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Exercise 6: Writing a Review (Ultimate Guide)

Exercise 6 of the Reading and Writing paper of the IGCSE English as a Second Language (ESL) exam (0510/0511/0991/0993) is always a formal or a semi-formal writing. It can be an article, an essay, a report, or a review.

In this article, you will discover how to write the perfect review that impresses the examiner and gets you the highest band.

So, what’s a review?

A review is a piece of writing someone writes expressing their opinion about something such as a new product or service that is usually published in a newspaper or a magazine.

Review writing could be for:

  • Books, Movies, or TV shows
  • Places such as hotels, restaurants, cafés, cinemas, amusement parks, shopping centres, museums, gyms, etc.
  • Events such as concerts, festivals, exhibitions, trips, etc. 
  • Digital or physical products or services such as apps, games (video games, board games, etc.), websites, courses, products (such as electronics or appliances)

The main purpose of a review is to give your opinion about something. The review needs to engage the audience from the beginning to the end. As a side note, it’s better to be positive and write about whatever you are reviewing in an overall positive way since it will generally be easier to write; however, a negative review is also totally acceptable.

The tone and register of a review

The tone of the review can be personal and informal. If writing for adults the style may be more formal than if writing for teenagers. But in both cases, you should sound professional as if you know about the subject.

If the review is for the school magazine (and it mostly is), then the main audience is the students at your school. Therefore, the register should be informal to semi-formal but should avoid language that is too idiomatic and colloquial.

The ideal format of a review

Introduction: Provide general information about what is being reviewed

Body (2-3 paragraphs): Give your opinions and/or highlight interesting points about some aspects (e.g. the facilities of a museum, the special effects in a film, the quality of food/service in a restaurant, etc.)

Conclusion: Give your overall opinion and recommendation

The title should include the name of what is being reviewed. Here are some examples:

  • Discover Your Talent — A Course Review
  • Samsung Galaxy S24 Review
  • Fitness Time: The Best Gym in Riyadh?
  • Book Review: The Alchemist

Don’t stress too much on the title as you can simply write the name of what you’re reviewing without any other details. For example: “VOX cinema”.

Introduction

The purpose of the introduction is to inform the reader about what is being reviewed and engage the reader to make them interested and continue reading.

The main components of an effective introduction are:

  • Something to engage the reader from the beginning right away such as a rhetorical question or an attractive statement highlighting a unique aspect of what you’re reviewing.
  • General information about what is being reviewed . This will depend on what you’re reviewing. For example, if you are writing a film review, you should mention its name, genre and the director’s name.

You could also add details of when and with whom you watched/visited/attended this movie/cinema/course, etc., and a quick overall opinion , which hints to the reader whether the rest of your review is overall positive or negative.

Here is an example of an effective introduction:

“Do you love superfast rollercoasters and other exhilarating rides that make your hair stand on end? If so, then Sky Zone Amusement Park is a must-visit. My friends and I visited it recently, and we were blown away!”

In the body,

  • Mention more relevant details of what’s being reviewed
  • Mention your personal opinion (what you liked and/or disliked), while providing evidence, reasons or examples. You can write entirely positively, entirely negatively or have a balanced approach

The details to include depend on what you’re reviewing. These will be discussed later.

The purpose of the conclusion is to give your overall opinion and recommendation .

In the conclusion, make sure to say whether you recommend this movie/book/product/service, etc. and to whom , stating why .

Here are some examples of useful concluding phrases:

  • In a nutshell, you should definitely read/watch/use …
  • All in all, I strongly/highly recommend …
  • On the whole, I wouldn’t recommend it (in view of the fact that … / because …)
  • Overall, it’s worth seeing/reading/using …
  • I strongly advise you (not) to …
  • It’s more suited for … / It will change the way you see… / Don’t miss it! / It’s absolutely worth a visit! / If you like …, then (the name of the movie/restaurant/course, etc.) is definitely for you! / If you’re looking for a …, don’t give it a second thought! / Or any other similar phrase.

Here is an example of an effective conclusion.

“I strongly recommend Sky Zone Park to anyone who wants to have an unforgettable experience whether alone, with friends or family. It’s absolutely worth a visit!”

Special types of review writing

Book review.

Paragraph 1: Introduction

Paragraph 2: Summary of the book

Paragraph 3: What you liked OR disliked

Paragraph 4: Overall opinion and recommendation

Paragraph 3: What you liked

Paragraph 4: What you disliked

Paragraph 5: Overall opinion and recommendation

In the introduction,

  • Start with something to engage the reader such as a rhetorical question or an attractive statement about something bold in this book that makes the reader want to know more.
  • Summarize the main background information of the book , for example, the book title, its genre (fiction, non-fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, mystery, etc.) and author’s name.

