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Public Speaking Tips & Speech Topics

259 Interesting Speech Topics [Examples + Outlines]

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Jim Peterson has over 20 years experience on speech writing. He wrote over 300 free speech topic ideas and how-to guides for any kind of public speaking and speech writing assignments at My Speech Class.

interesting speech topics

The most asked question I get almost every day from students is this:

What makes a topic interesting?

Well, the answer is simple. You have to like it yourself, the subject has to be appropriate to the rules of the assignment, to the audience and the setting of the meeting:

In this article:

How To Find An Interesting Topic

Best interesting speech topics, interesting persuasive speech topics, interesting informative speech topics, topics with outline.

1 – Look in magazines, journals, and newspapers for events.

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Current or historical, that does not matter at this point, both are okay – and recent engaging and exciting facts, and perhaps valuable information that attracts the attention.

Articles about subjects that interests you and that are comfortable for you to talk about are good indications.

2 – Jot down any possible idea that comes up for interesting speech topics. I always draft a short list for myself of candidate issues if I am contracted for a public speaking engagement.

And then I skip the ones that are too difficult and too complex to prepare and master in 8 to 10 minutes time.

3 – Review some online books on the subject for more detailed current information about your topic. Or go to a library and ask for books and reference articles about your subject.

Without exception, all librarians I know will help you sorting out the speechwriter subject with their advice and recommendations. For example you choose for an alluring pleasure physical activity or farming and countryside topic.

Try to understand how the author has covered it. What’s his structure? What points, information or arguments are the strongest? What examples and illustrations has she or he used?

4 – Peerless reliable statistics and new discoveries can help writing and refining.

Look for controversies, rare and strange opinions. What do you think of it? What do you want your audience to think of it?

5 – Think about related engaging interpretive hints to talk about. When you view your rough list, try to find new points, different angles of view or just turn your thoughts upside down. Look at the special aspects that surprise the listeners.

>>>  For example try these 2 more detailed summary outlines with main points and subpoints. Use my sample structure to add or otherwise wipe steps and stages you do not need.

>>>  In addition to these patterns, you find more ideas for outlined main points in my Minute Section (in the navigation menu bar right on your left of this portal page). Or move straight to sixty plus lineups for speechwriters.

That can be very enlighting for enhancing public discernment. They also can  see , feel, or even  taste  and  smell  what you try to explain or demonstrate in a couple of minutes.

6 – Look for supporting and also for opposing opinions, plus interesting speech topics statements. Add visual aids where you want to emphasize or to give some prominence to an unimaginable point in your interesting topic idea.

7 – Watch news shows, history documentaries and debating programs – for example, the morning shows and the evening news. They are especially helpful for developing a rough list of wheedling brainstorms.

Interesting Speech Topic Examples

Don’t have time to read our full list of 200+ topic ideas? Here is our list of 10 interesting speech topics.

  • Beauty is not only in the eye of the beholder
  • Children don’t play enough
  • Animal testing is necessary
  • Girls are too mean to each other
  • Men should get paternity leave
  • Tattoos are an addiction
  • If I had a year to do what I want
  • Butterflies: deadly creatures
  • How to ruin a date in the first minute
  • The meaning of dreams

Here is our list of top interesting persuasive speech topics.

  • Beauty is not only in the eye of the beholder.
  • Hyper active kids don’t need medication.
  • Books are always better than the movie.
  • Pick up lines do work.
  • Televise all court proceedings.
  • Suspend referees that are found to show too much bias.
  • There is no place for monarchs any more.
  • It is false that no one is above the law.
  • You tube needs to monitor comments.
  • Online friends show more compassion.
  • Cross cultural couples respect each other more.
  • Graffiti must be recognised as art.
  • You can loose weight without exercising.
  • Children don’t play enough.
  • Carpets are harmful and shouldn’t be in homes.
  • Sex education doesn’t work.
  • Ban smoking in all public places.
  • Women cheat just as much as men.
  • Prohibit destruction of rainforests.
  • Global warming is a myth.
  • Justice is never the same for all.
  • Video games are not the blame of violence at school.
  • Financial rewards is the only way employees stay loyal.
  • The world isn’t only black and white.
  • Give girls over 16 contraceptives without parents consent.
  • Calories should be included in restaurant menus.
  • Sugar tax won’t reduce obesity.
  • Pregnancy as a result of rape should be terminated.
  • All couples must live together before getting married.
  • Animal testing is necessary.
  • Children’s beauty pageants are wrong.
  • There are not enough cameras in public spaces.
  • Freedom of speech rights needs to be rewritten.
  • Random DUI test should be done on parents picking up children after school.
  • Atheists are more peaceful than religious people.
  • Heterosexual men and women can be just friends.
  • Adoptive parents need maternity leave too.
  • Print advertisements don’t work.
  • Click bate headlines are the cause of less followers.
  • Don’t give children allowances.
  • Stop checking in on social media.
  • There would be more divorces if couples didn’t have children.
  • Compensate organ donors.
  • Celebrities are not role models.
  • Do drug tests on welfare recipients.
  • Stem cell research is murder.
  • People should be considered adults at 21.
  • Religion is the cause of war.
  • Life was not easier a century ago.
  • Men are better forgivers.
  • Making substances illegal only makes people want them more.
  • Parenting classes must be compulsory.
  • Helicopter parents are damaging their children.
  • Give working moms special privileges.
  • Social media fame is a scam.
  • Make paparazzi photographing children a criminal offence.
  • Food should never be seen as a reward.
  • 6 hours is not enough sleep for an adult.
  • People can live without eating meat.
  • Curfews do not keep teens out of trouble.
  • Electronic textbooks don’t have the same impact as the printed version.
  • This generation cannot fix anything.
  • Boredom always leads to trouble.
  • Girls are too mean to each other.
  • Affirmative action isn’t right.
  • School system is responsible for low test scores.
  • Men should get paternity leave.
  • Fast food needs to come with more warnings.
  • Killing a murderer is immoral.
  • Famous people must stay away from politics.
  • Long distance relationships do work.
  • Men are the stronger sex.
  • Jobs shouldn’t be gender specific.
  • Religion won’t die away.
  • Women shouldn’t give birth after 40.
  • Abortion is murder.
  • Tattoos are an addiction.
  • Drug addiction is a choice.
  • Social media will run it’s course and die out.
  • Caesarian sections are safer than normal births.
  • There is a connection between science and religion.
  • Never pay children for good grades.
  • People in open marriages are not happy.
  • The soul does exist.
  • People’s salaries should reflect their performances.
  • English will always be the business language of the world.
  • Why you should always put yourself first.
  • Earth has not been explored properly.
  • Women are more intelligent than they give away.
  • Alternatives to evolution exist.
  • Prisons create criminals.
  • Sick building syndromes exist.
  • Strategic defense and ethics do not match.
  • The War on Terror is based on a hidden agenda.
  • Aging is a threat to pension funding.
  • Airline safety restrictions won’t stop terrorists.
  • Alcohol advertising stimulates underage alcohol use.
  • All humans are spiritual in one way or another.
  • Arts express the level of quality in different cultures.
  • Atheists do care about Christmas.
  • Australian aboriginal tattooing is art.
  • Ban the filibuster from Congress.
  • Body piercings can cause serious complications.
  • Books are outdated.
  • Censorship is a violation of freedom of speech.
  • Charities must minimize the organizational and overhead costs.
  • Child testimonies in abuse cases are not credible.
  • Corporal punishment could be ethical, provided that it is proportional.
  • Creative expression and creativity are not the same.
  • Electronic baby timeshare does help to prevent teen pregnancy.
  • English and Spanish should be the only languages in the world.
  • Establishing democracy in Iraq is mission impossible.
  • Fashion gurus have good reasons to promote skinny girls.
  • Female genital mutilation is not unethical when done by cosmetic surgery doctors.
  • Feminism will help improve the position of females in Africa.
  • Fill in a country … should be condemned as human rights violator.
  • Future generations have to keep their jobs until they drop.
  • George Orwell was just right when he wrote his novel ‘1984’ … Big Brother is watching us all the time.
  • Governments should not own news broadcasting corporations.
  • Granting amnesty perpetuates immigration and makes border patrols fruitless.
  • Harry Potter books are more popular among elderly persons.
  • Hollywood movies have a bad influence on the world.
  • Homelessness in rural areas is substantially undercounted compared to metropolitan and suburban areas.
  • Hospitality is a valuable instrument to better foreign relationships.
  • Houses affected by natural disasters should not be rebuilt.
  • International satellite news broadcasting poses a threat to indigenous cultures.
  • It is possible to be pro-life and pro-choice.
  • It’s a myth that bottled water is better than tap water.
  • Journalism codes are no longer respected by journalists.
  • Limiting immigration is limiting opportunities.
  • Link debt relief of developing countries to carbon emission reduction.
  • Local aid to African communities is more effective than national aid.
  • Mentally disabled people cannot be executed.
  • Motivation courses only have one objective: to fund the instructor’s bank account.
  • MP3 music belongs in the free public domain for educational institutions and the general public.
  • News programs must be interesting rather than important.
  • Open source software is better than Microsoft.
  • Parental advisory labels hinder the freedom of speech of artists.
  • People have the right to decide about their own life and death.
  • Political correctness kills freedom of speech.
  • Poverty can be cut by half in this century.
  • Princess Diana’s death was not a tragic accident.
  • Public insults should be considered as hate speech and should not be protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution.
  • Right to work laws are useless.
  • Robin Hood was a not a hero.
  • Sex and sexuality are from different hemispheres.
  • Telling lies is a justifiable instrument.
  • The local council elections in Cuba are no elections at all.
  • The right to privacy is not absolute.
  • There is no secure protection of property rights in developing countries.
  • There should be cultural content quotas in broadcasting.
  • Tobacco and alcohol billboards litter the streets.
  • United Nations will never truly exist in Europe.
  • Vegetarians would not eat vegetables if they were born in rural Africa.
  • We should have a king instead of a president.
  • Weblogs are intellectual property and therefore must be legally protected.
  • With the current economic situation, we will all be working until we are old and grey.
  • Zero tolerance is a useful instrument to prevent violence.

Here is our list of top interesting informative speech topics.

  • A comparison of the official definition of terrorism in different parts of the world.
  • A week of monastery life.
  • Abu Sayyaf links to global terror organizations.
  • Architectural movements in the late nineteenth century.
  • Armed conflicts in Africa.
  • Artificial intelligence opportunities.
  • Biochemical weapons explained.
  • Bioethics versus human rights.
  • Combatting modern slavery.
  • Debunking weight loss myths.
  • Development goals of the United Nations.
  • Everything we can find in our Solar System.
  • Five ways to give and donate to charity funds.
  • Forms of public diplomacy.
  • Fraud detection systems explained.
  • How giant sea aquariums are constructed.
  • How nepotisms started in the Middle Ages.
  • How the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is structured.
  • How the American Civil War began.
  • How the application for immigration and naturalization works.
  • How the CIA can track terrorists.
  • How to apply Feng Shui to your bedroom.
  • How to outlaw reactionary conservative groups and individuals.
  • Is it possible to clone humans?
  • Major incidents and consequences in the first decade of this millennium.
  • Middle East roadmap for peace.
  • Migration trends.
  • Offshore installation accidents over the years.
  • Racism and cultural diversity in mass media.
  • Refugees and forced displacement.
  • Result on foreign aid funding in the long term.
  • Scientific explanations for the mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle.
  • State sponsored tyranny explained.
  • The 9/11 Commission assignment and its main conclusions.
  • The best consumer electronics innovations to date.
  • The chain of cargo and freight services at international airports.
  • The difference between soft and hard drugs.
  • The effect of counter terrorism legislation on ordinary people.
  • The European convention on human rights explained.
  • The flying fortress called Air Force One.
  • The four general goals of the Homeland Security Department.
  • The functions of Samurai warriors in Ancient Japan.
  • The future of fashion.
  • The Geneva Convention on the treatment of prisoners of war.
  • The governing system of rules during the Middle Ages.
  • The history of Amtrak.
  • The innovative and unique styling of Dodge trucks.
  • The long term complications of sunburn.
  • The philosophical doctrine of Nihilism.
  • The pros and cons of pacifism.
  • The relations between federal budget deficit, national debt and trade balance.
  • The role of Emperor Akihito in Japan.
  • The secrets of crop circles revealed.
  • The short history of the second man on the Moon, Buzz Aldrin.
  • The struggle to patent computer software.
  • The war costs in Iraq and Afghanistan
  • Two party system compared multiple party systems.
  • What is acne and what are its causes.
  • Why the NASA shuttle program was stopped.
  • Why the Romans built huge aqueducts in France.
  • Venezuela and the constitutional power crisis.
  • A diamond exploration certification system will not prevent conflict-diamonds trade.
  • Handwriting analysis and how it reveals aspects of your personality.
  • Hindu Cinema: not just Bollywood movies.
  • How many disasters always happen at Christmas time.
  • How sleepwalkers perform the most unusual things while asleep.
  • Different lifestyles of generations.
  • Importance of sleeping
  • What makes me happy
  • My ideal trip to Asia
  • What would it be like to live with a famous person?
  • If I were a volcano
  • If l could the queen
  • Benefits of being a vegetarian
  • How girls worldwide are treated differently
  • History of Mainamati in Bangladesh
  • Broccoli flavored Oreos
  • The Importance of public speaking
  • A world without boundaries
  • Stars and shooting stars
  • How I came to school for the first time
  • Conspiracy theories
  • The pros and cons of being dead
  • Confusing grammar
  • When my birthday was there
  • Importance of languages
  • How to study effectively
  • If I walked backwards
  • The power of a lie
  • Power of words
  • If I was invisible
  • Why I smile
  • Fear of the unknown
  • Fashion trends I hate
  • Why do we have toes?
  • Why I want to be a lawyer (or whatever job u pick)
  • How colours affect your mood

Need a topic for your speech about an interesting persuasion statement?

Here are some of the best speech ideas and two easy informative subjects you can alter into a firm convincing claim.

Need other attracting ideas?

Check the navbar on the left and you will find thousands of special hints and tips for your public presentation 🙂

1. Whistleblower Protection Is Not Effective

  • Whistleblower laws don’t protect against reprisals, disciplinary measures and spin from superiors.
  • Huge companies have enough money to buy legal advice for a long period, laws offer employees no financial shield.
  • Legislation often doesn’t address the issue itself, the problem, the allegations often are not investigated.

Another topic for your speech on business could be on fair trade:

2. Is Fair Trade Really Fair?

  • Protectionism and markets are often stronger than fair trade appointments.
  • Buying products is subsidizing poor farmers and manufacturers in developing countries. It isn’t helping them to make them stronger.
  • It is anti-competitive and it undermines the economy in Third World nations.

And what do you think of this explosive persuasive topic for your speech?

3. Nuclear Power Is Dangerous Stuff

  • An accident could cause thousands of fatalities and for billions of dollars property damage.
  • There is no proper technology to handle radioactive waste material.
  • Health risks for people working in the plant and for those who are living nearby could not be foreseen in advance and certainly not at the long term.
  • Costs of nuclear plant safety measurements are very high.

And now two informative suggestions for a topic for your speech. But you easily transform them into some of the best speech ideas for persuasion speeches:

4. Checklist Before Taking A New Job

  • A bigger company means more interesting job and task opportunities.
  • It makes it possible to extend your existing network of trusted contacts.
  • Like to travel abroad? Is it a Yes or No?
  • How about the probability that you will keep your job – in other words what about the job security? What are the hidden clues?
  • Is there a chance you can make you professional dreams and personal goals come true?
  • How about the pay? Get all salary information, and decide on how much you want to earn from the start.
  • Are there other requirements? Some personal wishes you would like to fulfill?

5. The Advantages Of Working In The Night

  • No disturbing by telephone.
  • No traffic jam.
  • Not being awakened by the alarm clock in early morning hours …

You can think about the disadvantages too … Approach this subject from different sides and you double your opportunities!

