Stanford Graduate School of Education

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Economics of education, pedro dantas.

Pedro Dantas holds an MA in International Comparative Education (2016) and a Master of Public Policy (2021), both from Stanford. His previous experiences include a business development internship in Nigeria sponsored by the Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Economies, conducting

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Nina is a doctoral student in the Economics of Education and Educational Policy programs at Stanford University. She holds a Master's degree in Economics (MA) from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG - Brazil), and a Bachelor's degree (BA) from the São Paulo School of Economics (EESP). Most recently, she worked as a consultant at the World Bank, in Latin America and the Caribbean region, and at Mgov, a mobile platform for policy design and impact evaluation. Nina studies the economics of education, with a particular interest in teacher quality and parental engagement.

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ECON-PHD - Economics (PhD)

Program overview.

The department’s purpose is to acquaint students with the economic aspects of modern society, to familiarize them with techniques for analyzing contemporary economic problems, and to develop an ability to exercise judgment in evaluating public policy. There is training for the general student and those who plan careers as economists in civil service, private enterprise, teaching, or research.

The department’s curriculum is integral to Stanford’s International Relations, Public Policy, and Urban Studies programs.

The faculty interests and research cover a broad spectrum of topics in most fields of economics, including behavioral economics, comparative institutional analysis, econometrics, economic development, economic history, experimental economics, industrial organization, international trade, labor, macro- and microeconomic theory, mathematical economics, environmental economics, and public finance.

The primary objective of the graduate program is to educate students as research economists. In the process, students also acquire the background and skills necessary for careers as university teachers and as practitioners of economics. The curriculum includes a comprehensive treatment of modern theory and empirical techniques. Currently, 20 to 25 students are admitted each year.

Graduate programs in economics are designed to ensure that students receive a thorough grounding in the methodology of theoretical and empirical economics while at the same time providing specialized training in a wide variety of subfields and a broad understanding of associated institutional structures. Toward these ends, the program is arranged so that the student has little choice in the curriculum at the outset but considerable latitude later.

Students admitted to graduate standing in the department are expected to have a strong college-level economics, mathematics, and statistics background. Preparation ordinarily consists of a college major in economics, a year-long calculus sequence that includes multivariate analysis, a course in linear algebra, and a rigorous course in probability and statistics. 

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stanford economics of education phd

Barnett Family Professor of Education, Stanford University, 2018-present Director, John W. Gardner Center for Youth and their Communities, 2018-present Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR), 2015-present Professor of Education, Stanford University, 2012-2018 Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs, Stanford Graduate School of Education, 2015-2018 Director, Stanford Center for Education Policy Analysis, 2015-2018 Professor of Public Policy and Economics, University of Virginia, 2010-2012 Research Professor of Education, University of Virginia, 2010-2012 Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Swarthmore College, 2005-2010 Director, Public Policy Program, Swarthmore College, 2005-2010 Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Swarthmore College, 1999-2005. Assistant Professor of Economics, School of Economics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1997-1999

Thomas S. Dee, Ph.D., is a Professor of Education at Stanford University and a Research Associate in the Programs on Economics of Education, Health Economics and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). His research focuses largely on the use of quantitative methods (e.g., panel data techniques, instrumental variables, and random assignment) to inform contemporary policy debates. Recent examples include econometric evaluations of incentive and accountability-based reforms and an analysis of recent, stimulus-funded, school-turnaround initiatives.

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Economics of Education

Nicholas Bloom

Nicholas Bloom

William d. eberle professor of economics, senior fellow at the stanford institute for economic policy research and professor, by courtesy, of economics at the graduate school of business.

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  • Publications

Academic Appointments

  • Professor, Economics
  • Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)
  • Professor (By courtesy), Economics
  • Faculty Affiliate, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)
  • Affiliate, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Administrative Appointments

  • Professor, Stanford University, Department of Economics (2012 - Present)
  • Professor by Courtesy, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business (2012 - Present)
  • Co-Director of the Productivity Program, National Bureau of Economic Research (2011 - Present)
  • Associate Professor (with tenure), Stanford University, Department of Economics (2009 - 2012)
  • Assistant Professor, Stanford University, Department of Economics (2005 - 2009)
  • Research Fellow, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics (2003 - 2006)
  • Associate Consultant, McKinsey & Company (2002 - 2003)
  • Business Tax Policy Advisor, HM Treasury (2001 - 2002)
  • Research Economist, Institute for Fiscal Studies (1996 - 2002)
  • Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2013 - 2013)
  • Fellow, Econometrics Society (2011 - 2011)
  • Research Fellowship, Alfred Sloan Foundation (2008 - 2010)

Honors & Awards

  • EIB Prize, European Investment Bank (2015)
  • Kauffman Medal, Kauffman Foundation (2013)
  • John T Dunlop Scholar Award, Labor Economics Research Association (2008)
  • PhD advising award, Stanford Graduate Economics Association (2008)
  • Addington Prize, Fraser Institute (2013)
  • Bemacer Prize, Observatorio del Banco Central Europeo (OBCE) (2012)
  • Frisch Medal, Econometric Society (2010)
  • Bemacer Prize, Observatrio del Banco Central Europeo (2012)
  • Frisch Medal, The Econometrics Society (2010)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations

  • Associate Editor, Econometrica (2012 - Present)
  • Associate Editor, Quarterly Journal of Economics (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Editorial Review Board, Academy of Management Perspectives (2011 - Present)
  • Associate Editor, Management Science (2011 - Present)
  • Memberr, Board of Editors, Journal of Economic Literature (2010 - Present)
  • Member, American Economic Journal of Macro (2009 - Present)
  • Associate Editor, Economic Journal (2009 - Present)
  • Associate Editor, Journal of Monetary Economics (2008 - 2010)
  • Research Associate, Centre for Economic Performance
  • Affiliate, J-PAL
  • Co-Director of Productivity, NBER
  • Associate, EF&G and Monetary Economics programs, NBER
  • Research Fellow, Centre for Economic Policy Research
  • Member, San Francisco Federal Reserve Board
  • Research Fellow, IZA
  • Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy
  • Associate, Toulouse Network for Information Technology

Professional Education

  • BA, Cambridge University, Fitzwilliam College, Economics (1994)
  • MPhil., Oxford University, St. Peters College, Economics (1996)
  • PhD, University College London, Economics (2001)
  • 579 Serra Mall
  • Stanford,  California  94305 
  • (650) 725-7836 (office)

Additional Info

  • Mail Code: 6015
  • Other Names: Nick Bloom
  • Bloom Website

2023-24 Courses

  • Labor Economics II ECON 247 (Win)
  • Labor Economics Seminar ECON 345 (Aut, Win, Spr)
  • The Modern Firm in Theory and Practice ECON 149 (Win)
  • Directed Reading ECON 139D (Aut, Win, Spr)
  • Directed Reading ECON 239D (Aut, Win, Spr, Sum)
  • Directed Readings in Public Policy PUBLPOL 298 (Spr)
  • Honors Thesis Research ECON 199D (Aut, Win, Spr, Sum)
  • Practical Training ECON 299 (Aut, Win, Spr, Sum)

2022-23 Courses

2021-22 courses, 2020-21 courses, stanford advisees.

  • Doctoral Dissertation Reader (AC) Adrian Blattner , Bharat Chandar , Yiqin Fu , Suhani Jalota
  • Doctoral Dissertation Advisor (AC) Alain Pineda Pineda
  • Master's Program Advisor Alexander Finan , Rick Mihm
  • Doctoral Dissertation Co-Advisor (AC) Jacob Light , Emma Rockall

All Publications

View details for DOI 10.1162/rest_a_00925

View details for Web of Science ID 000673449300003

View details for DOI 10.1093/oxrep/grab009

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View details for DOI 10.1257/pandp.20211110

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View details for DOI 10.1257/pandp.20211057

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View details for DOI 10.1257/app.20180752

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View details for DOI 10.1093/ej/ueaa086

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View details for DOI 10.1093/rapstu/raaa008

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View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2019.02.008

View details for Web of Science ID 000571474100002

We consider several economic uncertainty indicators for the US and UK before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: implied stock market volatility, newspaper-based policy uncertainty, twitter chatter about economic uncertainty, subjective uncertainty about business growth, forecaster disagreement about future GDP growth, and a model-based measure of macro uncertainty. Four results emerge. First, all indicators show huge uncertainty jumps in reaction to the pandemic and its economic fallout. Indeed, most indicators reach their highest values on record. Second, peak amplitudes differ greatly - from a 35% rise for the model-based measure of US economic uncertainty (relative to January 2020) to a 20-fold rise in forecaster disagreement about UK growth. Third, time paths also differ: Implied volatility rose rapidly from late February, peaked in mid-March, and fell back by late March as stock prices began to recover. In contrast, broader measures of uncertainty peaked later and then plateaued, as job losses mounted, highlighting differences between Wall Street and Main Street uncertainty measures. Fourth, in Cholesky-identified VAR models fit to monthly U.S. data, a COVID-size uncertainty shock foreshadows peak drops in industrial production of 12-19%.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2020.104274

View details for PubMedID 32921841

View details for DOI 10.1162/rest_a_00847

View details for Web of Science ID 000544959700007

View details for DOI 10.1353/eca.2020.0012

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View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.20180338

View details for Web of Science ID 000522720800005

View details for DOI 10.1257/app.20180369

View details for Web of Science ID 000522150600007

View details for DOI 10.1111/1475-5890.12195

View details for Web of Science ID 000513759700006

View details for DOI 10.32609/0042-8736-2019-10-5-31

View details for Web of Science ID 000497653800001

View details for DOI 10.1257/jep.33.3.163

View details for Web of Science ID 000478070800008

View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.20170491

View details for Web of Science ID 000466609600003

View details for DOI 10.1093/qje/qjy025

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View details for DOI 10.1111/1475-5890.12179