Here is an example of an effective book review introduction. “Have you ever been so inspired by a book that it completely changes your perception of life? If not, then I suggest you read “The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho.”

In the 1 st body paragraph, write an outline of the story (do not describe the whole story, especially the ending). Use the present tense.

Here are some useful phrases for this part of the review:

  • The plot focuses on/revolves around/involves …
  • Set in …, this marvelous story explains …
  • This is an enchanting story of …

In the 2 nd (and 3 rd ) body paragraph(s), mention what you liked and/or disliked and state why, giving examples if possible .

You could write about:

  • The plot (captivating, entertaining, fascinating, thrilling, predictable, confusing, implausible, etc.)
  • The author’s writing style ( Does it suit the book’s genre?). You can write, for example, “The writer does a fantastic job in combining … with … // The writer skilfully combines … with …” // With the author’s visionary blend of … and …, the book … // The writer attempts to …, but fails miserably …)
  • What you learned
  • How the book made you feel? Were you satisfied by the book’s ending? Note: don’t mention the ending itself; just how it made you feel (e.g. The book was heart-touching// The book had me hypnotised! // It kept me absorbed from the beginning to the end! // I couldn’t stop reading it until the end! // I was impressed by… // What struck me most was… // , etc.)

In the final paragraph, give your overall opinion and recommendation (whether you recommend it or not, and if yes, to whom and why? If not, why not?).

Examples of concluding phrases have been mentioned earlier.

Film Review

Paragraph 2: Setting of the film and main plot

Paragraph 3: What you liked OR disliked.

  • Start with something to engage the reader such as a rhetorical question or an attractive statement about something bold in this movie that makes the reader want to know more.
  • Mention general information about the movie , for example, the movie’s title, its genre (sci-fi, comedy, thriller, horror, etc.) and the director’s name.

Here is an example of an effective film review introduction:

“Are you looking for an intriguing action-packed film where you can turn off your brain and enjoy the ride? If so, then “London Has Fallen”, directed by Babak Najafi is the film for you!”

In the 1 st body paragraph, mention the setting of the film (place and time) and an overview of the plot , including the main character(s) and plot twists (if any). Don’t describe the full story, especially the ending. Use the present tense.

Here are some useful phrases for this part of the review.

  • Set in (time and place), the movie …
  • … provides the setting for …
  • As the film opens, …

In the 2 nd (and 3rd) body paragraph(s), mention what you liked and/or disliked about the film and state why, giving examples if possible. For example, you could write about:

  • The plot (captivating, entertaining, thrilling, fast-paced, predictable, confusing, implausible, etc.)
  • The acting (excellent/exceptional/remarkable/awful/unconvincing/weak, etc.)
  • The script (e.g. the script is dull/exciting/clever/witty, etc.)
  • The special effects (realistic, brilliant, spectacular, breathtaking, mediocre, terrible, etc.)
  • How the movie made you feel (the film literally brought tears to my eyes// The film was heart-touching// The film was heart-pounding // I was on the edge of my seat the whole time// I didn’t want to miss a scene! // I was impressed by… // What struck me most was… // By the final scene I was already half-asleep, etc.)

It’s also important to note that you should focus on the main things rather than writing about every aspect of the film . Writing a few well-developed points is better than many unjustified ones.

In the final paragraph, give your overall opinion and recommendation (whether you recommend it or not, and if yes, to whom and why? If not, why not? Is it suitable families? Why?).

Here are some useful expressions for describing a movie:

  • The film combines (suspense) with (horror) …
  • a box-office success/failure
  • a blockbuster
  • a masterpiece
  • well-worth seeing
  • not to be missed

Important points to keep in mind

  • Include film-related vocabulary in your review, e.g. lead role, actors, director, plot, script, special effects, etc.
  • Any expression you use should be consistent with your opinion of the film. For example, if you’re writing positively about the film, it’s not appropriate to write “By the final scene I was already half-asleep”!

Place Review

Restaurant/cafe review.