89 Medical Speech Topic Ideas [Persuasive, Informative, Nursing]

292 Sports Speech Topics [Persuasive, Informative]

10 thoughts on “259 Interesting Speech Topics [Examples + Outlines]”

Are you in the Now?

Renewable energy pros and cons.

I want to learn the most detailed writing. Am a New student and i need to improve my own My subject is an informative one : Ivorians women teaching in Abidjan universites.

I need more topics to choose from for my oral presentation

Hello, I’d appreciate it if you’d stop perpetuating falseties about global warming and climate change. They are very much real, and putting them on a list like this only further pushes the myth that they are false. These topics are not up for debate.

Some of these are really creative.

#184 made me laugh. As someone who grew up with Harry Potter, perhaps students these days will consider me an older person ha.

Regards, Chris

thaaaank you very much this is help me a lot

Thanks for the ideas!

A lot of these “creative” topics are not only offensive but help push distructive rhetoric.

this helped me out so much.was just sitting there lost about what to speak at the academic decathlon.thanks

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How to write a speech that your audience remembers

Confident-woman-giving-a-conference-with-a-digital-presentation-how-to-give-a-speech

Whether in a work meeting or at an investor panel, you might give a speech at some point. And no matter how excited you are about the opportunity, the experience can be nerve-wracking . 

But feeling butterflies doesn’t mean you can’t give a great speech. With the proper preparation and a clear outline, apprehensive public speakers and natural wordsmiths alike can write and present a compelling message. Here’s how to write a good speech you’ll be proud to deliver.

What is good speech writing?

Good speech writing is the art of crafting words and ideas into a compelling, coherent, and memorable message that resonates with the audience. Here are some key elements of great speech writing:

  • It begins with clearly understanding the speech's purpose and the audience it seeks to engage. 
  • A well-written speech clearly conveys its central message, ensuring that the audience understands and retains the key points. 
  • It is structured thoughtfully, with a captivating opening, a well-organized body, and a conclusion that reinforces the main message. 
  • Good speech writing embraces the power of engaging content, weaving in stories, examples, and relatable anecdotes to connect with the audience on both intellectual and emotional levels. 

Ultimately, it is the combination of these elements, along with the authenticity and delivery of the speaker , that transforms words on a page into a powerful and impactful spoken narrative.

What makes a good speech?

A great speech includes several key qualities, but three fundamental elements make a speech truly effective:

Clarity and purpose

Remembering the audience, cohesive structure.

While other important factors make a speech a home run, these three elements are essential for writing an effective speech.

The main elements of a good speech

The main elements of a speech typically include:

  • Introduction: The introduction sets the stage for your speech and grabs the audience's attention. It should include a hook or attention-grabbing opening, introduce the topic, and provide an overview of what will be covered.
  • Opening/captivating statement: This is a strong statement that immediately engages the audience and creates curiosity about the speech topics.
  • Thesis statement/central idea: The thesis statement or central idea is a concise statement that summarizes the main point or argument of your speech. It serves as a roadmap for the audience to understand what your speech is about.
  • Body: The body of the speech is where you elaborate on your main points or arguments. Each point is typically supported by evidence, examples, statistics, or anecdotes. The body should be organized logically and coherently, with smooth transitions between the main points.
  • Supporting evidence: This includes facts, data, research findings, expert opinions, or personal stories that support and strengthen your main points. Well-chosen and credible evidence enhances the persuasive power of your speech.
  • Transitions: Transitions are phrases or statements that connect different parts of your speech, guiding the audience from one idea to the next. Effective transitions signal the shifts in topics or ideas and help maintain a smooth flow throughout the speech.
  • Counterarguments and rebuttals (if applicable): If your speech involves addressing opposing viewpoints or counterarguments, you should acknowledge and address them. Presenting counterarguments makes your speech more persuasive and demonstrates critical thinking.
  • Conclusion: The conclusion is the final part of your speech and should bring your message to a satisfying close. Summarize your main points, restate your thesis statement, and leave the audience with a memorable closing thought or call to action.
  • Closing statement: This is the final statement that leaves a lasting impression and reinforces the main message of your speech. It can be a call to action, a thought-provoking question, a powerful quote, or a memorable anecdote.
  • Delivery and presentation: How you deliver your speech is also an essential element to consider. Pay attention to your tone, body language, eye contact , voice modulation, and timing. Practice and rehearse your speech, and try using the 7-38-55 rule to ensure confident and effective delivery.

While the order and emphasis of these elements may vary depending on the type of speech and audience, these elements provide a framework for organizing and delivering a successful speech.

Man-holding-microphone-at-panel-while-talking--how-to-give-a-speech

How to structure a good speech

You know what message you want to transmit, who you’re delivering it to, and even how you want to say it. But you need to know how to start, develop, and close a speech before writing it. 

Think of a speech like an essay. It should have an introduction, conclusion, and body sections in between. This places ideas in a logical order that the audience can better understand and follow them. Learning how to make a speech with an outline gives your storytelling the scaffolding it needs to get its point across.

Here’s a general speech structure to guide your writing process:

  • Explanation 1
  • Explanation 2
  • Explanation 3

How to write a compelling speech opener

Some research shows that engaged audiences pay attention for only 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Other estimates are even lower, citing that people stop listening intently in fewer than 10 minutes . If you make a good first impression at the beginning of your speech, you have a better chance of interesting your audience through the middle when attention spans fade. 

Implementing the INTRO model can help grab and keep your audience’s attention as soon as you start speaking. This acronym stands for interest, need, timing, roadmap, and objectives, and it represents the key points you should hit in an opening. 

Here’s what to include for each of these points: 

  • Interest : Introduce yourself or your topic concisely and speak with confidence . Write a compelling opening statement using relevant data or an anecdote that the audience can relate to.
  • Needs : The audience is listening to you because they have something to learn. If you’re pitching a new app idea to a panel of investors, those potential partners want to discover more about your product and what they can earn from it. Read the room and gently remind them of the purpose of your speech. 
  • Timing : When appropriate, let your audience know how long you’ll speak. This lets listeners set expectations and keep tabs on their own attention span. If a weary audience member knows you’ll talk for 40 minutes, they can better manage their energy as that time goes on. 
  • Routemap : Give a brief overview of the three main points you’ll cover in your speech. If an audience member’s attention starts to drop off and they miss a few sentences, they can more easily get their bearings if they know the general outline of the presentation.
  • Objectives : Tell the audience what you hope to achieve, encouraging them to listen to the end for the payout. 

Writing the middle of a speech

The body of your speech is the most information-dense section. Facts, visual aids, PowerPoints — all this information meets an audience with a waning attention span. Sticking to the speech structure gives your message focus and keeps you from going off track, making everything you say as useful as possible.

Limit the middle of your speech to three points, and support them with no more than three explanations. Following this model organizes your thoughts and prevents you from offering more information than the audience can retain. 

Using this section of the speech to make your presentation interactive can add interest and engage your audience. Try including a video or demonstration to break the monotony. A quick poll or survey also keeps the audience on their toes. 

Wrapping the speech up

To you, restating your points at the end can feel repetitive and dull. You’ve practiced countless times and heard it all before. But repetition aids memory and learning , helping your audience retain what you’ve told them. Use your speech’s conclusion to summarize the main points with a few short sentences.

Try to end on a memorable note, like posing a motivational quote or a thoughtful question the audience can contemplate once they leave. In proposal or pitch-style speeches, consider landing on a call to action (CTA) that invites your audience to take the next step.

People-clapping-after-coworker-gave-a-speech-how-to-give-a-speech

How to write a good speech

If public speaking gives you the jitters, you’re not alone. Roughly 80% of the population feels nervous before giving a speech, and another 10% percent experiences intense anxiety and sometimes even panic. 

The fear of failure can cause procrastination and can cause you to put off your speechwriting process until the last minute. Finding the right words takes time and preparation, and if you’re already feeling nervous, starting from a blank page might seem even harder.

But putting in the effort despite your stress is worth it. Presenting a speech you worked hard on fosters authenticity and connects you to the subject matter, which can help your audience understand your points better. Human connection is all about honesty and vulnerability, and if you want to connect to the people you’re speaking to, they should see that in you.

1. Identify your objectives and target audience

Before diving into the writing process, find healthy coping strategies to help you stop worrying . Then you can define your speech’s purpose, think about your target audience, and start identifying your objectives. Here are some questions to ask yourself and ground your thinking : 

  • What purpose do I want my speech to achieve? 
  • What would it mean to me if I achieved the speech’s purpose?
  • What audience am I writing for? 
  • What do I know about my audience? 
  • What values do I want to transmit? 
  • If the audience remembers one take-home message, what should it be? 
  • What do I want my audience to feel, think, or do after I finish speaking? 
  • What parts of my message could be confusing and require further explanation?

2. Know your audience

Understanding your audience is crucial for tailoring your speech effectively. Consider the demographics of your audience, their interests, and their expectations. For instance, if you're addressing a group of healthcare professionals, you'll want to use medical terminology and data that resonate with them. Conversely, if your audience is a group of young students, you'd adjust your content to be more relatable to their experiences and interests. 

3. Choose a clear message

Your message should be the central idea that you want your audience to take away from your speech. Let's say you're giving a speech on climate change. Your clear message might be something like, "Individual actions can make a significant impact on mitigating climate change." Throughout your speech, all your points and examples should support this central message, reinforcing it for your audience.

4. Structure your speech

Organizing your speech properly keeps your audience engaged and helps them follow your ideas. The introduction should grab your audience's attention and introduce the topic. For example, if you're discussing space exploration, you could start with a fascinating fact about a recent space mission. In the body, you'd present your main points logically, such as the history of space exploration, its scientific significance, and future prospects. Finally, in the conclusion, you'd summarize your key points and reiterate the importance of space exploration in advancing human knowledge.

5. Use engaging content for clarity

Engaging content includes stories, anecdotes, statistics, and examples that illustrate your main points. For instance, if you're giving a speech about the importance of reading, you might share a personal story about how a particular book changed your perspective. You could also include statistics on the benefits of reading, such as improved cognitive abilities and empathy.

6. Maintain clarity and simplicity

It's essential to communicate your ideas clearly. Avoid using overly technical jargon or complex language that might confuse your audience. For example, if you're discussing a medical breakthrough with a non-medical audience, explain complex terms in simple, understandable language.

7. Practice and rehearse

Practice is key to delivering a great speech. Rehearse multiple times to refine your delivery, timing, and tone. Consider using a mirror or recording yourself to observe your body language and gestures. For instance, if you're giving a motivational speech, practice your gestures and expressions to convey enthusiasm and confidence.

8. Consider nonverbal communication

Your body language, tone of voice, and gestures should align with your message . If you're delivering a speech on leadership, maintain strong eye contact to convey authority and connection with your audience. A steady pace and varied tone can also enhance your speech's impact.

9. Engage your audience

Engaging your audience keeps them interested and attentive. Encourage interaction by asking thought-provoking questions or sharing relatable anecdotes. If you're giving a speech on teamwork, ask the audience to recall a time when teamwork led to a successful outcome, fostering engagement and connection.

10. Prepare for Q&A

Anticipate potential questions or objections your audience might have and prepare concise, well-informed responses. If you're delivering a speech on a controversial topic, such as healthcare reform, be ready to address common concerns, like the impact on healthcare costs or access to services, during the Q&A session.

By following these steps and incorporating examples that align with your specific speech topic and purpose, you can craft and deliver a compelling and impactful speech that resonates with your audience.

Woman-at-home-doing-research-in-her-laptop-how-to-give-a-speech

Tools for writing a great speech

There are several helpful tools available for speechwriting, both technological and communication-related. Here are a few examples:

  • Word processing software: Tools like Microsoft Word, Google Docs, or other word processors provide a user-friendly environment for writing and editing speeches. They offer features like spell-checking, grammar correction, formatting options, and easy revision tracking.
  • Presentation software: Software such as Microsoft PowerPoint or Google Slides is useful when creating visual aids to accompany your speech. These tools allow you to create engaging slideshows with text, images, charts, and videos to enhance your presentation.
  • Speechwriting Templates: Online platforms or software offer pre-designed templates specifically for speechwriting. These templates provide guidance on structuring your speech and may include prompts for different sections like introductions, main points, and conclusions.
  • Rhetorical devices and figures of speech: Rhetorical tools such as metaphors, similes, alliteration, and parallelism can add impact and persuasion to your speech. Resources like books, websites, or academic papers detailing various rhetorical devices can help you incorporate them effectively.
  • Speechwriting apps: Mobile apps designed specifically for speechwriting can be helpful in organizing your thoughts, creating outlines, and composing a speech. These apps often provide features like voice recording, note-taking, and virtual prompts to keep you on track.
  • Grammar and style checkers: Online tools or plugins like Grammarly or Hemingway Editor help improve the clarity and readability of your speech by checking for grammar, spelling, and style errors. They provide suggestions for sentence structure, word choice, and overall tone.
  • Thesaurus and dictionary: Online or offline resources such as thesauruses and dictionaries help expand your vocabulary and find alternative words or phrases to express your ideas more effectively. They can also clarify meanings or provide context for unfamiliar terms.
  • Online speechwriting communities: Joining online forums or communities focused on speechwriting can be beneficial for getting feedback, sharing ideas, and learning from experienced speechwriters. It's an opportunity to connect with like-minded individuals and improve your public speaking skills through collaboration.

Remember, while these tools can assist in the speechwriting process, it's essential to use them thoughtfully and adapt them to your specific needs and style. The most important aspect of speechwriting remains the creativity, authenticity, and connection with your audience that you bring to your speech.

Man-holding-microphone-while-speaking-in-public-how-to-give-a-speech

5 tips for writing a speech

Behind every great speech is an excellent idea and a speaker who refined it. But a successful speech is about more than the initial words on the page, and there are a few more things you can do to help it land.

Here are five more tips for writing and practicing your speech:

1. Structure first, write second

If you start the writing process before organizing your thoughts, you may have to re-order, cut, and scrap the sentences you worked hard on. Save yourself some time by using a speech structure, like the one above, to order your talking points first. This can also help you identify unclear points or moments that disrupt your flow.

2. Do your homework

Data strengthens your argument with a scientific edge. Research your topic with an eye for attention-grabbing statistics, or look for findings you can use to support each point. If you’re pitching a product or service, pull information from company metrics that demonstrate past or potential successes. 

Audience members will likely have questions, so learn all talking points inside and out. If you tell investors that your product will provide 12% returns, for example, come prepared with projections that support that statement.

3. Sound like yourself

Memorable speakers have distinct voices. Think of Martin Luther King Jr’s urgent, inspiring timbre or Oprah’s empathetic, personal tone . Establish your voice — one that aligns with your personality and values — and stick with it. If you’re a motivational speaker, keep your tone upbeat to inspire your audience . If you’re the CEO of a startup, try sounding assured but approachable. 

4. Practice

As you practice a speech, you become more confident , gain a better handle on the material, and learn the outline so well that unexpected questions are less likely to trip you up. Practice in front of a colleague or friend for honest feedback about what you could change, and speak in front of the mirror to tweak your nonverbal communication and body language .

5. Remember to breathe

When you’re stressed, you breathe more rapidly . It can be challenging to talk normally when you can’t regulate your breath. Before your presentation, try some mindful breathing exercises so that when the day comes, you already have strategies that will calm you down and remain present . This can also help you control your voice and avoid speaking too quickly.