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View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.20130470

View details for Web of Science ID 000448528900011

View details for DOI 10.3982/ECTA10927

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View details for DOI 10.1257/pandp.20181066

View details for Web of Science ID 000434468600061

View details for DOI 10.1086/694107

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View details for DOI 10.1111/1467-8462.12203

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View details for DOI 10.1093/qje/qjw024

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View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.p20161058

View details for Web of Science ID 000379341300028

View details for DOI 10.1093/restud/rdv039

View details for Web of Science ID 000374224300004

National policies to improve health care quality have largely focused on clinical provider outcomes and, more recently, payment reform. Yet the association between hospital leadership and quality, although crucial to driving quality improvement, has not been explored in depth. We collected data from surveys of nationally representative groups of hospitals in the United States and England to examine the relationships among hospital boards, management practices of front-line managers, and the quality of care delivered. First, we found that hospitals with more effective management practices provided higher-quality care. Second, higher-rated hospital boards had superior performance by hospital management staff. Finally, we identified two signatures of high-performing hospital boards and management practice. Hospitals with boards that paid greater attention to clinical quality had management that better monitored quality performance. Similarly, we found that hospitals with boards that used clinical quality metrics more effectively had higher performance by hospital management staff on target setting and operations. These findings help increase understanding of the dynamics among boards, front-line management, and quality of care and could provide new targets for improving care delivery.

View details for DOI 10.1377/hlthaff.2014.1282

View details for Web of Science ID 000361141000009

View details for PubMedID 26240243

View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.p20151000

View details for Web of Science ID 000357929400082

View details for DOI 10.1111/ecoj.12267

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View details for DOI 10.1093/restud/rdu045

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View details for DOI 10.1093/qje/qju032

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View details for DOI 10.1287/mnsc.2014.2013

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View details for DOI 10.1111/jeea.12094

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View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.104.5.56

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View details for DOI 10.1093/jleo/ewt003

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View details for DOI 10.1257/jep.28.2.153

View details for Web of Science ID 000344365500008

View details for DOI 10.3982/ECTA9466

View details for Web of Science ID 000322338400005

View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.103.3.208

View details for Web of Science ID 000322877000034

To improve the quality of health care, many researchers have suggested that health care institutions adopt management approaches that have been successful in the manufacturing and technology sectors. However, relatively little information exists about how these practices are disseminated in hospitals and whether they are associated with better performance.To describe the variation in management practices among a large sample of hospital cardiac care units; assess association of these practices with processes of care, readmissions, and mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI); and suggest specific directions for the testing and dissemination of health care management approaches.We adapted an approach used to measure management and organizational practices in manufacturing to collect management data on cardiac units. We scored performance in 18 practices using the following 4 dimensions: standardizing care, tracking of key performance indicators, setting targets, and incentivizing employees. We used multivariate analyses to assess the relationship of management practices with process-of-care measures, 30-day risk-adjusted mortality, and 30-day readmissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI).Cardiac units in US hospitals.Five hundred ninety-seven cardiac units, representing 51.5% of hospitals with interventional cardiac catheterization laboratories and at least 25 annual AMI discharges.Process-of-care measures, 30-day risk-adjusted mortality, and 30-day readmissions for AMI.We found a wide distribution in management practices, with fewer than 20% of hospitals scoring a 4 or a 5 (best practice) on more than 9 measures. In multivariate analyses, management practices were significantly correlated with mortality (P = .01) and 6 of 6 process measures (P < .05). No statistically significant association was found between management and 30-day readmissions.The use of management practices adopted from manufacturing sectors is associated with higher process-of-care measures and lower 30-day AMI mortality. Given the wide differences in management practices across hospitals, dissemination of these practices may be beneficial in achieving high-quality outcomes.

View details for DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.3577

View details for PubMedID 23552986

View details for DOI 10.1093/qje/qjs044

View details for Web of Science ID 000314883900001

View details for Web of Science ID 000310097200012

HBR's 90th anniversary is a sensible time to revisit a basic question: Are organizations more likely to succeed if they adopt good management practices? The answer may seem obvious to most HBR readers, but these three economists cast their net much wider than that. In a decadelong study of thousands of organizations in 20 countries, they and their interview teams assessed how well manufacturers, schools, and hospitals adhere to three management basics: targets, incentives, and monitoring. They found that huge numbers of companies follow none of those fundamentals, that adopting the basics yields big improvements in outcomes such as productivity and longevity, and that good nuts-and-bolts management at individual firms shapes national performance. At 14 textile manufacturers in India, for example, an intervention--involving free, high-quality advice from a consultant who was on-site half-time for five months--cut defects by half, reduced inventory by 20%, and raised output by 10%. A control group saw no such gains. The authors' global data set suggests that implementing good management at schools and hospitals yields change more slowly than at manufacturers--but it does come eventually. And the macroeconomic potential--for incomes, productivity, and delivery of critically needed services--is huge. A call for "better management" may sound prosaic, but given the global payoffs, it's actually quite radical.

