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How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples

Published on July 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

“Expository” means “intended to explain or describe something.” An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn’t set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

Expository essays are usually short assignments intended to test your composition skills or your understanding of a subject. They tend to involve less research and original arguments than argumentative essays .

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Table of contents

When should you write an expository essay, how to approach an expository essay, introducing your essay, writing the body paragraphs, concluding your essay, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about expository essays.

In school and university, you might have to write expository essays as in-class exercises, exam questions, or coursework assignments.

Sometimes it won’t be directly stated that the assignment is an expository essay, but there are certain keywords that imply expository writing is required. Consider the prompts below.

The word “explain” here is the clue: An essay responding to this prompt should provide an explanation of this historical process—not necessarily an original argument about it.

Sometimes you’ll be asked to define a particular term or concept. This means more than just copying down the dictionary definition; you’ll be expected to explore different ideas surrounding the term, as this prompt emphasizes.

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An expository essay should take an objective approach: It isn’t about your personal opinions or experiences. Instead, your goal is to provide an informative and balanced explanation of your topic. Avoid using the first or second person (“I” or “you”).

The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It’s worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline .

A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Like all essays, an expository essay begins with an introduction . This serves to hook the reader’s interest, briefly introduce your topic, and provide a thesis statement summarizing what you’re going to say about it.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

The body of your essay is where you cover your topic in depth. It often consists of three paragraphs, but may be more for a longer essay. This is where you present the details of the process, idea or topic you’re explaining.

It’s important to make sure each paragraph covers its own clearly defined topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Different topics (all related to the overall subject matter of the essay) should be presented in a logical order, with clear transitions between paragraphs.

Hover over different parts of the example paragraph below to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

The invention of the printing press in 1440 changed this situation dramatically. Johannes Gutenberg, who had worked as a goldsmith, used his knowledge of metals in the design of the press. He made his type from an alloy of lead, tin, and antimony, whose durability allowed for the reliable production of high-quality books. This new technology allowed texts to be reproduced and disseminated on a much larger scale than was previously possible. The Gutenberg Bible appeared in the 1450s, and a large number of printing presses sprang up across the continent in the following decades. Gutenberg’s invention rapidly transformed cultural production in Europe; among other things, it would lead to the Protestant Reformation.

The conclusion of an expository essay serves to summarize the topic under discussion. It should not present any new information or evidence, but should instead focus on reinforcing the points made so far. Essentially, your conclusion is there to round off the essay in an engaging way.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a conclusion works.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

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An expository essay is a broad form that varies in length according to the scope of the assignment.

Expository essays are often assigned as a writing exercise or as part of an exam, in which case a five-paragraph essay of around 800 words may be appropriate.

You’ll usually be given guidelines regarding length; if you’re not sure, ask.

An expository essay is a common assignment in high-school and university composition classes. It might be assigned as coursework, in class, or as part of an exam.

Sometimes you might not be told explicitly to write an expository essay. Look out for prompts containing keywords like “explain” and “define.” An expository essay is usually the right response to these prompts.

An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

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Expository Essays

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The Modes of Discourse—Exposition, Description, Narration, Argumentation (EDNA)—are common paper assignments you may encounter in your writing classes. Although these genres have been criticized by some composition scholars, the Purdue OWL recognizes the wide spread use of these approaches and students’ need to understand and produce them.

What is an expository essay?

The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. This can be accomplished through comparison and contrast, definition, example, the analysis of cause and effect, etc.

Please note : This genre is commonly assigned as a tool for classroom evaluation and is often found in various exam formats.

The structure of the expository essay is held together by the following.

  • A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay.

It is essential that this thesis statement be appropriately narrowed to follow the guidelines set forth in the assignment. If the student does not master this portion of the essay, it will be quite difficult to compose an effective or persuasive essay.

  • Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion.

Transitions are the mortar that holds the foundation of the essay together. Without logical progression of thought, the reader is unable to follow the essay’s argument, and the structure will collapse.

  • Body paragraphs that include evidential support.

Each paragraph should be limited to the exposition of one general idea. This will allow for clarity and direction throughout the essay. What is more, such conciseness creates an ease of readability for one’s audience. It is important to note that each paragraph in the body of the essay must have some logical connection to the thesis statement in the opening paragraph.

  • Evidential support (whether factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal).

Often times, students are required to write expository essays with little or no preparation; therefore, such essays do not typically allow for a great deal of statistical or factual evidence.

  • A bit of creativity!

Though creativity and artfulness are not always associated with essay writing, it is an art form nonetheless. Try not to get stuck on the formulaic nature of expository writing at the expense of writing something interesting. Remember, though you may not be crafting the next great novel, you are attempting to leave a lasting impression on the people evaluating your essay.

  • A conclusion that does not simply restate the thesis, but readdresses it in light of the evidence provided.

It is at this point of the essay that students will inevitably begin to struggle. This is the portion of the essay that will leave the most immediate impression on the mind of the reader. Therefore, it must be effective and logical. Do not introduce any new information into the conclusion; rather, synthesize and come to a conclusion concerning the information presented in the body of the essay.

A complete argument

Perhaps it is helpful to think of an essay in terms of a conversation or debate with a classmate. If I were to discuss the cause of the Great Depression and its current effect on those who lived through the tumultuous time, there would be a beginning, middle, and end to the conversation. In fact, if I were to end the exposition in the middle of my second point, questions would arise concerning the current effects on those who lived through the Depression. Therefore, the expository essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to its intent or argument.

The five-paragraph Essay

A common method for writing an expository essay is the five-paragraph approach. This is, however, by no means the only formula for writing such essays. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in fact, the method consists of:

  • an introductory paragraph
  • three evidentiary body paragraphs
  • a conclusion

Expository Essay

Expository Essay Examples

Caleb S.

Free Expository Essay Examples For Students

Published on: Aug 14, 2018

Last updated on: Jan 16, 2024

expository essay examples

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Are you a student struggling to understand the intricacies of expository essay writing? 

Do you find yourself in need of clear guidance and practical examples to master this essential skill? Look no further! 

In this guide, we'll look into 10+ expository essay examples, providing you with the knowledge you need to start writing. From understanding the fundamentals to dissecting real examples, we've got you covered. 

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What is Expository Essay Writing?

An expository essay is a form of academic writing that aims to inform, explain, or describe a particular topic to the reader. 

The primary purpose of an expository essay is to provide a clear presentation of facts, ideas, or concepts, often without the writer's personal bias or opinion. The expository essay is a genre of essay that is similar to a descriptive essay .

There are several types of expository writing , including:

  • Definition essay
  • Classification essay
  • Process analysis essay
  • Cause and effect essay
  • Problem solution essay  
  • Compare and contrast essay  

Newspaper articles, journals, and essays that define and explain a particular topic demonstrate expository essay writing.

Read the examples and learn to write a good expository essay for your school or college assignment.

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Expository Essay Examples 

While writing an expository essay, you might face difficulties in formatting and logically connecting your information. Below we have presented some amazing examples to help you understand how to write and organize an expository essay.

Expository Essay Outline Examples

Whenever you write an expository essay, the first thing you should do is craft an outline. The expository essay outline gives shape to your essay and keeps you organized. 

Here are some good expository essay outline examples that you can follow to outline your essay.

Expository Essay Outline Example

Expository Essay Outline Template Sample

Expository Essay Format Example

While writing an essay, you need to follow a proper format to present your information in a logical sequence. 

The typical 5 paragraph essay consists of 1 introduction, 3 body, and 1 conclusion paragraph. 

Below we have given expository essay format examples in both APA and MLA format to help you understand the formatting. Check out: 

Expository Essay Examples APA Format

Expository Essay Examples MLA Format

Short Expository Essay Examples

As we have discussed above, expository essay writing requires you to describe and explain a particular subject in detail. Achieving this level of detail can be quite challenging when working with a limited word count. 

To illustrate how to effectively convey information within limited words, we have provided a short expository essay example.

Short Expository Essay Example

Expository Essay Examples for Middle School

Here are some informative expository essay examples for middle school students to help you grasp the basics of expository essay writing.

Expository Essay Example For Middle School

Expository Essay Example Grade 7

Expository Essay Examples 5th Grade

Expository Essay Examples 4th Grade

Expository Essay Examples for High School

Here are some helpful expository essay examples PDFs for high school students. Check out:

Expository Essay Examples For High School

Expository Essay Examples for College

Looking for a college-level expository essay example? Check out the pdf below:

Expository Essay Examples For College

Expository Essay Examples for University 

Here are some good sample expository essay pdf examples for university students. 

Expository Essay Example About Life

Expository Essay Examples About Covid 19

Informative Expository Essay Example

How to Write an Expository Essay - Example

While writing an expository essay, you need to follow a proper structure. So that you can easily present your information and evidence in a logical sequence.

Here is a step-by-step process of how to write an expository essay:

Step 1. Choose an Appropriate Topic

  • Brainstorm different ideas to select a compelling expository essay topic. Check out our expository essay topics blog for inspiring ideas.
  • Ensure it has the potential to turn into an informative essay by being able to explain and inform effectively.

Step 2. Craft an Engaging Introduction

  • Begin with a captivating hook statement to grab the reader's attention.
  • Provide a brief background on the chosen topic to clarify its relevance.
  • Formulate an informative thesis statement that encapsulates the core idea of your essay.

Step 3. Develop the Body Paragraphs

  • Start each body paragraph with a clear topic sentence , representing the main idea of that particular paragraph.
  • Support the topic sentence with credible evidence, facts, or examples that bolster your thesis statement.
  • Ensure a smooth transition between paragraphs for a logical flow of ideas.

Step 4. Conclude Effectively

  • Start the essay conclusion paragraph by reasserting your thesis statement.
  • Summarize the key points and main arguments presented in the essay.
  • Encourage the reader with a call to action, prompting them to contemplate or engage further with the topic.

