Myth of Meritocracy and Teachers’ Accounts of Homework Inequalities .” They argued that while there’s some evidence that homework might help students learn, it also exacerbates inequalities and reinforces what they call the “meritocratic” narrative that says kids who do well in school do so because of “individual competence, effort and responsibility.” The authors believe this meritocratic narrative is a myth and that homework — math homework in particular — further entrenches the myth in the minds of teachers and their students. Calarco, Horn and Chen write, “Research has highlighted inequalities in students’ homework production and linked those inequalities to differences in students’ home lives and in the support students’ families can provide.”

Mr. Kang argues:

But there’s a defense of homework that doesn’t really have much to do with class mobility, equality or any sense of reinforcing the notion of meritocracy. It’s one that became quite clear to me when I was a teacher: Kids need to learn how to practice things. Homework, in many cases, is the only ritualized thing they have to do every day. Even if we could perfectly equalize opportunity in school and empower all students not to be encumbered by the weight of their socioeconomic status or ethnicity, I’m not sure what good it would do if the kids didn’t know how to do something relentlessly, over and over again, until they perfected it. Most teachers know that type of progress is very difficult to achieve inside the classroom, regardless of a student’s background, which is why, I imagine, Calarco, Horn and Chen found that most teachers weren’t thinking in a structural inequalities frame. Holistic ideas of education, in which learning is emphasized and students can explore concepts and ideas, are largely for the types of kids who don’t need to worry about class mobility. A defense of rote practice through homework might seem revanchist at this moment, but if we truly believe that schools should teach children lessons that fall outside the meritocracy, I can’t think of one that matters more than the simple satisfaction of mastering something that you were once bad at. That takes homework and the acknowledgment that sometimes a student can get a question wrong and, with proper instruction, eventually get it right.

Students, read the entire article, then tell us:

Should we get rid of homework? Why, or why not?

Is homework an outdated, ineffective or counterproductive tool for learning? Do you agree with the authors of the paper that homework is harmful and worsens inequalities that exist between students’ home circumstances?

Or do you agree with Mr. Kang that homework still has real educational value?

When you get home after school, how much homework will you do? Do you think the amount is appropriate, too much or too little? Is homework, including the projects and writing assignments you do at home, an important part of your learning experience? Or, in your opinion, is it not a good use of time? Explain.

In these letters to the editor , one reader makes a distinction between elementary school and high school:

Homework’s value is unclear for younger students. But by high school and college, homework is absolutely essential for any student who wishes to excel. There simply isn’t time to digest Dostoyevsky if you only ever read him in class.

What do you think? How much does grade level matter when discussing the value of homework?

Is there a way to make homework more effective?

If you were a teacher, would you assign homework? What kind of assignments would you give and why?

Want more writing prompts? You can find all of our questions in our Student Opinion column . Teachers, check out this guide to learn how you can incorporate them into your classroom.

Students 13 and older in the United States and Britain, and 16 and older elsewhere, are invited to comment. All comments are moderated by the Learning Network staff, but please keep in mind that once your comment is accepted, it will be made public.

Jeremy Engle joined The Learning Network as a staff editor in 2018 after spending more than 20 years as a classroom humanities and documentary-making teacher, professional developer and curriculum designer working with students and teachers across the country. More about Jeremy Engle

The Anti-Boring Academic Life Coach

How to Establish a Homework Routine on Weekends

by Gretchen | Oct 1, 2012 | Academic Coaching , Organization , Procrastination | 0 comments

when the teacher gives you homework on the weekend

So how should students manage their time during their precious weekend time? When is the best time to do homework, and when is the best time to relax?

In my experience, most students want to save their homework until Sunday night. While understandable (Homework is distasteful! Why not push it off until the last possible moment?), this habit often gets them in trouble, as they usually have more homework than can possibly be accomplished between 6-9pm on Sunday.

Secondly, the date can end in a bad mood. For example, tell him that you read books by Dawkins or other scientific atheists, and megapersonal hookup the new acquaintance’s eyes fill with blood because he’s a deeply religious person. Although such things could have come up during the correspondence stage.

I know many parents who want their kids to get homework started on Saturday mornings. If a student is motivated to do it, this is a fine suggestion. However, I’m a big believer that kids need a break from school work, just like adults do. I’d HATE my life if I worked every day of the week; why should it be any different for kids?

Sunday ritual to the rescue!

Recently I stumbled upon this blog entry by Cal Newport about how to create a ritual that starts on Sunday morning and continues for the rest of the day. As Cal says, “Friday and Saturday are a time to be social. Sunday morning and afternoon is a time for you to regroup, get organized, and get prepared for the upcoming week.”

The ritual he proposes includes a big breakfast, a swing by the library to do some planning for the day, getting some exercise, and then some time later for thinking through the upcoming week.