View details for PubMedID 23155999

View details for DOI 10.1093/qje/qje029

View details for Web of Science ID 000311905500003

View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0351.2012.00444.x

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View details for DOI 10.5465/amp.2011.0077

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View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.102.1.167

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View details for DOI 10.1002/smj.879

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  • Human resource management and productivity Handbook of Labor Economics Bloom, N., Reenen, J. V. 2011

View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.100.2.105

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View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.100.2.619

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View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1468-0297.2010.02351.x

View details for Web of Science ID 000277405100012

View details for DOI 10.1257/aer.100.2.434

View details for Web of Science ID 000278389300084

View details for DOI 10.1146/annurev.economics.050708.143328

View details for Web of Science ID 000290636900005

View details for DOI 10.1257/jep.24.1.203

View details for Web of Science ID 000275435100010

View details for DOI 10.3982/ECTA6248

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View details for Web of Science ID 000174916900008

83 years later, 105-year-old finally earns master's from Stanford

Virginia Hislop has spent a lifetime trying to increase access to education, and now, at 105 years old, she appears to have completed her own schooling.

On Sunday, Hislop celebrated Stanford University's conference of a master of art's degree in education — 83 years after having left campus just shy of the degree. Her son-in-law had contacted the institution and discovered a final thesis, her unfulfilled obligation, was no longer required.

“I’ve been doing this work for years and it’s nice to be recognized with this degree,” Hislop told Stanford for a story about her nearly lifelong journey to a stage on campus , where a diploma in a Cardinal-red cover was placed in her hand.

105 year old earns masters of arts in education Stanford University master's degree recipient virginia hislop

In 1941, on the eve of the United States' direct involvement in World War II, and as her fiance was preparing to be called to serve, Hislop skipped out on the thesis.

Her Stanford days, starting in 1936, were nonetheless fruitful, and she earned an undergraduate education degree before moving directly to postgraduate studies.

She wanted to go to law school, Hislop has said, but her father wouldn't pay for it, so she opted for the briefer time required for teaching.

Hislop had completed coursework for a master's and needed only to turn in the final version of her thesis, she has said. Instead, she told NBC Bay Area, she skipped town and had a honeymoon in Oklahoma near her husband's Army post at Fort Sill.

"Not my idea of a place for a honeymoon," she told the station, "but I had no choice in the matter."

At the time, such a sacrifice — trading her career for marriage and a future family — was seen as a way to support the war effort. It was a sacrifice for America.

She had grown up in Los Angeles, but after the war the California girl found herself with husband George in Yakima, Washington, where George took part in the family business of ranching.

They raised two children, which put Hislop's focus on a passion stoked during her days in Palo Alto: education.

105 year old earns masters of arts in education Stanford University master's degree recipient virginia hislop

"I didn’t return to teaching, but I feel I put my teaching certificate to good use serving in committees and on boards and trying to improve the educational opportunities every chance I got," she told the Yakima Herald-Republic in 2018.

She opposed middle school curricula that required home economics but not advanced English for her daughter, so she ran for the Yakima School District Board of Directors and won, according to the publication.

Hislop also successfully lobbied for independent community college districts in Washington state at a time when Yakima's two-year college was under the otherwise K-12 district.

She was eventually recruited to raise funds for what would become Heritage University, a women-founded, women-led institution about 20 miles south of Yakima.

She launched the school's annual Bounty of the Valley Scholarship Dinner, which by 2018 had raised nearly $6 million to help students attend the institution. Hislop is listed by the school as a board member emerita.

At Pacific Northwest University, a medical and health sciences school in Yakima, a scholarship, the Virginia Hislop Emergency Fund , bares her name.

Her interest in broad access to education may have been inspired by an aunt who was the principal of a public school in West Los Angeles' Sawtelle Japantown neighborhood when Hislop grew up in L.A.

Sawtelle is an area originally anchored by a housing and care facility for disabled veterans of the Civil War, but it evolved into a community populated by Japanese Americans and Latinos.

master's degree recipient virginia hislop

Hislop said she was moved by her aunt’s experience seeing education change lives on L.A.’s Westside, according to the Yakima Herald-Republic.

“Aunt Nora would tell us about some of the Hispanic students in her school and how they were doing and the difference that education made for them,” she told the publication. “It seemed to me that without an education, your future was limited and with an education it was unlimited.”

Her new degree is punctuation for a life spent advocating for public education for the masses.

On Sunday, Daniel Schwartz, dean of Stanford’s Graduate School of Education, handed Hislop her master’s diploma with a broad smile, describing her as “a fierce advocate for equity and the opportunity to learn."

stanford economics of education phd

Dennis Romero is a breaking news reporter for NBC News Digital. 

