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Physics in Daily Life: Facts, Examples, and Importance

  • November 24, 2023
  • Views 17200

physics in our daily life essay

Physics  extends to your  daily life  to describe the motion, forces, and energy of the ordinary experience. Physics is at work in tasks such as walking, driving a car or using a phone. Knowledge of physics is helpful in everyday situations as well as in non-scientific tasks.

For example, physics helps you understand:

  • How food is cooked in a microwave oven,
  • Why a radiator helps to dissipate the heat of a car engine, and
  • Why a white ceiling helps to keep the inside of a house cool.

Thousands of such questions can be answered and explained via physics.

Physics is the foundation of many critical scientific disciplines, such as chemistry is rooted in quantum physics which describes the in-depth study of atoms and molecules. Physics is also applicable in most branches of engineering. In architecture, physics is pivotal to determining structural stability, acoustics, heating, lighting and cooling systems for buildings. In Geology, the study of non-living parts of the Earth, such as the study of atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, earthquakes, storms, volcanoes, and other natural disasters, such as floods, droughts, and extreme heat on the Earth’s surface. Some disciplines, such as chemical electrodynamics, optics, thermodynamics and modern physics, are important branches of physics for studying natural phenomena.  Physical science  also describes the chemical processes in the human body through biophysics. Physics is implicated in medical diagnoses, such as X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonic blood flow measurements. Physics can also explain what we perceive with our senses, such as how the ear detects sound or how the eye detects colour.

10 Examples of Physics in daily life:

1. alarm clock ringing:.

Physics is involved everywhere in your daily life, from when you wake up in the morning to going to sleep at night. The alarm clock’s buzz helps you wake up in the morning according to your schedule. Sound is something that you cannot see but can hear or feel. Physics studies the origin, transmission, and properties of sound. The  concept of quantum mechanics  is applicable here.

2. Electricity: 

Electricity is one of physics’ most important direct applications in people’s lives and a major energy source. It is a continuous stream of  electric charges moving inside a conductor , known as electric current.

The importance of electricity can be understood from the conditions people endure when electricity is disconnected from their houses. All the electrical appliances stop working, the lights go out, and life becomes difficult.

3. Static Electricity:

When two objects that are not good conductors of electricity are rubbed together, electrons from one object rub off on the other.  The more friction between two objects, the more static electricity is built up  and the greater the electric charge.

This is why when you rub the pencil on your hair and move it towards small pieces of paper, the small pieces stick to your pencil. This is just a small example.

4. The Density of Seawater and Swimming in it:

The density of seawater is higher than normal water, so it is easier to swim in it. There’s an ocean in which people never drown and remain above the surface of the water because of its  water’s density . The name of this sea is the dead sea.

5. Smartphone: 

Smartphones have become like oxygen in modern social life. Now hardly anyone will be untouched by the effects of smartphones. Whether it is to send an important message, chat constantly, talk on video calls, send money or do any other important work, smartphones are everywhere. But do you know how smart phone works?  It works on the principle of electricity and the electromagnetic spectrum , the wavy patterns of electricity and magnetism.

6. The Science behind opening the Doors:

If you apply force near the door hinge, the door will not open because it will not be able to rotate around the hinge. But, when you apply the same force away from the hinge, the torque will be larger. That makes you  easily open the door  without exerting more effort.

7. How does the Washing Machine dry the Clothes?

The dryer of a washing machine is a rapidly rotating container that applies  centrifugal force  to its contents. Centrifugal force acts away from the centre. It throws water molecules radially outward on the fabric during the washing machine’s spin cycle.

8. Why are cars facilitated with Seat belts & Airbags?

When the brakes are applied on a moving car, the lower parts of the vehicle and the passengers attached to the car stop immediately, but their upper parts tend to fall forward due to  inertia . This is why airbags are also installed in cars, along with seat belts.

9. Falling Incident:

Suppose you are climbing a tree, and suddenly, you slip and fall from the tree. Then, you are sure to break a bone or two. But if the same thing happens with a small ant, i.e. if the ant falls below the height, it does not get hurt. Why is this?

From the ant’s perspective, the atmosphere is dense and viscous, and its experience of falling from a height is similar to that of us falling through the water to the bottom of a pool. The air beneath the falling becomes a large cushion of protection.

10. How does a Pen write?

Whether at your workplace or school, the ballpoint pen is your weapon. If there were no physics, you would hardly be able to write on paper with a ballpoint pen. Here the  concept of gravity  comes into play. As your pen moves over the paper, the ball turns, and gravity forces the ink down onto the top of the ball, from where the ink continues to transfer to the paper.

It is hard to imagine life without physics. Many other examples are available; you only need an eye to spot them. If you have any queries or suggestions, kindly let us know in the comments section below.

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Math in Daily Life: Uses, Importance and Facts

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Home / Essay Samples / Science / Physics / Physics in Everyday Life

Physics in Everyday Life

  • Category: Science , Literature
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Essays About Science In Everyday Life

The following essays provide a snapshot of the different ways science can be explored in everyday life.

Each essay offers its own unique perspective on the role of science in the world around us.

Read through these essays and get a feel for the range of possibilities that are available when exploring science in your everyday life. 

So read on!

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Blessings of Science Essay Sample

Want to read essays on scientific topics? Check out thes e science essay examples t o put your curiosity to rest.

After you've read these sample essays, try writing your own essay on a similar topic!

Continue reading to check out some tips that will help you write your essay!

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Tips for Writing An Essay About Science

You have read the sample essays and seen how they establish their point. The next step is to write an essay of your own.  

Here are some tips that will help you write a great essay about science in everyday life:

Brainstorm Ideas for a Topic

The first step in writing an essay is to choose a specific topic. Here are some questions that’ll help you brainstorm a topic. Or you can use them as prompts that you can consider for your essay:

  • What are some examples of science in everyday life?
  • What are some applications of science in daily life?
  • Science plays an important role in modern life.
  • Science is the greatest blessing for the modern man.
  • How has science affected human life?
  • How has modern science changed the way we live?
  • How has science made life easier?
  • What is the importance of science in your daily life?

In your essay, you can examine scientific discoveries that are essential for modern living. 

Topics may include telecommunications, medical breakthroughs, and other areas that impact people's lives. Check out this list of science essay topics if you need more ideas.

Here’s a video containing a list of examples of how science is involved in our daily lives. Check it out to get some ideas:

So, find an interesting topic for your essay before moving on.

Make an Essay Outline

Once you know what you will write about, start by making an essay outline . Making an essay outline is an important step for any writer. It organizes your thoughts and serves as a key reference point during the writing and editing process.

To create an effective essay outline, you should… 

  • Start by thinking of a thesis statement . A thesis statement is the central idea or main point of your essay.
  • Secondly, think of the main ideas or points you want to discuss. Once these are established, add supporting details, evidence, and examples for each point.
  • Finally, make sure all your points have a logical flow.

An effectively planned essay outline will result in a high-quality essay! So take your time when making an outline.