Step 5. Proofread and Edit 

  • Proofread your essay for grammatical and spelling mistakes and check if the information is presented in a proper sequence. 
  • Write multiple drafts and edit as needed to ensure your essay is free of errors.

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In conclusion, these expository essay examples offer a valuable resource for students. They serve as effective learning tools, providing insight into the art of expository writing. By studying these examples, students can improve their writing skills, and gain a deeper understanding of essay structure.

Need assistance with expository essay writing? Finding a website to write my essay ? MyPerfectWords.com is a legitimate essay writing service that provides top-notch essays at reasonable prices. Our expository essay writing service will craft 100% original and non-plagiarized essays within a short deadline.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What are 3 examples of expository.

The three main examples of expository are; 

  • Scientific reports 
  • Magazine articles 
  • Academic essays 

What are the 4 characteristics of expository text?

The main characteristics of expository text are; 

  • Informative 
  • Clarity 
  • Unbiased 
  • Impersonal 
  • Organization of the text 

What is the first important step in writing an expository essay?

To write an expository essay, you must first decide how to structure your work. An expository essay generally contains an introduction, followed by three body paragraphs and a conclusion. 

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The Ultimate Guide to the 5-Paragraph Essay

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A five-paragraph essay is a prose composition that follows a prescribed format of an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph, and is typically taught during primary English education and applied on standardized testing throughout schooling.

Learning to write a high-quality five-paragraph essay is an essential skill for students in early English classes as it allows them to express certain ideas, claims, or concepts in an organized manner, complete with evidence that supports each of these notions. Later, though, students may decide to stray from the standard five-paragraph format and venture into writing an  exploratory essay  instead.

Still, teaching students to organize essays into the five-paragraph format is an easy way to introduce them to writing literary criticism, which will be tested time and again throughout their primary, secondary, and further education.

Writing a Good Introduction

The introduction is the first paragraph in your essay, and it should accomplish a few specific goals: capture the reader's interest, introduce the topic, and make a claim or express an opinion in a thesis statement.

It's a good idea to start your essay with a hook (fascinating statement) to pique the reader's interest, though this can also be accomplished by using descriptive words, an anecdote, an intriguing question, or an interesting fact. Students can practice with creative writing prompts to get some ideas for interesting ways to start an essay.

The next few sentences should explain your first statement, and prepare the reader for your thesis statement, which is typically the last sentence in the introduction. Your  thesis sentence  should provide your specific assertion and convey a clear point of view, which is typically divided into three distinct arguments that support this assertation, which will each serve as central themes for the body paragraphs.

Writing Body Paragraphs

The body of the essay will include three body paragraphs in a five-paragraph essay format, each limited to one main idea that supports your thesis.

To correctly write each of these three body paragraphs, you should state your supporting idea, your topic sentence, then back it up with two or three sentences of evidence. Use examples that validate the claim before concluding the paragraph and using transition words to lead to the paragraph that follows — meaning that all of your body paragraphs should follow the pattern of "statement, supporting ideas, transition statement."

Words to use as you transition from one paragraph to another include: moreover, in fact, on the whole, furthermore, as a result, simply put, for this reason, similarly, likewise, it follows that, naturally, by comparison, surely, and yet.

Writing a Conclusion

The final paragraph will summarize your main points and re-assert your main claim (from your thesis sentence). It should point out your main points, but should not repeat specific examples, and should, as always, leave a lasting impression on the reader.

The first sentence of the conclusion, therefore, should be used to restate the supporting claims argued in the body paragraphs as they relate to the thesis statement, then the next few sentences should be used to explain how the essay's main points can lead outward, perhaps to further thought on the topic. Ending the conclusion with a question, anecdote, or final pondering is a great way to leave a lasting impact.

Once you complete the first draft of your essay, it's a good idea to re-visit the thesis statement in your first paragraph. Read your essay to see if it flows well, and you might find that the supporting paragraphs are strong, but they don't address the exact focus of your thesis. Simply re-write your thesis sentence to fit your body and summary more exactly, and adjust the conclusion to wrap it all up nicely.

Practice Writing a Five-Paragraph Essay

Students can use the following steps to write a standard essay on any given topic. First, choose a topic, or ask your students to choose their topic, then allow them to form a basic five-paragraph by following these steps:

  • Decide on your  basic thesis , your idea of a topic to discuss.
  • Decide on three pieces of supporting evidence you will use to prove your thesis.
  • Write an introductory paragraph, including your thesis and evidence (in order of strength).
  • Write your first body paragraph, starting with restating your thesis and focusing on your first piece of supporting evidence.
  • End your first paragraph with a transitional sentence that leads to the next body paragraph.
  • Write paragraph two of the body focussing on your second piece of evidence. Once again make the connection between your thesis and this piece of evidence.
  • End your second paragraph with a transitional sentence that leads to paragraph number three.
  • Repeat step 6 using your third piece of evidence.
  • Begin your concluding paragraph by restating your thesis. Include the three points you've used to prove your thesis.
  • End with a punch, a question, an anecdote, or an entertaining thought that will stay with the reader.

Once a student can master these 10 simple steps, writing a basic five-paragraph essay will be a piece of cake, so long as the student does so correctly and includes enough supporting information in each paragraph that all relate to the same centralized main idea, the thesis of the essay.

Limitations of the Five-Paragraph Essay

The five-paragraph essay is merely a starting point for students hoping to express their ideas in academic writing; there are some other forms and styles of writing that students should use to express their vocabulary in the written form.

According to Tory Young's "Studying English Literature: A Practical Guide":

"Although school students in the U.S. are examined on their ability to write a  five-paragraph essay , its  raison d'être  is purportedly to give practice in basic writing skills that will lead to future success in more varied forms. Detractors feel, however, that writing to rule in this way is more likely to discourage imaginative writing and thinking than enable it. . . . The five-paragraph essay is less aware of its  audience  and sets out only to present information, an account or a kind of story rather than explicitly to persuade the reader."

Students should instead be asked to write other forms, such as journal entries, blog posts, reviews of goods or services, multi-paragraph research papers, and freeform expository writing around a central theme. Although five-paragraph essays are the golden rule when writing for standardized tests, experimentation with expression should be encouraged throughout primary schooling to bolster students' abilities to utilize the English language fully.

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5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations)

An expository essay attempts to explain a topic in-depth, demonstrating expert knowledge and understanding.

Unlike an argumentative essay, it aims to remain objective and neutral throughout.

It generally follows this essay format:

expository essay format and structure template

Below are five expository essays to demonstrate style and tone.

Expository Essay Examples

#1 impacts of technology on education.

955 words | 4 Pages | 15 References

impact of technology on education essay

Thesis Statement: “The integration of technology in education represents a complex and critical area of study crucial for understanding and shaping the future of educational practices.”

#2 Impacts of Globalization on Education

1450 words | 5 Pages | 9 References

impacts of globalization on education essay

Thesis Statement: “This essay examines the profound and multifaceted effects of globalization on education, exploring how technological advancements and policy reforms have transformed access to, delivery of, and perceptions of education.”

#3 The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Interpersonal Relationships

1211 Words | 5 Pages | 22 References

emotional intelligence essay

Thesis Statement: “The central thesis is that EI, defined as the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions, is a crucial determinant of success and well-being.”

#4 The Future of Renewable Energy Sources and Their Impact

870 words | 4 Pages | 20 References

renewable energy essay

Thesis Statement: “The essay posits that although renewable energy sources hold immense promise for a sustainable future, their full integration into the global energy grid presents significant challenges that must be addressed through technological innovation, economic investment, and policy initiatives.”

#5 The Psychology Behind Consumer Behavior

1053 words | 4 Pages | 17 References

consumer behavior essay

Thesis Statement: “The thesis of this essay is that consumer behavior is not merely a product of rational decision-making; it is deeply rooted in psychological processes, both conscious and subconscious, that drive consumers’ choices and actions.”

How to Write an Expository Essay

expository essay definition and features, explained below

Unlike argumentative or persuasive essays, expository essays do not aim to convince the reader of a particular point of view.

Instead, they focus on providing a balanced and thorough explanation of a subject.

Key characteristics of an expository essay include:

  • Clarity and Conciseness
  • Structured Organization (Introduction, Body, Conclusion)
  • Objective Tone
  • Evidence-Based (Cite academic sources in every body paragraph)
  • Objective thesis statement (see below)
  • Informative purpose (Not argumentative)

You can follow my expository essay templates with AI prompts to help guide you through the expository essay writing process:

Expository Essay Paragraph Guide

How to write a Thesis Statement for an Expository Essay

An expository thesis statement doesn’t make an argument or try to persuade. It uses ‘is’ rather than ‘ought’ statements.

Take these comparisons  below. Note how the expository thesis statements don’t prosecute an argument or attempt to persuade, while the argumentative thesis statements clearly take a side on an issue:

💡 AI Prompt for Generating Sample Expository Thesis Statements An expository essay’s thesis statement should be objective rather than argumentative. Write me five broad expository thesis statement ideas on the topic “[TOPIC]”.

Go Deeper: 101 Thesis Statement Examples

Differences Between Expository and Argumentative Essays

Expository and argumentative essays are both common writing styles in academic and professional contexts, but they serve different purposes and follow different structures.

Here are the key differences between them:

  • Expository Essay : The primary purpose is to explain, describe, or inform about a topic. It focuses on clarifying a subject or process, providing understanding and insight.
  • Argumentative Essay : The goal is to persuade the reader to accept a particular point of view or to take a specific action. It’s about presenting a stance and supporting it with evidence and logic.
  • Expository Essay : It maintains a neutral and objective tone. The writer presents information factually and impartially, without expressing personal opinions or biases.
  • Argumentative Essay : It often adopts a more assertive, persuasive, and subjective tone. The writer takes a clear position and argues in favor of it, using persuasive language.
  • Expository Essay : The reader is expected to gain knowledge, understand a process, or become informed about a topic. There’s no expectation for the reader to agree or disagree.
  • Argumentative Essay : The reader is encouraged to consider the writer’s viewpoint, evaluate arguments, and possibly be persuaded to adopt a new perspective or take action.