Graduate Degree Programs

stanford economics of education phd

Ph.D. Program

The curriculum includes a comprehensive treatment of modern theory and empirical techniques. Students are exposed to a broad range of applied fields, and elect specialization in two fields of particular interest. The typical student can expect to spend two full years completing the required course work. The remaining time in the program is usually spent engaging in dissertation research and participating in seminars.

stanford economics of education phd

Master’s Degree

The Economics department does not admit students who plan to terminate their graduate study with the M.A. degree.  A master’s option is only available to currently enrolled Econ Ph.D. candidates, or Ph.D. candidates from other departments at Stanford.

stanford economics of education phd

Ph.D. Minor

Students who are currently enrolled in another Ph.D. program at Stanford may elect to add a Ph.D. Minor in Economics to their degree program.

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Joint Degree Programs

The Economics department offers two joint degree programs with the School of Law, leading to either a J.D./M.A. and a J.D./Ph.D degree.  We also offer a Ph.D./M.P.P. joint degree with the Public Policy program.

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Epidemiology and Population Health

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution, determinants, and control of illness and impairment in human populations. It is the cornerstone of population health and informs policy decisions and evidence-based medicine by identifying risk factors for disease and targets for treatment and prevention. The Department of Epidemiology and Population Health (EPH) provides the analytical foundation for research conducted at the Stanford School of Medicine, offering expertise, research, and training on collecting and interpreting the scientific evidence essential to improving human health. 

The scholars within EPH conduct a wide variety of health-related research. Using observational and experimental research methods, our scholars uncover environmental, social, genetic, and behavioral factors to aid in human disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Further, the faculty train physician investigators in techniques of clinical research and are committed to advancing knowledge in epidemiology and population health through educational programs for undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students. 

Read more about EPH

Recent News

Fellowship awardees

EPH students receive fellowships and awards

The Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education recently announced its 2024 Fellows. Five EPH students are recipients of fellowships or awards administered by the VPGE office.

Michelle Odden

EPH Professor Michelle Odden honored by Stanford Women's Faculty Forum  

EPH Professor Michelle Odden was recently recognized by the Stanford Faculty Women's Forum as a recipient of the 2024 Outstanding Mentor Award. This award is presented to faculty members who consistently create opportunities for the academic advancement of women at Stanford and recognizes individuals who promote and sponsor Stanford women students, postdoctoral fellows, research staff, and/or faculty for opportunities and advancement. 

Sam Jaros

We are EPH: Meet Alice Whittemore

Alice Whittemore, PhD, Professor Emerita, has dedicated her career to understanding cancers' genetic and environmental mechanisms by integrating mathematics and biology. Her research focuses on statistical methods for epidemiological studies of site-specific cancers, particularly cancers of the prostate, breast, ovaries, and skin. 

Lisa Goldman

Food as Medicine Interventions Can Reduce Cardiovascular Risk

March 23, 2024 - EPH Professor Lisa Goldman Rosas recently presented a new study at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Scientific Sessions 2024. The study shows that implementing a Food as Medicine program improved diet and physical activity and reduced cardiovascular risk factors among participants. After 16 weeks of free, weekly home delivery of fresh produce, study participants boosted their fruit and vegetable consumption by almost 1/2 of a serving per day and added 42 minutes to their weekly level of physical activity. A year later, participants had better blood sugar control, lower bad cholesterol levels, and improved cardiovascular health measures.

Mathew Kiang

Study Estimates Nearly 70 Percent of Children Under Six in Chicago may be Exposed to Lead-Contaminated Water

March 18, 2024 - EPH Professor Mathew Kiang is the senior author of a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics that estimates that 68 percent of Chicago children under age 6 are exposed to lead in their drinking water. Kiang and fellow researchers developed AI models that made citywide estimates of the number of children under 5 living in homes with lead-contaminated drinking water and determined that Black and Hispanic children were more likely than white children to live in homes where the water contained lead. 

Melissa Bondy

Melissa Bondy awarded American Society of Preventive Oncology Fraumeni Distinguished Achievement Award

March 1, 2024 - EPH Chair Dr. Melissa Bondy is the recipient of the 2024 Fraumeni Distinguished Achievement Award, the highest honor awarded by the American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) . The award is given annually to an outstanding scientist in the area of preventative oncology, cancer control, and/or cancer prevention. Dr. Bondy and EPH's Dr. Ann Hsing were part of the 2017 ASPO executive committee that renamed the award after Dr. Joeseph Fraumeni in recognition of his contributions to cancer etiology and prevention.

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Epidemiology Seminar Series

We hold weekly seminars featuring the research of internal and guest speakers working in the field of epidemiology every Tuesday from 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted on the program calendar. 

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The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is offered in all Faculties of the University. In the Faculty of Commerce, it is a research degree on an advanced topic under supervision. The examination is by thesis alone. The general rules for this degree are set out in Book 3 of this series entitled "General Rules and Policies". The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is also subject to the following Faculty rules:

A candidate who registers for the degree without submitting an approved research proposal is required to submit this approved research proposal to the Faculty Board by no later than six months from the date of first registration.   FDA2

If the Faculty Board approves the research proposal, the Board shall recommend the candidate for registration to the University’s Doctoral Degrees Board.