Define Your Argument Clearly

When writing an essay about science in everyday life, it is important to establish the main point or argument of your essay very early on.

Your thesis statement should be expressed clearly and concisely in the introduction of your essay. 

This will set the tone for the rest of your paper and help readers understand what your essay is about.

The main points of your body paragraphs should support your main thesis. Make sure that these points are presented logically and are connected to each other. 

In short, be clear and coherent throughout your essay.

Illustrate With Examples

When writing your essay, look for examples from everyday life to illustrate your main points. 

Using specific examples will also help readers understand the importance of your argument in a practical context. 

Luckily, we live in an age of science. You will find ample inspiration for your essay around you. There are countless scientific inventions and tools you use every day, such as motor cars. 

Additionally, personal anecdotes can be especially effective in making your argument more engaging and convincing. You should also include scientific research or statistics to strengthen your argument further.

Edit Your Essay Carefully

Finally, take time to review and edit your essay. Check for grammar, punctuation, and other common errors . 

Also, make sure that your argument is logical and consistent with the evidence you provide.

Going through your essay one last time will ensure that you are satisfied with the finished product. You may also get help from an experienced essay writer to edit your essay.

To conclude,

By reading these examples and following these tips, you can easily write an essay about science in everyday life. So get started and write your best essay today!

Do you still require further help in writing your essay? 

No problem! 

At MyPerfectWords.com , we provide expert science essay writing service . We will craft an essay that is unique to your topic and tailored to your specific needs. 

So, if you're struggling to write an effective science essay, contact our legit essay writing service . 

Our science essay writer will help you create an outstanding essay in no time. We guarantee you'll be satisfied with the results. You can also utilize the assistance of our essay bot if you’re looking for quick essay generation.

Betty P. (Natural Sciences, Life Sciences)

Betty is a freelance writer and researcher. She has a Masters in literature and enjoys providing writing services to her clients. Betty is an avid reader and loves learning new things. She has provided writing services to clients from all academic levels and related academic fields.

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Everyday Physics: 10 Examples of Physics in Daily Life

Physics facts in everyday life

Physics facts are present in all aspects of our lives. From the pre-scientific past to our modern era, physics is everywhere, whether you are walking, running, jumping, tossing, dancing, or simply doing nothing.

Physics is the superhero of science, as it is the basis of all other experimental sciences for students . It helps us to understand why things fall, why the Earth spins, and why humans don’t float away into space. Physics in everyday life helps improve our understanding of the natural world while also laying the foundations for many technological developments.

Whether you are looking for ICSE or CBSE schools in Mumbai ,  our expert faculties ensure to offer the best visual and practical learning experience to all aspiring and brilliant minds learning at EuroSchool.

By observation, experimentation, and the development of mathematical models that describe the fundamental laws of the world, physics in daily life aims to solve the mysteries of the universe. It examines the complicated interactions of particles, forces, and fields. But Physics is not about those complex mathematical glory, because most people after school or college would forget these equations and theories unless they get into a technical field. Through simple physics facts in everyday life, we can understand its importance. Let us look at the 10 examples of application of physics in daily life.

Application of physics in daily life:

Walking and running:.

One of the simple examples of physics in everyday life is the frictional force which helps us to walk or run easily. It acts like a “grip” between your shoes and the ground, which helps you to walk or run without slipping. It depends on two factors; one is the surface you are walking on and the other one is the weight that is pushed down on the surface. Friction allows us to have control and stability while moving.

Walking on a carpeted floor is easier because the rough texture of the carpet creates greater friction, which helps the shoes to grip the fibres and prevent slipping. But if you are walking on an icy surface, the smoothness of the ice reduces the traction between the shoes and the ground. This results in less friction and it’s difficult to walk or run on ice without slipping.

Alarm clock:

Most of us hate the sound of the alarm clock and love to press the snooze button. The annoying sound that wakes you up is a classic example of physics in daily life. The sound which you can’t see but only hear travels in the waveform.

Mechanical energy conversion concepts are used in alarm clocks. Potential energy is stored in a coiled spring when the clock has been wound up. The potential energy in the spring is turned into kinetic energy when it unwinds, which drives the clock mechanism. As a result, sound waves of high frequency are produced which wakes you up. Amazing, isn’t it?

Well, there is no fun in learning if a bit of practical examples aren’t involved. At EuroSchool, we strive to make learning fun and easy to remember for our students learning in ICSE or CBSE schools in Pune .

Ballpoint pen:

People say the pen is mightier than the sword. Physics plays a major role in using a pen as a tool for writing. The design of the ball pen explains the physics facts in everyday life. When you use a ballpoint pen, it involves principles of fluid dynamics and friction. There is a small spherical point object at the tip of the ball pen. When you apply pressure to the pen and move it across the paper, the ball rotates and rolls.

As it rolls, it picks up ink from the refill, which is a small tube filled with ink inside the pen. Because of the gravitational effect, the ink flows through the ball and then onto the paper. This mechanism ensures a smooth flow of ink and allows you to write or draw with precision.

Roller coasters:

Concepts such as gravity, acceleration, and inertia are used here. The roller coaster is initially dragged up a steep hill, storing potential energy. The potential energy is turned into kinetic energy when it rises the slope, ending in an exciting drop.

The track’s twists, bends, and loops influence forces like gravity and centripetal force, resulting in amazing moments of feeling weightless and tremendous g-forces. These aspects work together to provide an adrenaline-pumping experience while sticking to laws of physics that keep riders safe and engaged.

If your child loves going on adventures, our expert teaching faculties in ICSE and CBSE schools in Hyderabad will ensure to keep them intrigued with fascinating physics concepts adjoining with real-life theories.

Fans, the most needed thing in summer, depend on fluid dynamics and electromagnetic concepts. When a fan is turned on, the blades inside it revolve. As the blades rotate, they produce a low-pressure zone behind them. This low-pressure zone encourages air to flow from higher-pressure places, such as the surrounding room, to the fan.

The rotation of the fan’s blades and the design of the fan’s housing drive the flow of air in a specified direction. Fans use these physics principles to circulate air, which provides cooling and ventilation in houses and buildings.

Refrigerators:

Refrigerators work on thermodynamic and heat transfer principles. Refrigerators use the process of heat transfer to remove the heat from inside and release it outside. The refrigerator’s continual sequence of compression, condensation, expansion, and evaporation allows it to keep a low temperature and preserve our food and beverages.

Cell phones:

If you say you don’t have a cell phone, people will think you are an alien. For user interaction, the touchscreen makes use of changes in electrical charge.  Wireless communication involves the transmission of electromagnetic waves.

The device’s components, such as the batteries and microchips, operate on electromagnetism and electrical circuit principles. This clearly explains the role of physics facts in everyday life. Cell phones have become vital instruments for communication and connection in our daily lives as a result of these physics concepts.

However, our interesting teaching practices used at our ICSE and CBSE schools in Bangalore will ensure your child is never bored and always gets excited to learn new concepts or physics.