Cal writes for college students, not high school students, and so the Sunday ritual he proposes is quite a bit more elaborate than I’d advocate for younger students. You’ll note that it doesn’t include time for homework, just for planning for the week (I’m guessing that Cal proposes trying to get most homework done during the school week itself).

However, I love the idea of creating a routine, and I especially love that the routine includes exercise. I recommend that students design their own rituals, and include time for:

  • planning for the week (in the morning)
  • exercise (in the late morning)
  • homework (after exercise…given that the brain is most ready for learning after at least 20 minutes of exericse)

Of course, family schedules are complex, and this routine may not work for everyone. So often my coaching clients will tell me, “I wanted to do my homework when we planned, but my mom made me help her around the house.” Perhaps this is true! Perhaps it is ALSO true that the teen didn’t tell her mother that she HAD a plan in the first place.

Regardless, having a Sunday ritual that works for the whole family will make these kinds of excuses a moot point, and lead to greater productivity AND a greater sense of control. Not to mention, the opportunity to relax and enjoy Sunday evening without having to finish last minute assignments.

If you are a parent having trouble getting buy-in from your teen about establishing Sunday rituals, a few sessions of academic coaching (to brainstorm ideas with a non-annoying adult) might be just the thing. Feel free to contact me for more information.

Do you have a weekend routine? Tell me about it in the comments!

P.S. Did you enjoy this post? Get more helpful and happening ideas by signing up for free email updates !

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The School Newspaper of Cherry Hill High School East

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March 6 STOPit Explained: a look into East’s anonymous reporting

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While similar to yoga and other forms of exercise, pilates is a mind and body exercise used to help one gain flexibility, increase muscular ability and more, having many benefits for ones body.

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Homework should be reserved for weekdays only

During the school year, weekends are the only time students can have free time to spend with their family and friends, unlike weekdays when students are piled on with loads of homework given by teachers. Students should not have homework on the weekends because it interferes with other obligations such as the time you can spend relaxing with family, resting, and studying the knowledge previously learned that week.

On a typical school night, a high school student spends around two hours, at a minimum each night on homework, according to a survey from directhit.com.  During weekdays students miss out on sleep, socializing, and crucial family time. If a person spends all their time doing homework Monday through Thursday, there should be a break on the weekend for time to catch up on things missed during the week.

During the week, children and family do not spend quality time together because of six hour school day, which is followed up by extracurricular activities and homework.  Parents too long forward to weekend, since they have jobs during the week that demands much of their own time.

Although some believe that homework creates bonding time between parents and students, since parents can aid in their child’s school work, many other parents believe that homework is stressful on kids, and when it comes to the weekend, that time should go towards strengthening the family connection, not doing homework.

Many students are involved in extracurricular activities, sports or even work hours on school nights. This causes students to get home from school late. Kids don’t usually start homework right away; they take care of other priorities first, pushing their homework further into the night.

“After I get home from volleyball, I go right into the shower and eat dinner with my family. By the time everything’s settled, I can’t usually start my hours of homework till 8:30 p.m,” said Danielle Montgomery.

Many other students are put into this situation also cutting down on crucial needed sleep during the week to do well in school the next day. By having this same routine every weekday, when the weekend finally arrives, a student is run down on energy and missing out on a lot of sleep. Knowing that they are free of homework on

those days brings a huge relief and allows them to finally rest and regain energy.

Being assigned loads of homework during a time that you could rest, does not allow you to do so.

Some people may say that with better time management, the student can get his or her homework done in the time needed to still allow a decent night’s sleep. If extra time is needed on an assignment, they can squeeze it in at lunch or even in another class that allows some free time.  When kids try to figure out how to get everything done, but fail, they get discouraged and their work ethic is affected. They have no choice but to stay up late into the evening making sure everything is done for the next day.

Another important argument is that students have other obligations such as church, Sunday school, or sporting events that if they have homework on the weekends, it would prevent them from attending any of them.

Some say this is a lesson that has to be learned, and gives good practice for

Future events, since an adult may be called into work, or have to finish something for a job on the weekends even though he or she has off. Having homework on the weekends as a teen helps you learn responsibility of when to choose work over other plans in the real world. Although it would be good practice for a kid, now isn’t the time to learn because they should enjoy their childhood while they still have it.

The School Newspaper of Cherry Hill High School East

Comments (36)

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byrw • Jan 11, 2024 at 2:52 pm

i hope all of yall have a good easter

Random • Jan 3, 2024 at 6:14 pm

I needed this for a school project. Thank you so much for this information!

Hayden • May 31, 2023 at 12:17 pm

jo troto • May 10, 2023 at 3:49 pm

I think homework should not be on weekends because it is boring.