Go Deeper: Expository vs Argumentative Essays

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Expository Essay Template

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Read Next: Process Essay Examples

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How to Write an Expository Essay

Last Updated: December 13, 2022 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Tristen Bonacci . Tristen Bonacci is a Licensed English Teacher with more than 20 years of experience. Tristen has taught in both the United States and overseas. She specializes in teaching in a secondary education environment and sharing wisdom with others, no matter the environment. Tristen holds a BA in English Literature from The University of Colorado and an MEd from The University of Phoenix. There are 10 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 563,585 times.

Expository essays are often assigned in academic settings. In an expository essay, you need to consider an idea, investigate the idea, then explain the idea. Some expository essays may include an argument, while others are purely informative. [1] X Trustworthy Source Purdue Online Writing Lab Trusted resource for writing and citation guidelines Go to source While it may seem overwhelming, writing an expository essay is easy if you take it one step at a time.

Sample Essay Conclusion

5 paragraph expository essay

Planning Your Essay

Step 1 Define your purpose for writing.

  • If you are writing an expository essay for an assignment, read the assignment guidelines. Ask your instructor if anything seems unclear.

Step 2 Consider your audience.

  • If you are writing your essay for a class assignment, consider what your instructor will expect you to include in your essay.

Step 3 Generate ideas for your expository essay.

  • Try listing. List all your ideas for your expository essay. Then look over the list you have made and group similar ideas together. Expand those lists by adding more ideas or by using another prewriting activity. [6] X Research source
  • Try freewriting. Write nonstop for about 10 minutes. Write whatever comes to mind and don’t edit yourself. After you finish writing, review what you have written. Highlight or underline the most useful information for your expository essay. Repeat the freewriting exercise using the passages you underlined as a starting point. You can repeat this exercise many times to continue to refine and develop your ideas. [7] X Research source
  • Try clustering. Write a brief explanation of the subject of your expository essay on the center of a piece of paper and circle it. Then draw three or more lines extending from the circle. Write a corresponding idea at the end of each of these lines. Continue developing your cluster until you have explored as many connections as you can. [8] X Research source
  • Try questioning. On a piece of paper, write out “Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?” Space the questions about two or three lines apart on the paper so that you can write your answers on these lines. Respond to each question in as much detail as you can. [9] X Research source

Step 4 Make an outline.

  • Trustworthy internet sources usually include academic institutions like universities or research labs, government websites, and non-profit organizations.

Step 6 Evaluate your sources to determine their credibility before you decide to use them.

  • Identify the author and his or her credentials. Think about what qualifies this person to write about their subject. If the source has no author or the author does not have adequate credentials, then this source may not be trustworthy.
  • Check for citations to see if this author has researched the topic well enough. If the author has provided few or no sources, then this source may not be trustworthy.
  • Look for bias. Think about whether or not this author has presented an objective, well-reasoned account of the topic. If the author seems to value a particular argument or slant that is not supported or only thinly supported by fact, then this source may not be trustworthy.
  • Consider the publication date to see if this source presents the most up to date information on the subject.
  • Cross-check some of the information in the source. If you are still concerned about a source, cross-check some of its information against a trustworthy source.

Step 7 Read your sources well.

  • Show when you have quoted a source word for word by putting it into quotation marks. Include information about the source such as the author’s name, article title or book title, and page number.
  • Write down the publishing information of each source. You will need this information for your "References," "Bibliography," or "Works Cited" pages. Format this page according to your instructor's guidelines.

Step 9 Develop your tentative thesis.

  • Make sure your thesis is arguable. Do not state facts or matters of taste. For example, "George Washington was the first president of the United States," is not a good thesis because it states a fact. Likewise, "Die Hard is a great movie," is not a good thesis because it expresses a matter of taste. [16] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source
  • Make sure your thesis provides enough detail. In other words, avoid just saying that something is "good" or "effective." Instead, say what makes something "good" or "effective. [17] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source

Introducing Your Essay

Step 1 Begin with an engaging sentence that gets right into your topic.

  • An engaging hook can take many forms. You could start with an anecdote, an informative and attention-grabbing quote, a bold opinion statement, or anything that will make your readers want to continue with your essay.

Step 2 Provide context.

  • If you are writing about a book, provide the name of the work, the author, and a brief summary of the plot.
  • If you are writing about a specific day in history, summarize the day's events. Then, explain how it fits into a broader historical scope.
  • If you are writing about a person, name the person and provide a brief biography.
  • Keep in mind that your context should lead up to your thesis statement. Explain everything your reader needs to know to understand what your topic is about. Then narrow it down until you reach the topic itself.

Step 3 Provide your thesis statement.

Expressing Your Main Points

Step 1 Determine how many paragraphs to include.

  • A five-paragraph essay should include three body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis.
  • Even if your essay is longer than five paragraphs, the same principles still apply. Each paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence.

Step 2 Begin each paragraph with a topic sentence.

  • "Dogs played an active role in Marine Corps missions in the Pacific."
  • "The Doberman Pinscher was the official dog of the US Marine Corps during WWII, but all breeds were eligible to train as war dogs."
  • "War dogs were even eligible to receive military awards for their service."

Step 3 Elaborate on your supporting evidence.

  • Most of your evidence should be in the form of cited quotes, paraphrases, and summaries from your research.
  • Your evidence could also come from interviews, anecdotes, or personal experience.
  • Try to provide at least two to three pieces of evidence to support each of your claims.
  • For example, if a paragraph starts with, "War dogs were even eligible to receive military awards for their service," the supporting evidence might be a list of dogs who got awards and the awards they were given.

Step 4 Analyze the significance of each piece of evidence.

  • You could write, "Even though Dobermans were the most common breed used in WWII, they were not the only breed, and were not the only dogs recognized for their help."

Concluding Your Essay

Step 1 Restate and rephrase your thesis.

  • Note that the second sentence repeats the information provided in your original thesis. It just says it in a new way while also hinting at the information you included in the body of the essay.

Step 2 Summarize and review your main ideas.

  • Explain how the topic affects the reader
  • Explain how your narrow topic applies to a broader theme or observation
  • Call the reader to action or further exploration on the topic
  • Present new questions that your essay introduced

Expert Q&A

Tristen Bonacci

Video . By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube.

  • If you are unsure about anything as you work on your essay, talk to your instructor or meet with a writing tutor for help. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0

5 paragraph expository essay

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  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/academic_writing/essay_writing/expository_essays.html
  • ↑ https://www.grammarly.com/blog/expository-essay/
  • ↑ Tristen Bonacci. Licensed English Teacher. Expert Interview. 21 December 2021.
  • ↑ http://writing.ku.edu/prewriting-strategies
  • ↑ https://grammar.yourdictionary.com/grammar-rules-and-tips/tips-on-writing-an-excellent-expository-essay.html
  • ↑ http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/reading-and-researching/notes-from-research
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/thesis-statements/
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/using_research/quoting_paraphrasing_and_summarizing/index.html
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/argument_papers/conclusions.html

About This Article

Tristen Bonacci

Before you write an expository essay, take some time to jot down ideas for your essay. Try the clustering method by writing a brief explanation of your subject in a bubble in the center of your page. Then, draw 3 or more lines extending from the circle and jot down idea bubbles that connect to your main theme. Once you have a plan for your expository essay, write out an outline to organize what you’re going to say. Make sure to begin your outline with an engaging introduction sentence. After the introduction sentence, provide some background information and include your thesis statement, which is your main argument. If you’re writing a 5 paragraph essay, you should include 3 body paragraphs after your introduction then a conclusion paragraph that summarizes your main points. However you organize your essay, make sure to include credible sources for important information, like statistics, so your teacher knows that it’s accurate. To learn how to use transitions in your essay, read more from our Writing co-author. Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Expository Writing: Definition and Examples

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Hannah Yang

expository writing

Table of Contents

What is expository writing, what is an expository paragraph, expository writing examples, how prowritingaid can help you with expository composition.

One of the most common types of writing is expository writing. Whether you’re a student taking an English class or a professional trying to communicate to others in your field, you’ll need to use expository writing in your day-to-day work.

So, what exactly does this term mean?

The short answer is that expository writing refers to any writing designed primarily to explain or instruct.

Read on to learn the definition of expository writing as well as some examples of what this type of writing can look like.

Before we look at examples of expository writing, let’s start with a quick definition of what this term actually means.

Expository Writing Definition

The term expository writing refers to any writing that’s designed to explain something. We use the word expository to describe any passage of writing that’s supposed to present information and help you understand it in an objective way.

Some common examples of expository writing include academic essays, textbooks, instructional guides, and news reports. Good expository writing should be factual, objective, and clear.

expository writing definition

To better understand what this term means, think about the difference between a scientific article, a short story, and an advertisement.

The scientific article is considered expository writing because its primary purpose is to explain a particular topic in more detail. It presents data, analyzes what that data means, and focuses on the facts.  

On the other hand, the short story isn’t considered expository writing, because its core purpose isn’t to explain or inform—instead, it’s probably trying to entertain you or to take you on a journey. Short stories are narrative writing.

Similarly, an advertisement isn’t expository writing because its core purpose isn’t to explain or inform—instead, it’s trying to persuade you to buy what it’s selling. Advertisements are persuasive writing.   

Here’s a quick rundown of what expository essays should and shouldn’t do.