Aeroplanes:

Flight physics is critical in aviation. Aerodynamics manages the forces that act on an aeroplane’s wings to allow it to fly. Bernoulli’s principle and Newton’s laws of motion are essential concepts for designing and operating aircraft.

Batteries are an essential part of physics in daily life. A chemical reaction happens inside a battery, resulting in an electron flow. This flow generates electric current by creating an electrical potential difference between the battery’s terminals. Our devices are powered by the flow of electrons through the circuit.

Electron behaviour is governed by physics principles such as electromagnetism and electrical circuits, allowing batteries to provide portable and reliable sources of energy for a variety of applications.

Automobile:

Several physics ideas are incorporated into automobiles. The engine uses combustion and thermodynamic principles to transform fuel into mechanical energy. The interaction of forces such as friction, inertia, and aerodynamics is involved in vehicle dynamics.

Conclusion:

In one way or another, physics governs the whole universe. At EuroSchool , we understand that by being aware of the physics facts in everyday life we can understand the natural world, and improve our daily lives. It gives us the ability to develop original ideas, enhance current procedures, and make wise decisions in our personal and professional lives.

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Physics Network

How does physics help improve our lives?

Physics helps us to understand how the world around us works, from can openers, light bulbs and cell phones to muscles, lungs and brains; from paints, piccolos and pirouettes to cameras, cars and cathedrals; from earthquakes, tsunamis and hurricanes to quarks, DNA and black holes.

What are some examples of physics in everyday life?

  • Alarm Clock. Physics gets involved in your daily life right after you wake up in the morning.
  • Steam Iron.
  • Ball Point Pen.
  • Headphones/Earphones.
  • Car Seat-Belts.
  • Camera Lens.
  • Cell Phones.

How does physics change the world?

Physics has helped us better understand all the natural processes around us, and we have used this knowledge to create things to benefit society, such as the prediction of weather and natural disasters.

Why do we need physics?

Physics helps you to understand the world around you, and satisfy your curiosity. Studying physics develops your critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Physicists are versatile, which opens a wide range of future careers.

What is the importance of science in our daily life?

Science generates solutions for everyday life and helps us to answer the great mysteries of the universe. In other words, science is one of the most important channels of knowledge.

How is physics used in technology?

Physics is the most fundamental of all the sciences and has a wide range of applications to modern technologies. The importance of physics in modern technology can be recognized because it enables mobile devices, computers, televisions, watches, and many other modern technologies to operate in an automated manner.

What is the importance of science in our daily life essay?

Science plays an important part in our daily life. It has made our life easier and more comfortable. Science is nothing but a systematic way of knowledge and living. Man’s behavior of inquiringly, alertness and keen observation of changes in natural happenings has given birth to science and scientific study.

Can live without physics?

We can conclusively say that physics governs our lives and ease our day-to-day operations. Without the understanding of physics today, many applications in physics such as electronics and mechanics would not exist today. We would be living without modern technology or instruments.

What problems can physics solve?

Physics not only helps us to understand how the world works, but also can help develop new technologies that address social issues such as energy generation and water purification.

What concepts is important to physics?

  • The universe is made of matter and energy. At the smallest level, matter is made of elementary particles which have mass and charge.
  • The universe evolves by means of interactions.
  • Some quantities are conserved.
  • There are four fundamental forces.
  • Waves carry energy.

What is physics and why do we study it?

Physics is a natural science that studies matter, its motion and behaviour through space and time. It studies the related entities of energy and force. It is also one of the most fundamental science disciplines and its main goal is to understand how the universe works.

What type of knowledge is gained from physics?

Knowledge & Skills Gained as a Physics Major: Knowledge: Learn how to solve quantitative problems and find relationships between physical factors. Learn how to obtain, organize, analyze, and interpret scientific data.

How can I enjoy physics?

Instead of memorizing formulas, it is better to understand the derivations. Mugging up a number of formulas will only make you more apprehensive of the subject. Rather, if you try and understand where they come from, you will start enjoying physics and its applications!

What are the impact of science on society?

By drastically changing our means of communication, the way we work, our housing, clothes, and food, our methods of transportation, and, indeed, even the length and quality of life itself, science has generated changes in the moral values and basic philosophies of mankind.

What are 3 reasons why science is important?

Science is important for a variety of reasons including: Increases our fundamental knowledge. Creates new technology. Dreams up new applications. A pathway to share ideas.

How does science and technology affect society?

The essence of how science and technology contributes to society is the creation of new knowledge, and then utilization of that knowledge to boost the prosperity of human lives, and to solve the various issues facing society.

What is the role of physics in communication?

Physics allows us to understand the electromagnetic radiation we use to transmit data with fiber optics and satellites and to build computers that interpret those signals and transmit data on the Internet.

How is physics related to biology?

Biology and Physics Working Together Physics provides the basis for biology. Without space, matter, energy and time — components that make up the universe — living organisms would not exist. Physicist Richard Feynman said that everything on earth is made of atoms, basic units of matter, that constantly move.

How science has made our lives pleasant and comfortable?

In fact, science has provided us with so many amenities of life. Science has made human life immensely better than what it was in the past. Science has revolutionaries’ agriculture and now it is possible for us to grow more food it has also enabled us to dress ourselves in a much better manner than our forefathers.

What do you learn in physics?

Understanding of the laws and applications of motion, forces, and gravity. Understanding of the processes of work and energy and the laws of thermodynamics. Understanding of how light and sound waves function in our environment. Understanding of principles of electricity and magnetism and how they are applied.

Why should I take physics in high school?

Knowledge of physics is a prerequisite for many forms of employment. Success in school and on SAT is built on skills—physics builds analytical, critical reading, and problem solving skills. All science and engineering majors must take a 1 year college level Physics course.

Is physics a useful degree?

A Physics Degree is Valuable Physics is sometimes referred to as the “liberal arts” degree of technology because physics majors can go on to careers in fields such as computer science, engineering, and research and development.

How important is problem-solving in physics?

Problem-solving skills are clearly essential to success in a quantitative course in physics. More important, the ability to apply broad physical principles—usually represented by equations—to specific situations is a very powerful form of knowledge. It is much more powerful than memorizing a list of facts.

What is the biggest question in physics?

  • What is matter made of?
  • Why is gravity so weird?
  • Why does time seem to flow only in one direction?
  • Where did all the antimatter go?
  • What happens in the gray zone between solid and liquid?
  • Can we find a unified theory of physics?
  • How did life evolve from nonliving matter?

What is the biggest unsolved problem in physics?

Quantum Gravity The biggest unsolved problem in fundamental physics is how gravity and the quantum will be made to coexist within the same theory.

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Essay on Importance of Science in Our Life

Science is a systematic process in which various theories, formulas, laws, and thoughts are analysed and evaluated in order to determine the truth about the facts of anything.

This systematic process studies and generates new knowledge from any kind of activity that occurs in the nature around us or in the universe, of which we are a tiny part.

Table of Contents

Science is essential.

  • Importance of Science in Society
  • Frequently Asked Questions – FAQs

Science is a methodical process of extracting true facts from any given thought by adhering to a set of rules known as methodology.