Emilee • Apr 17, 2023 at 4:35 pm

Thankyou for this and the funny thing is that i am ussing this for an argumentative essay that i sm working on on the weekend

Anonymous • Oct 4, 2022 at 12:01 pm

Thank you so much! This information helped me with a project we are doing at school. – Anonymous

Anonymous • Apr 5, 2022 at 1:01 pm

Thank you so much! This information helped me with a project we are doing at school. – Anonymous

STIFFY SPIDER-MAN • Mar 22, 2022 at 2:14 pm

Homework on the weekends is just not right bros

Bryant Holmes • Feb 7, 2022 at 12:45 pm

This is an amazing place to get information for the presentation I’m organizing, and all of your claims seem to be supported by a fair amount of good evidence and surveys. One of the main troubles I have with weekend homework is that by the time I’ve gotten home and taken a shower, I can barely even stand up, causing me to have to push back my homework back. I then take the Saturday to relax and rest for the next week of school, which the weekend is meant for, pushing the work back even further to Sunday. Thank you for helping me organize my presentation!

Alan • Jan 9, 2022 at 9:15 am

Great story! I could inspire from this book. I remember the first time when I wrote my essay, writers from https://pro-papers.com/do-my-homework-for-me told me that I could become a writer. To continue the work I had begun, such a book was not enough for me.

zaeem • Jan 6, 2022 at 3:04 pm

this is all good . I think your facts are true and trusted

foop • Dec 9, 2021 at 9:49 am

Bro thanks i needed this for a class

ewwdk • Oct 23, 2021 at 9:19 pm

lol I do 4 hours of homework every single day including weekends. I also have club meetings every week so by the time I am done with everything its already 2:00AM. My teachers are just slacking off and they teach us nothing in class. All they do is assign loads of homework expecting us to have our ten assignments turned in by Monday.

Adam Ball • Jul 26, 2021 at 11:24 am

Students should do homework Monday through Thursday not Monday through Friday. Homework didn’t belong in My Friday Routine. So my parents pulled me Out of Griffin in November 2004. Monday Through Friday Homework is too Stressful. It’s more Homework than anyone can Handle.

Vincezo Licavoli • May 26, 2021 at 4:38 pm

Parents cannot make their children do the homework. To my mind, children do not have to do homework not only while virtual school but always. Because they have to be tought at school, but not in home by their parents. Parents do not have to help their children with homework, it must be done by teachers at school. Homework brings only stress and tears. I also suffered from doing my child’s homework. But now i hve already solved this problem, and want to share the solution to other parents. Do not waste your freetime, just chooe some writing service and order your homework. They will do everything in the highest quality. You can try this out https://www.topwritersreview.com/reviews/pro-essay-writer/ . If you visit this website you will find a list of such services and reviews to them. Choose what you like.

Eliott • May 22, 2021 at 4:15 pm

my spanish teacher didn’t warn us that we had any work for the weekend, on Monday she asked if we submitted our ten assignments, thenn proceeded to give us 7 for the week, it all took me 32 hours to catch up, i also got behind on my other classes

paul ryan • May 20, 2021 at 6:26 pm

yeah I’m a middle school student with quite a bad track record of missing assignments, and I’ll admit that is due to laziness and procrastination. and when I have to work on them during the weekend and there’s also regular homework too, it’s just exponential stress.

(not showing my name) • May 2, 2021 at 11:30 am

Weekends are meant for relaxation. If teachers will give us homework on the weekends, why not just send us into school on Saturdays and Sundays? Those two options are on the same level in my opinion, since weekend homework typically takes MUCH longer than traditional weekday homework.

Yusuf • Apr 23, 2021 at 9:59 am

I agree with all of you. Having school on the weekends is annoying and stressful. I can’t watch a movie on Sundays without stressing on the fact that I have homework to do. I’m always staying up till 12 am to finish up. I want to relax on the weekends rather than stress and have anxiety. Yes, I get anxiety because of homework. I wish we could only be assigned homework on the weekdays but not Friday, since that’s basically the start of the weekend. Sometimes i’m so tired and there is so much work to do I just don’t even do it. I let it be a missing assignment for a couple of days while i’m finishing it up on the weekdays. But normally that wouldn’t even be an option to finish and get an extra day because the teachers have it marked missing. The only class where I didn’t get any homework was Spanish class, which didn’t give me stress because of my nice teacher.

mm • Apr 5, 2021 at 8:24 pm

Homework should not be on the weekend because that can lead you to be behind in class as a middle schooler it can affect metal qulitys and it does not help that there is homework on the weekend it does NOT make you smarter it just stresses people out and makes you get behind in class.

Lol no • Mar 21, 2021 at 8:28 pm

Wasn’t the whole point of weekends to not have a bunch of stuff to do? Why they gotta give so much homework I’m ok with school but I CAN’T DEAL WITH HOMEWORK ON THE WEEKENDS.

(who cares abt my name) • Feb 21, 2021 at 8:03 pm

Im doing homework non-stop all day every day even on weekends and I feel like it’s gonna go on forever they give me way too much homework at least 3-4 assignments every day and I have past due assignments also to do and its so insanely stressful and I can’t even do anything and I could barely play with my puppy and I never get a day off or free time like youtube or video games or something. And it takes me so long to do the assignments bc its really long and its super hard. Im in 7th grade.