Paragraph 2: What you liked OR disliked (mention 2 points)

Paragraph 3: What you liked OR disliked (mention another 2 points)

Paragraph 2: What you liked

Paragraph 3: What you disliked

The 2 nd and 3 rd paragraphs don’t have to be balanced. For example, in an overall positive review, you can write 3 points you liked about the restaurant and only 1 point you disliked

  • Start with something to engage the reader such as a rhetorical question or an attractive statement about something unique in this restaurant that makes the reader want to know more.
  • Mention general information about the restaurant, for example, its name, its location, when it opened, why you visited it, and with whom you visited it (if any). Note that you don’t have to mention all these details and that some of them, such as its location or when it opened, can be included in the 2 nd paragraph.

In the 2 nd and 3 rd paragraphs, mention what you liked and/or disliked according to the format you choose.

You can write about:

  • Location (the city? close to/far from? Is it easily accessible?)
  • Its physical features (if any striking one, e.g. extreme size, unusual architectural shape, etc.)
  • The food: type of food (fast-food, fine dining), food options (varied, limited), taste (delicious, mouth-watering, lip-smacking, scrumptious, appetizing // awful, overcooked, salty, etc.)
  • Staff (polite, helpful, friendly, amiable // awful, rude, unskilled, careless, slow, etc.)
  • Setting: décor (modern, contemporary, magnificent, etc.), atmosphere (lively, soothing // dull, crowded, noisy, etc.)
  • Cleanliness (immaculate, spotless, tidy // filthy, dirty, untidy, etc.)
  • Price (expensive, exorbitant, overpriced // inexpensive, affordable, reasonable, low-priced, etc.)
  • Located in …, this (sumptuous, luxurious, sophisticated, impeccable, exceptional, or any other suitable adjective) restaurant offers …
  • As you enter the place, you …
  • Just as you step in, …
  • The ambience of the restaurant was …
  • The menu offers …
  • What I particularly enjoyed was …
  • I was pleasantly surprised by …
  • The best thing about it is …
  • However, I disliked …
  • I was disappointed by …
  • I was extremely dissatisfied by …
  • What you may find unfavourable is …

Describe the restaurant in the present tense and describe your experience in the past tense. Remember to write about the important parts of the experience, not every detail.

In the final paragraph, mention your overall opinion and recommendation (Do you recommend it or not? If yes, to whom and why? If not, why not? Is it suitable for families?).

Other places

  • Start with something to engage the reader such as a rhetorical question or an interesting point about it, such as its exploding popularity, its long-awaited opening, etc.
  • Mention general information about the place , for example, its name, its location, when it opened, why you visited it, and with whom you visited it. Note that you don’t have to mention all these details and that some of them, such as location, can be included in the 2nd paragraph as part of your opinion about the place. For example, the following sentence could be used to begin the 2 nd body paragraph: “Located right at the heart of (city name), (place) is easily accessible by car.”

In the 2nd and 3rd paragraphs, mention what you liked and/ or disliked according to the format you choose.

  • Atmosphere (lively, soothing // dull, crowded, noisy, etc.)
  • Facilities (depends on the place you’re reviewing.  For example, in a gym review, you could write about the variety of gym equipment available and whether there’s personal coaching; and in a shopping centre, you could write about the variety of shops available and whether there’s a children’s play area.)
  • Located in …, this (sumptuous, luxurious, sophisticated, impeccable, exceptional, or any other suitable adjective) (place) offers …
  • The ambience of the place was …
  • The place offers …

Describe the place in the present tense and describe your experience in the past tense. Remember to write about the important parts of the experience, not every detail.

In the final paragraph, mention your overall opinion and recommendation (Do you recommend it or not? If yes, to whom and why? If not, why not? Is it suitable for families? Why?).

Examples for concluding phrases have been mentioned earlier.

Event Review

Paragraph 2: What you liked (mention 2 points)

Paragraph 3: What you disliked (mention 2 points)

  • Start with something to engage the reader such as a rhetorical question or an attractive statement about something unique in this event that makes the reader want to know more.
  • Mention general information about the event , for example, its name, location, when it’s held, why you visited it, and with whom you visited it. Some of these details can also be mentioned in the following paragraph.

In the 2nd and 3rd paragraphs, mention what you liked and/or disliked according to the format you choose.

  • The program of the event (For example, what band will be playing in the concert? What’s their album name? What will be displayed in the exhibition?)
  • The performance, including the stage lightening and the musicians’ attire (if it’s a concert or a festival)
  • Atmosphere and sounds (lively, boisterous // dull, crowded, noisy, etc.)
  • How did it make you and the audience feel? (fascinated, excited, mesmerized, captivated, enthusiastic// didn’t live up to my expectations, dull, etc.)
  • Ticket price (expensive, exorbitant, overpriced // inexpensive, affordable, reasonable, low-priced, etc.)