It includes the following:

  • Observation: The observations are made based on the collected data and measurements.
  • Evidence: If any evidence is gathered for further processing of data evaluation.
  • Experiment : Using the data and evidence gathered, experiments are carried out to test the assumption.
  • Initiation: Identify the facts based on data and evidence analysis.
  • Re-examination and complex analysis: To ensure the veracity and authenticity of the results, the data and evidence are examined several times and critically analysed.
  • Verification and review of the results: The results of the experiment are verified and tested by experts to ensure that they are correct.

Science is concerned with generating new knowledge and proving new hypotheses by collecting and analysing data in a systematic manner.

There are numerous scientific disciplines:

  • Astrophysics
  • Climate science
  • Atmospheric science

Importance of science in society

Science and technology play an important role in today’s changing world. Everything from the road to the buildings, the shop to the educational instructions is the result of modern science and technology. Almost everything we see in society is the result of applied science and technology. Even the toothpaste we use to clean our teeth after waking up in the morning and before going to bed at night are products of science and technology.

Electricity

The discovery of electricity was the first modern scientific marvel. It has altered our way of life, society, and culture. It’s a fantastic source of power and energy.

The radio and television Lights, fans, electric irons, mills, factories, and refrigerators are all powered by electricity.

Transport and Communication

Science has simplified and shortened our communication. Ships, boats, trains, buses, and cars can be found on the seas, rivers, and roads. All of these are scientific gifts.

Telegraph, telephone, fax, and wireless communication are also important modes of communication. Trains, steamers, aeroplanes, buses, and other modes of transportation make communication quick and easy.

Medicine and Surgery

  • It elevates one’s overall standard of living, quality of life, and life expectancy.
  • It aids in detecting and treating diseases, ailments, and conditions.
  • It dissects the molecular mechanism of any disease and helps to develop drugs and pharmaceuticals.
  • Basic Medical Sciences, in addition to curative care, sow the seeds of preventive care.
  • It teaches researchers, doctors, scientists, and even laypeople about living a healthy lifestyle.
  • It fosters a fundamental understanding of medical science principles, which may be useful in the future.

Agriculture

A great deal of agricultural research was conducted, which resulted in the production of artificial fertilisers, which are now a basic requirement for all agricultural activities. Agricultural education is now taught in schools across the country. Scientists have gone so far as to study the genomic makeup of plants to select crops that can withstand harsh climate changes. Improved farming techniques have been developed using new technologies such as computer science and biotechnology.

Science has played an important role in agriculture, and the two cannot be separated. Science must be used to help produce better yields on a small piece of land for the world to be able to provide enough food for all of its citizens.

Read more: Chemistry of Life

New scientific understanding may result in new applications.

The discovery of the structure of DNA, for example, was a major breakthrough. It served as the foundation for research that would eventually lead to many practical applications, such as DNA fingerprinting, genetically engineered crops, and genetic disease tests.

New technological developments may result in new scientific discoveries.

For example, the development of DNA copying and sequencing technologies has resulted in significant advances in many areas of science.

Scientific research may be motivated by potential applications.

For example, the possibility of engineering microorganisms to produce drugs for diseases such as malaria motivates many microbe genetics researchers to continue their research.

Frequently Asked Questions on Essay on Importance of Science in Our Life

What role does science play in our lives.

It helps us live a longer and healthier life by monitoring our health, providing medicine to cure our diseases, alleviating aches and pains, assisting us in providing water for our basic needs – including our food – providing energy and making life more enjoyable by including sports, music, entertainment, and cutting-edge communication technology.

How has science influenced our daily lives?

Science has changed how we live and what we believe since the invention of the plough. Science has allowed man to pursue societal concerns such as ethics, aesthetics, education, and justice, to create cultures, and to improve human conditions by making life easier.

How has science made our lives easier?

When scientific discoveries are combined with technological advancements, machines make managing our lives easier. Science has created everything from household appliances to automobiles and aeroplanes. Farmers can now save their crops from pests and other problems thanks to advances in science.

What is the social significance of science and technology?

The essence of how science and technology contribute to society is the creation of new knowledge and then the application of that knowledge to improve human life and solve societal problems.

Why is science education important in the 21st century?

Exemplary science education can offer a rich context for developing many 21st-century skills, such as critical thinking, problem solving, and information literacy, especially when instruction addresses the nature of science and promotes the use of science practices.

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Essay on Science in Our Daily Life

Students are often asked to write an essay on Science in Our Daily Life in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Science in Our Daily Life

Introduction.

Science is everywhere in our daily lives, from the moment we wake up until we go to sleep. It’s in the alarm clock that wakes us, the breakfast we eat, and the transport we use.

Science at Home

At home, science is in our refrigerators, televisions, and computers. It’s in the electricity that powers our appliances and the Wi-Fi that keeps us connected.

Science in School

In school, we use science to understand the world around us. It helps us solve problems, make discoveries, and create new technologies.

In conclusion, science is a vital part of our daily life, making our lives easier and more interesting.

250 Words Essay on Science in Our Daily Life

The ubiquity of science.

Science is not just an academic discipline, but a way of perceiving the world. It is deeply ingrained in every aspect of our daily lives, from the moment we wake up to the moment we sleep.

The Dawn of a Day

Consider the start of a day. The alarm clock that wakes us up is a product of years of scientific and technological advancement. From the understanding of time to the intricate circuits inside the clock, science plays a pivotal role. The hot shower that rejuvenates us is a testament to the principles of thermodynamics.

Nutrition and Health

In the kitchen, the food we consume is a complex combination of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals. The understanding of these nutrients, their roles, and the way our body processes them is all thanks to the biological and chemical sciences. Moreover, the medical science advancements help us lead healthier lives.

Communication and Transportation

The way we communicate and travel is another testament to the profound impact of science. The internet, smartphones, cars, and airplanes – all are fruits of scientific progress. They have significantly shrunk the world, making it a global village.

In essence, science is not confined to laboratories or research papers. It is a living, breathing entity that permeates every aspect of our lives. Its influence is so pervasive that we often take it for granted. However, a conscious acknowledgment of its role can lead to a greater appreciation of the world around us and inspire us to contribute to its advancement.

500 Words Essay on Science in Our Daily Life

The ubiquity of science in daily life.

Science is an integral part of our daily lives, often operating behind the scenes in ways we may not immediately perceive. It is the driving force behind the modern world, shaping our lives and influencing our actions in countless ways.

Science and Technology

The most evident manifestation of science in our daily lives is the technology we use. From smartphones to laptops, home appliances to transportation systems, science is the bedrock upon which these innovations are built. The principles of physics power our electrical devices, while the laws of thermodynamics keep our engines running.

Health and Medicine

Science’s role in health and medicine is paramount. It is through the principles of biology and chemistry that we understand the human body, enabling us to diagnose and treat diseases. The development and administration of vaccines, the creation of life-saving drugs, and the implementation of sanitation practices all rely on scientific knowledge.