How to ghostwrite a great speech for someone else

Ghostwriting a speech requires a unique set of skills, as you're essentially writing a piece that will be delivered by someone else. Here are some tips on how to effectively ghostwrite a speech:

  • Understand the speaker's voice and style : Begin by thoroughly understanding the speaker's personality, speaking style, and preferences. This includes their tone, humor, and any personal anecdotes they may want to include.
  • Interview the speaker : Have a detailed conversation with the speaker to gather information about their speech's purpose, target audience, key messages, and any specific points they want to emphasize. Ask for personal stories or examples they may want to include.
  • Research thoroughly : Research the topic to ensure you have a strong foundation of knowledge. This helps you craft a well-informed and credible speech.
  • Create an outline : Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval.
  • Write in the speaker's voice : While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style. Use language and phrasing that feel natural to them. If they have a particular way of expressing ideas, incorporate that into the speech.
  • Craft a captivating opening : Begin the speech with a compelling opening that grabs the audience's attention. This could be a relevant quote, an interesting fact, a personal anecdote, or a thought-provoking question.
  • Organize content logically : Ensure the speech flows logically, with each point building on the previous one. Use transitions to guide the audience from one idea to the next smoothly.
  • Incorporate engaging stories and examples : Include anecdotes, stories, and real-life examples that illustrate key points and make the speech relatable and memorable.
  • Edit and revise : Edit the speech carefully for clarity, grammar, and coherence. Ensure the speech is the right length and aligns with the speaker's time constraints.
  • Seek feedback : Share drafts of the speech with the speaker for their feedback and revisions. They may have specific changes or additions they'd like to make.
  • Practice delivery : If possible, work with the speaker on their delivery. Practice the speech together, allowing the speaker to become familiar with the content and your writing style.
  • Maintain confidentiality : As a ghostwriter, it's essential to respect the confidentiality and anonymity of the work. Do not disclose that you wrote the speech unless you have the speaker's permission to do so.
  • Be flexible : Be open to making changes and revisions as per the speaker's preferences. Your goal is to make them look good and effectively convey their message.
  • Meet deadlines : Stick to agreed-upon deadlines for drafts and revisions. Punctuality and reliability are essential in ghostwriting.
  • Provide support : Support the speaker during their preparation and rehearsal process. This can include helping with cue cards, speech notes, or any other materials they need.

Remember that successful ghostwriting is about capturing the essence of the speaker while delivering a well-structured and engaging speech. Collaboration, communication, and adaptability are key to achieving this.

Give your best speech yet

Learn how to make a speech that’ll hold an audience’s attention by structuring your thoughts and practicing frequently. Put the effort into writing and preparing your content, and aim to improve your breathing, eye contact , and body language as you practice. The more you work on your speech, the more confident you’ll become.

The energy you invest in writing an effective speech will help your audience remember and connect to every concept. Remember: some life-changing philosophies have come from good speeches, so give your words a chance to resonate with others. You might even change their thinking.

Boost your speech skills

Enhance your public speaking with personalized coaching tailored to your needs

Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

What this handout is about

This handout will help you create an effective speech by establishing the purpose of your speech and making it easily understandable. It will also help you to analyze your audience and keep the audience interested.

What’s different about a speech?

Writing for public speaking isn’t so different from other types of writing. You want to engage your audience’s attention, convey your ideas in a logical manner and use reliable evidence to support your point. But the conditions for public speaking favor some writing qualities over others. When you write a speech, your audience is made up of listeners. They have only one chance to comprehend the information as you read it, so your speech must be well-organized and easily understood. In addition, the content of the speech and your delivery must fit the audience.

What’s your purpose?

People have gathered to hear you speak on a specific issue, and they expect to get something out of it immediately. And you, the speaker, hope to have an immediate effect on your audience. The purpose of your speech is to get the response you want. Most speeches invite audiences to react in one of three ways: feeling, thinking, or acting. For example, eulogies encourage emotional response from the audience; college lectures stimulate listeners to think about a topic from a different perspective; protest speeches in the Pit recommend actions the audience can take.

As you establish your purpose, ask yourself these questions:

  • What do you want the audience to learn or do?
  • If you are making an argument, why do you want them to agree with you?
  • If they already agree with you, why are you giving the speech?
  • How can your audience benefit from what you have to say?

Audience analysis

If your purpose is to get a certain response from your audience, you must consider who they are (or who you’re pretending they are). If you can identify ways to connect with your listeners, you can make your speech interesting and useful.

As you think of ways to appeal to your audience, ask yourself:

  • What do they have in common? Age? Interests? Ethnicity? Gender?
  • Do they know as much about your topic as you, or will you be introducing them to new ideas?
  • Why are these people listening to you? What are they looking for?
  • What level of detail will be effective for them?
  • What tone will be most effective in conveying your message?
  • What might offend or alienate them?

For more help, see our handout on audience .

Creating an effective introduction

Get their attention, otherwise known as “the hook”.

Think about how you can relate to these listeners and get them to relate to you or your topic. Appealing to your audience on a personal level captures their attention and concern, increasing the chances of a successful speech. Speakers often begin with anecdotes to hook their audience’s attention. Other methods include presenting shocking statistics, asking direct questions of the audience, or enlisting audience participation.

Establish context and/or motive

Explain why your topic is important. Consider your purpose and how you came to speak to this audience. You may also want to connect the material to related or larger issues as well, especially those that may be important to your audience.

Get to the point

Tell your listeners your thesis right away and explain how you will support it. Don’t spend as much time developing your introductory paragraph and leading up to the thesis statement as you would in a research paper for a course. Moving from the intro into the body of the speech quickly will help keep your audience interested. You may be tempted to create suspense by keeping the audience guessing about your thesis until the end, then springing the implications of your discussion on them. But if you do so, they will most likely become bored or confused.

For more help, see our handout on introductions .

Making your speech easy to understand

Repeat crucial points and buzzwords.

Especially in longer speeches, it’s a good idea to keep reminding your audience of the main points you’ve made. For example, you could link an earlier main point or key term as you transition into or wrap up a new point. You could also address the relationship between earlier points and new points through discussion within a body paragraph. Using buzzwords or key terms throughout your paper is also a good idea. If your thesis says you’re going to expose unethical behavior of medical insurance companies, make sure the use of “ethics” recurs instead of switching to “immoral” or simply “wrong.” Repetition of key terms makes it easier for your audience to take in and connect information.

Incorporate previews and summaries into the speech

For example:

“I’m here today to talk to you about three issues that threaten our educational system: First, … Second, … Third,”

“I’ve talked to you today about such and such.”

These kinds of verbal cues permit the people in the audience to put together the pieces of your speech without thinking too hard, so they can spend more time paying attention to its content.

Use especially strong transitions

This will help your listeners see how new information relates to what they’ve heard so far. If you set up a counterargument in one paragraph so you can demolish it in the next, begin the demolition by saying something like,

“But this argument makes no sense when you consider that . . . .”

If you’re providing additional information to support your main point, you could say,

“Another fact that supports my main point is . . . .”

Helping your audience listen

Rely on shorter, simpler sentence structures.

Don’t get too complicated when you’re asking an audience to remember everything you say. Avoid using too many subordinate clauses, and place subjects and verbs close together.

Too complicated:

The product, which was invented in 1908 by Orville Z. McGillicuddy in Des Moines, Iowa, and which was on store shelves approximately one year later, still sells well.

Easier to understand:

Orville Z. McGillicuddy invented the product in 1908 and introduced it into stores shortly afterward. Almost a century later, the product still sells well.

Limit pronoun use

Listeners may have a hard time remembering or figuring out what “it,” “they,” or “this” refers to. Be specific by using a key noun instead of unclear pronouns.

Pronoun problem:

The U.S. government has failed to protect us from the scourge of so-called reality television, which exploits sex, violence, and petty conflict, and calls it human nature. This cannot continue.

Why the last sentence is unclear: “This” what? The government’s failure? Reality TV? Human nature?

More specific:

The U.S. government has failed to protect us from the scourge of so-called reality television, which exploits sex, violence, and petty conflict, and calls it human nature. This failure cannot continue.

Keeping audience interest

Incorporate the rhetorical strategies of ethos, pathos, and logos.

When arguing a point, using ethos, pathos, and logos can help convince your audience to believe you and make your argument stronger. Ethos refers to an appeal to your audience by establishing your authenticity and trustworthiness as a speaker. If you employ pathos, you appeal to your audience’s emotions. Using logos includes the support of hard facts, statistics, and logical argumentation. The most effective speeches usually present a combination these rhetorical strategies.

Use statistics and quotations sparingly

Include only the most striking factual material to support your perspective, things that would likely stick in the listeners’ minds long after you’ve finished speaking. Otherwise, you run the risk of overwhelming your listeners with too much information.

Watch your tone

Be careful not to talk over the heads of your audience. On the other hand, don’t be condescending either. And as for grabbing their attention, yelling, cursing, using inappropriate humor, or brandishing a potentially offensive prop (say, autopsy photos) will only make the audience tune you out.

Creating an effective conclusion

Restate your main points, but don’t repeat them.

“I asked earlier why we should care about the rain forest. Now I hope it’s clear that . . .” “Remember how Mrs. Smith couldn’t afford her prescriptions? Under our plan, . . .”

Call to action

Speeches often close with an appeal to the audience to take action based on their new knowledge or understanding. If you do this, be sure the action you recommend is specific and realistic. For example, although your audience may not be able to affect foreign policy directly, they can vote or work for candidates whose foreign policy views they support. Relating the purpose of your speech to their lives not only creates a connection with your audience, but also reiterates the importance of your topic to them in particular or “the bigger picture.”

Practicing for effective presentation

Once you’ve completed a draft, read your speech to a friend or in front of a mirror. When you’ve finished reading, ask the following questions:

  • Which pieces of information are clearest?
  • Where did I connect with the audience?
  • Where might listeners lose the thread of my argument or description?
  • Where might listeners become bored?
  • Where did I have trouble speaking clearly and/or emphatically?
  • Did I stay within my time limit?

Other resources

  • Toastmasters International is a nonprofit group that provides communication and leadership training.
  • Allyn & Bacon Publishing’s Essence of Public Speaking Series is an extensive treatment of speech writing and delivery, including books on using humor, motivating your audience, word choice and presentation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Boone, Louis E., David L. Kurtz, and Judy R. Block. 1997. Contemporary Business Communication . Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Ehrlich, Henry. 1994. Writing Effective Speeches . New York: Marlowe.

Lamb, Sandra E. 1998. How to Write It: A Complete Guide to Everything You’ll Ever Write . Berkeley: Ten Speed Press.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Public Affairs Council

Speechwriting 101: Writing an Effective Speech

Whether you are a communications pro or a human resources executive, the time will come when you will need to write a speech for yourself or someone else.  when that time comes, your career may depend on your success..

J. Lyman MacInnis, a corporate coach,  Toronto Star  columnist, accounting executive and author of  “ The Elements of Great Public Speaking ,”  has seen careers stalled – even damaged – by a failure to communicate messages effectively before groups of people. On the flip side, solid speechwriting skills can help launch and sustain a successful career.  What you need are forethought and methodical preparation.

Know Your Audience

Learn as much as possible about the audience and the event.  This will help you target the insights, experience or knowledge you have that this group wants or needs:

  • Why has the audience been brought together?
  • What do the members of the audience have in common?
  • How big an audience will it be?
  • What do they know, and what do they need to know?
  • Do they expect discussion about a specific subject and, if so, what?
  • What is the audience’s attitude and knowledge about the subject of your talk?
  • What is their attitude toward you as the speaker?
  • Why are they interested in your topic?

Choose Your Core Message

If the core message is on target, you can do other things wrong. But if the message is wrong, it doesn’t matter what you put around it.  To write the most effective speech, you should have significant knowledge about your topic, sincerely care about it and be eager to talk about it.  Focus on a message that is relevant to the target audience, and remember: an audience wants opinion. If you offer too little substance, your audience will label you a lightweight.  If you offer too many ideas, you make it difficult for them to know what’s important to you.

Research and Organize

Research until you drop.  This is where you pick up the information, connect the ideas and arrive at the insights that make your talk fresh.  You’ll have an easier time if you gather far more information than you need.  Arrange your research and notes into general categories and leave space between them. Then go back and rearrange. Fit related pieces together like a puzzle.

Develop Structure to Deliver Your Message

First, consider whether your goal is to inform, persuade, motivate or entertain.  Then outline your speech and fill in the details:

  • Introduction – The early minutes of a talk are important to establish your credibility and likeability.  Personal anecdotes often work well to get things started.  This is also where you’ll outline your main points.
  • Body – Get to the issues you’re there to address, limiting them to five points at most.  Then bolster those few points with illustrations, evidence and anecdotes.  Be passionate: your conviction can be as persuasive as the appeal of your ideas.
  • Conclusion – Wrap up with feeling as well as fact. End with something upbeat that will inspire your listeners.

You want to leave the audience exhilarated, not drained. In our fast-paced age, 20-25 minutes is about as long as anyone will listen attentively to a speech. As you write and edit your speech, the general rule is to allow about 90 seconds for every double-spaced page of copy.

Spice it Up

Once you have the basic structure of your speech, it’s time to add variety and interest.  Giving an audience exactly what it expects is like passing out sleeping pills. Remember that a speech is more like conversation than formal writing.  Its phrasing is loose – but without the extremes of slang, the incomplete thoughts, the interruptions that flavor everyday speech.

  • Give it rhythm. A good speech has pacing.
  • Vary the sentence structure. Use short sentences. Use occasional long ones to keep the audience alert. Fragments are fine if used sparingly and for emphasis.
  • Use the active voice and avoid passive sentences. Active forms of speech make your sentences more powerful.
  • Repeat key words and points. Besides helping your audience remember something, repetition builds greater awareness of central points or the main theme.
  • Ask rhetorical questions in a way that attracts your listeners’ attention.
  • Personal experiences and anecdotes help bolster your points and help you connect with the audience.
  • Use quotes. Good quotes work on several levels, forcing the audience to think. Make sure quotes are clearly attributed and said by someone your audience will probably recognize.

Be sure to use all of these devices sparingly in your speeches. If overused, the speech becomes exaggerated. Used with care, they will work well to move the speech along and help you deliver your message in an interesting, compelling way.

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How to Write a Speech to Engage your Audience

February 19, 2021 - Dom Barnard

In order to write a speech, you need to think about your audience, the required length, and the purpose or topic. This is true whether you are writing a wedding speech, conference presentation, investor pitch, or any other type of speech.

Being a great speech writer can help you get a promotion, motivate people, sell a business idea, persuade others and much more – it’s an essential skill in the modern world. In this article, we cover key tips for writing a speech.

Initial planning – Why? Who? What?

You should invest time strategically considering the speech. This will help you decide on the key message and content about your topic. Here are some points to consider.

  • What do I want to achieve?
  • When I achieve this, what will that do for me?
  • Why am I speaking?
  • What is the purpose of this speech?
  • Who are the audience and who do they represent?
  • Who do I represent?
  • What do I know about them? (culture, language, level of expertise)
  • How much influence do they have?
  • What is the main message and key points?
  • What specific action is implied?
  • What level of information should I include?
  • What is important to them?

Popular speech structure

You need to catch the audience attention early, very early (see section below). Deliver a memorable beginning, a clear middle and structured ending.

Popular speech structure:

  • Explanation 1
  • Explanation 2
  • Explanation 3

Secondary Point (Optional: supports main)

Tertiary Point (Optional: supports secondary and main)

Attention span of your audience

Research shows that attention span is greatest at the beginning of a speech, reduces considerably during the middle of your speech and picks up again towards the end when your audience know you about to finish.

Don’t try to put too many ideas into your speech. Research shows that people remember very little from speeches, so just give them one or two ideas to hang onto.

Attention span graph of audience in a conference or speech

These two articles explain audience attention span in more detail, and how to write a speech to extend it:

  • How many minutes is the audience’s attention span?
  • What to do when you’re losing your audience

Speech introduction

Make sure your opening few seconds are memorable as this is when your audience will make up their minds about you. Use a bold sentence to grab their attention, works best with numbers reinforcing your point.

An example sentence might be – “After this speech, I’m confident 50% of you will go out and buy a VR headset.” Follow these tips on how to write a speech intro:

Remember the INTRO model

This is more focused on presentations but sections can be applied broadly to other general speeches.

1. Interest

You: Introduce yourself confidently and clearly Audience: Why should I listen to you?