( not gonna say my name ) • Feb 11, 2021 at 11:11 am

I dont think that after 5 days of working I should have more work on the day I’m suppose to be relaxing.

Beren • Jan 8, 2021 at 1:08 pm

I always do my homeworks

Amber Keller • Apr 16, 2020 at 9:20 pm

I think homework should be reserved on weekdays only because after a full 5 day school week you would like to have some free time and go to a friend’s house.

Can’tSayMyName • Apr 4, 2020 at 2:54 pm

I agree, it’s especially stressful when you not only have homework to make up from being sick, and you have to study for old and new tests.

Hazel • Mar 3, 2020 at 9:46 pm

I agree that homework should not be given on weekends. I often want to relax on the weekend and don’t want to do school work on my time off. Teachers need to realize that high schoolers have a social life and need a break from school on the weekends. Or we can have just a four day week at school 🙂

sandy • Feb 12, 2020 at 11:41 am

i wake up at six in the morning and drag my self out of bed just to go to school, then i come back and at least do one hour of homework, then i do housework, and then sleep and do all of that for the rest of the week. And especially on the weekends doing that will just take all the fun out of it.

Maddox • Feb 5, 2020 at 12:37 pm

Homework is so stressful i play sports and when i come home I have to do algebra homework for 2 hours. If i went on a family trip i could actually be able to catch up if there wasn’t extra homework from school.

matt • Jan 31, 2020 at 9:33 am

I agree with all of you. Hw on the weekends kills me bc I can’t go on any family trips.

devan • Jan 21, 2020 at 4:06 pm

i am a student and i think the idea of home work on the weekend is dumb its like never ending school and it gives to much worry about ” how will i finish all this”

Yung Anthony • Oct 22, 2019 at 5:47 am

I’m stressed bro.

Alexa Danley • Oct 14, 2019 at 11:34 pm

This particular weekend was a four day weekend, and I just finished everything up. It’s 1am. I have been working on it for the past 3 days for about 5 hours each day. I had soccer on Saturday and Monday, and church on Sunday.

Hamzah Shaif • Sep 1, 2019 at 10:05 pm

My son has been given of 24 pages of homework this 3 day weekend. He has put 24 hours so far into his homework, but he estimates tha tomorrow he will have 6 hours more at least of homwork. He has not been able to go on family trips, much less leave his room. The Ironic part is that it is Labor Day,

Matthias Scunter • Sep 25, 2018 at 10:44 am

Me: I have homework. Dad: idc come here boi Me: no!

bob davis • Nov 2, 2011 at 10:08 am

i think that there should be no hw on weekends because i am a student and it is very stressful to come home and have to do more school work. it is never ending school.

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What’s the Purpose of Homework?

author avatar

  • Homework teaches students responsibility.
  • Homework gives students an opportunity to practice and refine their skills.
  • We give homework because our parents demand it.
  • Our community equates homework with rigor.
  • Homework is a rite of passage.
  • design quality homework tasks;
  • differentiate homework tasks;
  • move from grading to checking;
  • decriminalize the grading of homework;
  • use completion strategies; and
  • establish homework support programs.
  • Always ask, “What learning will result from this homework assignment?” The goal of your instruction should be to design homework that results in meaningful learning.
  • Assign homework to help students deepen their understanding of content, practice skills in order to become faster or more proficient, or learn new content on a surface level.
  • Check that students are able to perform required skills and tasks independently before asking them to complete homework assignments.
  • When students return home, is there a safe and quite place for them to do their homework? I have talked to teachers who tell me they know for certain the home environments of their students are chaotic at best. Is it likely a student will be able to complete homework in such an environment? Is it possible for students to go to an after school program, possibly at the YMCA or a Boys and Girls Club. Assigning homework to students when you know the likelihood of them being able to complete the assignment through little fault of their own doesn’t seem fair to the learner.
  • Consider parents and guardians to be your allies when it comes to homework. Understand their constraints, and, when home circumstances present challenges, consider alternative approaches to support students as they complete homework assignments (e.g., before-or after-school programs, additional parent outreach).

when the teacher gives you homework on the weekend

Howard Pitler is a dynamic facilitator, speaker, and instructional coach with a proven record of success spanning four decades. With an extensive background in professional development, he works with schools and districts internationally and is a regular speaker at national, state, and district conferences and workshops.

Pitler is currently Associate Professor at Emporia State University in Kansas. Prior to that, he served for 19 years as an elementary and middle school principal in an urban setting. During his tenure, his elementary school was selected as an Apple Distinguished Program and named "One of the Top 100 Schools in America" by Redbook Magazine. His middle school was selected as "One of the Top 100 Wired Schools in America" by PC Magazine. He also served for 12 years as a senior director and chief program officer for McREL International, and he is currently serving on the Board of Colorado ASCD. He is an Apple Distinguished Educator, Apple Teacher, National Distinguished Principal, and Smithsonian Laureate.