Food and Agriculture

Science also plays a significant role in agriculture and food production. Techniques such as genetic modification and hydroponics have revolutionized farming, increasing yield and making it possible to grow crops in previously inhospitable environments. Even the food we consume daily is a product of scientific understanding, from the preservation techniques that keep it fresh to the nutritional science that informs our dietary choices.

Understanding Our Environment

Through the lens of science, we gain a deeper understanding of the world around us. The principles of earth science help us comprehend natural phenomena like weather patterns and geological processes. Moreover, the field of environmental science enables us to understand our impact on the planet, guiding our efforts to mitigate climate change and conserve biodiversity.

Science in Communication

The revolution in communication technology, powered by science, has transformed our lives. The internet, social media, and digital communication platforms have made it possible to connect with people across the globe instantaneously. These technologies rely on principles of computer science and electronics, demonstrating the pervasive influence of science in our daily interactions.

The Future of Science in Our Lives

As we look to the future, the role of science in our lives will only continue to grow. Advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and genetic engineering promise to reshape our world in profound ways. These developments will present both opportunities and challenges, underscoring the importance of scientific literacy in navigating the complexities of the modern world.

In conclusion, science is not just a subject studied in schools or a profession pursued by researchers. It is a fundamental part of our everyday existence, shaping our world and driving progress. As we continue to explore and understand the universe, the role of science in our daily lives will become even more significant.

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A Hubble Space Telescope image of the barred spiral galaxy known as NGC 1672, which is likely powered by a supermassive black hole at its center.

Book Review: Reflections on a Life Suffused With Science

Science journalist nell greenfieldboyce deftly weaves science and memoir in a collection of deeply personal essays..

Top: A Hubble Space Telescope image of the barred spiral galaxy known as NGC 1672, which is likely powered by a supermassive black hole at its center. Visual: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team

A s her father’s health began to decline, NPR science journalist Nell Greenfieldboyce went through a phase in which she was obsessed with finding a micrometeorite — a scrap of cosmic dust, smaller than a meteorite — on her roof. While grappling with her father’s mortality, she gathered water in a plastic bin and used a strong magnet to trawl through it for iron. Her family gently mocked her, but she didn’t stop: She borrowed her 12-year-old son’s microscope to examine dust she’d collected from her rain gutter, searching for a miniscule gray sphere that would reveal otherworldly debris on her ordinary home.

Meanwhile, her father’s last will and testament arrived in the mail. And still she persevered, desperate for some glimpse of the ephemeral, even though the tediousness of the project made her feel “like this hunt might emotionally wreck me.”

physics in our daily life essay

BOOK REVIEW — “Transient and Strange: Notes on the Science of Life,” by Nell Greenfieldboyce (W. W. Norton & Company, 224 pages).

Greenfieldboyce never did find a micrometeorite. But this period is one of the deeply personal and specific scientific preoccupations she explores in “Transient and Strange: Notes on the Science of Life,” a collection of essays in which she breaks out of the objective, impersonal journalistic mode that’s characterized her career and instead plumbs what the field of science has meant to her as an individual.

The personal is not a mode in which Greenfieldboyce was naturally comfortable: As a reporter on NPR’s technology beat, she expected to keep her private life private until the day a decade ago when she started nurturing a large spider that had appeared in her kitchen window. A friend encouraged her to write about this unlikely human-arachnid friendship for The Last Word on Nothing, a blog where science journalists dismantle the traditional walls between reportage and personal experience.

“I wasn’t sure I wanted people to know what I thought about in my kitchen while I watched a spider,” Greenfieldboyce writes. “But once I wrote that piece, I began to write about other personal experiences too — including ones that were more fraught.”

What emerged are the 10 essays in this collection, on topics ranging from fleas to the human heart to toaster ovens, by turns tender, tragic, and horrifying, and always chock-full of the personal reflections and humanistic analysis that are traditionally lacking in science journalism.

Greenfieldboyce found inspiration for several essays in that never-ending font of scientific curiosity: children. Her essay “Pum pum pum,” a brief piece on the human heart, opens with a scene in which she demonstrates for her daughter that the human heart is the size of a fist and explains that our hearts beat every second we are alive.

Greenfieldboyce explores topics ranging from fleas to the human heart to toaster ovens, by turns tender, tragic, and horrifying.

In “Everybody does it!” — an essay on the compulsive practice of doodling — her children imitate her longstanding fixation on filling spare scraps of paper with lines and shapes. And the first essay in the book, “The symbol of the tornado,” deals with her attempts to assuage her young son’s terror of storms, sparked by listening to a children’s novel called “Twister on Tuesday.” In this case, her son’s curiosity sparks something in Greenfieldboyce, who finds herself sucked into a dark obsession. She calls up Howard Bluestein, whose tornado research inspired the 1996 movie “Twister,” and asks him if her son needs to worry. Bluestein says no, explaining it’s “very, very, very difficult to get near a tornado,” a statement that seems especially apt for their family, who lives far from Tornado Alley in Washington, D.C.

Greenfieldboyce scrutinizes photographs of tornadoes and contemplates the array of descriptors that storm chasers use for these deadly, sublime storms: “cones, wedges, elephant trunks, needles, drill bits, stovepipes, and hourglasses.”

She pores over the autobiography of Ted Fujita, the pioneer of the tornado-ranking Fujita scale, who visited both Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the aftermath of the American atomic bombing in 1945 and noticed similarities between the starburst pattern of nuclear destruction and the damage wrought by downbursts, a weather pattern that instead of sucking things up like a tornado, violently pushes them down.

While her children and family provide heartfelt and sometimes bittersweet inroads into the book’s scientific queries, the collection’s most striking, disturbing moments involve Greenfieldboyce moving through the world as a girl and woman.

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Undark is a non-profit, editorially independent magazine covering the complicated and often fractious intersection of science and society. If you would like to help support our journalism, please consider making a donation. All proceeds go directly to Undark’s editorial fund.

In a surprising and deeply effective twist, “The symbol of a tornado” turns to a scene from Greenfieldboyce’s New Jersey adolescence that caused her deep, lasting shame. Interspersed with descriptions of the eerie phenomena that visited Worcester, Massachusetts during a famously destructive tornado, Greenfieldboyce describes an ordinary afternoon in the 1980s, when she was 13 and answered the landline at her parents’ house. A man on the other line claimed to have abducted her mother and then ordered Greenfieldboyce to have phone sex with him.

This incident plunged her into a spiral of fear, leaving her unable to answer the phone or spend time home alone. This memory, which seemed “almost like natural disasters” to Greenfieldboyce, sheds new, sobering light on the ending scene in the essay, where she silently vows to her children that if a tornado ever did destroy their home, she would rebuild it so they would never know. She writes, “I will fix everything, replace everything, make everything perfect so that in the end no one will know — not even you.”

“A very charming young black hole” treads similar ground. Here, Greenfieldboyce braids the history of black hole science in the 1970s and 1980s, a time when “astronomers had started to make weird observations that could be explained by hungry, unseen companions lurking near certain stars,” with her own early sexual experiences, chiefly with a scene where Greenfieldboyce, a 12-year-old unsupervised on vacation, spends the night in the lobby of an inn exchanging flirty, innuendo-laden handwritten notes with a college-aged man.