You: Remind the audience the reasons for this speech Audience: What’s in it for me?

You: State length of speech at beginning, “Over the next 15 minutes” Audience: How long until I can get a coffee?

4. Routemap

You: State the main points, “Today I’m going to cover 4 main points” Audience: Which sections of the speech are important to me?

5. Objectives

You: Clearly state the objective, “By the end of this speech, I would like to…” Audience: So that’s what you want from me today…

Example: Great speech opening

This speech opening is by Jamie Oliver, giving a TED talk on teaching every child about food.

Sadly, in the next 18 minutes when I do our chat, four Americans that are alive will be dead through the food that they eat. My name’s Jamie Oliver. I’m 34 years old. I’m from Essex in England and for the last seven years I’ve worked fairly tirelessly to save lives in my own way. I’m not a doctor; I’m a chef, I don’t have expensive equipment or medicine. I use information, education. I profoundly believe that the power of food has a primal place in our homes that binds us to the best bits of life. We have an awful, awful reality right now. America, you’re at the top of your game. This is one of the most unhealthy countries in the world.

Jamie Oliver TED talk

How not to open your speech

Avoid the following opening comments:

  • “ Apologies, I’m a little nervous about speaking ” – no need to make the audience aware of this, it will make them focus on how nervous you are instead of what you are saying
  • “ I’ve got the graveyard shift ” – you are telling people not to expect much
  • “ I’m what stands between you and lunch ” – even if people weren’t thinking it, after this comment, all they are thinking of is when will you finish so they can eat
  • “ We are running late, so I’ll do my best to explain… ” – instead of this, state how long your speech will take so that people know when they will be leaving

Middle of the speech

The body of your speech is where the majority of the information is. The audience has been introduced to the subject and reasons for the speech. Now you need to present your arguments and examples, data, illustrations backing up your key message.

How to write a speech body can be difficult, the best way to build this section is to write down three points you are trying to convey in your speech, your main, secondary and tertiary points. Then write down three descriptions clarifying each of these points. The descriptions should be simple, memorable and meaningful.

The middle of your speech is where the audience start losing attention. Keep this in mind and ensure your message is clear. Use images, jokes and rhetoric questions to keep the audience engaged.

Don’t overwhelm your audience with many points. It is much more valuable to make a small number of points well, than to have too many points which aren’t made satisfactorily.

Obama speech

Obama and his speeches

Obama’s speeches are well prepared with a focus on powerful words “A change is brought about because ordinary people do extraordinary things“. His speeches use simple language and quotes from famous speeches his listeners can relate to.

For additional trademark Obama techniques, check out  How Barack Obama prepares his speeches.

How to end a speech

Similar to the opening, your closing statements should be impactful, re-stating the key message of your speech. We advise learning your ending few lines word for word. The ending is an opportunity to:

  • Leave the audience with a lasting impression of your speech
  • Summarise the main points
  • Provide further ideas and discussion points for the audience to take away with them
  • Thank the audience for taking the time to listen

Methods to end your speech

Quotation Close  – use a famous quote to get the audience’s attention and create a link to your speech.

Bookend Close  – refer back to an opening statement and repeat it or add a few extra words to elaborate on it.

Open Question  – ask the audience a provocative question or a call to action to perform some task on the back of your speech.

For additional tips on how to write a speech, in particular how to close your speech, read:

  • 5 great ways to end a speech
  • 10 ways to end your speech with a bang
  • Presentations: language expert – signposting

Ideas for ending a speech

  • Key message
  • Refer to opening impact statement
  • Objectives met
  • Call to action
  • End on an Up

Step-by-step process for writing a speech

Here’s how to write your speech from concept to completion.

  • Outline your speech’s structure. What are the main ideas for each section?
  • Write out the main ideas in your outline. Don’t worry about making it perfect – just write as much of it down as you can
  • Edit and polish what you’ve written until you have a good first draft of your speech
  • Now you need to practice and  memorize your speech . The more you practice, the more you’ll figure out which sections need changing. You’ll also get an idea of length and if you need to extend / shorten it.
  • Update your speech, practice some more, and revise your speech until it has a great flow and you feel comfortable with it.

Classic speech transcripts

One of the best ways for learning how to write a speech is reading other well written ones. Here are a list of famous speeches to read and learn from:

  • Bill Gates TED Talk Transcript from 2015: Warns of Pandemics, Epidemics
  • Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg Commencement Speech at Harvard 2014
  • Ronald Reagan Memorial Day Speech Transcript 1984
  • I Have Been to the Mountaintop Speech Transcript – Martin Luther King Jr.

Speech And Debate

Speech Writing

Last updated on: Feb 9, 2023

How to Write a Speech - Outline With Example

By: Cordon J.

Reviewed By: Rylee W.

Published on: Sep 8, 2020

How to Write a Speech

Giving a speech for a class, event or work can be nerve-wracking. However, writing an effective speech can boost your confidence level.

A speech is an effective medium to communicate your message and speech writing is a skill that has its advantages even if you are a student or a professional.

With careful planning and paying attention to small details, you can write a speech that will inform, persuade, entertain or motivate the people you are writing for.

If this is your first speech. Take all the time you need.

Like other skills, you can learn speech writing too.

Give yourself enough time to write and practice it several times for the best possible results.

How to Write a Speech

On this Page

You have a message that you want people to hear or you are preparing a speech for a particular situation such as a commemorative speech.

No matter what the case, it is important to ensure that the speech is well structured or else you will fail to deliver your effective message. And you don’t want that, do you?

You can also explore our complete guide to  write a commemorative speech . Make sure to give the article a thorough read.

How to Create a Speech Outline?

Want to write a speech your audience will remember? A speech outline is a thing you should start with.

‘How to write a speech outline?’

A speech outline is very important in helping you sound more authoritative and in control. As you write your speech outline you will have to focus on how you will introduce yourself, your topic, and the points that you will be going to cover.

A speech outline will save a lot of your time and will help you organize your thoughts. It will make sure the speech is following a proper structure and format.

Before you start writing your own speech you need to know:

  • WHO you are writing the speech for
  • WHAT the speech will be going to cover
  • HOW long it needs to be e.g if it is a 5-minute speech (then how many words in a 5-minute speech)

These speech tips will help you get on the right track from the start. Here is an example of how you can craft a speech outline.

Preparation

  • Choose your topic and the main points that your speech will cover. Know your audience and get to know what they are looking for. Pay attention to their needs
  • Define the purpose of the speech and properly organize it

Introduction

  • A strong statement to grab the reader’s attention
  • Refine the thesis statement
  • State something that establishes credibility
  • Provide your main idea and include some supporting statements.
  • Examples and further details (if needed)
  • Summarize the main points of the speech
  • Closing statement
  • Call to action

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How to Write an Effective Speech?

‘How to write a graduation speech?’

‘How to write a speech for school?’

‘How to write a speech about yourself?’

Get your answers in the below sections.

Just like essays, the speech also follows three sections: Introduction, the main body, and conclusion.

However, unlike essays, a speech must be written to be heard as opposed to just being read. It is important to write a speech in a way that can grab the reader’s attention and helps in painting a mental image.

It is the opening statement of a speech. It is important to know how to start a speech that can grab the attention of the audience.

‘How to write a speech introduction?’

It should include a hook-grabber statement about your topic. It should end with a strong transition from a big idea of the introduction to the main body of the essay. Some great ways to begin your speech are, to begin with, a rhetorical question, a quote, or another strong statement.

Make sure the introduction is not more than one paragraph. This will ensure you do not spend much time on the background before getting to the main idea of the topic.

The introduction is a great chance to make sure your opening is memorable as this is the point when your audience will make up their mind about you.

The Main body

The majority of the speech should be spent presenting your thesis statement and supporting ideas in an organized way.

Avoid rambling as it will immediately lose your audience’s attention. No need to share everything, instead pick some points and stick to them throughout your speech.

Organize your points in a logical manner so they support and build on each other. Add as many points as needed to support the overall message of your speech.

State each point clearly and provide all the required information, facts, statistics, and evidence, to clarify each of your points.

It is a good idea to include your personal experiences to make your speech more interesting and memorable.

Another important thing to be kept in mind is the use of transition. The purpose of adding transition words is to improve the overall flow of the information and help the reader to understand the speech structure. Words like next, then, after, before, at that moment, etc. are the most commonly used transition words to make the whole writing less choppy and more interesting.

The conclusion should restate and summarize all the main points of the speech. Because the audience will most likely remember what they have heard last. Beautifully wrap up the whole speech and give something for the audience to think about.

For an extra element, close your speech by restating the introduction statement so it feels like a complete package.

A good approach to conclude your speech is to introduce a call to action. Encourage your audience to participate in the solution to the problem that you are discussing. Give your audience some direction on how they can participate.

Practice and more practice is key to a great speech so it is important that you read your speech and listen to yourself. When writing, take care of the required length also.

Speech Topics - Engaging Topics to Choose From

You feel relief when your teacher says you are free to choose your speech topic. Feel free to write about anything you want. The problem is students still feel stuck in choosing an effective speech topic. If you are one of them, here is a list of the best speech ideas to help you get through the process.

  • What role do cats play in human’s lives
  • How to improve communication disorders
  • World’s fastest-growing country
  • Today’s world pollution rate
  • How to improve interpersonal skills
  • Are paper books better than e-books
  • Should the death penalty be abolished
  • Should prisoners be allowed to vote
  • Should voting be made compulsory
  • Is it better to live together before marriage

These are some of the interesting topics that you can consider. However, if you are still not sure about the topic of your speech, you can explore our article on  informative speech topics  and pick any of your choices.

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Speech Example

Stressing over on how to write a good speech? Speech examples are sure to be your best friend for effective speech writing and its effortless delivery.

Here is a sample speech example to help you get through your own speech writing process. Explore this example and get the answer on how to give a good speech.

Get Professional Help for Your Speech

If you are good at public speaking but lack writing skills or you do not have enough time to follow the mentioned points and write a speech, don't worry.

You can always contact us at 5StarEssays.com.

We have a highly qualified and amazing team of expert writers who can help you if you want to buy speeches online with high-quality content.

Contact our " write my essay " service with your requirements. Our essay writer will provide you with quality material that your audience will remember for a long time.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best introduction for a speech.

The best way to open a speech’s introduction is, to begin with, a story. Tell an inspiring story to your audience and connect it with your personal narrative.

What is the first step of speech writing?

The first step of writing a speech is to choose a topic. Choosing a good topic is important to have an engaging and great speech.

What are the five steps in speech writing?

Here are the five steps involved in writing a speech.

  • Choose a topic.
  • Investigate your audience.
  • Built an outline.
  • Rehearse the speech.
  • Revise and finalize.

What are the types of speech delivery?

Here are the types of speech delivery.

  • Extemporaneous

What are the two P’s required for good speech delivery?

The two P’s required for proper speech delivery are Preparation and Practice.

Cordon J.

Cordon. is a published author and writing specialist. He has worked in the publishing industry for many years, providing writing services and digital content. His own writing career began with a focus on literature and linguistics, which he continues to pursue. Cordon is an engaging and professional individual, always looking to help others achieve their goals.

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The Write Practice

How to Write a Speech Your Audience Remembers

by Sue Weems | 0 comments

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I’ve had some additional duties this year that have required me to add speech writing to my list of skills. I didn’t realize how much it would improve my writing in general. Even if you run in fear from public speaking (you’re in good company—95% of adults say it’s their number one fear), try these techniques for how to write a speech and see if speech writing helps your writing too!

How to Write a Speech Your Audience Remembers

I’ve received a couple big awards at work lately, and as a result, I’ve been called to speak at events. For an introvert like me, public speaking doesn’t come naturally. I’d much rather type out my words and publish them for an audience to read.

But writing a speech is great practice regardless of whether or not you’ll ever deliver it, because it forces you to think about audience, story, and message in a compressed format. Here’s what I’ve been practicing in my own speeches.

When I’m writing fiction, I tend to think about one ideal reader. In speechwriting, I’ve had to broaden how I think about audience.

Who will be there? What problems are they facing? What questions do they have? And most importantly, how can I speak effectively into those problems or questions with my message?

Knowing your audience is as important as knowing your readers. Your audience and readers have expectations. You make a promise by stepping to that podium that you will connect with them, even if it is only for a few minutes.

We’ve all sat through a boring or ineffective talk, lecture, or speech. What went wrong? It usually has to do with the connection of the message with the audience. If I don’t find it relevant, I’m going to have a hard time paying attention.

If you don’t know your audience, you’ll struggle to make that connection.

I attended a rally this week where we stood for several hours as people made speeches. There were probably ten speakers, and most were very good. They were clear and spoke into the concerns of the audience.

But two days later, I can only remember the specifics of two. You know what they had in common? Both told a story.

Our brains are hard-wired for story. A story is simply a person who wants something and has to overcome obstacles to get it; it’s transformation after struggle. A story uses clear imagery that stays with the audience long after the event.

Think about Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, with the line, “America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked ‘insufficient funds,'” or where he offers the image of children holding hands as the dream. His storytelling and imagery perfectly aligned with his message. It still resonates today.

If you’re writing a speech, find or write a story that illustrates your point and build your message from it. Get specific and use imagery that will stick in the audience's mind.

In fiction, the message is the theme. Sometimes it is explicitly stated, but often theme is implied. In a speech, the message has to be clear, succinct, and unambiguous, especially if it is to be memorable.

This can be the most challenging part of public speaking. It’s easy to say a lot of words. It’s hard to revise and limit yourself to speaking only what is needed.

I recently attended a training where we wrote out our message on paper. They gave us five or six minutes and I easily had a page.

Then, we had to work with a partner. Each of us read our message and then our partner condensed what we’d said into a sentence. Suddenly, I realized which parts of my message were off.

By the end of the exercise, we each had our message down to six words—enough for a quick elevator pitch that grabbed someone’s attention.

As I reflected on the training, I realized it was the writing process in action. First draft, feedback, revision, feedback, more cutting, feedback, and polishing until crystal clear.

Strengthen Your Communication

I can’t end without sharing Nancy Duarte’s fascinating talk on the shared structure of great speeches. She studied the structure of famous speeches like Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech and Steve Jobs’s speech when he introduced the iPhone and found they used similar structures. Well worth a listen.

Whether you have a speech to write for yourself or for a character in your book, I hope you’ll practice these strategies and find they strengthen your writing like they have mine.

What are your best tips for speech writing? Share in the comments .

Your character is given an award and asked to make a speech in front of a crowd. What's the award, and what does your character say? Keeping the tips above in mind, write your character's speech.

Take fifteen minutes to write. When you're done, share your writing in the comments , and be sure to leave feedback for your fellow writers!

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Sue Weems is a writer, teacher, and traveler with an advanced degree in (mostly fictional) revenge. When she’s not rationalizing her love for parentheses (and dramatic asides), she follows a sailor around the globe with their four children, two dogs, and an impossibly tall stack of books to read. You can read more of her writing tips on her website .

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Writing a speech

Topic outline.

The purpose of a speech is often to inform or persuade an audience. 

Speeches are usually written to be spoken directly to an audience and can be used to entertain, influencing the listeners that the viewpoint of the speaker is correct. 

Speeches can also be used to encourage the audience to take action or to change their behaviour in some way; for example, to join a particular school club or society, or to recycle more. 

The ways you use language and vocabulary when writing the words of a speech will depend on the audience and the purpose you are writing for; for example, in a speech to a group of teachers and parents giving your views on a recent proposal, formal language is most appropriate.