An expository essay should:

Teach the reader about a particular topic

Focus on the facts

Follow a clearly organized structure

Present information and details from credible sources

An expository essay should not:

Try to change the reader’s mind about something

Present the author’s personal opinions

Include made-up narratives or stories

Follow experimental or nonlinear structures

3 types of writing

An expository paragraph is exactly what it sounds like—a paragraph of expository writing.

A well-written expository paragraph should follow a specific format to make it as clear and easy to read as possible. Most expository paragraphs do the following things:

Start with a topic sentence, which explains what the paragraph will be about

Then, include 3 – 5 body sentences that provide supporting details for the topic sentence

Finally, wrap things up with a closing sentence that summarizes what the paragraph has said

Writing an expository paragraph is a great way to practice expository writing. That’s because the paragraph follows the same structure as a more complex expository essay, just on a smaller scale.

Most expository essays should follow this format:  

Start with an introductory paragraph that includes the thesis statement, which tells the reader the core statement of the essay

Then, include 3 – 5 body paragraphs that provide factual evidence to support the thesis statement

Finally, wrap things up with a concluding paragraph that summarizes what the body paragraphs and thesis statement said

You can see the similarities between the two formats. If you can write a fantastic expository paragraph, you’ll be well-prepared to move on to writing a full expository essay.

Example of Expository Paragraph

Here’s an example of an expository paragraph that follows the structure described above.

The leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease, which can be fatal if it leads to heart attack or cardiac arrest. Heart attacks occur when a blockage in the coronary artery prevents oxygenated blood from reaching the heart. Cardiac arrests occur when the heart stops pumping entirely, which prevents the patient from breathing normally. Both of these problems can be deadly, even in seemingly healthy people who don’t have noticeable risk factors. As a result, heart disease is an important problem that many doctors and scientists are researching.

5 paragraph expository essay

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There are many ways you can present information in an expository essay. Here are four of the most popular ways, along with examples of each one.  

Problem and Solution Essay

A problem and solution essay presents the reader with a problem and then considers possible solutions to that problem. 

Here’s an example passage you might find in a problem and solution essay:

Among the many proposed solutions to rising carbon emissions, one promising possibility is carbon trapping. Scientists are figuring out how to pull carbon emissions out of the atmosphere and trap it in less harmful forms, such as by injecting carbon dioxide underground so it will turn to stone.

Compare and Contrast Essay

This type of essay takes two subjects and compares and contrasts them. It focuses on highlighting the differences and similarities between those two things.

Here’s an example passage of this type of expository writing:

Though country music and R&B music have very different sounds, they also share many similarities. For one thing, both types of music embody a specific cultural identity. For another, both genres trace their roots back to the 1920s, when the Victor Talking Machine Company signed singers from the American South.

Classification Essay

In a classification essay, you describe the categories within a certain group of things.  

Here’s an example passage you might find in a classification essay:

There are three ways in which artificial intelligence might become stronger than humans in the future: high speed, high collective intelligence, and high quality. A speed AI would be able to perform calculations and experience the world much faster than humans. A collective intelligence, like a hive mind, would be able to break down a complex task into several parts and pursue them simultaneously. Finally, a quality AI would simply be able to solve more complex problems than humans could.

Process Essay

In a process essay, you give the reader the steps for completing a specific process. This is similar to a how-to guide or an instruction manual.   

Here’s an example passage you might find in this type of expository writing:

Caramelize the chopped onions in a frying pan. When the onions have caramelized, mix in the bell peppers, mushrooms, and tomatoes and stir for 4 – 6 minutes or until all the ingredients have softened. If you want to add meat, you can add ground beef and cook for another 4 – 6 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.  

Good expository writing should be easy to read. After all, the purpose of exposition is to explain things to your readers, and you won’t be able to accomplish that if they have trouble understanding your writing.

That’s why ProWritingAid can help you write an expository essay. The grammar checker can help you ensure your sentences flow well, you’re not missing any necessary punctuation, and all your words are precise and clear.

Good luck, and happy writing!

Hannah is a speculative fiction writer who loves all things strange and surreal. She holds a BA from Yale University and lives in Colorado. When she’s not busy writing, you can find her painting watercolors, playing her ukulele, or hiking in the Rockies. Follow her work on hannahyang.com or on Twitter at @hannahxyang.

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Expository Writing: Everything You Need to Know

Lindsay Kramer

Expository writing, as its name implies, is writing that exposes facts. In other words, it’s writing that explains and educates its readers, rather than entertaining or attempting to persuade them. When you read a scholarly article, a textbook page, a news report, or an instructional guide, you’re reading expository writing. 

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What is expository writing?

Expository writing is writing that aims to inform its reader. As we mentioned above, this includes all types of factual writing, like textbooks, news stories, technical guides, and pieces of business writing. Many journalistic pieces are pieces of expository writing, but not all are—advertorials, opinion pieces, and many pieces of political writing are not pieces of expository writing because their primary goal is something other than providing unbiased facts. 

An easy way to understand expository writing is to compare and contrast it with other types of writing . Three other commonly recognized types of writing are descriptive , narrative , and persuasive . Each of these types of writing has a specific goal. Descriptive writing creates a sense of time, place, and experience in the reader’s mind. Narrative writing tells the reader a story. Persuasive writing convinces the reader that a specific position is the right position. Expository writing gives the reader the facts they need about a specific topic to deepen their understanding of it. 

Expository writing is:

  • Usually presented in a linear format
  • Always presented in a logical format
  • Clear about its purpose

Expository writing is not:

  • The author’s opinion
  • An attempt to change the reader’s mind or shape their perspective
  • Nonlinear or otherwise unconventional in how it presents content

Expository writing can still be fun and engaging

Although expository writing is fact-based, it doesn’t need to be dry or boring. Skilled writing can present factual information in an engaging way that only increases the reader’s comprehension of the topic, often by borrowing techniques used in narrative and descriptive writing to make the facts more vivid and impactful. If you’ve ever seen the docuseries Cosmos , you’ve seen engaging expository writing in action. In both the 1980 and 2014 versions, the host captivates viewers by guiding them through our known universe, our solar system, and how life on Earth evolved over millennia. Although Cosmos is a docuseries, the narrative that speaks directly to the viewer and constantly positions them within our universe’s story is a kind of expository writing: screenwriting.  

However, discerning an expository piece’s credibility can be tricky at times. Remember one of the kinds of writing we mentioned above, advertorials? An advertorial is an advertisement disguised as an editorial. In other words, it’s an article presented as either fact or the author’s personal thoughts, but really, it’s a sponsored advertisement. Advertorials aren’t the only instance where you can find subjective opinions disguised as objective facts—many documentaries, journalistic pieces, books, and even scholarly articles are written according to the author’s bias or to fit a specific agenda.

This is why it’s so critical to carefully vet every source you use when you’re working on an expository writing assignment. Inadvertently using a biased source in your academic writing can undermine your work by making it look like you either didn’t research the topic carefully or are pushing a specific agenda in your writing.

Types of expository writing

There are numerous ways to present topics in a piece of expository writing:

  • Compare and contrast . In a compare-and-contrast essay , you present two or more subjects and write about their similarities and differences. 
  • Definition. This type of expository writing defines a subject. For example, you might write a piece that defines a historic figure by exploring their actions, motivations, and circumstances. 
  • Classification. In a classification piece, you write about the characteristics of multiple subjects within one category. For example, you might write a blog post about the types of expository writing. In that blog post, you explain each type of expository writing, covering their differences as well as their similarities. 
  • Problem and solution. In a problem and solution piece, you explain an existing problem and then explore the most effective solution for that problem. This kind of structure can also be found in persuasive writing, but when it’s used in expository writing, it’s generally used in troubleshooting guides and to explain how specific problems have been solved.
  • Process. When you need to explain how a process works or the steps the reader needs to follow to assemble something or complete another task, you write out the process step by step, providing as much explanation as necessary for each step.

Just like the other commonly recognized writing styles , you’ll find lots of drastically different expository writing examples. Technical manuals and research papers are both types of expository writing. So are lab reports, investigative journalism pieces, expository essays, and explainer video scripts. Even recipes count as pieces of expository writing, as do travel guides and biographies. 

How to do expository writing effectively

As a student, many of your writing assignments are pieces of expository writing. Presenting facts in a logical, clear way is a much different task from writing a fictional story or supporting your opinion. Here are a few tips to keep in mind when you’re completing expository writing assignments:

Work through the entire writing process

The first step in writing a strong piece isn’t typing words on a screen, but rather brainstorming your topic. With other kinds of writing, like narrative or persuasive writing, you might have a clear idea of what you want to write from the moment you receive your assignment and, with it, skip ahead a few steps in the writing process . But because you’re working with facts and a strategy for presenting them in a coherent, engaging way, you’ll need to devote time to thoroughly brainstorming, researching, outlining, and then drafting your work. 

Be creative, but constrained

There’s room to have a little fun in your expository writing, but it’s not going to be a party on the page. Use literary devices like similes and juxtaposition sparingly and only when they serve to make the facts clearer to your reader. 

Always check the facts

Expository writing is all about the facts. When you’re researching, you might come across contradictory sources. If this happens, examine the conflicting information to find the truth. You can do this by researching that specific piece of information and finding what other scholarly sources have to say about it and by examining who published the two conflicting sources. If one is a personal blog and the other is an article from a .edu or .gov website, the latter is more likely to be unbiased. 

Share the facts with style

Expository writing is logical and fact-based, but it doesn’t have to be boring. In fact, it shouldn’t be. But it’s not always easy to present facts and figures in an engaging style. 

Grammarly can help. Our writing suggestions ensure you’re using engaging vocabulary and that your sentences flow clearly. In addition, with Grammarly’s tone detector, you can instantly see how your writing is communicating with its reader: confident, friendly, direct, and casual are just a few of the tones Grammarly can pick up. 