He is a published book author and has written numerous magazine articles for  Educational Leadership ® magazine,  EdCircuit , and  Connected Educator , among others.

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The Student News Site of Thomas S. Wootton High School

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The Student News Site of Thomas S. Wootton High School

No more giving school work to students on weekends

Myiesha Ameen , staff writer | January 5, 2022

Senior+Nideesh+Shanmugam+Bhuvaneswari+uses+his+lunch+period+on+Jan.+5+to+study+for+his+upcoming+AP+Calculus+AB+test.

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Senior Nideesh Shanmugam Bhuvaneswari uses his lunch period on Jan. 5 to study for his upcoming AP Calculus AB test.

After five, roughly seven-hour-long school days, on top of the time it takes to complete homework, students are left feeling exhausted and looking forward to the weekend. But when they get there, a problem arises: they have to do even more homework. Students should not get any homework on weekends. They should instead be able to do other fun activities and not have to worry about school. They deserve a stress-free weekend after a stress-filled week.

Senior Lizzie Nelson gets her homework done during the advisory period on Nov. 19.

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Large workloads put student mental well-being at risk

It could be viewed that students should have homework on weekends so that they don’t forget what they learned over the weekend, or to prepare them for what they will learn when they come back. Teachers may also argue that if the students don’t get homework on weekends it would mean extra homework on weekdays.

Sure these are good points and true in some scenarios, but there are other ways to solve this problem that don’t include homework on weekends. For example, teachers could review quickly at the start of class. Memory works in a way that once you learn something it’ll still be in your brain, it just needs to be brought back out. This is a better method because students deserve to get their full break on the weekend.

It’s OK for teachers to assign work that students may have to finish over the weekend if they didn’t finish in the time they were originally given, but they should not assign homework on Friday that is due Monday. Additionally, if homework on weekends is potentially exhausting the mental health of students and stressing them out then it should be eliminated.

Often it’s said how kids used to enjoy school and would want to go, but as they got older, they didn’t feel the same way. Of course, they may feel this way because classes are harder, but a bigger reason is the amount of homework they have to do. On weekdays it’s understandable, but on weekends it is not, as they are supposed to be the two days students get off from school.

On average, students get at least three to four hours worth of homework on each school night. Students work hard enough on school days and school nights that they deserve two days where they don’t have to think about school, unless they have a test or quiz the next day.

Purposefully giving work for Friday night or the weekend should not be allowed as it’s unfair and students do not deserve it. Students deserve no homework weekends for all the hard work they put into their classes and assignments during the week. Teachers especially know how hard their students work since they are the ones who assign the work. Teachers may be working over the weekend, but that doesn’t mean students deserve to do the same.

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Senior Lizzie Nelson gets her homework done during the advisory period on Nov. 19.

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Should Teachers Still Give Homework?

A male math teacher is writing on a chalkboard in front of his class. Behind him, his students are sitting at their desks, taking notes.

Giving homework is a standard practice in most educational facilities across all grade levels and locations. Homework is intended to further solidify concepts and practices that a student learns in class in their minds later at home. But that could all be changing. 

Educators are now taking many different approaches to homework with more of an emphasis placed on the relevancy of the work to both the students’ age and learning level. Some educators are joining the anti-homework movement, and have seen positive results from giving little to no homework for students. However, with outside parties like parents and families getting more involved in the conversation around homework, it may be here to stay. The question is, should it be?

  • What is the history of homework?

For contemporary parents or guardians and their students, it might seem like homework has always been around. However, homework has actually been a widely debated topic since its inception in the 19th century. Horace Mann, among others, is credited with championing the idea of homework in the United States after touring German “Volksschulen (‘People’s Schools’)” while visiting the country.

As the idea of homework came across the Atlantic to America, it was quickly met with opposition and eventually a ban was placed on homework for any children under the age of 15 until 1917. When the United States and Russia entered the Cold War era, homework became relevant again as the United States placed emphasis on improving students’ knowledge to compete with other countries for success.

Various studies arguing both sides of the homework question have been released since then. The relevance of homework is now once again in question as educators and homeschooling parents try to understand the true purpose behind it. 

  • Is homework still relevant? 

Somewhere around 50% of educators still assign homework . However, this number might be bolstered due to parent involvement. Often, educators don’t want to assign homework or want to assign less homework, saving the time their students have at home for family bonding and other activities. 

But many parents are uncomfortable with a lack of homework assignments for the following reasons:

  • Parents feel like their children need homework to solidify concepts learned in the classroom.
  • Some parents also advocate for the time management, organization, and structure that homework can teach children.

They will often complain to the teacher, forcing the teacher to provide homework of some kind. So while half of all educators are assigning homework, the number of educators who believe it’s necessary may actually be less since some teachers feel pressured to assign homework when they otherwise wouldn’t. 