  • think about the audience that the speech is for  – are you giving your speech to a group of people you know, or do not know, or a mixture of both? If you know your audience well, you may be able to relax a little, but a speech is still a formal kind of talk and would usually not include slang
  • whether your audience are likely to disagree with what you say – you will need to consider any possible objections and deal with them. Use language carefully to make objections seem less significant; for example, using phrases like ‘A few people may still think, however’
  • the reason you are giving this speech and how you feel about this topic  – try to imagine the words of your speech as you would speak them out loud. Your tone of voice must match your message, so choose words that appeal to the emotions of your listeners. Focus on what you want your audience to know and feel by the end of your speech
  • how to engage your listeners  – f or example, you might use inclusive words or phrases like ‘we’, ‘all of us’ and ‘our’ to make your listeners feel that you are all on the same side.
  • Plan where you want to finish your speech and how you will get there before you start writing – t h e structure of a speech is usually in three parts. For example: 
  • An opening that grabs your audience's attention and makes the overall topic of your speech clear  – for example, pose a question to the audience where you can predict the answer.
  • A well-structured, supported and developed argument –  for example, to support your argument you might use real life examples or anecdotes.
  • A powerful conclusion  –  for example, group your final words or ideas in threes to help make them memorable or end with a thought- provoking question or image and thank your audience for listening.
  • Organise your ideas into paragraphs as appropriate – this will help you to develop and support your points convincingly, to build your argument and/or offer a full explanation of a particular point of view.
  • S how the connectio ns between ideas in sentences and paragraphs  –  where a new point or idea follows on from what you have already said you might use linking words or phrases such as, ‘in addition’, ‘likewise’ or ‘similarly’.
  • Select activity Example of a speech Example of a speech

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How to Write and Structure a Persuasive Speech

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The purpose of a persuasive speech is to convince your audience to agree with an idea or opinion that you present. First, you'll need to choose a side on a controversial topic, then you will write a speech to explain your position, and convince the audience to agree with you.

You can produce an effective persuasive speech if you structure your argument as a solution to a problem. Your first job as a speaker is to convince your audience that a particular problem is important to them, and then you must convince them that you have the solution to make things better.

Note: You don't have to address a real problem. Any need can work as the problem. For example, you could consider the lack of a pet, the need to wash one's hands, or the need to pick a particular sport to play as the "problem."

As an example, let's imagine that you have chosen "Getting Up Early" as your persuasion topic. Your goal will be to persuade classmates to get themselves out of bed an hour earlier every morning. In this instance, the problem could be summed up as "morning chaos."

A standard speech format has an introduction with a great hook statement, three main points, and a summary. Your persuasive speech will be a tailored version of this format.

Before you write the text of your speech, you should sketch an outline that includes your hook statement and three main points.

Writing the Text

The introduction of your speech must be compelling because your audience will make up their minds within a few minutes whether or not they are interested in your topic.

Before you write the full body you should come up with a greeting. Your greeting can be as simple as "Good morning everyone. My name is Frank."

After your greeting, you will offer a hook to capture attention. A hook sentence for the "morning chaos" speech could be a question:

  • How many times have you been late for school?
  • Does your day begin with shouts and arguments?
  • Have you ever missed the bus?

Or your hook could be a statistic or surprising statement:

  • More than 50 percent of high school students skip breakfast because they just don't have time to eat.
  • Tardy kids drop out of school more often than punctual kids.

Once you have the attention of your audience, follow through to define the topic/problem and introduce your solution. Here's an example of what you might have so far:

Good afternoon, class. Some of you know me, but some of you may not. My name is Frank Godfrey, and I have a question for you. Does your day begin with shouts and arguments? Do you go to school in a bad mood because you've been yelled at, or because you argued with your parent? The chaos you experience in the morning can bring you down and affect your performance at school.

Add the solution:

You can improve your mood and your school performance by adding more time to your morning schedule. You can accomplish this by setting your alarm clock to go off one hour earlier.

Your next task will be to write the body, which will contain the three main points you've come up with to argue your position. Each point will be followed by supporting evidence or anecdotes, and each body paragraph will need to end with a transition statement that leads to the next segment. Here is a sample of three main statements:

  • Bad moods caused by morning chaos will affect your workday performance.
  • If you skip breakfast to buy time, you're making a harmful health decision.
  • (Ending on a cheerful note) You'll enjoy a boost to your self-esteem when you reduce the morning chaos.

After you write three body paragraphs with strong transition statements that make your speech flow, you are ready to work on your summary.

Your summary will re-emphasize your argument and restate your points in slightly different language. This can be a little tricky. You don't want to sound repetitive but will need to repeat what you have said. Find a way to reword the same main points.

Finally, you must make sure to write a clear final sentence or passage to keep yourself from stammering at the end or fading off in an awkward moment. A few examples of graceful exits:

  • We all like to sleep. It's hard to get up some mornings, but rest assured that the reward is well worth the effort.
  • If you follow these guidelines and make the effort to get up a little bit earlier every day, you'll reap rewards in your home life and on your report card.

Tips for Writing Your Speech

  • Don't be confrontational in your argument. You don't need to put down the other side; just convince your audience that your position is correct by using positive assertions.
  • Use simple statistics. Don't overwhelm your audience with confusing numbers.
  • Don't complicate your speech by going outside the standard "three points" format. While it might seem simplistic, it is a tried and true method for presenting to an audience who is listening as opposed to reading.
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How To Write A Speech Outline

Do you have a speech coming up soon, but don’t know where to start when it comes to writing it? 

Don’t worry. 

The best way to start writing your speech is to first write an outline.

While to some, an outline may seem like an unnecessary extra step — after giving hundreds of speeches in my own career, I can assure you that first creating a speech outline is truly the best way to design a strong presentation that your audience will remember.

Should I Write A Speech Outline?

You might be wondering if you should really bother with a preparation outline. Is a speaking outline worth your time, or can you get through by just keeping your supporting points in mind?

Again, I highly recommend that all speakers create an outline as part of their speechwriting process. This step is an extremely important way to organize your main ideas and all the various elements of your speech in a way that will command your audience’s attention.

Good public speaking teachers will agree that an outline—even if it’s a rough outline—is the easiest way to propel you forward to a final draft of an organized speech that audience members will love.

Here are a few of the biggest benefits of creating an outline before diving straight into your speech.

Gain More Focus

By writing an outline, you’ll be able to center the focus of your speech where it belongs—on your thesis statement and main idea.

Remember, every illustration, example, or piece of information you share in your speech should be relevant to the key message you’re trying to deliver. And by creating an outline, you can ensure that everything relates back to your main point.

Keep Things Organized

Your speech should have an overall organizational pattern so that listeners will be able to follow your thoughts. You want your ideas to be laid out in a logical order that’s easy to track, and for all of the speech elements to correspond.

An outline serves as a structure or foundation for your speech, allowing you to see all of your main points laid out so you can easily rearrange them into an order that makes sense for easy listening.

Create Smoother Transitions

A speaking outline helps you create smoother transitions between the different parts of your speech.

When you know what’s happening before and after a certain section, it will be easy to accurately deliver transitional statements that make sense in context. Instead of seeming like several disjointed ideas, the parts of your speech will naturally flow into each other.

Save Yourself Time

An outline is an organization tool that will save you time and effort when you get ready to write the final draft of your speech. When you’re working off of an outline to write your draft, you can overcome “blank page syndrome.”

It will be much easier to finish the entire speech because the main points and sub-points are already clearly laid out for you.

Your only job is to finish filling everything in.

Preparing to Write A Speech Outline

Now that you know how helpful even the most basic of speech outlines can be in helping you write the best speech, here’s how to write the best outline for your next public speaking project.

How Long Should A Speech Outline Be?

The length of your speech outline will depend on the length of your speech. Are you giving a quick two-minute talk or a longer thirty-minute presentation? The length of your outline will reflect the length of your final speech.

Another factor that will determine the length of your outline is how much information you actually want to include in the outline. For some speakers, bullet points of your main points might be enough. In other cases, you may feel more comfortable with a full-sentence outline that offers a more comprehensive view of your speech topic.

The length of your outline will also depend on the type of outline you’re using at any given moment.

Types of Outlines

Did you know there are several outline types? Each type of outline is intended for a different stage of the speechwriting process. Here, we’re going to walk through:

  • Working outlines
  • Full-sentence outlines
  • Speaking outlines

Working Outline

Think of your working outline as the bare bones of your speech—the scaffolding you’re using as you just start to build your presentation. To create a working outline, you will need:

  • A speech topic
  • An idea for the “hook” in your introduction
  • A thesis statement
  • 3-5 main points (each one should make a primary claim that you support with references)
  • A conclusion

Each of your main points will also have sub-points, but we’ll get to those in a later step.

The benefit of a working outline is that it’s easy to move things around. If you think your main points don’t make sense in a certain order—or that one point needs to be scrapped entirely—it’s no problem to make the needed changes. You won’t be deleting any of your prior hard work because you haven’t really done any work yet.

Once you are confident in this “skeleton outline,” you can move on to the next, where you’ll start filling in more detailed information.

Full-sentence outline

As the name implies, your full-sentence outline contains full sentences. No bullet points or scribbled, “talk about x, y, z here.” Instead, research everything you want to include and write out the information in full sentences.

Why is this important? A full-sentence outline helps ensure that you are:

  • Including all of the information your audience needs to know
  • Organizing the material well
  • Staying within any time constraints you’ve been given

Don’t skip this important step as you plan your speech.

Speaking outline

The final type of outline you’ll need is a speaking outline. When it comes to the level of detail, this outline is somewhere in between your working outline and a full-sentence outline. 

You’ll include the main parts of your speech—the introduction, main points, and conclusion. But you’ll add a little extra detail about each one, too. This might be a quote that you don’t want to misremember or just a few words to jog your memory of an anecdote to share.

When you actually give your speech, this is the outline you will use. It might seem like it makes more sense to use your detailed full-sentence outline up on stage. However, if you use this outline, it’s all too easy to fall into the trap of reading your speech—which is not what you want to do. You’ll likely sound much more natural if you use your speaking outline.

How to Write A Speech Outline

We’ve covered the types of outlines you’ll work through as you write your speech. Now, let’s talk more about how you’ll come up with the information to add to each outline type.

Pick A Topic

Before you can begin writing an outline, you have to know what you’re going to be speaking about. In some situations, you may have a topic given to you—especially if you are in a public speaking class and must follow the instructor’s requirements. But in many cases, speakers must come up with their own topic for a speech.

Consider your audience and what kind of educational, humorous, or otherwise valuable information they need to hear. Your topic and message should of course be highly relevant to them. If you don’t know your audience well enough to choose a topic, that’s a problem.

Your audience is your first priority. If possible, however, it’s also helpful to choose a topic that appeals to you. What’s something you’re interested in and/or knowledgeable about? 

It will be much easier to write a speech on a topic you care about rather than one you don’t. If you can come up with a speech topic that appeals to your audience and is interesting to you, that’s the sweet spot for writing and delivering an unforgettable speech.

Write A Thesis Statement

The next step is to ask yourself two important questions:

  • What do you want your audience to take away from your speech?
  • How will you communicate this main message?

The key message of your speech can also be called your “thesis statement.”

Essentially, this is your main point—the most important thing you hope to get across.

You’ll most likely actually say your thesis statement verbatim during your speech. It should come at the end of your introduction. Then, you’ll spend the rest of your talk expanding on this statement, sharing more information that will prove the statement is true.

Consider writing your thesis statement right now—before you begin researching or outlining your speech. If you can refer back to this statement as you get to work, it will be much easier to make sure all of the elements correspond with each other throughout your speech.

An example of a good thesis statement might read like this:

  • Going for a run every day is good for your health.
  • It’s important to start saving for retirement early.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on many small businesses.

The second part of this step is to know how you will communicate your main message . For example, if your key point is that running improves physical health, you might get this across by:

  • Citing scientific studies that proved running is good for your health
  • Sharing your personal experience of going for a run every day

Your goal is for all of your sub-points and supporting material to reflect and support your main point. At the end of the speech, your audience should be appropriately motivated, educated, or convinced that your thesis statement is true.

Once you have a topic for your presentation and a good thesis statement, you can move on to the bulk of the outline.

The first part of your speech is the introduction, which should include a strong “hook” to grab the attention of your audience. There are endless directions you can go to create this hook. Don’t be afraid to get creative! You might try:

  • Telling a joke
  • Sharing an anecdote
  • Using a prop or visual aid
  • Asking a question (rhetorical or otherwise)

These are just a few examples of hooks that can make your audience sit up and take notice.

The rest of your introduction shouldn’t be too long—as a general rule of thumb, you want your introduction to take up about 10% of your entire speech. But there are a few other things you need to say.

Briefly introduce yourself and who you are to communicate why the audience should trust you. Mention why you’re giving this speech. 

Explain that you’re going to cover X main points—you can quickly list them—and include your thesis statement. 

You could also mention how long your speech will be and say what your audience will take away from it (“At the end of our 15 minutes together today, you’ll understand how to write a resume”).

Then smoothly transition into the body of your speech.

Next, you’ll write the body of your speech. This is the bulk of your presentation. It will include your main points and their sub-points. Here’s how this should look:

Your subpoints might be anecdotes, visual aids, or studies. However you decide to support your main points, make them memorable and engaging. Nobody wants to sit and listen to you recite a dry list of facts.

Remember, the amount of detail you include right now will depend on which outline you’re on. Your first outline, or working outline, doesn’t have to include every last little detail. Your goal is to briefly encapsulate all of the most important elements in your speech. 

But beyond that, you don’t need to write down every last detail or example right now. You don’t even have to write full sentences at this point. That will come in your second outline and other future drafts.

Your conclusion should concisely summarize the main points of your speech. You could do this by saying, “To recap as I finish up, today we learned…” and reiterate those primary points.

It’s also good to leave the audience with something to think about and/or discuss. Consider asking them a question that expands on your speech—something they can turn over in their minds the rest of the day. 

Or share one final story or quote that will leave them with lasting inspiration. Bonus points if your conclusion circles back around to your introduction or hook.

In other cases, you may want to end with a call to action. Are you promoting something? Make sure your audience knows what it is, how it will benefit them, and where they can find it. Or, your CTA might be as simple as plugging your Twitter handle and asking listeners to follow you.

Finally, don’t forget to say thank you to your audience for taking the time to listen.

Additional Helpful Speechwriting Tips

Your speech outline is important, but it’s not the only thing that goes into preparing to give a presentation. Take a look at these additional tips I recommend to help your speech succeed.

Use Visual Aids

Visual aids are a good way to make sure your audience stays engaged—that they listen closely, and remember what you said. Visual aids serve as an attention-getter for people who may not be listening closely. These aids also ensure that your points are sufficiently supported.

You might choose to incorporate any of the following in your talk:

  • A PowerPoint presentation
  • A chart or graph
  • A whiteboard or blackboard
  • A flip chart
  • A prop that you hold or interact with

Don’t overdo it. Remember, your speech is the main thing you’re presenting. Any visual aids are just that—aids. They’re a side dish, not the main entrée. Select one primary type of aid for your speech.

If you decide to include visual aids, use your speaking outline to make a note of which items you will incorporate where. You may want to place these items on your working outline. They should definitely be on your full-sentence outline.

Keep Your Audience Engaged

As you write and practice your speech, make sure you’re doing everything you can to keep your audience engaged the entire time. We’ve already talked about including stories and jokes, using visual aids, or asking questions to vary your talk and make it more interesting.

Your body language is another important component of audience engagement. Your posture should be straight yet relaxed, with shoulders back and feet shoulder-width apart. Keep your body open to the audience.

Make eye contact with different people in the audience. Incorporate hand gestures that emphasize certain points or draw attention to your visual aids.

Don’t be afraid to move around whatever space you have. Movement is especially helpful to indicate a clearer transition from one part of your speech to another. And smile! A simple smile goes a long way to help your audience relax.

Practice Your Speech

When you’re done with speechwriting, it’s time to get in front of the mirror and practice. Pay attention to your body language, gestures, and eye contact. 

Practice working with any visual aids or props you will be using. It’s also helpful to make a plan B—for instance, what will you do if the projector isn’t working and you can’t use your slides?

Ask a friend or family member if you can rehearse your speech for them. When you’re through, ask them questions about which parts held their attention and which ones didn’t.