In the conclusion, mention your overall opinion and recommendation (Do you recommend attending this event or not? If yes, to whom and why? If not, why not?)

Product Review

Paragraph 2: Positive aspects of the product

Paragraph 3: Negative aspects of the product

  • Start with something to engage the reader such as a rhetorical question or an attractive statement about something unique in this product that makes the reader want to know more.
  • Mention general information about the product , for example, its name, the brand name, and its release date. You could also include when you bought it, why you bought it and your first impression.

In the 2nd and 3rd paragraphs, mention the positive and/or negative aspects of the product according to the format you choose.

  • The product’s core features and your comment on them
  • The benefits and uses of the product
  • Any notable improvements or changes to previous versions (if applicable), and your comment on them (Are they useful? Not many? Disappointing?)
  • Price (mention its price and comment on it: expensive, exorbitant, overpriced // inexpensive, affordable, reasonable, low-priced, etc.)

In the conclusion, mention your overall opinion and recommendation (Is it worth buying? Why? Why not? Who are the target users?).

Points to keep in mind

  • Organize your review into 4-5 paragraphs. Leave a line between paragraphs or indent the first line of each new paragraph. Don’t do both!
  • Take care of spelling, punctuation, and grammar. This is important as the examiner will look at the accuracy of your language.
  • Use a wide range of cohesive devices and linking words. Here are some examples:
  • Addition: and, also, as well as, plus, what’s more, apart from that, not only … but also …, but that’s not all, above all, and best of all, on top of that, one of the best things …
  • Contrast: but, yet, though, while, however
  • Reasoning: because, as, so, that’s why, for this reason,
  • Giving examples: for example, like
  • Highlighting and stressing: specifically, especially
  • Use a combination of simple, compound, and complex sentences. A series of long sentences will make your writing difficult to read, and a series of short simple sentences will make your writing boring to read. Balance is the key.
  • Place longer sentences next to shorter ones for a dramatic effect.
  • Use a wide range of vocabulary, including some advanced and less commonly used ones. Don’t use common adjectives such as happy, nice, bad, sad, etc. Try to think of more advanced and interesting alternatives such as ecstatic, pleasant, terrible, heartbroken, etc. We recommend reading a lot of samples to improve your vocabulary. You can find them on our samples page .
  • Use a variety of adjectives and adverbs
  • Include a range of topic-related vocabulary to show that you have a good understanding of the topic. For example, if you’re writing a film review, you could include vocabulary such as “director, “cast”, “special effects”, “scene”, “protagonist”, “blockbuster”, etc.
  • Use advanced punctuation sparingly (1-3 in the whole review), for example, colon (:), semicolon (;) and em dash (—).
  • Aim to complete towards the maximum word limit (approximately 160 words). Exceeding the word limit slightly (15-20 words) is fine as long as you write accurately and complete the task within the correct time. If you exceed the word limit by any number of words, no marks will be cut directly, but you increase your chances of making more mistakes and spending more time than required for this exercise, which may affect your mark indirectly. If you write towards the lower limit or below, you are highly unlikely to achieve the highest band for Content as your content is not well developed.
  • Develop your content by including reasons, evidence or examples to support the opinions expressed.
  • Spend about 30 minutes on this exercise : the initial 5 minutes for planning and the last 2-3 minutes for checking your work for simple spelling and grammatical mistakes.
  • Include your audience throughout by using pronouns such as “we”, “us” and “you”.
  • Use phrasal verbs , examples: pick up, left off, takes you on, etc.
  • Use contractions but stay away from ones which are too informal such as wanna, gonna, etc.
  • Write legibly

Don’ts

  • Avoid writing very simple sentences with simple vocabulary , e.g. “The film is very nice. The actors are also good, and the story is also great.”
  • Avoid repetition of vocabulary and beginning your sentences with the same words. Sometimes students write 3 or more sentences in a row starting with “The” or “I”!
  • Avoid very formal linking words and vocabulary like “moreover”, “furthermore”, etc. as this may have a negative effect on the target audience (i.e. other students if you’re writing for your school magazine).
  • Avoid abbreviations and slang (texting language) such as, wanna, gonna, etc.
  • Avoid listing (firstly, secondly, thirdly, etc.). If necessary, you might use other informal alternatives to “firstly”, such as “To start with”, “For a start”, or “For starters”, but listing is not preferred whatsoever.
  • Avoid including too many different ideas in your review. It is better to include fewer ideas and develop one or two in greater depth rather than writing many ideas which are not well-developed.