The relevance of homework when it is assigned is frequently up for debate because there are many nuances that go into the process of a student completing homework. When a teacher assigns homework they need to be aware of many things including:

  • Student access to a reliable internet source and computer or tablet
  • Student/parent dynamics at home
  • Parent/parent dynamics at home
  • Student accessibility levels
  • Necessity to student learning

All of these factors play a role in how well the student will respond to homework. Other factors like grade level also play a role in the quality and quantity of homework being assigned. But beyond these factors, homework also needs to be thought out before it's assigned. To some extent, the relevancy of homework is determined by how well it’s been formulated by the teacher assigning it.

  • How much homework is too much? 

The quantity of homework will vary greatly by grade level. Teachers will often operate by the “ 10-minute rule ” which recommends that a child should be assigned 10 minutes of homework for every grade they’ve passed. So a fifth grader would have 50 minutes of assigned work. 

However, homework can become overwhelming when a teacher hasn’t put the time into creating meaningful assignments that can be completed in a reasonable amount of time. Thus the feeling of “too much homework” is often conflated with poorly constructed homework. A positively constructed homework assignment will contain a few things:

  • Work reviewing material that the student has already learned in class
  • Work that involves professor feedback or has a clear purpose
  • Work that can be finished in the time period appropriate for the age and grade level of the student
  • Why is homework important? 

While many educators do not see much value in homework at the K–6 level, studies have shown that students in middle school or grades 7–12 do benefit from homework. Often this is because a student is learning more rigorous material and has a more fully developed brain that benefits from the reinforcement that homework provides. 

Many teachers argue that homework for students is like practice for athletes: it reinforces concepts and the neural pathways a student has used during class. Beyond these benefits , homework can also teach students time management and organizational skills.

__________ Become who you are called to be Pursue your purpose at PLNU. __________

  • Should teachers still give homework? 

Studies on the relevance of homework to actual success in the classroom are varied. One of the most comprehensive studies reinforces the idea that homework can have a positive impact if the teacher assigning it is doing so in the correct manner. In this case, the 2006 study conducted by Duke University psychology professor Harris Cooper, showed a positive correlation for students who were doing appropriate homework in higher grade levels. He stated that “a good way to think about homework is the way you think about medications or dietary supplements. If you take too little, they’ll have no effect. If you take too much, they can [hurt] you. If you take the right amount, you’ll get better.” 

The study also revealed that the impact of homework went down if the student was in elementary school. Therefore, the decision for teachers to assign homework should be based on the grade level they are teaching and the general intensity level of their students. One PLNU alumna, Megan Wheeler (19), who is also a grade school teacher has found this to be a sound policy and practices it with her own students:

“As an elementary teacher, I do not assign any homework to my students because I find that many students may not have home lives that are conducive to the demands that homework requires…My eight-year-old students are already working hard on school work for six hours during the day with me, so I would much rather they spend that time together as a family or participating in extracurricular activities.”

“As an elementary teacher, I do not assign any homework to my students because I find that many students may not have home lives that are conducive to the demands that homework requires… My eight-year-old students are already working hard on school work for six hours during the day with me, so I would much rather they spend that time together as a family or participating in extracurricular activities.” - Megan Wheeler (19)

  • Take the next steps to becoming an educator

Learning the ins and outs of properly constructed homework assignments can be a daunting task for rising educators, especially when the many types of student learning styles are taken into account. One of the best places to receive more instruction on how to assign the right kind of homework is in an education-specific degree program. 

PLNU boasts many undergraduate and graduate-level options for all types of budding educators so you can continue your education while pursuing a worthwhile career. Find out more about these programs by visiting PLNU’s School of Education website .

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when the teacher gives you homework on the weekend

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Put the Grading Down! 50 Ways to Unwind This Weekend

Yes, yes, and yes!

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As teachers we know there is a never-ending, limitless supply of work that could, should and might be done. We could be lesson planning, grading, creating, prepping and studying 24/7.  But gosh darnit, sometimes there are better ways to spend your teacher weekend.

Our friend Lydia Ann started it all by posting this sentence starter on our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE:

“I should be grading or lesson planning or prepping for tomorrow, but instead I am…”

The answers offer a peek into how other teachers are spending their weekend. You’ll probably recognize yourself in many of their answers and maybe even find something that inspires you to blow off your work next weekend too! So grab a few and enjoy (guilt-free)!

Training my dog?

Drinking wine?

Reading a book?

Looking at Facebook

Playing with my kids?

Watching football?

Watching cute animal videos?

Cooking dinner??‍?

Grocery shopping?

Binge watching Netflix?

Sitting on the beach?

Riding my bike?

Ignoring my floor that needs vacuuming?

Avoiding adulting?

Laying in bed sick?

Watching Hulu?

Working on my newsletter??

Knitting a baby blanket?

Painting the guest room?

Guiltlessly taking it easy?