You should also use your speaking outline and whatever other notes you’ll be using in your speech itself. Get used to referring to this outline as you go. But remember, don’t read anything verbatim (except maybe a quote). Your speaking outline is simply a guide to remind you where you’re going.

Learn to Speak Like A Leader

There’s a lot of work that goes into writing a speech outline. That’s undeniable. But an outline is the best way to organize and plan your presentation. When your speech outline is ready, it will be a breeze to write and then present your actual speech.

If you’re looking for more help learning how to become a strong public speaker, I recommend my free 5 Minute Speech Formula . This will help you start writing your speech and turn any idea into a powerful message.

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About Brian Tracy — Brian is recognized as the top sales training and personal success authority in the world today. He has authored more than 60 books and has produced more than 500 audio and video learning programs on sales, management, business success and personal development, including worldwide bestseller The Psychology of Achievement. Brian's goal is to help you achieve your personal and business goals faster and easier than you ever imagined. You can follow him on Twitter , Facebook , Pinterest , Linkedin and Youtube .

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Become a Writer Today

370+ Speech Writing Topics For Students

Discover our guide with great speech writing topics for debate speeches, persuasive speeches, informative speeches, and much more. Get answers below.

Writing and delivering a speech can be nerve-wracking, especially for the first time. Explore our top speech writing topics for college and high school students and get answers to your frequently asked questions about how to choose a speech topic and overcome anxiety surrounding public speaking. For tips on how to write a speech , check out our guide!

How to Prepare For Public Speaking 

Persuasive speech topics, informative speech topics, speech topics on environment and nature , speech topics on science and health , speech topics about technology , motivational speech topic ideas, speech topics on friendship , speech topics on family , speech topics on sports , debate speech topic ideas , speech topics on politics , speech topics on social issues , business speech topics , personal speech topics , special occasion speech topics  , travel speech topics, speech topics on education , psychology speech topics , funny speech writing topics , what are the different types of persuasive speech , what are some effective and easy ways to fight a fear of public speaking.

College and high school students often find themselves giving a speech for the first time, which can be stressful if you’ve never done public speaking before. Students can prepare ahead of time in several different ways to help set the stage for success – here are just a few:   

  • Learn the fundamentals of giving a good speech. This includes understanding the elements of a speech, such as the introduction, body, and conclusion. Each section should flow smoothly into the next and build upon the main point. Pay close attention to which words you choose and how your delivery comes across.
  • Practice makes perfect. Try to find opportunities to speak in front of an audience in different situations, even if it’s just in front of family, friends, or in front of a mirror. It can also help to record yourself so you can listen back and identify areas that need improvement. The more practice you have, the more confident you’ll feel when it comes time to give your speech.
  • Use relaxation techniques before giving your speech. You can start by taking some deep breaths and focusing on exhaling slowly. You can also try progressive muscle relaxation, which involves tensing and relaxing different muscle groups in your body several times until your muscles begin to relax on their own naturally. You can also check out these quick writing topics .

Speech Writing Topics: Persuasive speech topics

  • The dangers of social media. 
  • How to improve American healthcare. 
  • The problems with plastic bags. 
  • How cell phones lessen the quality of life. 
  • Why criminals need rights. 
  • If students should be required to study art. 
  • How the war on drugs harms communities of color.
  • If schools should ban certain types of books. 
  • If statues of slave owners should be removed from public property. 
  • If more practical subjects should be taught in school instead of algebra. 
  • If religion causes fighting and wars. 
  • If outlawing drugs makes them more desirable. 
  • If taking photographs of children in public should be illegal. 
  • How making food a reward sets the stage for eating disorders. 
  • If men should be granted paternity leave when they have or adopt a baby. 
  • If routine circumcision should be banned in the United States. 
  • How artificial intelligence stands to change the world. 
  • How American prisons are a form of modern-day slavery. 
  • Why the media needs more cultural and racial diversity. 
  • If restaurants have an obligation to purchase produce from local farmers. 
  • Global Warming & Climate Change 
  • Renewable Energy Benefits 
  • Problems In The American Education System 
  • Harmful Ingredients In Fast Food
  • Animal Testing, Zoos, And Other Forms of Animal Cruelty 
  • The Difference Between Real Life And Reality Shows
  • The Issue Of Indoor Pollution
  • Unethical Fast Fashion Practices 
  • The Benefits Of Journal Writing 
  • The Dangers Of Texting And Driving 
  • The Benefits Of Gender-Affirming Care For Trans People 
  • The History Of Racism In America 
  • The Dangers Of Hazing In College 
  • How Natural Disasters Develop With Climate Change 
  • How To Think Critically When Watching The News 
  • Homelessness Statistics And Trends In America 
  • The Use Of Color Psychology In Marketing  
  • The Physical Effects Of Tattoo Ink 
  • The Psychological Impacts Of Beauty Pageants  
  • How Social Media Affects The Brain
  • How best to protect endangered animals. 
  • If having pet birds is ethical. 
  • If vegetable gardens should replace grass lawns. 
  • The impact of plastic disposables on the environment. 
  • The most efficient type of renewable energy. 
  • How increasing train travel can benefit both people and the environment.
  • If zoos should be strictly regulated or banned. 
  • The impact of fracking on the environment. 
  • If animal testing should be outlawed. 
  • If the government needs to allocate more resources to national wildlife preserves. 
  • The deforestation crisis. 
  • Air pollution and the impact of poor air quality on human health. 
  • If people should be allowed to own certain types of exotic animals and keep them as pets. 
  • How to reduce the presence of microplastics in the ocean. 
  • How drilling for oil impacts water aquifers and sources of clean, fresh water in America. 
  • If all grocery stores should stop using plastic bags. 
  • If parents should be allowed to choose their child’s sex and physical characteristics 
  • If vaccinations should be mandatory. 
  • If private corporations have a responsibility to create sustainable products. 
  • The impact of robots on the environment. 
  • If cloning animals and humans is moral. 
  • Whether physician-assisted suicide and compassionate euthanization should be legalized.
  • If cigarette smoking should be outlawed. 
  • If minors should be allowed to purchase birth control without parental permission. 
  • If sugary drinks should be taxed to discourage overconsumption. 
  • If America should have a single-payer healthcare system. 
  • The importance of adequate mental health care for high school students. 
  • Racial bias in the American healthcare system. 
  • If women face higher rates of being denied adequate pain control by healthcare providers.
  • If cannabis is harmful or helpful for certain medical conditions. 
  • If fast food restaurants have a responsibility to offer more affordable healthy food options. 
  • The role of relaxation in physical and mental health. 
  • If organ donation should be mandatory. 
  • How to address the obesity epidemic in America. 
  • If doctors should be paid according to their patient outcomes. 
  • How to reduce the cost of prescription medications for the average person. 
  • The benefits of laughing on physical and mental health. 
  • If breastfeeding should be more normalized in America. 
  • Sources of indoor air pollution and its impact on physical health. 
  • If food additives in America are unsafe. 
  • How technology can improve daily life. 
  • The consequences of biological warfare. 
  • How the advancement of robotics will impact the human population. 
  • If the internet is more dangerous than it is beneficial. 
  • The role of social media and online bullying in teen suicide. 
  • Practical applications for 3D printing. 
  • The future of self-driving cars. 
  • The differences and similarities between computers and the human brain. 
  • If colonizing the moon is possible and beneficial or harmful to the human species. 
  • How cell phones affect the human body. 
  • If humans can be grown in an artificial womb. 
  • If text messaging jargon is having a negative impact on human language. 
  • How technology has changed over the years for the better or worse. 
  • The impact of cryptocurrency on world economics. 
  • Using virtual reality to augment mental health treatment. 
  • The intersection of artificial intelligence and animatronics.
  • The future applications of nanotechnology. 
  • The applications of drones in global military efforts. 
  •  If dependence on technology is a danger to humanity. 
  • The impacts of Wi-Fi signals on human health. 

Motivational speech topic ideas

  • Women’s Empowerment 
  • The Me Too Movement 
  • Overcoming Peer Pressure 
  • The Value Of Community Service 
  • Mental Health And Wellness 
  • Productivity And Time Management 
  • How To Own Up To Mistakes And Learn From Them 
  • The Benefits Of Meditation 
  • Money Management 
  • Taking Time For Yourself 
  • How To Become A Winner 
  • How To Be A Better Role Model
  • Turning Failures Into Successes 
  • Handling Rejection Gracefully 
  • How To Work Smarter Instead Of Harder 
  • Why Time Is More Valuable Than Money 
  • Setting Effective Goals 
  • How To Break Bad Habits 
  • How To Cope When Bad Things Happen 
  • Thinking And Speaking Positively
  • How mental health can affect friendships and other relationships.
  • Tips for managing conflicts with friends. 
  • How to communicate special needs effectively to friends. 
  • The qualities of a good friend. 
  • Signs of a toxic friendship and how to get out of one. 
  • How people from different generations can be friends. 
  • If sororities and fraternities promote friendships or cause problems. 
  • How to help a friend who is experiencing thoughts of self-harm. 
  • What loyalty and dependability mean in a friendship. 
  • How to hold friends accountable for wrongdoing without destroying the friendship. 
  • What can be done about bullying that occurs inside a friend group? 
  • If friends have a responsibility to report dangerous behavior. 
  • If men and women can be friends. 
  • If it’s a good idea to develop a friendship with someone before dating them and why. 
  • The benefits of keeping in touch with your childhood or high school friends. 
  • If groups of single parents can become friends and raise their children together. 
  • How friends can help each other succeed in life. 
  • The challenges of maintaining friendships as a busy adult. 
  • What gifts would you get your friends if money was no object? 
  • How to avoid jealousy in a friendship. 
  • Signs of toxic family dynamics and how to get out of harmful cycles. 
  • The definition and impact of generational trauma. 
  • Qualities of a strong and healthy family dynamic. 
  • How parents can build a loving family and home life. 
  • Communication tips for family members. 
  • If families with young children should limit their screen time. 
  • The benefits of going on family vacations. 
  • The best ways to balance work and family commitments.
  • The importance of staying in touch with family members who are far away. 
  • How having a family can enrich someone’s life. 
  • If you should be required to donate a lifesaving organ or blood to a family member. 
  • If children should be required to take care of elderly parents. 
  • If the Christian religion promotes misogyny within conservative families. 
  • If the number of children a couple can have should be regulated by the government. 
  • If parents should be held accountable for crimes committed by their children. 
  • If couples should be required to take parenting classes before starting a family. 
  • How spanking causes brain damage in young children. 
  • Misconceptions new parents have about raising kids in modern society. 
  • What it means to go “no contact” with a parent and why adult children choose to leave their families.
  • What a “chosen family” is and how people develop familial relationships outside of their blood relatives. 
  • What Is Good Sportsmanship?
  • Professional Sports Salaries 
  • How Sports Impact Human Psychology
  • Sports And Mental Development 
  • Benefits Of Childhood Sports 
  • How Sports Teach Morals 
  • Do International Sports Promote World Peace?
  • Why Dance Is A Sport 
  • Should School Sports Be Mandatory?
  • What Competitive Sports Teach About Life 
  • Sports and Performance Enhancing Drugs 
  • Trans People In Sports 
  • The Role Of Social Media In Sports 
  • How Sports Build Social Skills
  • How Losing At Sports Teaches Life Lessons 
  • Are Professional Sports Too Commercialized Now? 
  • Sports And Virtual Reality 
  • The Future Of College Sports 
  • What Players Want Sports Coaches To Know 
  • Sports And Disabilities 
  • Violent Video Games 
  • The Death Penalty 
  • Human Rights Issues 
  • Obesity in America
  • Mass Shootings In Public Places 
  • Alcohol Has A Greater Negative Impact On Society Than Cannabis 
  • The War Against Drugs 
  • Cellphone Policies In Schools 
  • Religious Indoctrination Is Child Abuse 
  • Police & Qualified Immunity 
  • Regulating Senior Drivers 
  • Affirmative Action 
  • Stem Cell Research 
  • Peaceful Protests 
  • Contraceptive Regulation 
  • Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) 
  • Arranged Marriages 
  • Censorship 
  • Animal Breeding 
  • The Adoption Industry 
  • If America is not a true democracy. 
  • If corporations should be allowed to donate to political campaigns. 
  • If celebrities should be able to run for public office. 
  • If poverty should be a government priority. 
  • The prevalence of political corruption in America. 
  • If the voting age should be raised in America. 
  • If the United States should fund wars between other countries. 
  • If national voter ID laws would disenfranchise minority voters. 
  • The definition and prevalence of domestic terrorism in America. 
  • Why it’s important for young people to vote. 
  • If far-right influencers promote dangerous ideals. 
  • If the government should spend less money on the military and wars. 
  • If Social Security benefits should be preserved for future generations. 
  • If Americans should get to vote for who serves on the Supreme Court. 
  • If Congress should have term limits. 
  • If the Electoral College should be abolished. 
  • How minorities are represented in Congress. 
  • If private for-profit prisons should be banned or heavily regulated. 
  • If the police should be required to operate their body cameras at all times. 
  • If people imprisoned for marijuana offenses should be let out in states where cannabis is now legal. 
  • Abortion 
  • Free Education In America 
  • Right To Marry 
  • Racism And Poverty In America 
  • Food Deserts And Malnutrition 
  • Substance Abuse And Crime Rates 
  • The Right To Housing 
  • Wage Inequality 
  • Crime Recidivism Reduction 
  • Child Labor 
  • Agricultural Integrity 
  • Taxing Religious Institutions 
  • Prostitution 
  • Minimum Wage 
  • Common Sense Gun Control Laws 
  • Gender And Sexual Orientation Discrimination 
  • Violence In Media 
  • Paid Maternity And Paternity Leave In America 
  • What skills do entrepreneurs need to be successful? 
  • How to motivate and engage employees at work. 
  • Top indicators of business success. 
  • How to make money using your passion. 
  • The importance of good financial planning for businesses. 
  • How companies can create loyal customers for life. 
  • Why businesses need to create a powerful brand image in today’s competitive market. 
  • Tips for people who want to start their own business. 
  • How to create a home office. 
  • Why do some companies have high turnover rates? 
  • If incentivized customer reviews are unethical. 
  • If businesses should be held responsible for false advertising. 
  • If businesses should be allowed to lobby people in Congress. 
  • Ethical marketing practices for new businesses. 
  • How to balance owning a business and starting a family. 
  • Women entrepreneurs in America. 
  • Do companies have a responsibility to help manage inflation?
  • The disparity between CEO and employee pay. 
  • If the existence of billionaires is ethical. 
  • How businesses can cultivate positive company culture. 
  • The scariest thing you ever did and how you overcame your fear. 
  • A difficult decision you had to make and why you made the choice you did. 
  • Your favorite teacher and what you learned from them. 
  • Something you learned about yourself that improved your life. 
  • A regret that you have and what you wish you would have done instead and why. 
  • Something valuable you broke or lost and how it made you feel. 
  • Someone you admire in your personal life and what they taught you. 
  • Your ambitions and why you want to achieve them. 
  • A family member you looked up to as a child and why. 
  • The most exciting thing you’ve ever done and if you would do it again. 
  • The type of job you want to hold in the future and why. 
  • Specific expertise you hold and how it can provide value to your community. 
  • Charities or social initiatives you support and why. 
  • What your favorite motivational quote is and why. 
  • Something that makes you unique and distinguishes you from other people. 
  • The historical figure you most look up to and why. 
  • A time you failed at something you tried but learned an important lesson from the experience. 
  • A close call you had with something and how the situation might have turned out differently. 
  • Somewhere you would visit in the world and why you would go there. 
  • Something you learned watching television or listening to the radio that changed your life. 
  • Graduation Speeches 
  • Valedictorian Speeches
  • Independence Day Speeches 
  • Wedding Toasts
  • Eulogies 
  • Speeches For Beauty Pageants 
  • Pep Rally Speeches 
  • Award Acceptance Speeches 
  • Introduction Speeches 
  • Presentation Speeches 
  • Farewell Speeches 
  • Dedication Speeches 
  • Commemorative Speeches 
  • Retirement Speeches
  • Welcome Speeches 
  • Birthday Speeches 
  • Tribute Speeches 
  • Keynote Addresses 
  • Anniversary Speeches 
  • Bar/Bat Mitzvah Speeches 
  • If traveling to Hawaii is ethical. 
  • If it’s dangerous for women to travel internationally alone. 
  • How travel can be educational. 
  • If vacations have a positive impact on emotional and psychological health. 
  • How travel can help prevent burnout. 
  • The dangers of drinking tap water when traveling to other countries. 
  • If there should be more travel accommodations for plus-size people. 
  • How viruses spread on cruise ships. 
  • Top reasons people travel. 
  • How to manage travel frustrations like missed flights and canceled reservations. 
  • What to do if there’s an emergency while traveling. 
  • Ethical tourism in poor countries. 
  • How to get to know a country’s customs when traveling. 
  • The impact of traveling on the economy. 
  • How American tourism impacts politics. 
  • The intersection between travel and religion. 
  • How the COVID-19 pandemic affected the travel industry. 
  • What travel means to you. 
  • If young children should be allowed to travel to dangerous places. 
  • How to navigate currency exchange issues when traveling. 
  • How COVID-19 impacted public education in America. 
  • The benefits of e-learning for children of different ages and education levels. 
  • If corporal punishment should be allowed in schools with or without parental consent. 
  • If sodas and energy drinks should be allowed in high schools. 
  • The different types of learning styles and how these play a role in public education. 
  • The impact of public school on child socialization. 
  • If schools should abolish homework policies. 
  • How elementary and middle schools should treat young trans students. 
  • The role of the Internet in American education today. 
  • How schools can provide more support to students with learning disabilities. 
  • If special education in schools is actually beneficial to students who are struggling in class. 
  • Comparing American schools to educational institutions in other countries. 
  • If students should be taught sex education in schools and if so, to what degree? 
  • If high school students should have access to condoms at school. 
  • If college should be free. 
  • Why teachers of all grade levels don’t make enough money in America. 
  • If a student’s grades are an indicator of their intelligence. 
  • If students should be required to learn etiquette at a certain age. 
  • If public education institutions should implement school uniform policies. 
  • If the pressures of school have a negative impact on kids who should be enjoying their childhood. 
  • The definition of trauma and how it impacts young children. 
  • How emotional abuse impacts psychological development in children. 
  • How dissociative disorders work to protect the brain from the impact of severe trauma. 
  • How reverse psychology works. 
  • The greatest contribution to modern psychology in history. 
  • How people with different personality disorders experience the world. 
  • The psychological relationship between parents and their children. 
  • The intersection between sleep and psychology. 
  • The differences between psychology and psychiatry. 
  • How psychologists benefit society and human development. 
  • How child psychology differs from adult treatment modalities. 
  • How psychological treatment has changed over the years. 
  • If basic psychology should be a required high school or college course. 
  • How violent movies and television impact human psychology.
  • How short and long-term memories form. 
  • The impact of bullying on child psychological development. 
  • The psychological impact of childhood neglect. 
  • If antidepressants are overprescribed.
  • The comorbidity of trauma and personality disorders. 
  • If birth order affects a child’s psychological development. 