Practice a lot of past papers and get feedback on your writing. If you don’t have a teacher, reread these notes and check for what you have done right and what you haven’t. Read some of the samples on the samples page to see what you have just learned effectively used and incorporated in a review.

Finally, don’t forget to check out our  samples page  and if you find this helpful, please share it with your friends.

Good luck! Go get that A*!

12 responses to “Exercise 6: Writing a Review (Ultimate Guide)”

Atuhairwe Carolyne avatar

I’m so much pleased with your work ,it has done wonders .How do I access notes on other types of writing in IGSCE 0511

ESL Kings team avatar

Thank you for your kind words! You can find them on our notes page .

 avatar

Amazing notes!!!!! Absolutely love them! However, I just have two small questions: – In book review, if its not a story or something like that, for instance, its a course book can I still use the introduction “Are you looking for a book to help your English go from…….? Then …. is for you. Written by………….., and was published back in……” Is it appropriate ?

– How strict are the examiners? Considering this is ESL but the grade boundaries are extremely high. Thank you!

Thank you for your kind words! We’re glad you found them helpful!

Yes, you can still use the same introduction regardless of the type of book you’re reviewing. It’s also worth noting that exam questions will never limit you to reviewing a specific book; you can review whatever book you want. This is also the case for all types of reviews.

Examiners are neither strict nor lenient; they evaluate your answer based on the specific criteria outlined in the mark scheme, so you get your marks based on the maximum level of competence you showed in your answer. With dedicated practice and a good understanding of what the examiner is looking for in your answer, you can definitely get top marks despite the high grade thresholds.

Thanks alot for the response, much appreciated.

You’re welcome

Hi ESL Kings, your notes are detailed and the suggested sentence frames are well developed; many thanks.

Thank you for your wonderful feedback! We truly appreciate it!

Ayaan avatar

I used all of your notes and they have always helped me. I am giving exam in mayjune 2024. I wanted to ask you that in Place review, Resturant/cafe review section in the second option in paragraph 4 is it important to write opinion and recommendation in one paragraph or you can write in 2 seperate paragraphs?

Hi Ayaan, thank you for your comment. We are glad our notes are helpful!

Regarding your question, your final opinion and recommendation are typically included together in the final paragraph of the review since they’re strongly correlated. You recommend or do not recommend something based on your overall opinion about it, so there’s no need to write them in two separate paragraphs. In fact, you can even just mention your recommendation, which implies your opinion.

So, while your final opinion and recommendation can be included in separate paragraphs, it is not recommended for the previously stated reason, as well as the limited word count of the review.

Okay thanks! Sorry for the late reply. I was busy practicing my upcoming speaking exam on 19th/20th April.

You’re welcome 🙂 It’s ok. Good luck with your exam!

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How to Write a Review ( Edexcel IGCSE English Language A )

Revision note.

Deb Orrock

Question 6 or 7 will ask you to write for a specific purpose and in a specific format. It is important to use the correct conventions of the format and directly focus your writing to its purpose, as the mark scheme rewards adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences. 

This means: 

The tone (the sound of the writer’s “voice”) is appropriate and convincing 

The register (vocabulary and phrasing) is appropriately formal or informal, and suitable for the purpose

The style of the writing (sentence structure and overall structure) is dynamic and effective 

The following guide will detail how to structure your response in the style of a review. It is divided into:

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Structuring an Impressive IGCSE Review: A Step-by-Step Approach

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  • Writing Articles & Reviews
  • December 26, 2023

book review format igcse

writing a review for the International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) can be a daunting task, but with the right approach, you can create an impressive and comprehensive review that will help other students and educators. In this article, we will provide a step-by-step guide to help you structure an effective IGCSE review.

Step 1: Understand the Purpose of the Review

Before you start writing your IGCSE review, IT ‘s important to understand the purpose of the review. Are you providing an overview of a specific subject or course? Are you focusing on the curriculum, textbooks, or exam preparation materials? Understanding the purpose of your review will help you stay focused and organized throughout the writing process.

Step 2: Research and Gather Information

Once you have a clear understanding of the purpose of your review, IT ‘s time to gather information. This may involve researching the specific subject or course, examining textbooks and study materials, and collecting feedback from other students and educators. IT ‘s crucial to gather as much relevant information as possible to support your review and provide a well-rounded perspective.