If the candidate fails to submit a research proposal by not later than six months from the date of first registration, or if the Faculty Board rejects the research proposal, the candidate’s registration shall be cancelled. 

A candidate registering for the first time for the degree may register at any time.

A returning candidate shall register by not later than 28 February each year.

The registration renewal is subject to a satisfactory annual report from the primary supervisor and relevant Head of Department approved by the Dean or Dean’s nominee. 

Except by the special permission of the Dean of Commerce, the thesis submitted for the degree shall not be less than 40,000 words or exceed 80,000 words. 

For further information, please  send an email to   [email protected]

To apply, please click this link    Apply here

PROCEDURES FOR ADMISSION INTO THE PhD in Economics (by Thesis)

  • A Masters degree in Economics is usually required.
  • Applicants should upload a 5-page proposal with their application. Check our staff page  for our academic's areas of interest. 
  • You must put in an application to the University as well. You can do this online at  http://applyonline.uct.ac.za/ . We encourage students to apply through the Commerce Faculty.
  • Your proposal will be distributed to the relevant lecturers within the School of Economics to match you with a suitable supervisor.
  • The Post-graduate Committee in the School of Economics will send recommendations for suitable candidates to the Faculty Board.
  • Subject to Faculty Board approval, the candidate may register with the university for this degree.
  • A candidate will be required to submit and present a formal research proposal to the Post-graduate Committee and Faculty Board for approval by no later than six months from the date of first registration.
  • If the proposal is not accepted, registration will be cancelled.
  • During the registration period, a candidate will normally be required to “attend the University” for a period of at least one year. By “attend at the University”, the Senate understands that the candidate shall, within reason, be readily available for discussion at the University.
  • For practical purposes, the PhD in Economics (by thesis) programme takes about 4 years to complete. The Doctoral Degrees Board (DDB) controls much of the process after registration, even though the School of Economics can call for seminars periodically. Students are generally required to be residents in Cape Town for at least one year.  The thesis submitted for the degree shall not exceed 80,000 words. 

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Economic Analysis & Policy Requirements

I. preparation .

Admitted students are assumed to have a substantial background in economics. An undergraduate major in economics or mathematics or a graduate degree in economics or business administration suffices in most cases.

In addition, all students are required to have, or to obtain in the first year, skill in the use of the following mathematical methods:

Topic Courses
Calculus MATH 19, 20, 21: Calculus 
Linear Algebra MATH 51: Linear Algebra, Multivariable Calculus, and Modern Applications
MATH 113: Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory

 

Analysis MATH 115: Functions of a Real Variable
Probability MS&E 220: Probabilistic Analysis
STATS 116: Theory of Probability

 

Optimization ECON 181: Optimization and Economic Analysis
Statistics STATS 200: Introduction to Statistical Inference

II. Course Requirements

All required courses must be taken for a grade (not pass/fail or credit/no credit). Exceptions are made if the required course is offered pass/fail or credit/no credit only. Each course must be passed with a grade of P or B- or better. Substitutions of required courses require approval from the faculty liaison. Waiving a course requirement based on similar doctoral level course completed elsewhere requires the approval of the course instructor, faculty liaison, and the PhD Program Office.

Requirement Courses
Core Requirements
(7 courses)

One macroeconomics course:

Field Requirements
(6 courses)

Students must complete 3 two-course sequences in topics in economics and related business fields. Examples are given below. If a course appears in more than one sequence, the course may not be counted twice. Alternative topics and two-course sequences may be proposed by the student, and must be approved by the faculty liaison.

II

III. Practicum

Students do not need to sign up for practicum in year one. In years two through five, students sign up for MGTECON 699 with the faculty liaison or the faculty advisor (after one is chosen) as a one unit pass/fail course in every quarter. Students must regularly attend and participate in one of the seminar series at Stanford GSB. With the faculty liaison’s approval, students may attend a non-Stanford GSB seminar series, in lieu of a seminar series at Stanford GSB.

IV. Field Examination

Students take two field exams in the summer after the first year in the program: theory and metrics. Students must pass both exams in order to successfully complete the requirement. Successful completion of the field exams is required for advancement to candidacy.

V. Summer Research Paper

Each student is required to submit a research paper and present it in the Fall quarter of their third year in the program at the time announced by the liaison. The paper has to be an original and novel body of work. Students should discuss the scope and expectations for the paper with their faculty advisor and liaison. The papers and presentations will be graded by the faculty with a Pass/Fail grade. A student who fails will be provided with a second opportunity to complete this requirement (paper and presentation) in the spring of the third year. Successful completion of the research paper is required for advancement to candidacy.

VI. Teaching Requirement

One quarter of course assistantship or teaching practicum. Requirement must be completed prior to graduation.

VII. Candidacy

Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree is a judgment by the faculty of the student’s potential to successfully complete the requirements of the degree program. Students are required to advance to candidacy by September 1 before the start of their fourth year in the program.