Looking for more? You might also be interested in our list of the best report writing topics .

  • How Trix cereal discriminates against rabbits by making their cereal for kids. 
  • If plants have feelings and if vegans are committing acts of vegetable cruelty. 
  • Why the grass might literally be greener on the other side of a fence. 
  • How to be good at being lazy. 
  • Why lying well can be considered a talent. 
  • How being annoying can be considered an art. 
  • How to fail at a job interview. 
  • Tell a story about a joke that didn’t go over well. 
  • Compare Instagram to real life. 
  • If regifting is an ethical practice.
  • Why clothing companies don’t put pockets in women’s clothes. 
  • Why bad pickup lines work better than traditionally good pickup lines. 
  • Why a cartoon character should be elected President. 
  • A practical guide to surviving the zombie apocalypse. 
  • If internet surfing counts as an aerobic workout. 
  • Why kids shouldn’t have to clean their rooms. 
  • The worst business slogans and why. 
  • The correct way to offend someone. 
  • How to cheat at the game of Life. 
  • A list of the worst gifts ever. 

If you liked this post, you might also find these essays about being a student helpful.

The three main types of persuasive speeches are value-based, policy-based, and emotional-based. Value-based speeches argue a certain concept based on its merits, while a policy persuasive speech argues for a certain course of action. Emotional-based speeches seek to elicit a certain response from the audience by evoking an emotional reaction.

Some people find that focusing on their breathing helps to calm their nerves, while others find visualization exercises like picturing the audience in their underwear to be a helpful way to diffuse the tension. Others say that simply accepting that they will be nervous and embracing that feeling is the best way to get through it.  

Looking for more? Check out our round-up of the best inspirational books !

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Meet Rachael, the editor at Become a Writer Today. With years of experience in the field, she is passionate about language and dedicated to producing high-quality content that engages and informs readers. When she's not editing or writing, you can find her exploring the great outdoors, finding inspiration for her next project.

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Frantically Speaking

15 Powerful Speech Opening Lines (And How to Create Your Own)

Hrideep barot.

  • Public Speaking , Speech Writing

powerful speech opening

Powerful speech opening lines set the tone and mood of your speech. It’s what grips the audience to want to know more about the rest of your talk.

The first few seconds are critical. It’s when you have maximum attention of the audience. And you must capitalize on that!

Instead of starting off with something plain and obvious such as a ‘Thank you’ or ‘Good Morning’, there’s so much more you can do for a powerful speech opening (here’s a great article we wrote a while ago on how you should NOT start your speech ).

To help you with this, I’ve compiled some of my favourite openings from various speakers. These speakers have gone on to deliver TED talks , win international Toastmaster competitions or are just noteworthy people who have mastered the art of communication.

After each speaker’s opening line, I have added how you can include their style of opening into your own speech. Understanding how these great speakers do it will certainly give you an idea to create your own speech opening line which will grip the audience from the outset!

Alright! Let’s dive into the 15 powerful speech openings…

Note: Want to take your communications skills to the next level? Book a complimentary consultation with one of our expert communication coaches. We’ll look under the hood of your hurdles and pick two to three growth opportunities so you can speak with impact!

1. Ric Elias

Opening: “Imagine a big explosion as you climb through 3,000 ft. Imagine a plane full of smoke. Imagine an engine going clack, clack, clack. It sounds scary. Well I had a unique seat that day. I was sitting in 1D.”

How to use the power of imagination to open your speech?

Putting your audience in a state of imagination can work extremely well to captivate them for the remainder of your talk.

It really helps to bring your audience in a certain mood that preps them for what’s about to come next. Speakers have used this with high effectiveness by transporting their audience into an imaginary land to help prove their point.

When Ric Elias opened his speech, the detail he used (3000 ft, sound of the engine going clack-clack-clack) made me feel that I too was in the plane. He was trying to make the audience experience what he was feeling – and, at least in my opinion, he did.

When using the imagination opening for speeches, the key is – detail. While we want the audience to wander into imagination, we want them to wander off to the image that we want to create for them. So, detail out your scenario if you’re going to use this technique.

Make your audience feel like they too are in the same circumstance as you were when you were in that particular situation.

2. Barack Obama

Opening: “You can’t say it, but you know it’s true.”

3. Seth MacFarlane

Opening: “There’s nowhere I would rather be on a day like this than around all this electoral equipment.” (It was raining)

How to use humour to open your speech?

When you use humour in a manner that suits your personality, it can set you up for a great speech. Why? Because getting a laugh in the first 30 seconds or so is a great way to quickly get the audience to like you.

And when they like you, they are much more likely to listen to and believe in your ideas.

Obama effortlessly uses his opening line to entice laughter among the audience. He brilliantly used the setting (the context of Trump becoming President) and said a line that completely matched his style of speaking.

Saying a joke without really saying a joke and getting people to laugh requires you to be completely comfortable in your own skin. And that’s not easy for many people (me being one of them).

If the joke doesn’t land as expected, it could lead to a rocky start.

Keep in mind the following when attempting to deliver a funny introduction:

  • Know your audience: Make sure your audience gets the context of the joke (if it’s an inside joke among the members you’re speaking to, that’s even better!). You can read this article we wrote where we give you tips on how you can actually get to know your audience better to ensure maximum impact with your speech openings
  • The joke should suit your natural personality. Don’t make it look forced or it won’t elicit the desired response
  • Test the opening out on a few people who match your real audience. Analyze their response and tweak the joke accordingly if necessary
  • Starting your speech with humour means your setting the tone of your speech. It would make sense to have a few more jokes sprinkled around the rest of the speech as well as the audience might be expecting the same from you

4. Mohammed Qahtani

Opening: Puts a cigarette on his lips, lights a lighter, stops just before lighting the cigarette. Looks at audience, “What?”

5. Darren Tay

Opening: Puts a white pair of briefs over his pants.

How to use props to begin your speech?

The reason props work so well in a talk is because in most cases the audience is not expecting anything more than just talking. So when a speaker pulls out an object that is unusual, everyone’s attention goes right to it.

It makes you wonder why that prop is being used in this particular speech.

The key word here is unusual . To grip the audience’s attention at the beginning of the speech, the prop being used should be something that the audience would never expect. Otherwise, it just becomes something that is common. And common = boring!

What Mohammed Qahtani and Darren Tay did superbly well in their talks was that they used props that nobody expected them to.

By pulling out a cigarette and lighter or a white pair of underwear, the audience can’t help but be gripped by what the speaker is about to do next. And that makes for a powerful speech opening.

6. Simon Sinek

Opening: “How do you explain when things don’t go as we assume? Or better, how do you explain when others are able to achieve things that seem to defy all of the assumptions?”

7. Julian Treasure

Opening: “The human voice. It’s the instrument we all play. It’s the most powerful sound in the world. Probably the only one that can start a war or say “I love you.” And yet many people have the experience that when they speak people don’t listen to them. Why is that? How can we speak powerfully to make change in the world?”

How to use questions to open a speech?

I use this method often. Starting off with a question is the simplest way to start your speech in a manner that immediately engages the audience.

But we should keep our questions compelling as opposed to something that is fairly obvious.

I’ve heard many speakers start their speeches with questions like “How many of us want to be successful?”

No one is going to say ‘no’ to that and frankly, I just feel silly raising my hand at such questions.

Simon Sinek and Jullian Treasure used questions in a manner that really made the audience think and make them curious to find out what the answer to that question is.

What Jullian Treasure did even better was the use of a few statements which built up to his question. This made the question even more compelling and set the theme for what the rest of his talk would be about.

So think of what question you can ask in your speech that will:

  • Set the theme for the remainder of your speech
  • Not be something that is fairly obvious
  • Be compelling enough so that the audience will actually want to know what the answer to that question will be

8. Aaron Beverley

Opening: Long pause (after an absurdly long introduction of a 57-word speech title). “Be honest. You enjoyed that, didn’t you?”

How to use silence for speech openings?

The reason this speech opening stands out is because of the fact that the title itself is 57 words long. The audience was already hilariously intrigued by what was going to come next.

But what’s so gripping here is the way Aaron holds the crowd’s suspense by…doing nothing. For about 10 to 12 seconds he did nothing but stand and look at the audience. Everyone quietened down. He then broke this silence by a humorous remark that brought the audience laughing down again.

When going on to open your speech, besides focusing on building a killer opening sentence, how about just being silent?

It’s important to keep in mind that the point of having a strong opening is so that the audience’s attention is all on you and are intrigued enough to want to listen to the rest of your speech.

Silence is a great way to do that. When you get on the stage, just pause for a few seconds (about 3 to 5 seconds) and just look at the crowd. Let the audience and yourself settle in to the fact that the spotlight is now on you.

I can’t put my finger on it, but there is something about starting the speech off with a pure pause that just makes the beginning so much more powerful. It adds credibility to you as a speaker as well, making you look more comfortable and confident on stage. 

If you want to know more about the power of pausing in public speaking , check out this post we wrote. It will give you a deeper insight into the importance of pausing and how you can harness it for your own speeches. You can also check out this video to know more about Pausing for Public Speaking:

9. Dan Pink

Opening: “I need to make a confession at the outset here. Little over 20 years ago, I did something that I regret. Something that I’m not particularly proud of. Something that in many ways I wish no one would ever know but that here I feel kind of obliged to reveal.”

10. Kelly McGonigal

Opening: “I have a confession to make. But first I want you to make a little confession to me.”

How to use a build-up to open your speech?

When there are so many amazing ways to start a speech and grip an audience from the outset, why would you ever choose to begin your speech with a ‘Good morning?’.

That’s what I love about build-ups. They set the mood for something awesome that’s about to come in that the audience will feel like they just have to know about.

Instead of starting a speech as it is, see if you can add some build-up to your beginning itself. For instance, in Kelly McGonigal’s speech, she could have started off with the question of stress itself (which she eventually moves on to in her speech). It’s not a bad way to start the speech.

But by adding the statement of “I have a confession to make” and then not revealing the confession for a little bit, the audience is gripped to know what she’s about to do next and find out what indeed is her confession.

11. Tim Urban

Opening: “So in college, I was a government major. Which means that I had to write a lot of papers. Now when a normal student writes a paper, they might spread the work out a little like this.”

12. Scott Dinsmore

Opening: “8 years ago, I got the worst career advice of my life.”

How to use storytelling as a speech opening?

“The most powerful person in the world is the storyteller.” Steve Jobs

Storytelling is the foundation of good speeches. Starting your speech with a story is a great way to grip the audience’s attention. It makes them yearn to want to know how the rest of the story is going to pan out.

Tim Urban starts off his speech with a story dating back to his college days. His use of slides is masterful and something we all can learn from. But while his story sounds simple, it does the job of intriguing the audience to want to know more.

As soon as I heard the opening lines, I thought to myself “If normal students write their paper in a certain manner, how does Tim write his papers?”

Combine such a simple yet intriguing opening with comedic slides, and you’ve got yourself a pretty gripping speech.

Scott Dismore’s statement has a similar impact. However, just a side note, Scott Dismore actually started his speech with “Wow, what an honour.”

I would advise to not start your talk with something such as that. It’s way too common and does not do the job an opening must, which is to grip your audience and set the tone for what’s coming.

13. Larry Smith

Opening: “I want to discuss with you this afternoon why you’re going to fail to have a great career.”

14. Jane McGonigal

Opening: “You will live 7.5 minutes longer than you would have otherwise, just because you watched this talk.”

How to use provocative statements to start your speech?

Making a provocative statement creates a keen desire among the audience to want to know more about what you have to say. It immediately brings everyone into attention.

Larry Smith did just that by making his opening statement surprising, lightly humorous, and above all – fearful. These elements lead to an opening statement which creates so much curiosity among the audience that they need to know how your speech pans out.

This one time, I remember seeing a speaker start a speech with, “Last week, my best friend committed suicide.” The entire crowd was gripped. Everyone could feel the tension in the room.

They were just waiting for the speaker to continue to know where this speech will go.

That’s what a hard-hitting statement does, it intrigues your audience so much that they can’t wait to hear more! Just a tip, if you do start off with a provocative, hard-hitting statement, make sure you pause for a moment after saying it.

Silence after an impactful statement will allow your message to really sink in with the audience.

Related article: 5 Ways to Grab Your Audience’s Attention When You’re Losing it!

15. Ramona J Smith

Opening: In a boxing stance, “Life would sometimes feel like a fight. The punches, jabs and hooks will come in the form of challenges, obstacles and failures. Yet if you stay in the ring and learn from those past fights, at the end of each round, you’ll be still standing.”

How to use your full body to grip the audience at the beginning of your speech?

In a talk, the audience is expecting you to do just that – talk. But when you enter the stage and start putting your full body into use in a way that the audience does not expect, it grabs their attention.