5 paragraph expository essay

5 paragraph expository essay

Quick and Easy Guide on How to Write an Expository Essay

5 paragraph expository essay

Understanding What Is an Expository Essay

If you clicked on this article, then you must have recently been assigned an expository essay homework. There is also a possibility that you are here because you enjoy exploring different ideas and concepts rather than solely scratching the surface. Well, that explains why you decided to research more about expository essay writing. We won't leave you hanging, so let's delve right into the expository essay definition.

It's only reasonable to first give you a clear explanation of what is an expository essay and what this kind of paper tries to accomplish. Simply put, an expository essay presents information on a topic. It explains something about a situation, person, idea, or occurrence and communicates knowledge about it to the reader. It does not attempt to persuade the reader of a certain point of view or present a convincing case. An expository essay depends on facts rather than personal opinion since it aims to inform the reader about a subject.

Expository writing involves anything from sharing your day to outlining a job assignment. Therefore it wouldn't be unfair to say that it is the most popular type of writing in the world.

Expository Essay Topics

Speaking of the above, there must be plenty of options to write your expository paper on, right? You're correct! But one needs a properly worded title that would make great expository essay topics. That's why our research paper service covered some interesting areas below. You can browse myriads of choices and find one that is just right for your endeavor!

Expository Essay Topics About Education

  • School Dress Codes: A Physical And Mental Stress
  • The Idea Of Free Higher Education
  • The Issue With High School Massacres
  • The Importance of College Success
  • STEM versus STEAM educational approaches
  • How literate people differ from uneducated ones
  • The advantages of studying foreign languages.
  • What changes should be made to the educational system in your nation?
  • Does 'educated' have the same connotation as 'smart'?
  • Can someone receive a top-notch education at home?

Expository Essay Topics About Mental Health

  • Is it true that music impacts our mental and physical health?
  • Are acts of heroism and patriotic acts typical in terms of mental health?
  • Is there a need to increase mental health benefits under health insurance?
  • Comparatively speaking, does the American mental health system lag behind other nations?
  • Effects of mental health law
  • The connection between antisocial personality disorder and parenting methods
  • Learning-disabled kids can benefit greatly from school programs.
  • How social anxiety is influenced by digital communication
  • Patients with mental illness receiving physical care
  • Issues with mental health and grief therapy

Expository Essay Topics About Society

  • Advertisements seen via the lens of social science.
  • Prejudices towards African Americans.
  • The social implications of feminism.
  • Global refugee crisis.
  • Constructing a wall to separate Mexico and the US.
  • The psychology of implicit racial prejudice and discrimination
  • The effects of racism at work on the economy and mind.
  • Gender roles in society: shifting perspectives and effects on families.
  • Who was responsible for the cost of the War on Terror?
  • Is peace education receiving enough attention from society?

Expository Essay Topics About Politics

  • The connection between politics and religion
  • What are the pros and drawbacks of democracy?
  • How powerful are NGOs?
  • What are the UN's primary responsibilities?
  • What are the disadvantages of not having a state?
  • Has the US soured relations with its European allies?
  • What does the Human Development Index mean?
  • Celebrity Influence in political campaigning
  • What objectives does the anti-globalization movement seek to achieve?

How to Write an Expository Essay with an Expository Essay Outline

Outlining is one of the most vital steps for knowing how to write an expository essay. Many believe that creating an outline is a waste of time, but in reality, the more complete your expository essay plan is, the fewer hours you will have to devote to research and writing. An expository essay outline divides each paragraph of the essay into various components. By doing so, you may divide a more complex activity into more manageable components and better understand how various pieces of information will work together. Let's go through each section of the expository essay format prepared by our writer.

expository essay outline

I. Introduction

So, how to start expository essay on a strong note? Consider opening with a bold claim that is related to your topic. After that, go on to briefly describe your subject's significance. Finally, make a statement about your essay's core thesis or objective.

  • Background information
  • Thesis statement

II. Body Paragraphs

In your first body paragraph. introduce the first major point that backs up your primary statement. Then, support your claim with instances or facts, and then explain how these examples or evidence link to your thesis and support your core notion. Remember to include a transitional sentence that relates to the following paragraph.

If you follow a five paragraph essay format, then feel free to develop three body paragraphs with the similar order.

  • Topic sentence

III. Conclusion

In your concluding paragraph, try restating your thesis statement in a different way to successfully conclude your work. Then put your essay's essential ideas in a brief summary before concluding with a powerful remark that will stay with your readers.

  • Restate thesis
  • Closing sentence

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How to Write an Expository Essay

Even though you now know a lot about the expository essay format, there are other things to keep in mind as well. In this section, we'll go over the specific steps you should take when figuring out how to write an expository essay.

Brainstorming Ideas

The absolute first thing you should do when given an expository essay assignment is to carefully go over the guidelines. Make sure you completely understand what is required of you. If it is for class, you may be limited to certain topics and word counts, there may be restrictions on the quality of sources you can use, etc. You might write an incredible essay but get a low grade because you missed out on some small restriction or guideline.

Once you know exactly what you are supposed to do, it's time to think about different concepts you would like to explain. Make sure you are aware of the different types of expository essays so that when you brainstorm topics you have a tentative idea of what type of expository essay would be best suited for that topic.

Think about what has been covered in class, what the teacher might expect, and what you find interesting to try and come up with a list of topics. Do a little bit of research on each topic to figure out whether you can easily find reputable sources and to gain a further understanding of the topic. After keeping all these things in mind, you should end up with an expository essay topic that is appropriate, engaging, and high-scoring.

Fill Up an Outline

Once you have zeroed in on a topic it's time to do research. One of the best ways to plan your writing is to use an expository essay outline to organize interesting information. While conducting research focus on the body paragraphs rather than on the introduction or conclusion. Think about three main ways you can explain the topic and put information that fits into those subtopics under the appropriate body paragraphs.

While conducting research and filling out an outline, think about potential thesis statements. Coming up with a thesis statement too early will restrict your research, so it is better to develop a thesis statement as you find out more and more information. That being said, by the end of the planning stage you should have a finalized thesis statement

Planning out your essay beforehand will give direction to your research, cut down on the amount of time you spend on the assignment, improve the overall flow of the final essay, and make the actual writing process much easier.

Write the First Draft

Now is the time to translate your outline into full sentences. It is often useful to leave the writing of the introduction till the end because after writing the body paragraphs you will have a better idea of what to say in an introduction, but make sure that you write down your thesis statement.

Use the information you have found to create a cohesive analysis of the topic in each body paragraph. Make sure that the information you present is on topic and connects to the other facts around it. Think about what the purpose of each body paragraph is and question whether the information you are presenting fits that purpose or not. Make sure to use transition words within the paragraph and use transition sentences between paragraphs to improve overall comprehensibility and flow.

Finalize Your Draft

Go over the first draft of the essay and focus on whether the different paragraphs make sense or not. Don't be afraid to reorganize sections or completely get rid of some pieces of information. As you write your draft, new ways of expressing the information can come to mind that will make the overall essay more powerful.

Make sure that you are not trying to make a persuasive argument and that you are using facts rather than opinions as evidence.

Go over each sentence to make sure that it is clear and that it fits the purpose of the paragraph it is in. Look at the information you have included and make sure that it is useful and enhances understanding of the topic. It is better to have less information than more if the information is distracting or does not add anything to the essay.

Try and read the paper as if it is the first time you are coming across the topic to see if it makes sense or not. Congratulations, you are just one step away from being able to submit an expository essay!

Editing and Proofreading

Go over the final draft of your essay and check for formatting errors, grammatical errors, spelling mistakes, etc and make sure that it complies with all the guidelines of the assignment. Finally, ask a friend or relative to go over the paper to do the last check. If you feel like you still need to make a lot of changes, don't be disheartened, spend the extra time to make the changes or reach out to expository essay writing service .

Expository Essay Examples

One of the best ways to learn how to write an expository essay is to look at an expository essay example. Looking at expository essay examples can give you a deeper understanding of what is expected as well as how to write an essay that flows well. Make sure that you use any examples you find as inspiration rather than a place to directly source information or text!

Expository Essay Example

The shift from traditional to current methods in treating diseases has improved the quality of many services, products, and processes. However, many regions worldwide are still applying traditional medicines (Stefanov et al., 2020). Therefore, conventional western medicine and alternative Eastern medicine are two recognized approaches to treating multiple diseases. Researchers have developed the foundational differences between these two approaches that have helped establish the pros and cons of each. Each approach has advantages and drawbacks. There have been debates on which approach is cheaper in terms of time and cost of treatment. Also, there is ongoing concern on which approach is safer than the other.
As of 2019, there were over 3.5 billion social media users globally, and this figure still increases by 9% each year. It is impossible to deny that social media has become an important part of many people’s lives. There are various positive effects linked with the platforms, including better connectivity. However, addiction to social media platforms, the increased comparisons between individuals, and the fear of missing out have increased depression and sadness. Social media addiction has become rampant, which has negatively influenced the lives of many individuals in society. Checking and scrolling through the different social media platforms has become increasingly popular over time, leading to excessive and compulsive use.

FAQs on Expository Essay Writing

If the information was not quite enough for you to create an outstanding paper, our college essay writer has yet to supply you with further details about expository essays. Below you'll find the most frequently asked questions on this matter, so you won't have to spend extra time and effort researching any unanswered questions.

What are the Different Types of Expository Essays?