Rita Colwell in the lab.

In another disturbing denouement, we learn that the physicist Stephen Hawking made a bet with a fellow physicist about whether black holes existed, with a news magazine subscription at stake for Hawking, and a pornography subscription for his opponent. Hawking and his colleague fulfilled this bet the same month when Greenfieldboyce, at 16, lost her virginity to a decade-older graduate student at a lab where she was interning.

Greenfieldboyce ends the piece by comparing herself to a black hole, contemplating the swirl of lies and self-delusion she used to protect herself as a teenager. She writes: “Sometimes I think it might be possible to stare at this darkness long enough to get through, to discern what was there at the start. Other times, I know that’s just another lie.”

The power here lies in Greenfieldboyce’s juxtaposition of the misogynistic scientific establishment with the experiences of a curious young girl, herself passionate about science. Her frank examination of her personal experiences forces the reader to consider this traditionally male-dominated field and its discoveries in a new light.

Greenfieldboyce’s shorter essays, about topics such as recording ambient noise during interviews and about her parents’ toaster oven, are diverting, but in general they don’t pack as much of a punch as her long-form writing. Perhaps the most gripping piece is her final one, a 54-page essay with the provocative title “My eugenics project.”

In it, Greenfieldboyce charts her journey towards becoming a mother, a complex process given her husband’s polycystic kidney disease, a serious illness that can require transplants and lifelong reliance on drugs. She and her husband embark on a yearslong debate about whether to intervene to ensure their potential children don’t inherit the disease, a debate that causes Greenfieldboyce to wonder, “Was I secretly, at my core, a eugenicist?”

“Sometimes I think it might be possible to stare at this darkness long enough to get through, to discern what was there at the start. Other times, I know that’s just another lie.”

The essay charts well-known territory, describing the American establishment’s investment in eugenics before World War II, but also delves into more pressing, novel questions about whether embryo selection and gene editing are ethical or simply a modern twist on the same old ideas about what makes a life worth living.

Greenfieldboyce does not spare us the painful conversations and emotions that stem from this ethical quandary, nor the particularities of her situation: She navigates failed rounds of IVF, considers abortion, and contemplates the impossible task of weighing her love for her husband and her desire to be a mother against her fear of her children inheriting this disease.

One can imagine a version of this essay that simply reported the debates around gene editing and embryo selection — that version would not be nearly as gripping or powerful. “My eugenics project,” like most of the other pieces, reminds us that abstract discoveries and thorny ethical questions can come to life when animated by passion, love, or pain.

Greenfieldboyce’s project is a testament to the possibilities inherent in bringing history, science, and other academic disciplines out of the cold realm of the textbook or newspaper and into the complicated, vital space of an individual’s life.

Emily Cataneo is a writer and journalist from New England whose work has appeared in Slate, NPR, the Baffler, and Atlas Obscura, among other publications.

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Library develops all-digital Watergate exhibit

The collection preserves and shares historic “national treasures” drawn from papers donated by three Tar Heels.

Senator Sam Ervin next to Rufus Edmisten during the Watergate trial.

Old enough to remember daytime TV being pre-empted for the Senate Watergate Committee hearings? Or young enough to wonder why every scandal seems to end in “-gate”?

The University Libraries’ new digital-only exhibition, “ A Southern View of Watergate: Tar Heels’ Impact on a Nationwide Scandal ,” appeals to both. It provides a valuable record of events from the 1970s and a resource for today’s discussion about presidential immunity.

The digitized collection became available online March 1. On that day 50 years ago, a grand jury indicted seven aides and advisers to then-President Richard Nixon and named the president as an unindicted co-conspirator. The exhibit spotlights key documents that all came to be housed in the Southern Historical Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Wilson Library: two Nixon subpoenas, Nixon’s written refusal to comply and a copy of the president’s infamous “enemies list.”

Many point to the Watergate scandal as the beginning of American distrust in public institutions. That makes the preservation of artifacts related to the scandal particularly relevant.

“Archivists are always there in the background saying primary sources are how we’re going to get at the truth,” said Biff Hollingsworth, collecting and outreach archivist for the Southern Historical Collection at Wilson Library.

The Watergate scandal began with the 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate Office Building. The burglary’s coverup by the Nixon administration led to a Senate investigation and charges of obstruction of justice. With impeachment looming in 1974, Nixon became the only U.S. president to resign from office.

Over the years, UNC-Chapel Hill acquired what Hollingsworth called several “national treasures” related to the scandal. They were among the papers donated by Tar Heels who were also key Watergate investigation figures, Sen. Sam Ervin ’17, chair of the Watergate Committee, and Rufus Edmisten ’63, Ervin’s deputy chief counsel. The archive also includes the personal diary of the hearings and other papers from journalist and author Jim Reston ’63, whose book “The Conviction of Richard Nixon” was the basis of the play and movie “Frost/Nixon.”

“We felt like we were somehow accruing a little bit of a southern Watergate archive,” Hollingsworth said.

The digital-only exhibition brings together for the first time these rare items that have been digitized for preservation. River Zorich, graduate student in the School of Information and Library Science and graduate assistant at Wilson Library, built the exhibit, adding a timeline and supporting information for more context. There are photos from the hearings and audio clips of Edmisten’s recollections of such key moments as finding out that Nixon had a taping system in the White House and his personal delivery of Nixon’s subpoena.

Zorich knew only the basics about Watergate from a high school history class but found their dad was “super excited” to talk about the scandal that he had lived through. In building the exhibit, “I was really surprised to find out that a lot of what happened in the Watergate scandal set the tone for how records are kept for presidents going forward,” Zorich said.

The exhibit is also a way to share these national treasures, papers that grow more fragile each day, without causing them further damage.

“They are nationally important, primary sources that really are central and pivotal to the Watergate story. We felt like this was a way for us to not just digitize them and store those digital files away, but to digitize, synthesize, analyze and present them through this project,” Hollingsworth said. “This is the way that we hope folks will approach them. We have made them more accessible while we’re preserving them.”

Mike Smith, former dean of the UNC School of Government, was honored for excellence in public service.

Wilson Library in daylight with students walking around.

Wilson Library improvement timeline extended

Delaying the start of the project means the library will remain open and its materials available.

Student with white baseball cap talking in front of seated group of students.

School of Civic Life and Leadership debuts new minor

SCiLL courses offer interdisciplinary training in civics, the humanities and scientific literacy.

Jed Atkins

Jed Atkins named inaugural SCiLL dean

A professor of classics and political science, he will lead the School of Civic Life and Leadership.

The Old Well behind purple flowers and beneath a blue sky.

Undergraduate data science degree programs approved

Starting this fall, Tar Heels can pursue either a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts degree in the discipline.

Two students sitting in lab room discussing with their laptop open.