Step 3: Create an Outline

Before you start writing , IT ‘s helpful to create an outline for your review. This will help you organize your thoughts and ensure that your review flows logically. Your outline should include an introduction, main body paragraphs, and a conclusion. You can also include subheadings for specific topics or sections you want to cover in your review.

Step 4: Write the Introduction

The introduction of your IGCSE review should provide a brief overview of the subject or course you are reviewing and explain the purpose of your review. You can also include any background information or context that will help readers understand the focus of your review.

Step 5: Write the Main Body

The main body of your review should be broken down into sections that correspond to the specific aspects of the subject or course you are reviewing . For example, if you are reviewing a science course, you may have sections for the textbook, classroom instruction, and exam preparation materials. Within each section, provide detailed analysis, examples, and evidence to support your evaluation.

Step 6: Write the Conclusion

In the conclusion of your IGCSE review, summarize the main points you have discussed and reiterate your overall evaluation of the subject or course. You can also offer recommendations for improvement or additional resources that may be helpful for students and educators.

Step 7: Revise and Edit

Once you have completed the first draft of your IGCSE review, take the time to revise and edit your work. Check for grammatical errors, clarity, and coherence. Make sure that your review is well-structured and presents a balanced and objective perspective.

writing an impressive IGCSE review requires careful planning, research, and organization. By following the step-by-step approach outlined in this article, you can create a comprehensive and insightful review that will be valuable to other students and educators.

1. Are there specific guidelines for writing an IGCSE review?

While there may not be specific guidelines for writing an IGCSE review, IT ‘s important to ensure that your review is well-structured, provides a balanced perspective, and is based on thorough research and analysis.

2. How do I gather information for my IGCSE review?

You can gather information for your IGCSE review by conducting research, examining textbooks and study materials, and seeking feedback from other students and educators. IT ‘s important to gather a variety of perspectives to support your evaluation.

3. What should I include in the conclusion of my IGCSE review?

In the conclusion of your IGCSE review, you should summarize the main points you have discussed and reiterate your overall evaluation of the subject or course. You can also offer recommendations for improvement or additional resources.

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Programmes & Qualifications

Cambridge igcse english as a second language (speaking endorsement) (0510).

  • Published resources

Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language Student's Book

Endorsed by Cambridge Resources align to the syllabus they support, and have been through a detailed quality assurance process.

Description

This series develops practical language skills and key cultural knowledge with real-world, internationally focused guidance. Stimulating project-based tasks and a visual, global presentation of themes help students familiarise themselves with concepts. Varying difficulty levels including discussion-based tasks and challenging activities help build confidence.

Find out more about this resource:

>

>

>

Publisher

Hodder Education

Author Paizee, D, Burbeary, S, Menon, M, Ahuja, R, and Danker, B
ISBN 9781398352698
Published Date 2022
Website

Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language Coursebook (Sixth Edition)

Description

This series provides clear and accessible guidance for English reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Engaging topics, such as lifestyles and food, bring authentic English to life while projects, language focus boxes and exam-style questions help to build skills and prepare students for assessment.

Find out more about this resource:

>

>

>

Publisher Cambridge University Press
Author Lucantoni, P
ISBN 9781009031943
Published Date 2022
Website

Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language Digital Textbook

Description

This syllabus-aligned digital textbook for teachers and students offers customisable assignments, including strength tests and exam-style questions. The Big Picture feature introduces topics and highlights key ideas, while study skills, grammar and vocabulary boxes are included throughout. Interactive materials and glossary definitions are also included.

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Publisher Kognity
Author Font, N and Viccars, D
Published Date 2022
Website

Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language Student's Book (Second Edition)

Description

This series focuses on building strong communication skills and linking language to life in authentic international contexts. A focus on values helps students think about their personal development and how they use language to relate to others, while the struture of units supports understanding of various language functions, such as persuading and giving opinions.

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Publisher Marshall Cavendish Education
Author Bilsborough, K,Bilsborough, S, and Kemp, B
ISBN 9789815027716
Published Date 2022
Website

Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language Student's Book (Third Edition)

Description

With fun and creative projects and topic-based chapters, this engaging resource provides equal coverage of the four skills areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive support helps students develop their skills and also prepare for assessment.

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Publisher Collins
Author Anstey, S, Gould, J, Gould, M, Harper, K, Kirkham, A, Moore, J, and Pepper, L
ISBN 9780008493097
Published Date 2022
Website

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English book review: does anyone have any recommendations?

I take 2nd lang english and we are expected to read a book and prepare a review, which could be added to our final grade (if cambridge decides to cancel their exams again). However even if the cambridge exam was conducted there is a chance there might be a book review question.