Since expository writing may take various forms, understanding the different sorts of essays will help you pick a topic and organize the essay's general trajectory and framework.

expository essay types

  • Process Essays - In a typical process essay, the introduction presents what you will learn, the body paragraphs offer step-by-step instructions, and the conclusion discusses the significance of what you have taken away.
  • Compare and Contrast Essays - The purpose of comparing and contrasting is to present facts and allow readers to reach their own conclusions. This is still an expository essay and not an evaluation of one over the other. A contrast essay may highlight differences, similarities, or both.
  • Cause and Effect Essays - Cause and effect essays examine the reasons behind events or speculate on possible effects. They can also draw attention to relevant connections or provide details about a cause or consequence.
  • Classification Essays - In classification essays, distinct items in the same category are compared, stressing their differences while pointing up the similarities that place them in the same category. Classification essays may be quite intriguing when attempting to classify something into a category it often does not belong to.
  • Definition Essays - Apart from an argumentative essay format , the basic objective is to define a topic by providing information. In contrast to just providing the word's dictionary definition, a definition essay also builds on the term's general notion while thoroughly defining it.

What is the Most Important Part of the Expository Essay Structure?

The core of the outline for expository essay is your thesis. It's what your essay's audience will remember. It is critical to select a thesis statement that is both intriguing and provocative yet accurate and true. It is what makes the structure of expository essay powerful and constructive.

What is the Main Idea in Expository Writing?

Identifying the core concept, or the most crucial message the author wishes to convey, is the fundamental objective for all expository papers. The text's main concepts are frequently introduced early, generally in the introductory paragraph.

Using headings, subheadings, and other emphasis techniques, you may further emphasize key ideas. Main concepts, meanwhile, can also be inferred from the text and not explicitly expressed. Occasionally, you must draw the major concept from the text's specifics, assertions, and justifications.

Now that you know whats an expository essay, you must agree that writing an expository essay is a great method to learn how to effectively communicate information while also pursuing an interest of yours. Therefore, there are many ways in which knowing how to convey ideas and explain things will help you both professionally and individually.

And if you ever feel like you need an extra push towards pursuing your dream academic life, consider us your go-to college life partner. We won't criticize you no matter how many times you need essay writing help . The EssayPro team is loyal, always reliable, and never judgmental! 

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Expository Essay Writing

Expository Essay Examples

Leanne R.

Interesting Expository Essay Examples For Your Help

Published on: Jan 19, 2023

Last updated on: Jan 19, 2023

Expository Essay Examples

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High school and college students are mostly assigned to write expository essays. This type of essay is written to explain something to the readers.

If you are assigned to write an expository essay, know what to do and what to avoid for an A+ paper.

You can also refer to the following great expository essay examples to better understand the basics.

Expository Essay Definition and Examples

An expository essay is a genre of writing that explores several aspects of a particular topic to provide information.

For a perfect  expository essay , the topic should be discussed in an objective manner. The writer should not try to convince the reader about any side of the issue.

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The following are some other ways of writing expository essays.

  • Descriptive essays
  • Cause and effect essays
  • Problem solution essays
  • Compare and contrast essays
  • Process essays

The structure of an expository essay will vary according to the scope of the assignment and the nature of your topic.

Refer to the following section and find interesting expository essay examples for students of all academic levels. These examples will help you understand the basic writing process for a great expository essay.

Expository Essay Examples for Different Grades

No matter if you are in grade 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, or 9th, the following examples will help you understand the expository writing style.

4th Grade Expository Essay Examples

5th Grade Expository Essay Examples

6th Grade Expository Essay Examples

7th Grade Expository Essay Examples

8th Grade Expository Essay Examples

9th Grade Expository Essay Examples

Expository Essay Examples for Different Academic Levels

Expository essays explain and evaluate an idea and provide an argument in a clear and concise manner. Similar to other types of essays, expository essays also consist of an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Usually, the body section contains three paragraphs but it can be increased according to the essay requirements and topic.

For a perfect expository essay, understand its purpose and follow the required steps for this type of academic writing.

Expository Essay Examples Middle School

Expository Essay Examples for High School

Expository Essay Examples College

Expository Essay Examples University

5 Paragraph Expository Essay Examples

There are many ways to write an expository essay but the most common approach is the 5-paragraph structure.

Here is how a 5-paragraph expository essay should be written.

Have a look at them in detail now.

Introduction -  Here present a brief description of your essay. It should end with a strong thesis statement.

3 Body Paragraphs -  Expand the idea in the body paragraphs and present evidential information. Each body paragraph should start with a topic sentence followed by relevant details and examples. Make sure all the ideas discussed in the body paragraph should correlate to one another. Information provided through topic sentences and paragraphs of an essay is the main essence of the topic under discussion.

Conclusion -  Here summarize the whole point in a strong and memorable way.

Informative Expository Essay Examples

Expository Essay Examples on Bullying

Expository Essay Structure Examples

As we know, it is not easy to write an effective expository essay without the right disposition and enthusiasm.

This type of essay examines and evaluates a topic in great detail. The main purpose of expository writing is to provide all the details about an idea in a definite and concise manner.

An expository essay does not usually have in-depth research as compared to other academic essays. It follows a 5-paragraph structure approach which includes an introduction, 3 body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Expository Essay Introduction Paragraph Examples

Expository Essay Conclusion Examples

Hopefully, now you know what a perfect expository essay looks like. All the above examples are for assistance purposes only. You can also read our  free essays  if you are looking for more essay examples to improve your writing skills.

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Expository Essay Writing Help

Writing a perfect expository essay is never an easy task. It takes time, attention, and skills to handle such an important writing task.

With the right guidelines and some examples in hand, you will be able to handle this task easily. After this blog, you can easily write your essay in a great way.

But if you still think that you can not cope up with this task on your own, better get professional help.

A professional  essay writer  at  FreeEssayWriter.net  can help you create a top-notch expository essay.

Contact us and get the best expository essay writing help from experts.

Leanne R. (Law, Education)

Leanne is one of the most experienced writers on our platform and holds a Ph.D. degree from Cambridge. She has worked as a journalist, an editor, and a content creator for newspapers, magazines, and websites around the world. Leanne’s research and writing skills are unsurpassed making her one of the best-reviewed writers on our platform.

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Expository Essay Guide

Expository Essay Outline

Last updated on: Feb 9, 2023

How to Write an Expository Essay Outline - Complementary Template Added

By: Donna C.

Reviewed By: Rylee W.

Published on: Apr 21, 2020

Expository Essay Outline

An expository essay examines the topic in detail by providing relevant facts and information.

It is a type of academic writing that explains the topic at hand. It informs and educates the reader about the subject, using facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes or examples.

This blog post will provide you with assistance to create an outline for your expository essay.

To write a successful expository essay, a basic outline is followed.

Continue reading to know more about an expository essay outline and get downloadable and free samples also.

Expository Essay Outline

On this Page

Expository Essay Outline - Format and Structure

A typical expository essay format consists of the following 3 components.

1. Introduction – Start your essay with an interesting fact to hook your reader in.

2. Body Paragraph – Explain your topic with relevant facts in the body of your essay.

3. Conclusion – End your essay by summarizing the main points.

This is a basic essay structure that you have to follow in your essay.

Now, let's discuss these components in detail.

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Introduction

Begin your essay with an interesting and engaging sentence to hook your reader in. Write an interesting fact, a quote, or an anecdote, to grab the attention of your reader.

In the next sentence, provide a little background information about the topic under discussion. Providing background context will help the readers understand the topic in a better way.

The background context should lead to the main point of your essay.

End your introduction with a strong thesis statement. Your thesis statement should present the basic purpose of writing your essay.

The thesis statement holds the essence of your essay and, therefore, it should be strong and gripping.

Thesis Statement

The thesis statement is an important part of an essay and an expository essay is no different. It comes at the end of the introduction and it informs the readers about the main idea of the essay.

Body Paragraph

Normally, there are three body paragraphs in an essay. However, the number of body paragraphs can increase in the essay, based on the scope of the topic. Decide the number of body paragraphs for your essay. Make sure that they are relevant and you are not adding them for the sake of stretching the essay only.

Follow the tips given below.

  • Each body paragraph should start with a topic sentence. The topic sentence discusses the main idea of the paragraph.
  • Relate the topic sentence to your thesis statement. Divide the topic discussed and highlighted in your thesis statement and explain each idea in the body paragraphs.
  • Once you have written the topic sentence, explain it by providing supporting details and evidence in the paragraph.
  • Make sure that the sources you are using to accumulate the evidence are credible. An expository essay is based entirely on facts. Therefore, the facts you are using should be authentic and credible.
  • Explain how the provided evidence connects with your thesis statement.

While writing body paragraphs, focus on the transition from one paragraph to the next. Moreover, the body paragraphs must support the thesis statement as it is an important part of the essay writing process.

The best way to write a strong conclusion for your expository essay is to restate the thesis statement.

Relate the evidence provided in the body paragraphs with your thesis statement.

After discussing the thesis statement, summarize the main points of your essay.

Make sure not to introduce any new information, since you are concluding the essay.

In the last sentence of the essay, you can suggest a possible solution to the problem. You can also engage the readers by calling them to think and do something on their part, if possible.

You can also mention how significant your topic is, plus the possible impacts of what you have discussed in the essay.

Paragraph Expository Essay Outline

A five-paragraph essay is used to compose a basic expository essay structure. Here is a sample 5-paragraph outline for your expository essay.

The outline will be according to the chosen essay topic and type of expository essay. It further has different types of papers and the writer must follow them.

Expository Essay Outline Examples

The basic purpose of writing an expository essay is to inform the readers regarding the chosen topic.

If you follow the outline, we are sure that you will have no problems composing a perfect expository essay. Here are some examples to help you craft a perfect and powerful expository essay outline.

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Tips to Create a Strong Expository Essay Outline

The basic purpose of writing an expository essay is to inform the readers regarding the chosen topic in detail and with solid evidence and reason.

If you follow the outline, we are sure that you will have no problems composing a perfect expository essay.

Apart from the outline, if you want to learn how to write an expository essay, its topics and samples, visit our detailed guide on Writing a Great Expository Essay .

For further help, contact 5StarEssays now.

Here are the tips to create a strong expository essay outline.