Playing with my cat?

Having a bonfire?

Cleaning my house?

Playing video games?

Getting sucked into the vortex that is Pinterest?

Spending time with my hubby?

Homecoming dress shopping?

Making pasta?

Doing my graduate school homework?

Digging in my garden?

Going to my kids’ soccer games⚽️

Deep conditioning my hair??‍♀️

Shoe shopping ?

Putting my babies to bed??

Wiping tears of frustration as my laptop just crashed with my work on it?

Cleaning up after my kids’ first mud run?

Sitting in a movie theater eating popcorn with extra butter?

Enjoying my family ?‍?‍?‍?

Laundry, laundry and more laundry??

Talking on the phone with my best friend?

Golfing?️‍♀️

Posting photos on Instagram?

Celebrating my anniversary❤️

Sewing a Halloween costume?

Staring into space?

Dancing to my favorite tunes?

What’s your favorite way to enjoy your teacher weekend? Add it to the comments below!

when the teacher gives you homework on the weekend

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If the teacher gives us lots of homework this weekend, I ____ happy.

A. won’t be

B. wouldn’t be

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Deped: no homework or assignments during weekends.

DepEd Memo 392 mandates school teachers not to give assignments or any form of homework during weekends. This controversial memorandum has drawn flak from the public school educators.

Signed by Education Secretary Armin Luistro advised teachers to limit giving of homework and assignments. This is to give children the chance to have more quality time with their parents and loved ones. The can relax and rest at home for the rest of the weekends.

He added that children must not be burdened with the thought of doing lots of homework. They must enjoy their childhood.

This is contrary to the Teachers’ Dignity Coalition’s point of view. According to TDC’s president Benjo Basas, the memorandum is unnecessary. It actually violates the educators’ academic freedom to give the students the best education.

He said that as educators, they know the capacity of their students and how long it will take to finish their homework. It is to help them develop self-discipline and not make their lives harder. Students can learn time management and become responsible.

Furthermore, he said that teachers give more homework on Fridays because they have more free time during the weekends. Parents can even use homework to spend quality time with their kids. He explained that there are two main purposes for assignments: to review previews lessons or to get ready for a new one.

GUIDELINES ON GIVING HOMEWORK OR ASSIGNMENTS TO ALL PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPILS

Director of the DepEd Bureau of Elementary Education, Yolanda Quijano admitted that the memorandum was signed in after they have received complaints from a number of parents about teachers who were giving too much homework. It is a part of the initiative to make schools child-friendly.

She further added that they want kids to enjoy their time. Study time should be a habit and must not be strictly required during the weekends. Homework can bring opposite effect to the good education. Source

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COMMENTS

  1. Students shouldn't have homework on weekends

    A weekend with no homework would help them to be fresh and ready on Monday morning. Weekend assignments tend to be longer and more difficult. The students have a difficult day with classes, practices, and going to school. By Friday, (test day) they are near exhaustion. Most tests are given on Fridays.

  2. The Bird Feed

    In a weekend homework survey of teachers, about 20% of Sofo teachers give no homework over the weekend. Out of the 80% that do, almost 50% try to avoid it when necessary, and 29% only assign a couple of times per month. Most teachers try to avoid giving weekend homework unless necessary.

  3. Homework should not be assigned on weekends or breaks

    Teachers should only give homework out Monday through Thursday. There are so many different reasons as to why teachers shouldn't be permitted to hand out homework over the weekends and especially over breaks. Having a heavy workload on weekends or on breaks will take time away from friends and family. Having time with your friends and family ...

  4. Should homework be required during school vacation?

    Yes, it is. Advertisement. Tell the teacher that you've decided to give your child the vacation he deserves. Your son is far too young to be learning that vacations are only partial escapes from ...

  5. Should More Schools Adopt a "No Homework on Weekends" Policy?

    Schools in Princeton, New Jersey, began implementing one homework-free weekend each semester in 2015, in part to give students more time to pursue interests and passions outside of school. Other New Jersey schools limit the number of minutes students should spend on homework each night. In Hinsdale, Illinois, one high school began offering ...

  6. The Pros and Cons: Should Students Have Homework?

    Homework allows for more time to complete the learning process. School hours are not always enough time for students to really understand core concepts, and homework can counter the effects of time shortages, benefiting students in the long run, even if they can't see it in the moment. 6. Homework Reduces Screen Time.

  7. Why We Should Give Students a Homework Break Over the Holidays

    Taking the stress of homework out of my students' holiday breaks is important. They deserve an opportunity to relax and rejuvenate as much as I do—particularly if they are overscheduled to ...

  8. Should We Get Rid of Homework?

    Want more writing prompts? You can find all of our questions in our Student Opinion column.Teachers, check out this guide to learn how you can incorporate them into your classroom. Students 13 and ...