According to my teacher, the book we pick has to:

have a moral

not be a collection of combined stories

not be a popular series (like harry potter) or anything thats expected to be picked my a lot of students basically

Can someone please give me some recommendation for books I can pick? I would really appreciate your help 🤗

Here's a reference for the type of question I'm talking about for those interested

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Writing a Book Review (IGCSE English as a Second Language)

Writing a Book Review (IGCSE English as a Second Language)

Subject: English

Age range: 14-16

Resource type: Lesson (complete)

MsEnglishTeacher's Shop

Last updated

13 November 2020

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book review format igcse

IGCSE English as a Second Language A lesson on writing a Book review for IGCSE English as a Second Language Exam

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Home | Learning Resources | Samples | Review | Event Review | Sample -1 IGCSE S22/2019

In your school holidays, you attended a course to learn singing, dancing and acting. Your teacher has asked you to write a review of the course for the school magazine.

Here are two comments from other young people who attended the course:

  • • It was brilliant! We all learned new things.
  • • I started to get bored after a few classes.
  • Write a review for the school magazine, giving your opinions.

Paragraph 1: Introduction

  • • State the background
  • • Basic facts of the matter

Paragraph 2: Summary information

  • • Give quantified information about the programme

Paragraph 3 and 4: analysis

  • • Basic facts of the matter.Develop review statement in paragraph 3 and treat the alternative point in paragraph 4 from your own point of view without weakening the idea of the review statement.

Paragraph 5: conclusion

  • • Restate your review sentence and then write a closing sentence to end the review

Sample review

During the last vacation, I attended a two months’ course - in singing, dancing and acting. It was designed and managed by a group of graduates from the ‘School of Fine Arts’. Though a little amateurish, the course was remarkable as it trained us in useful technical aspects of the arts.

The programme – ‘Foundation Course in Performing Arts’- aimed to offer training in basic technical skills to young students who want to make a career in art industry. The number of seats was limited to 30 and that helped personalised attention in instructions. In addition to the management team, faculty from various institutes were invited to facilitate various sessions. The course combined activities and lectures so that experience was supported by theoretical knowledge.

The greatest plus point about the course is that it was a programme, in true sense of the word. A brochure was given to the candidates in advance and it contained the syllabus and detailed schedule with specific information about what is done in each session. This clarity worked wonderfully. We had the idea of what and how we are going to achieve. This also helped to avoid lapse of time and get the best out of each sessions.

Some participants complain that theoretical sessions were boring. I think this opinion is because of tightly packed schedules wrongly interpreted. For me, the lecture sessions helped a lot in detailing our performances.

To put my idea in brief, except for the unprofessional concepts of arts here and there, the course did marvellous little to mould us into artists. All of the participants could really get fluent with the basic technical side of their arts. With only two months, it was just one or two inches, but real ivory.

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ANN'S ENGLISH ACADEMY

How to write a film review in Cambridge IGCSE ESL Exercise 6?

book review format igcse

Are you looking for a film review for your school magazine expressing your views? If yes, you are in the right place!

  • Add the title of the film and underline it, you may provide the reviewer’s name or byline.
  • Begin your film review with an introduction. One of the easiest ways of involving or reader hooked to the review is by asking questions. For example, ”Do you love action-packed films which keep you gripped to your seats?”
  • State your compelling opinion about the film and it gives your readers a feel for the film and keeps them go on reading.
  • The body of your film review gives some background story you should mention the lead role and the plot of the film briefly.
  • The second half of the film review describes the settings of the film.
  • In the next paragraph, includes settings and scenes
  • Link your film review with your opinion opinion
  • Ending paragraph deals with a general recommendation and reasons for the reader to view the film or reject it.

Format of Film Review

1st paragraph 
Introduction
2nd paragraph 
Plot summary
3rd Paragraph
Settings and scenes
4th paragraph
Recommendation and reasons

book review format igcse

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  1. Writing: Exercise 6 (Writing a Review)

    Exercise 6 of the ESL paper could also be a review writing. The review could be for a book, movie, restaurant etc. that you enjoyed (or didn't!) The exercise is worth 16 marks and you should write about 150-200 words. Let's dive right in. I will be using a book review for examples. I have included a sample review at the end.

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    Exercise 6 of the Reading and Writing paper of the IGCSE English as a Second Language (ESL) exam (0510/0511/0991/0993) is always a formal or a semi-formal writing. It can be an article, an essay, a report, or a review. In this article, you will discover how to write the perfect review that impresses the examiner and gets you the highest band.