  • Choose an engaging and interesting topic for your essay.
  • Research and gather important and relevant details and information.
  • Break those details into sections and decide which section would have which kind of details.
  • Add background information, thesis statement, and main essay theme in the introduction.
  • Divide the important arguments into three sections and form the paragraphs of the body section.
  • Write the points in bullets and stay close to them when writing the essay.
  • Add the details that you would discuss in the conclusion paragraph in bullet form and stick to it.
  • Once done, review your outline and make sure that you did not add any irrelevant details to it.

Following these tips, you will be able to create a strong and workable outline for your expository essay.

In case you need help, you can contact 5StarEssays.com. We are a reliable ‘ write me an essay ’ and paper writing help. Our expert and professional writers are here 24/7 to help you with your work.

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Frequently Asked Questions

How do you start an expository introduction.

Here is how you can start an introduction to your expository essay.

  • Begin with an interesting hook statement.
  • Introduce the main topic briefly.
  • Add an engaging and brief thesis statement.
  • Beginning an essay on a strong footing is important. So make sure that you follow the outline properly and closely when beginning with your essay.

How do you end an expository essay?

End your essay in an engaging and encouraging tone. Do not paraphrase the entire essay but stick to important points only. Restate the thesis statement and add a call to action.

What is the purpose of an expository essay?

The main purpose of an expository essay is to investigate, evaluate, and explain the topic of the essay. The writer must do it in a clear and brief manner.

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Marketing, Literature

Donna has garnered the best reviews and ratings for her work. She enjoys writing about a variety of topics but is particularly interested in social issues, current events, and human interest stories. She is a sought-after voice in the industry, known for her engaging, professional writing style.

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Expository Essay Examples for Middle and High School

World War I Attack Formation Reenactment

  • DESCRIPTION World War I Attack Formation Reenactment
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When you write an expository essay , you are explaining something to your audience. It is different from technical writing (also known as process essays), which explains how to do or use a product. Expository writing is also different from argumentative writing , which is meant to convince the audience to agree with the writer’s perspective. News articles are good examples of expository writing, as are any pieces that focus on the 5 Ws (who, what, where, when, and why).

Types of Expository Essays

Even though expository essays are meant to inform, they can serve different purposes depending on the writer’s objective. Here are the four different kinds of expository essays.

  • Cause and Effect : The writer details the reasons for an event or situation before discussing the effect(s). These essays are common in literary essays or social studies reports.
  • Problem and Solution : After identifying a problem in today’s world, the writer poses a possible solution. The problem/solution essay is similar to the cause/effect essay. It can become an argumentative essay depending on the writer’s tone.
  • Descriptive : A descriptive essay requires the writer to describe something in their own words. The topic can be an event from the writer’s own life, a relationship in a book, or a significant moment in history. Though the essay can be from the writer’s perspective, it does not tell a story like in narrative writing .
  • Compare and Contrast : How is this different than that? A compare and contrast essay takes two subjects and explains how they are similar and different. It is a more analytical version of a descriptive essay.

Expository Essay Format

Expository essays typically follow the standard five-paragraph format. After you outline the three main points of your essay, you’re ready to start writing. Your essay should include these sections:

  • Introduction: Start with a “hook” to get your reader’s attention. In one or two sentences, transition to a strong thesis statement to tell your reader what the essay will be about (but don’t start with “My essay will be about….”).
  • Body: Each of body paragraphs typically start with a topic sentence that directly links to the thesis statement. Discuss different information in each paragraph, leading up to your most compelling or relevant point. Be sure to include quotes from credible sources along with insightful commentary. End with transition sentences that introduce your next topic sentence.
  • Conclusion: Restate your thesis statement before making a broader statement about your topic. Do not introduce new information here; if you didn’t cover a point in your body paragraphs, you may not need it in the essay.

Middle School Expository Essay Example

It’s helpful to see the format and structure of expository essays at different levels. Here is one example of how a middle schooler may write a compare and contrast essay about two characters in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

Harry and Draco: Not As Different as They Seem

Whether you’re sorted into Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw, or Slytherin, your background and behavior tells a lot about who you are. Harry Potter and Draco Malfoy from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone are in opposite houses, and at times they seem like opposite characters. Even though Harry and Draco appear different in every way, readers can see how alike these two rivals really are.

The first difference between Harry and Draco is their upbringing. Harry was raised by Muggles (non-magical people), while Draco comes from an elite wizarding family that hates Muggles. When the boys meet for the first time, Draco talks about whether Muggle-born wizards should even attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry:

“I really don’t think they should let the other sort in, do you? They’re just not the same, they’ve never been brought up to know our ways. Some of them have never even heard of Hogwarts until they get the letter, imagine. I think they should keep it in the old wizarding families.” (Rowling 61)

Harry doesn’t respond to Draco’s comment. Even though Harry is from an “old wizarding family” like Draco’s, he is one of those people who had not heard of Hogwarts because of his Muggle upbringing. Draco’s negative opinion about families he believes to be “lower” than his family creates his first conflict with Harry.

The way that Draco and Harry treat people from other backgrounds is another difference between them. On the Hogwarts Express, Harry and Draco meet again, this time with Ron Weasley. Harry makes friends with Ron, while Draco immediately insults him.

“You’ll soon find out some wizarding families are much better than others, Potter. You don’t want to go making friends with the wrong sort. I can help you there.” [Draco] held out his hand to shake Harry’s, but Harry didn’t take it. “I think I can tell who the wrong sort are for myself, thanks,” he said coolly. (Rowling 81)

Harry won’t join in with Draco’s put-down and even refuses to shake his hand. Harry is the kind of person who stands up for people, while Draco tears them down. But even though Harry and Draco are early enemies, their character traits can be quite similar, too.

They are both competitive and passionate about their houses. Both boys are even willing to break Hogwarts rules for their own purposes. When Hagrid, the school groundskeeper, has an illegal dragon that is about to hatch, Harry convinces his friends to break the rules and see it.

“Hermione, how many times in our lives are we going to see a dragon hatching?” (said Harry.) “We’ve got lessons, we’ll get into trouble, and that’s nothing to what Hagrid’s going to be in when someone finds out what he’s doing.” (Rowling 171)

Harry and his friends end up sneaking out to see the dragon. But, as they are about to leave, they find out that another student has also broken the rules to see the dragon: Draco.

Harry bolted to the door and looked out. Even at a distance there was no mistaking him. Malfoy had seen the dragon. (Rowling 172)

Harry broke the rules to protect Hagrid, and Draco broke the rules to get Harry in trouble. Their motivations are different, but neither character seems to care too much about Hogwarts rules. Later on, they both get detention at Hogwarts for different reasons, demonstrating that their behavior is treated the same way.

Even though Harry and Draco are enemies throughout the book, they are not completely different. Their similarities help them grow, and their differences help them make choices that are right for their character. Their houses may be opposites, but their characters certainly aren’t.

High School Expository Essay Example

Read another example of an expository essay. This Cause and Effect essay about World War I is from the perspective of a high school student.

The Cause and Lasting Effects of World War I

It’s almost impossible to imagine a war that involved 32 countries, 40 million fatalities, and 186 billion dollars. But World War I, also known as The Great War or The War to End All Wars, ended up being one of the costliest global conflicts in terms of both funds and human lives. While it’s difficult to understand the magnitude of World War I, it’s even harder to comprehend how the actions of Gavrilo Princip, a Bosnian assassin, could trigger such an international chain event.

Though there were many underlying causes to World War I, the events of June 28, 1914 are considered the inciting incident. Princip’s assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo was designed to influence the creation of Yugoslavia. As a result, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia one month later during the July Crisis.

Though Serbia effectively accepted all of Austria’s demands except for one, the Austrian government broke diplomatic relations with the other country on July 25 and went ahead with military preparedness measures. (“Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia,” History.com)

When Austria-Hungary entered the war, Germany was immediately involved. Serbia’s ally, Russia, posed a significant threat to Austria-Hungary’s objective. What could have been a small-scale skirmish turned into a larger operation when Germany then declared war on Russia.

His Majesty the Emperor, my august Sovereign, in the name of the German Empire, accepts the challenge, and considers himself at war with Russia.” (“The German Declaration of War on Russia,” wwi.lib.byu.edu/ )

By bringing Russia to the war, Germany found itself at war with Russia’s ally, France. Soon after, Germany began “The Rape of Belgium,” in which it illegally invaded Belgium in an attempt to bring its troops to Paris. The atrocity quickly attracted international attention, including that of Britain, who declared war on Germany on August 4, 1914. Britain’s declaration of war is considered the true beginning of World War I. The assassination that caused the initial conflict was left behind long ago, as its effects were rapidly escalating long past that fateful day.

The effects of Princip’s actions quickly ricocheted around the world. The Ottoman Empire entered the war after making a secret alliance with Germany, and Montenegro and France declared war against Austria-Hungary. The Battle of the Marne in 1914 between Germany, France, Russia, and Britain began four years of constant trench warfare. Soldiers suffered from the advances of chemical warfare, as detailed by nurse Vera Brittain in her 1933 memoir Testament of Youth.

“I wish those people who talk about going on with this war whatever it costs could see the soldiers suffering from mustard gas poisoning. Great mustard-coloured blisters, blind eyes, all sticky and stuck together, always fighting for breath, with voices a mere whisper, saying that their throats are closing and they know they will choke.” (Brittain)

Operations continued in the Pacific as Japan, New Zealand, and South Africa declared war against Germany. Italy, having already proclaimed their neutrality, declared war on Germany after the Treaty of London. In 1917, Germany tried to coerce Mexico to declare war against America, leading President Woodrow Wilson to finally bring the United States into the strife.