ITS EdTech and CFE team up for Canvas training

As they make the transition from Sakai, faculty benefit from campus expertise in tech and teaching.

Group photo in a classroom of associate professor Marc Cohen and six students from his English 105 class with the two band members of Hotel Fiction, Jess Thompson and Jade Long.

English 105 students get ‘School of Rock’ experience

As part of teaching associate professor Marc Cohen’s writing and rhetoric course, they met a rock band and went to a concert.

Clara Yang playing the piano

Video: Clara Yang plays ‘Clair de Lune’

The associate professor of music will perform modern pieces March 22 as part of "Ex Machina."

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Want fewer microplastics in your tap water? Try boiling it first

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“Drinking Boiled Tap Water Reduces Human Intake of Nanoplastics and Microplastics” Environmental Science & Technology Letters

A kettle pouring steaming water into a glass. Inside the kettle is an illustration of a chemical reaction between calcium ions, carbonate ions and nano- and microplastics that forms solids on the bottom of the kettle.

Nano- and microplastics are seemingly everywhere — water, soil and the air. While many creative strategies have been attempted to get rid of these plastic bits, one unexpectedly effective solution for cleaning up drinking water, specifically, might be as simple as brewing a cup of tea or coffee. As reported in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology Letters , boiling and filtering calcium-containing tap water could help remove nearly 90% of the nano- and microplastics present.

Contamination of water supplies with nano- and microplastics (NMPs), which can be as small as one thousandth of a millimeter in diameter or as large as 5 millimeters, has become increasingly common. The effects of these particles on human health are still under investigation, though current studies suggest that ingesting them could affect the gut microbiome. Some advanced drinking water filtration systems capture NMPs, but simple, inexpensive methods are needed to substantially help reduce human plastic consumption. So, Zhanjun Li, Eddy Zeng and colleagues wanted to see whether boiling could be an effective method to help remove NMPs from both hard and soft tap water.

The researchers collected samples of hard tap water from Guangzhou, China, and spiked them with different amounts of NMPs. Samples were boiled for five minutes and allowed to cool. Then, the team measured the free-floating plastic content. Boiling hard water, which is rich in minerals, will naturally form a chalky substance known as limescale, or calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ). Results from these experiments indicated that as the water temperature increased, CaCO 3 formed incrustants, or crystalline structures, which encapsulated the plastic particles. Zeng says that over time, these incrustants would build up like typical limescale, at which point they could be scrubbed away to remove the NMPs. He suggests any remaining incrustants floating in the water could be removed by pouring it through a simple filter such as a coffee filter.

In the tests, the encapsulation effect was more pronounced in harder water — in a sample containing 300 milligrams of CaCO 3 per liter of water, up to 90% of free-floating MNPs were removed after boiling. However, even in soft water samples (less than 60 milligrams CaCO 3 per liter), boiling still removed around 25% of NMPs. The researchers say that this work could provide a simple, yet effective, method to reduce NMP consumption.

The authors acknowledge funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS’ mission is to advance the broader chemistry enterprise and its practitioners for the benefit of Earth and all its people. The Society is a global leader in promoting excellence in science education and providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple research solutions, peer-reviewed journals, scientific conferences, eBooks and weekly news periodical Chemical & Engineering News . ACS journals are among the most cited, most trusted and most read within the scientific literature; however, ACS itself does not conduct chemical research. As a leader in scientific information solutions, its CAS division partners with global innovators to accelerate breakthroughs by curating, connecting and analyzing the world’s scientific knowledge. ACS’ main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive press releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org .

Note: ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies.

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Kidney amniotic fluid organoids resembling renal tubules

Scientists grow ‘mini-organs’ from cells shed by foetuses in womb

Creating organoids from cells found in amniotic fluid could bring insights into cause and progression of malformations

Researchers have grown mini-organs from cells shed by foetuses in the womb in a breakthrough that promises to shed light on human development throughout late pregnancy.

They created the 3D lumps of tissue know as organoids from lung, kidney and intestinal cells recovered from the amniotic fluid that bathes and protects the foetus in the uterus.

It is the first time such organoids have been made from untreated cells in the fluid and paves the way for unprecedented insights into the cause and progression of malformations, which affect 3-6% of babies globally.

Dr Mattia Gerli, a stem cell researcher at UCL, said foetal organoids, which are less than a millimetre wide, would allow scientists to study how foetuses develop in the womb “in both health and disease”, a feat that has so far not been possible.

Because the organoids can be created months before a baby is born, scientists believe they could drive more personalised interventions by helping doctors diagnose any defects and work out how best to treat them.

Organoids are tiny clumps of cells that mimic, to a greater or lesser extent, the features and functions of larger tissues and organs. Scientists use them to study how organs grow and age, how diseases progress, and whether drugs can reverse any damage that arises.

Most organoids are made from adult tissue, but researchers have recently made them from cells obtained from foetuses. The most ethically sensitive were created from tissue collected from terminated foetuses , while others have been made by reprogramming cells into a more embryo-like state.

Writing in Nature Medicine , Gerli and Prof Paolo de Coppi, a foetal surgeon at Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, describe how they analysed amniotic fluid taken from 12 pregnant women as part of their routine diagnostic testing. Most of the cells in the amniotic fluid were dead, but a tiny fraction turned out to be stem cells for making the baby’s lungs, kidneys and intestines. The researchers found they could grow these into 3D organoids by injecting them into droplets of gel and culturing them.

To explore how the organoids might be used, the team created lung organoids from the cells of unborn babies with a condition called congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or CDH. Babies with CDH have a hole in the diaphragm, the dome-shaped muscle under the lungs that drives breathing. The hole allows organs in the abdomen to push up on lungs and hamper their growth.

Comparison of organoids from CDH babies before and after treatment showed substantial differences in their development, pointing to a clear benefit from the treatment. “This is the first time that we’ve been able to make a functional assessment of a child’s congenital condition before birth,” said De Coppi.

The same approach could investigate other congenital conditions such as cystic fibrosis, which causes mucus to build up in the lungs, and malformations in the kidneys and gut. Drugs that help alleviate congenital disorders could be tested on the organoids before giving them to the babies, De Coppi said.

Roger Sturmey, professor of reproductive medicine at the University of Hull, said the research paved the way for scientists to study how key organs formed and functioned in unborn babies without tissue donated to research after an abortion. “It may also reveal early origins of adult disease,” he said, “by highlighting what happens when the cells of key tissues within foetuses malfunction”.

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Fake academic papers are on the rise: Why they're a danger and how to stop them

by Lex Bouter, The Conversation

papers

In the 1800s, British colonists in India set about trying to reduce the cobra population, which was making life and trade very difficult in Delhi. They began to pay a bounty for dead cobras. The strategy very quickly resulted in the widespread breeding of cobras for cash .

This danger of unintended consequences is sometimes referred to as the " cobra effect ". It can also be well summed up by Goodhardt's Law , named after British economist Charles Goodhart. He stated that, when a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.