  9. Should Students Have Homework Over Breaks?

    Kids Need Rest. Others, however, are quick to point out that today's students are already facing high stress levels, and the last thing they need over the holidays is more assignments. Homework over winter break is unnecessary, says Alfie Kohn, author of The Homework Myth. In fact, kids probably don't need to do homework ever.

  10. How to Establish a Homework Routine on Weekends

    As Cal says, "Friday and Saturday are a time to be social. Sunday morning and afternoon is a time for you to regroup, get organized, and get prepared for the upcoming week.". The ritual he proposes includes a big breakfast, a swing by the library to do some planning for the day, getting some exercise, and then some time later for thinking ...

  11. Teachers of Reddit, do y'all give a lot of homework on weekends? If so

    I don't assign homework - you only have homework if you didn't complete the assignment in class, and I always give plenty of time. Alright. Just for you, I'm telling my class that you're the reason I'm assigning a ton of homework on weekends from now on. As a teacher, I 100% agree with you.

  12. How to talk with your child's teacher about too much homework

    Communicate clearly. Keep the focus on what your child is doing, not on what the teacher is doing or what the homework policies are. Be specific about what you're noticing at home, but don't be critical of the teacher. For instance, saying "You're giving so much homework that my child is spending hours trying to get it done" can sound ...

  13. Homework should be reserved for weekdays only

    Homework should be reserved for weekdays only. Bridget Linchuk ('12)/Eastside staff. February 16, 2011. During the school year, weekends are the only time students can have free time to spend with their family and friends, unlike weekdays when students are piled on with loads of homework given by teachers. Students should not have homework on ...

  14. What's the Purpose of Homework?

    Others have found that homework can help students strengthen their self-regulation skills such as managing time, setting goals, self-reflecting on their performance, and delaying gratification (Ramdass & Zimmerman, 2011). On the flip side, there's some research highlighting negative aspects of homework, including disruption of family time ...

  15. what's the point of a weekend if teachers assign 7 pounds of homework

    like weekends are supposed to be our days off. so why do teachers assign so much fucking homework on weekends. i can understand one or two things that have to be done over the weekend, but some teachers give out so much homework that you have to spend the entire weekend doing it. there's not much point in having a fucking weekend if you're just gonna ruin it by turning it into study hall.

  16. Key Lessons: What Research Says About the Value of Homework

    Too much homework may diminish its effectiveness. While research on the optimum amount of time students should spend on homework is limited, there are indications that for high school students, 1½ to 2½ hours per night is optimum. Middle school students appear to benefit from smaller amounts (less than 1 hour per night).

  17. No more giving school work to students on weekends

    No more giving school work to students on weekends. Senior Nideesh Shanmugam Bhuvaneswari uses his lunch period on Jan. 5 to study for his upcoming AP Calculus AB test. After five, roughly seven-hour-long school days, on top of the time it takes to complete homework, students are left feeling exhausted and looking forward to the weekend.

  18. Should Teachers Still Give Homework?

    The quantity of homework will vary greatly by grade level. Teachers will often operate by the " 10-minute rule " which recommends that a child should be assigned 10 minutes of homework for every grade they've passed. So a fifth grader would have 50 minutes of assigned work.

  19. Government scraps homework rules for English schools

    Some teachers give us homework that we haven't even been doing in lessons. ... I don't mind if I have the weekend to do my homework. I think infants shouldn't get homework, juniors should get two ...

  20. When A Teacher Decides To Give Homework On The Weekend

    If you enjoyed this video please share it with a friend, leave a like and comment!Check out our app "Mash - Soundboard for Vine" http://itunes.apple.com/app/...

  21. How to Spend Your Teacher Weekend

    Yes, yes, and yes! As teachers we know there is a never-ending, limitless supply of work that could, should and might be done. We could be lesson planning, grading, creating, prepping and studying 24/7. But gosh darnit, sometimes there are better ways to spend your teacher weekend. Our friend Lydia Ann started it all by posting this sentence ...

  22. If the teacher gives us lots of homework this weekend, I

    How to use : Read the question carefully, then select one of the answers button. GrammarQuiz.Net - Improve your knowledge of English grammar, the best way to kill your free time. If the teacher gives us lots of homework this weekend, I ____ happy. A. won't be B. wouldn't be C. am not - First & Second Conditional Quiz.

  23. DepEd: No Homework or Assignments during weekends

    June 25, 2018. DepEd Memo 392 mandates school teachers not to give assignments or any form of homework during weekends. This controversial memorandum has drawn flak from the public school educators. Signed by Education Secretary Armin Luistro advised teachers to limit giving of homework and assignments. This is to give children the chance to ...

  24. When the teacher assigns homework over the weekend or breaks you just

    TikTok video from MKTrickShots (@mktrickshots12): "When the teacher assigns homework over the weekend or breaks you just want to scream! #fyp #christmas #hanukkah #winterbreak #schoollife". POV: Your teacher gives out homework over the weekendCLOUD 333 - Bvtter.