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    Review. In a review you should: Use a clear, informative heading: This could be as simple as the name of the thing being reviewed, such as the name of a film or book. Include an introduction that summarises what the review is about, including a brief description. State your opinions with supporting reasons:

  4. PDF Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language 0510

    lish as a Second Language 0510Writing a review The main purpose of a review is when you want to give your opinion about something, for example, a fi. m, book, game, product, restaurant, concert, etc. The review needs to engage the audience from the begi. ning to the end and there should be a conclusion. Unlike in a news article or report ...

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    Step 1: Familiarize Yourself with the Material. The first step in mastering the art of IGCSE review writing is to familiarize yourself with the material you will be reviewing. Whether IT is a book, film, or play, read or watch IT carefully, taking notes of the key points, themes, and characters. Understanding the material thoroughly will allow ...

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    Cambridge IGCSE / IGCSE (9-1) English as a Second. Language 0510 /0511 \ 0993/0991 (for examination from 2024) Writing a review . Overview . The main purpose of a review is to give your opinion about something (e.g. a film, website, video game, product, restaurant, concert, etc.) and to say whether you would recommend it to the readers and why.

  7. HOW TO WRITE A REVIEW: IGCSE English as a Second Language No-prep

    zip, 1.29 MB. This is a handy, no-prep resource for teachers of IGCSE English as a Second Language. It's a series of lessons showing students how the same structure can be used to write film, book, restaurant, theatre and event REVIEWS. Ideal for both Year 10 and 11 students writing the new 2019 examinations, this lesson will take 6 lessons ...

  8. Cambridge IGCSE ESL Reviews Topics

    Cambridge IGCSE ESL Reviews Topics. How to write a review in Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language exam? This article focuses on the alternative question of Exam exercise 6. Types of questions questions. 1.Book Review 2. Film Review 3. Restaurant Review 4. Trip Review 5. Review a Course 6.

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    Mastering IGCSE ESL review writing: Tips and Techniques. review writing is an essential skill that every IGCSE ESL student needs to master. Whether IT's reviewing a book, a movie, a restaurant, or even an event, being able to express your opinion in a clear and coherent manner is crucial. In this article, we will explore some valuable tips and techniques that will help you excel in IGCSE ESL ...

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    Step 3: Create an Outline. Before you start writing, IT 's helpful to create an outline for your review. This will help you organize your thoughts and ensure that your review flows logically. Your outline should include an introduction, main body paragraphs, and a conclusion. You can also include subheadings for specific topics or sections ...

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    Here comes the review question and model answer to the cinema for your school magazine. Model answer: Grand Cinemas ... Are you looking for Extended model answers for IGCSE ESL writing questions? If yes,pre-book our A Star Model answers for Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language. A Star Learning materials from Ann's English Academy.

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  13. PDF Cambridge IGCSE / IGCSE (9-1) English as a Second

    Cambridge IGCSE / IGCSE (9-1) English as a Second. Language 0510 / 0993 (for examination from 2019) Writing a review . The main purpose of a review is when you want to give your opinion about something, for example, a film, book, game, product, restaurant, concert, etc. The review needs to engage the audience from the beginning to the end and ...

  14. IGCSE ESL Review Writing Practice and Guidance

    IGCSE ESL Review Writing Bundle. Presentation supported by authentic example reviews (film and book) to introduce students to the structure, features and useful expressions for review writing at IGCSE ESL level, though this could be adapted for IBDP English B. There are two exam-style prompts (book and restaurant) and guidance frameworks for ...

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  17. English book review: does anyone have any recommendations?

    The syllabus for English as a Second Language (0510/0511) does not include a book review component at all, only Reading and Writing, Listening and Oral (Speaking) in both Core and Extended tiers. The exams for next year is highly unlikely to be cancelled if the current Oct/Nov 2021 series was not cancelled in your country.

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  19. IGCSE 0510 Review Sample |languagecentre

    Sample review. During the last vacation, I attended a two months' course - in singing, dancing and acting. It was designed and managed by a group of graduates from the 'School of Fine Arts'. Though a little amateurish, the course was remarkable as it trained us in useful technical aspects of the arts. The programme - 'Foundation ...

  20. How to write a film review in Cambridge IGCSE ESL Exercise 6?

    Add the title of the film and underline it, you may provide the reviewer's name or byline. Begin your film review with an introduction. One of the easiest ways of involving or reader hooked to the review is by asking questions. For example, "Do you love action-packed films which keep you gripped to your seats?".