But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts—democracy. . . . .” (Wilson)

Immediately following the United States’ entrance into the war was Cuba and Panama, who declared war on Germany the next day. Greece followed suit in June 1917, followed closely by Liberia and China. Over the next year, countless battles and operations pushed boundaries and lost hundreds of thousands of soldiers to the cause. The final offensive of World War I, the Hundred Days Offensive, led Germany to the brink of defeat. After Germany signed the Armistice of Compiègne on November 11, 1918, the fighting was officially over – but the effects of the war were just beginning.

World War I may seem like it took place over four very busy years, but the effects of the international strife would come to define the 21st century. By the time the Paris Peace Conference began in January 1919, Germany’s economy and morale had plummeted. They had fought against nearly 30 countries and had come close to complete destruction, only to feel cheated by the Versailles Treaty.

The social and economic upheaval that followed World War I gave rise to many radical right wing parties in Weimar Germany. The harsh provisions of the Treaty of Versailles led many in the general population to believe that Germany had been "stabbed in the back" by the "November criminals." (“WWI: Aftermath,” encyclopedia.ushmm.org/ ).

The discouraged nation was resistant to the provisions of the treaty and to their new democratic rule. Many German citizens longed for more authoritarian rule as they’d had prior to World War I. A ruined economy led to hyperinflation, which made Germany fearful of Communism as well. Adolf Hitler, an Austrian extremist and leader of the Nazi Party, became a welcome voice in right-wing nationalist politics.

Beyond Marxism he believed the greatest enemy of all to be the Jew, who was for Hitler the incarnation of evil. (“Rise To Power,” britannica.com)

Hitler’s leadership in the years following World War I was a direct result of the war’s events. The next global crisis, World War II, would result in atrocities far beyond the scope of its predecessor. The world would spend the second half of the 20th century recovering from the enormous costs of both of these wars.

One assassin on an ordinary day in 1914 ended up starting an unfathomable chain of events. The wars that resulted would define an entire century, several generations, and countless government actions. It’s important to consider the effects of any action, political or not, to decide whether it’s the best path to take.

More Expository Writing Ideas

Need some ideas to get started on your expository essay? Check out a list of 100 writing prompts for middle school students. You can also find some writing strategy tips or more examples of informative essays to get your creative juices going.

Grade 5 lesson plan

IMAGES

  1. Expository Essay Masterclass: The Art of Perfect Writing

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  2. How to Write an Expository Essay

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  3. Writing a 5 Paragraph Essay

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  4. Five Paragraph Expository Essay Template by Tales of a Fourth Grade

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  5. Expository Essay Outline: 5 Paragraph Essay by Amanda Finnerty

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  6. Expository Essay Examples+Great Topic Ideas

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VIDEO

  1. Exploring the Elements of an Expository Paragraph

  2. Essay 18: THE EXPOSITORY ESSAY

  3. What are the characteristics of expository writing?

  4. Expository Paragraph: Comparison and Contrast

  5. TYPES OF INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPHS: AN INTRODUCTION

  6. Conclusion Paragraphs -- Expository Essay

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write an Expository Essay

    "Expository" means "intended to explain or describe something." An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn't set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

  2. How to Write a Five-Paragraph Essay, With Examples

    Write with Grammarly What is a five-paragraph essay? The five-paragraph essay format is a guide that helps writers structure an essay. It consists of one introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs for support, and one concluding paragraph.

  3. Expository Essays

    The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. This can be accomplished through comparison and contrast, definition, example, the analysis of cause and effect, etc.

  4. Expository Essay Examples For All Academic Levels

    1. What is Expository Essay Writing? 2. Expository Essay Examples 3. How to Write an Expository Essay - Example What is Expository Essay Writing? An expository essay is a form of academic writing that aims to inform, explain, or describe a particular topic to the reader.

  5. 5 Paragraph Essay: Guide, Topics, Outline, Examples, Tips

    A five-paragraph essay is a standard academic writing format consisting of an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. In the introduction, you present your thesis statement, which is the main idea or argument you will discuss in your essay.

  6. PDF Writing an Expository Essay

    The fi rst paragraph of an essay should introduce the reader to the essay topic. It should create interest in the essay, outline the writer's main ideas, and suggest how these ideas will be presented within the body of the essay. The introduction consists of three main elements: a hook, building sentences, and a thesis statement. Hook

  7. Expository Essay Guide With Definition & Examples

    Write with Grammarly What is an expository essay? An expository essay is an essay that communicates factual information. Broadly, this type of writing is known as expository writing. Expository essays rely on different structures to communicate their positions, like compare and contrast, process essays, and analyzing cause and effect.

  8. The Ultimate Guide to the 5-Paragraph Essay

    A five-paragraph essay is a prose composition that follows a prescribed format of an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph, and is typically taught during primary English education and applied on standardized testing throughout schooling.

  9. How to Write an Expository Essay in 5 Steps

    How to Write an Expository Essay in 5 Steps Written by MasterClass Last updated: Jun 7, 2021 • 3 min read Learning how to write a good expository essay is an academic writing skill that lays the foundation for the type of expository writing that's necessary for numerous professions.

  10. How to write a five-paragraph essay

    The five-paragraph essay is a short essay (usually 500 or so words) that explains your take on a topic. Arguably the most common of expository essays, it's pretty straightforward with an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Now, let's go over all the elements you need for a five-paragraph, expository essay:

  11. 5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations)

    Thesis Statement: "The thesis of this essay is that consumer behavior is not merely a product of rational decision-making; it is deeply rooted in psychological processes, both conscious and subconscious, that drive consumers' choices and actions." Read Essay How to Write an Expository Essay

  12. How To Write an Excellent Expository Essay: Expert Tips and Examples

    An expository essay asks for a critical explanation of a specific idea, theory, or topic. Our expert tips can help you write a well-structured and informative piece. ... The best news: If you've written a typical five-paragraph essay for class, you already know what an expository essay outline will look like (an intro, some body paragraphs, ...

  13. 4 Easy Ways to Write an Expository Essay

    1 Define your purpose for writing. Think about why you are writing an expository essay. Jot down some of the reasons why you are writing an expository essay and what you hope to do with your completed essay. [2] If you are writing an expository essay for an assignment, read the assignment guidelines. Ask your instructor if anything seems unclear. 2

  14. Five-Paragraph Expository Essays

    The expository essay is the most common type of writing required in high school and college. In this class, students will write two expository essays and r. Five-Paragraph Expository Essays. Dana Lorelle, Writing, Vocabulary, Essays. Star Educator. Popular. Average rating: 5.0 Number of reviews: (1,173)

  15. Expository Writing: Definition and Examples

    An expository paragraph is exactly what it sounds like—a paragraph of expository writing. ... which tells the reader the core statement of the essay. Then, include 3 - 5 body paragraphs that provide factual evidence to support the thesis statement. Finally, wrap things up with a concluding paragraph that summarizes what the body paragraphs ...

  16. Free Expository Essay Examples To Help You Write

    Published on: Mar 22, 2023 Want to write an expository essay that will elevate your grades? Don't know what to do and what to avoid? It can be hard to know where to start when you're writing an expository essay. Do you begin with the facts or with your own opinion? How do you structure your argument? Let us guide you with expository essay examples!

  17. Expository Writing: Definition and Examples

    Expository writing, as its name implies, is writing that exposes facts. In other words, it's writing that explains and educates its readers, rather than entertaining or attempting to persuade them. When you read a scholarly article, a textbook page, a news report, or an instructional guide, you're reading expository writing.

  18. How to Write an Expository Essay: Topics, Outline, Examples

    March 21, 2023 12 min read Share the article Understanding What Is an Expository Essay If you clicked on this article, then you must have recently been assigned an expository essay homework. There is also a possibility that you are here because you enjoy exploring different ideas and concepts rather than solely scratching the surface.

  19. How to Write an Expository Essay Step by Step

    Here are some steps that you should follow and create a well-written expository essay. 1. Write the Introduction. When writing the introductory paragraph, remember that there are the following purposes: Grab the reader's attention. Define the essay topic. State the main idea/purpose of the essay.

  20. Best Expository Essay Examples for Students of All Levels

    5 Paragraph Expository Essay Examples Expository Essay Structure Examples Expository Essay Writing Help High school and college students are mostly assigned to write expository essays. This type of essay is written to explain something to the readers.

  21. Expository Essay Outline Guide with Sample

    A typical expository essay format consists of the following 3 components. 1. Introduction - Start your essay with an interesting fact to hook your reader in. 2. Body Paragraph - Explain your topic with relevant facts in the body of your essay. 3. Conclusion - End your essay by summarizing the main points. This is a basic essay structure ...

  22. PDF Grade&5& Expository&and&Opinion&Writing&&

    distinct enough, it will be clear which paragraph the detail belongs in. Write the number of the paragraph the detail sentence belongs in. TOPIC: ITALY BLURB: _____ _____ _____ MAIN IDEA SENTENCES: MAIN IDEA #1: See the world famous sights of Rome. MAIN IDEA #2: Food is at the heart of Italian culture.

  23. Expository Essay Examples for Middle and High School

    Expository essays typically follow the standard five-paragraph format. After you outline the three main points of your essay, you're ready to start writing. Your essay should include these sections: Introduction: Start with a "hook" to get your reader's attention.

  24. Grade 5 lesson plan (docx)

    Part A9. Independent Student Practice: Remember, your students are required to work independently to use each of the 5 steps of the writing process and the writing guide to write their own paragraph on an expository topic. Be sure to note what topic they are writing about. Activity Description/Teacher Student Actions Teacher Will: I will hand out the animal expository worksheet ((informative ...

  25. Part 5: Types of Essays Expository Essay #typesofessays # ...

    123 Likes, TikTok video from Abrite Education (@abriteedu): "Part 5: Types of Essays 📝 Expository Essay #typesofessays #essaywriting #essaywritingtips #abriteedu". Writing. original sound - Abrite Education.