The cobra effect has taken root in the world of research. The "publish or perish" culture, which values publications and citations above all, has resulted in its own myriad of "cobra breeding programs". That includes the widespread practice of questionable research practices, like playing up the impact of research findings to make work more attractive to publishers.

It's also led to the rise of paper mills, criminal organizations that sell academic authorship. A report on the subject describes paper mills as (the) "process by which manufactured manuscripts are submitted to a journal for a fee on behalf of researchers with the purpose of providing an easy publication for them, or to offer authorship for sale."

These fake papers have serious consequences for research and its impact on society. Not all fake papers are retracted. And even those that are often still make their way into systematic literature reviews which are, in turn, used to draw up policy guidelines, clinical guidelines, and funding agendas.

How paper mills work

Paper mills rely on the desperation of researchers—often young, often overworked, often on the peripheries of academia struggling to overcome the high obstacles to entry—to fuel their business model.

They are frighteningly successful. The website of one such company based in Latvia advertises the publication of more than 12,650 articles since its launch in 2012. In an analysis of just two journals jointly conducted by the Committee on Publications Ethics and the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers, more than half of the 3440 article submissions over a two-year period were found to be fake.

It is estimated that all journals, irrespective of discipline, experience a steeply rising number of fake paper submissions. Currently the rate is about 2%. That may sound small. But, given the large and growing amount of scholarly publications it means that a lot of fake papers are published. Each of these can seriously damage patients, society or nature when applied in practice.

The fight against fake papers

Many individuals and organizations are fighting back against paper mills.

The scientific community is lucky enough to have several "fake paper detectives" who volunteer their time to root out fake papers from the literature. Elizabeth Bik , for instance, is a Dutch microbiologist turned science integrity consultant. She dedicates much of her time to searching the biomedical literature for manipulated photographic images or plagiarized text. There are others doing this work , too.

Organizations such as PubPeer and Retraction Watch also play vital roles in flagging fake papers and pressuring publishers to retract them.

These and other initiatives, like the STM Integrity Hub and United2Act , in which publishers collaborate with other stakeholders, are trying to make a difference.

But this is a deeply ingrained problem. The use of generative artificial intelligence like ChatGPT will help the detectives—but will also likely result in more fake papers which are now more easy to produce and more difficult or even impossible to detect.

Stop paying for dead cobras

They key to changing this culture is a switch in researcher assessment.

Researchers must be acknowledged and rewarded for responsible research practices: a focus on transparency and accountability, high quality teaching, good supervision, and excellent peer review. This will extend the scope of activities that yield "career points" and shift the emphasis of assessment from quantity to quality.

Fortunately, several initiatives and strategies already exist to focus on a balanced set of performance indicators that matter. The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment , established in 2012, calls on the research community to recognize and reward various research outputs, beyond just publication. The Hong Kong Principles , formulated and endorsed at the 6th World Conference in Research Integrity in 2019, encourage research evaluations that incentivize responsible research practices while minimize perverse incentives that drive practices like purchasing authorship or falsifying data.

These issues, as well as others related to protecting the integrity of research and building trust in it, will also be discussed during the 8th World Conference on Research Integrity in Athens, Greece in June this year.

Practices under the umbrella of " Open Science " will be pivotal to making the research process more transparent and researchers more accountable. Open Science is the umbrella term for a movement consisting of initiatives to make scholarly research more transparent and equitable, ranging from open access publication to citizen science.

Open Methods, for example, involves the pre-registration of a study design's essential features before its start. A registered report containing the introduction and methods section is submitted to a journal before data collection starts. It is subsequently accepted or rejected based on the relevance of the research, as well as the methodology's strength.

The added benefit of a registered report is that reviewer feedback on the methodology can still change the study methods, as the data collection hasn't started. Research can then begin without pressure to achieve positive results, removing the incentive to tweak or falsify data.

Peer review

Peer reviewers are an important line of defense against the publication of fatally flawed or fake papers. In this system, quality assurance of a paper is done on a completely voluntary and often anonymous basis by an expert in the relevant field or subject.

However, the person doing the review work receives no credit or reward. It's crucial that this sort of "invisible" work in academia be recognized, celebrated and included among the criteria for promotion. This can contribute substantially to detecting questionable research practices (or worse) before publication.

It will incentivize good peer review, so fewer suspect articles pass through the process, and it will also open more paths to success in academia—thus breaking up the toxic publish-or-perish culture.

Provided by The Conversation

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  1. Importance of Physics in our Daily Life Free Essay Example

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  1. The Role of Physics in our Daily Life Essay

    BODY. Physics is considered natural science because it deals with the things like matter, force, energy and motion. As these all are related to task related to everyday life, so, we can say that physics studies how the universe works, how Earth Moves around the sun, how lightening strikes, how our refrigerator works and many more. In short ...

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    Physics extends to your daily life to describe the motion, forces, and energy of the ordinary experience. Physics is at work in tasks such as walking, driving a car or using a phone. Knowledge of physics is helpful in everyday situations as well as in non-scientific tasks. For example, physics helps you understand: How food is cooked in… Continue reading Physics in Daily Life: Facts ...

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    The Importance of Physics in Our Daily Lives. Physics is the science that helps us understand various natural phenomena that are embedded in our reality. We use physics in our daily life activities such as walking, cutting, watching, cooking, and opening and closing things. Physics is one of the most elementary sciences that contributes ...

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    Date: 10/19/14 Physics in your Daily Activities The laws of physics have a significant impact in our daily lives. However, many people aren't even aware of how physics impacts their lives. As the semester progresses, I have begun to notice the critical role physics play within my life. A few aspects of physics that I've noticed in my life ...

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    In this essay, I reflect on some daily events and processes which have strong physics backgrounds. - The Human Body. Seldom do we come across a device everyday that uses some fundamental principles of physics as the human body does. The human body is just like an engine with a perpetually running motor.

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    Date: 10/19/14 Physics in your Daily Activities The laws of physics have a significant impact in our daily lives. However, many people aren't even aware of how physics impacts their lives. As the semester progresses, I have begun to notice the critical role physics play within my life.

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    Class #7: Revised Essay Due; Instructions. Here's an opportunity to satisfy your curiosity about the science of something close at hand, something we encounter every day but to which most of us are blissfully oblivious. Write a short essay on an aspect of "everyday" science or technology that you would enjoy sharing with readers.

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    papers too. Within the framework of the project, the author prepared various new interdisciplinary projects to demonstrate how inventions in physics are used in everyday life. Now, about one year later, the author found out that students were most addressed with the modules physics and crime scene investigation physics in the kitchen, as

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    People say the pen is mightier than the sword. Physics plays a major role in using a pen as a tool for writing. The design of the ball pen explains the physics facts in everyday life. When you use a ballpoint pen, it involves principles of fluid dynamics and friction. There is a small spherical point object at the tip of the ball pen.

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    Similarly, physics governs our everyday lives and is involved in a number of activities we perform and things we use in our daily life. Here we will discuss how physics is playing its part in running our everyday tasks and assists us to do our errands, chores and duties smoothly and effectively.

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