VIII. University Oral Exam

The oral examination is a defense of the dissertation work in progress. The student orally presents and defends the thesis work in progress at a stage when it is one-half to two-thirds complete. The oral examination committee tests the student on the theory and methodology underlying the research, the areas of application and portions of the major field to which the research is relevant, and the significance of the dissertation research. Students are required to successfully complete the oral exams by September 1 before the start of their fifth year in the program

IX. Doctoral Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation is expected to be an original contribution to scholarship or scientific knowledge, to exemplify the highest standards of the discipline, and to be of lasting value to the intellectual community. The Econ faculty defer to the student’s Dissertation Reading Committee to provide general guidelines (e.g. number of chapters, length of dissertation) on the dissertation.

Typical Timeline

Years one & two.

  • Field Requirements
  • Directed Reading & Research
  • Advancement to Candidacy
  • Formulation of Research Topic
  • Annual Evaluation
  • Continued Research

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IMAGES

  1. Nobel Prize in economics awarded to Stanford professor Guido Imbens

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  2. Stanford Economics Phd Application

    stanford economics of education phd

  3. Department of Economics

    stanford economics of education phd

  4. Department of Economics

    stanford economics of education phd

  5. ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION

    stanford economics of education phd

  6. Department of Economics, Stanford University

    stanford economics of education phd

VIDEO

  1. RES 2022: Economic Journal Lecture

  2. Stanford Executive Program Flex: A New Way to Experience SEP

  3. Understanding the Financial Crisis and What It Means to You

  4. Stanford Economics 1 Guest Lecturer, September 24, 2009

  5. Nick Bloom on Telecommuting

  6. CES Munich Lectures in Economics 2020: "Why Working From Home Will Stick”

COMMENTS

  1. Doctoral Programs

    The goal of the GSE PhD in Education is to prepare the next generation of leading education researchers. The cornerstone of the doctoral experience at the Stanford Graduate School of Education is the research apprenticeship that all students undertake, typically under the guidance of their academic advisor, but often with other Stanford faculty as well.

  2. Economics of Education

    Landau Economics Building . 579 Jane Stanford Way . Stanford, CA 94305 . Phone: 650-725-3266 . econ[at] stanford.edu(econ[at]stanford[dot]edu) . Connect with us on Twitter . Campus Map. "The Stanford Economics Department has two central missions: to train students at the undergraduate and graduate level in the methods and ideas of modern ...

  3. Doctoral Program

    The Ph.D. program is a full time program leading to a Doctoral Degree in Economics. Students specialize in various fields within Economics by enrolling in field courses and attending field specific lunches and seminars. Students gain economic breadth by taking additional distribution courses outside of their selected fields of interest.

  4. Programs & Degrees

    Leading to a PhD degree in Education, these doctoral programs, as listed below, prepare students in a variety of approaches to the study of teaching and learning. ... Economics of Education Education Data Science Educational Linguistics Educational Policy ... Stanford Graduate School of Education. 482 Galvez Mall Stanford, CA 94305-3096 Tel ...

  5. Eric Bettinger

    Biography. Eric Bettinger is the Conley DeAngelis Family Professor in the Stanford University School of Education and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is also a research associate in the program on education at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Bettinger is the Director of the Center for Educational Policy Analysis and the ...

  6. Applying to Stanford

    Stanford's Office of Graduate Admissions begins accepting graduate program applications in late-September for students wishing to be considered for admission to the Economics Ph.D. program the following September. The application deadline for the Economics Ph.D. is 29 November 2023 (11:59pm Pacific Time). The Department of Economics ...

  7. Economic Analysis & Policy

    Students who enroll in this program have a substantial background in economics and mathematics. They are expected to have, minimally, mathematical skills at the level of one year of advanced calculus and one course each in linear algebra, analysis, probability, optimization, and statistics. The faculty selects students based on predicted ...

  8. ED-PHD Program

    The Graduate School of Education offers the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in all program area committees. The university confers the degree upon recommendation by the Graduate School of Education faculty and the University Committee on Graduate Studies. The PhD requires a minimum of 135 units of coursework and research completed at Stanford ...

  9. Faculty by Research Interest: Economics of Education

    Stanford Graduate School of Education. 482 Galvez Mall Stanford, CA 94305-3096 Tel: (650) 723-2109

  10. Economics of education

    Nina is a doctoral student in the Economics of Education and Educational Policy programs at Stanford University. She holds a Master's degree in Economics (MA) from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG - Brazil), and a Bachelor's degree (BA) from the São Paulo School of Economics (EESP).

  11. ECON-PHD Program

    The primary objective of the graduate program is to educate students as research economists. In the process, students also acquire the background and skills necessary for careers as university teachers and as practitioners of economics. The curriculum includes a comprehensive treatment of modern theory and empirical techniques. Currently, 20 to ...

  12. Department of Economics

    Stanford Institute for Theoretical Economics (SITE) The SITE 2024 Conference takes place this summer from July 1 - September 11 on the Stanford campus with sessions that cover a wide-range of economic topics. Its purpose is to advance economic science for the benefit of society and to support cutting-edge work of economic theorists within ...

  13. Thomas Dee

    Thomas Dee. Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Swarthmore College, 1999-2005. Thomas S. Dee, Ph.D., is a Professor of Education at Stanford University and a Research Associate in the Programs on Economics of Education, Health Economics and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

  14. Doctoral Programs

    A doctoral degree is a significant investment in your future, and financing your education is a critical factor to consider. While the funding we provide covers the basic standard cost of attendance determined by Stanford University for a modest life as a graduate student, accepting an offer from a doctoral program has significant personal, professional, and financial implications. Below you ...

  15. Stanford University Graduate School of Education

    The Stanford University Graduate School of Education (Stanford GSE or GSE) is one of the top education schools in the United States. It offers master's and doctoral programs in more than 25 areas of specialization, along with joint degrees with other programs at Stanford University including business , law , and public policy. [1]

  16. Economics of Education

    Encina Hall West 616 Jane Stanford Way, CA 94305-6050 Phone: 650-725-0109 publicpolicy [at] stanford.edu (publicpolicy[at]stanford[dot]edu) Campus Map

  17. Nicholas Bloom's Profile

    MPhil., Oxford University, St. Peters College, Economics (1996) PhD, University College London, Economics (2001) Nicholas Bloom is part of Stanford Profiles, official site for faculty, postdocs, students and staff information (Expertise, Bio, Research, Publications, and more). The site facilitates research and collaboration in academic endeavors.

  18. Lifelong learning: Stanford GSE student collects her master's degree

    It's been a minute since Virginia "Ginger" Hislop was a student at Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE). When she started at the GSE in 1936 — then the Stanford University School of Education — her plan was to get her bachelor's of education, which she did in 1940, and obtain her master's of education so she could teach, which she started directly after.

  19. 105-year-old earns master's degree from Stanford

    Her Stanford days, starting in 1936, were nonetheless fruitful, and she earned an undergraduate education degree before moving directly to postgraduate studies.

  20. Graduate Degree Programs

    Ph.D. Program. The curriculum includes a comprehensive treatment of modern theory and empirical techniques. Students are exposed to a broad range of applied fields, and elect specialization in two fields of particular interest. The typical student can expect to spend two full years completing the required course work. The remaining time in the ...

  21. 105-year-old Stanford student graduates with master's degree 8 ...

    Virginia "Ginger" Hislop, 105, recently walked the stage at Stanford University to receive her master's degree in education for coursework she completed in 1941.

  22. Graduate Studies

    The key to selecting a successful graduate program is identifying the right research environment for you. To ensure the Stanford Genetics program is the appropriate Home Program within Stanford Biosciences for you, we recommend ensuring that your scientific interests align with those of the department and our faculty. Take the time to explore ...

  23. School of Medicine's 2024 graduates celebrate ...

    Stanford Medicine is an integrated academic health system comprising the Stanford School of Medicine and adult and pediatric health care delivery systems. Together, they harness the full potential of biomedicine through collaborative research, education and clinical care for patients. For more information, please visit med.stanford.edu.

  24. Epidemiology and Population Health

    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution, determinants, and control of illness and impairment in human populations. It is the cornerstone of population health and informs policy decisions and evidence-based medicine by identifying risk factors for disease and targets for treatment and prevention.

  25. PhD in Economics (by Dissertation)

    The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is offered in all Faculties of the University. In the Faculty of Commerce, it is a research degree on an advanced topic under supervision. The examination is by thesis alone. The general rules for this degree are set out in Book 3 of this series entitled "General Rules and Policies". The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is also subject to the following ...

  26. GSE 2024 graduates leave campus to lead lives in service to learning

    From bouncing babies and cheerful children, to young adults and centenarians, the full breadth of human life was in attendance at Stanford Graduate School of Education's (GSE) 2024 commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 16. The air was electric as GSE students who've been on campus from one to five-plus years prepared to receive the fruits of their labor: a degree that will

  27. Meet investor Laurene Powell Jobs, the billionaire widow of Steve ...

    She later headed west for her MBA, enrolling in Stanford's Graduate School of Business in 1989. It was there that she met Steve Jobs, her future husband. Lou Dematteis/Reuters

  28. Economics Academic Area

    The rigorous application of economic principles permeates the Stanford MBA Program, Stanford MSx Program, and Stanford GSB Executive Education curricula. The economics area extends its impact beyond Stanford by publishing, educating PhD students, and influencing public policy.

  29. State Housing Inspectorate of the Moscow Region

    State Housing Inspectorate of the Moscow Region Elektrostal postal code 144009. See Google profile, Hours, Phone, Website and more for this business. 2.0 Cybo Score. Review on Cybo.

  30. Economic Analysis & Policy Requirements

    Field Requirements. (6 courses) Students must complete 3 two-course sequences in topics in economics and related business fields. Examples are given below. If a course appears in more than one sequence, the course may not be counted twice. Alternative topics and two-course sequences may be proposed by the student, and must be approved by the ...