Body language is critical when it comes to public speaking. Hand gestures, stage movement, facial expressions are all things that need to be paid attention to while you’re speaking on stage. But that’s not I’m talking about here.

Here, I’m referring to a unique use of the body that grips the audience, like how Ramona did. By using her body to get into a boxing stance, imitating punches, jabs and hooks with her arms while talking – that’s what got the audience’s attention.

The reason I say this is so powerful is because if you take Ramona’s speech and remove the body usage from her opening, the entire magic of the opening falls flat.

While the content is definitely strong, without those movements, she would not have captured the audience’s attention as beautifully as she did with the use of her body.

So if you have a speech opening that seems slightly dull, see if you can add some body movement to it.

If your speech starts with a story of someone running, actually act out the running. If your speech starts with a story of someone reading, actually act out the reading.

It will make your speech opening that much more impactful.

Related article: 5 Body Language Tips to Command the Stage

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Final Words

So there it is! 15 speech openings from some of my favourite speeches. Hopefully, these will act as a guide for you to create your own opening which is super impactful and sets you off on the path to becoming a powerful public speaker!

But remember, while a speech opening is super important, it’s just part of an overall structure.

If you’re serious about not just creating a great speech opening but to improve your public speaking at an overall level, I would highly recommend you to check out this course: Acumen Presents: Chris Anderson on Public Speaking on Udemy. Not only does it have specific lectures on starting and ending a speech, but it also offers an in-depth guide into all the nuances of public speaking. 

Being the founder of TED Talks, Chris Anderson provides numerous examples of the best TED speakers to give us a very practical way of overcoming stage fear and delivering a speech that people will remember. His course has helped me personally and I would definitely recommend it to anyone looking to learn public speaking. 

No one is ever “done” learning public speaking. It’s a continuous process and you can always get better. Keep learning, keep conquering and keep being awesome!

Lastly, if you want to know how you should NOT open your speech, we’ve got a video for you:

Hrideep Barot

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writing a speech questions

writing a speech questions

15 Informative Speech Examples to Inspire Your Next Talk

  • The Speaker Lab
  • May 13, 2024

Table of Contents

A good informative speech is one of the most effective tools in a speaker’s arsenal. But with so many potential topics out there, it can be tough to know where to start. That’s why we’ve compiled 15 informative speech examples to help you find your perfect subject. Whether you’re unearthing secrets from history for your listeners or delving into future technologies, informative speeches can prove to be the recipe for the perfect talk.

But crafting an effective informative speech is about more than just picking a topic. You have to research topics, put your thoughts in order, and speak up clearly and confidently. In this post, we’ll explore strategies for each step of the process, so you can create a speech that informs, engages, and makes a lasting impact on your listeners. Let’s get started.

15 Informative Speech Examples

If you’re looking for some inspiration for your next informative speech, look no further. Below are 15 examples of informative speech topics that are sure to engage and educate your audience.

  • The history and evolution of social media platforms
  • The benefits and drawbacks of renewable energy sources
  • The impact of sleep deprivation on mental and physical health
  • The role of emotional intelligence in personal and professional success
  • The science behind climate change and its potential consequences
  • The importance of financial literacy for young adults
  • The influence of artificial intelligence on various industries
  • The benefits of regular exercise and a balanced diet
  • The history and cultural significance of a specific art form or genre
  • The impact of technology on interpersonal communication
  • The psychology behind procrastination and effective strategies to overcome it
  • The role of diversity and inclusion in fostering innovation and creativity
  • The importance of mental health awareness and resources for students
  • The future of space exploration and its potential benefits for humanity
  • The impact of globalization on local economies and cultures

These topics cover a wide range of subjects, from technology and science to psychology and culture. By choosing one of these informative speech examples, you’ll have plenty of material to work with to create an engaging and educational presentation.

Remember, the key to a successful informative speech is to choose a topic that you’re passionate about and that will resonate with your audience. Do your research, organize your thoughts, and practice your delivery to ensure that your message comes across loud and clear.

What Is an Informative Speech?

If you’ve ever been to a conference or seminar, chances are you’ve heard an informative speech. But what exactly is an informative speech? Simply put, it’s a type of speech designed to educate the audience on a particular topic. The goal is to provide interesting and useful information, ensuring the audience walks away with new knowledge or insights. Unlike persuasive speeches that aim to convince the audience of a viewpoint, informative speeches focus on explaining a subject clearly and objectively.

Types of Informative Speeches

Informative speeches come in various forms, each with its own purpose. The most common types are definition, explanation, description, and demonstration speeches. Depending on the objective, an informative speech can take on different structures and styles.

For example, a definition speech aims to explain a concept or term, while a demonstration speech shows the audience how to perform a task or process. An explanatory speech, on the other hand, provides a detailed account of a complex subject, breaking it down into digestible parts.

Purpose of Informative Speeches

At its core, the purpose of an informative speech is to share knowledge with the audience. These speeches are characterized by their fact-based, non-persuasive nature. The focus is on delivering information in an engaging and accessible way.

A well-crafted informative speech not only educates but also sparks curiosity and encourages further learning. By dedicating yourself to providing valuable information and appealing to your audience’s interests, you can succeed as an informative speaker.

Strategies for Selecting an Informative Speech Topic

Choosing the right topic is crucial for an effective informative speech. You want a subject that is not only interesting to you but also relevant and engaging for your audience. Consider their knowledge level, background, and expectations when selecting your topic.

One strategy is to focus on a subject you’re passionate about or have expertise in. This allows you to speak with authority and enthusiasm, making your speech more compelling. Another approach is to address current events or trending topics that are on people’s minds.

When brainstorming potential topics, consider your speech’s purpose and the type of informative speech you want to deliver. Is your goal to define a concept, explain a process, describe an event, or demonstrate a skill? Answering these questions will help guide your topic selection.

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How to Write an Informative Speech

Now that you’ve selected your topic, it’s time to start writing your informative speech. The key to a successful speech is thorough preparation and a clear, organized structure. Let’s break down the steps involved in crafting an engaging and informative presentation.

Researching Your Topic

Before you start writing, it’s essential to conduct thorough research on your topic. Gather facts, statistics, examples, and other supporting information for your informative speech. These things will help you explain and clarify the subject matter to your audience.

As you research, use reliable sources such as academic journals, reputable websites, and expert opinions to ensure the accuracy and credibility of your information. Take notes and organize your findings in a way that makes sense for your speech’s structure.

Structuring Your Speech

A typical informative speech structure includes three main parts, namely, an introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction should grab the audience’s attention, establish your credibility , and preview the main points you’ll cover.

The body of your speech is where you’ll present your main points and supporting evidence. Use clear transitions between each point to maintain a logical flow. The conclusion should summarize your key takeaways and leave a lasting impression on your audience.

Outlining Your Speech

Creating an outline is a crucial step in organizing your thoughts and ensuring a coherent flow of information. Start by listing your main points and then add subpoints and supporting details for each section.

A well-structured outline will serve as a roadmap for your speech, keeping you on track and helping you stay focused on your key messages. It also makes the writing process more efficient and less overwhelming.

Writing Your Draft

With your outline in hand, it’s time to start writing your draft. Focus on presenting information clearly and concisely, using simple language and avoiding jargon. Provide examples and analogies throughout your informative speech in order to illustrate complex ideas and make them more relatable to your audience.

As you write, keep your audience in mind and tailor your language and examples to their level of understanding. Use transitions to link your ideas and maintain a smooth flow throughout the speech.

Editing and Revising

Once you’ve completed your draft, take the time to edit and revise your speech. First, check for clarity, accuracy, and logical organization. Then, eliminate unnecessary details, repetition, and filler words.

Read your speech aloud to identify any awkward phrasing or unclear passages. Lastly, seek feedback from others and be open to making changes based on their suggestions. Remember, the goal is to create a polished and effective informative speech.

Delivering an Informative Speech

You’ve written a fantastic informative speech, but now comes the real challenge: delivering it effectively. The way you present your speech can make all the difference in engaging your audience and ensuring they retain the information you’re sharing.

Practicing Your Speech

Practice makes perfect, and this couldn’t be more true when it comes to public speaking. Rehearse your speech multiple times to build confidence and familiarity with the content. Practice in front of a mirror, family members, or friends to get comfortable with your delivery.

As you practice, focus on your pacing, intonation, and body language. Aim for a conversational tone and maintain eye contact with your audience. The more you practice, the more natural and engaging your delivery will become.

Using Visual Aids

Visual aids such as slides, charts, or props can enhance your informative speech by making complex information more accessible and engaging. When utilized in your informative speech, they can help illustrate key points, provide visual examples, and break up the monotony of a purely verbal presentation.

Of course, it’s important to ensure your visuals are clear, relevant, and easy to understand. Otherwise, they may end up obscuring your points instead of clarifying them. In light of this, avoid cluttering your slides with too much text or overwhelming your audience with too many visuals. Use them strategically to support your message, not distract from it.

Engaging Your Audience

Engaging your audience is crucial for a successful informative speech. Use rhetorical questions, anecdotes, or interactive elements to keep them involved and attentive. Encourage participation, if appropriate, and maintain a conversational tone to create a connection with your listeners.

Pay attention to your audience’s reactions and adapt your delivery accordingly. If you sense confusion or disinterest, try rephrasing your points or providing additional examples to clarify your message. Remember, your goal is to educate and inspire your audience, so keep them at the forefront of your mind throughout your speech.

Handling Nerves

It’s normal to feel nervous before and during a speech, but there are strategies to help you manage those nerves . Take deep breaths, visualize success, and focus on your message rather than your anxiety. Remember, your audience wants you to succeed, and a little nervousness can actually enhance your performance by showing enthusiasm and authenticity.

If you find yourself getting overwhelmed, take a moment to pause, collect your thoughts, and regain your composure. Smile, make eye contact, and remind yourself that you’ve prepared thoroughly and have valuable information to share.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

To deliver an effective informative speech, it’s important to be aware of common pitfalls and mistakes. One of the biggest errors is overloading your audience with too much information. Remember, less is often more when it comes to public speaking.

Another mistake is failing to organize your content logically or using complex jargon without explanation. Make sure your speech has a clear structure and that you’re explaining any technical terms or concepts in a way that your audience can understand.

Finally, don’t neglect the importance of practice and preparation. Winging it or relying too heavily on notes can lead to a disjointed and unengaging speech. Take the time to rehearse, refine your delivery, and internalize your key points.

By avoiding these common mistakes and focusing on the strategies we’ve discussed, you’ll be well on your way to delivering an informative speech that educates, engages, and inspires your audience.

Tips for Delivering a Compelling Informative Speech

Once you’ve chosen your topic and done your research, it’s time to focus on delivering a compelling speech. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Start with a strong attention-grabbing opening that draws your audience in and sets the tone for your speech.
  • Use clear, concise language and avoid jargon or technical terms that your audience may not understand.
  • Incorporate storytelling, examples, and anecdotes to make your points more relatable and memorable.
  • Use visual aids , such as slides or props, to enhance your message and keep your audience engaged.
  • Practice your delivery and timing to ensure that you stay within your allotted time and maintain a natural, conversational tone.

By following these tips and choosing a topic that you’re passionate about, you’ll be well on your way to delivering an informative speech that educates and inspires your audience.

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20 Bonus Topics for Informative Speeches

In case the informative speech examples above didn’t pique your interest, we have several more for you to consider. Ranging from topics like science and technology to history and education, these 20 topics are perfect for your next presentation.

  • The history and development of virtual reality technology
  • The benefits and challenges of remote work
  • The science behind the formation of hurricanes and tornadoes
  • The impact of social media on political campaigns and elections
  • The importance of sustainable fashion and its environmental benefits
  • The role of emotional support animals in mental health treatment
  • The history and cultural significance of a specific cuisine or dish
  • The impact of plastic pollution on marine ecosystems
  • The benefits and risks of gene editing technology
  • The psychology behind conspiracy theories and their spread online
  • The importance of digital privacy and data security in the modern age
  • The role of music therapy in healthcare and wellness
  • The impact of deforestation on biodiversity and climate change
  • The history and evolution of a specific sport or athletic event
  • The benefits and challenges of alternative education models
  • The science behind the human immune system and how vaccines work
  • The impact of mass incarceration on communities and families
  • The role of storytelling in preserving cultural heritage and traditions
  • The importance of financial planning for retirement and old age
  • The impact of urban agriculture on food security and community development

Choosing a Topic That Resonates With Your Audience

When selecting a topic for your informative speech, it’s important to consider your audience and what will resonate with them. Think about their interests, backgrounds, and knowledge levels, and choose a topic that will be both informative and engaging.

For example, if you’re speaking to a group of high school students, you may want to choose a topic that relates to their experiences or concerns, such as the impact of social media on mental health or the importance of financial literacy for young adults. If you’re speaking to a group of business professionals, you may want to focus on topics related to industry trends, leadership strategies, or emerging technologies.

By choosing a topic that resonates with your audience, you’ll be more likely to capture their attention and keep them engaged throughout your speech. And remember, even if you’re not an expert on the topic, you can still deliver an informative and engaging speech by doing your research and presenting the information in a clear and accessible way.

FAQs on Informative Speech Examples

What is an example of informative speech.

An example includes breaking down the impacts of climate change, detailing causes, effects, and potential solutions.

What are the 3 types of informative speeches?

The three main types are explanatory (breaks down complex topics), descriptive (paints a picture with words), and demonstrative (shows how to do something).

What are the 5 useful topics of an informative speech?

Top picks include technology advances, mental health awareness, environmental conservation efforts, cultural diversity appreciation, and breakthroughs in medical research.

What is an effective informative speech?

An effective one delivers clear info on a specific topic that educates listeners without overwhelming them. It’s well-researched and engaging.

Informative speech examples are everywhere, if you know where to look. From TED Talks to classroom lectures, there’s no shortage of inspiration for your next presentation. All you have to do is find a topic that lights your fire while engaging your audience.

Remember, a great informative speech is all about clarity, organization, and engagement. By following the tips and examples we’ve covered, you’ll be well on your way to delivering an informative speech that educates, enlightens, and leaves a lasting impression. So go ahead, pick your topic, and start crafting your own informative speech today!

  • Last Updated: May 9, 2024

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Speech Writing

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  • Updated on  
  • Jan 16, 2024

Speech Writing

The power of good, inspiring, motivating, and thought-provoking speeches can never be overlooked. If we retrospect, a good speech has not only won people’s hearts but also has been a verbal tool to conquer nations. For centuries, many leaders have used this instrument to charm audiences with their powerful speeches. Apart from vocalizing your speech perfectly, the words you choose in a speech carry immense weight, and practising speech writing begins with our school life. Speech writing is an important part of the English syllabus for Class 12th, Class 11th, and Class 8th to 10th. This blog brings you the Speech Writing format, samples, examples, tips, and tricks!

This Blog Includes:

What is speech writing, speech in english language writing, how do you begin an english-language speech, introduction, how to write a speech, speech writing samples, example of a great speech, english speech topics, practice time.

Must Read: Story Writing Format for Class 9 & 10

Speech writing is the art of using proper grammar and expression to convey a thought or message to a reader. Speech writing isn’t all that distinct from other types of narrative writing. However, students should be aware of certain distinct punctuation and writing style techniques. While writing the ideal speech might be challenging, sticking to the appropriate speech writing structure will ensure that you never fall short.

“There are three things to aim at in public speaking: first, to get into your subject, then to get your subject into yourself, and lastly, to get your subject into the heart of your audience.”- Alexander Gregg

The English language includes eight parts of speech i.e. nouns , pronouns , verbs , adjectives 410 , adverbs , prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections.

  • Noun- A noun is a word that describes anything, such as an animal, a person, a place, or an emotion. Nouns are the building blocks for most sentences.
  • Pronoun – Pronouns are words that can be used in place of nouns. They are used so that we don’t have to repeat words. This makes our writing and speaking much more natural.
  • Verb – A verb is a term that implies activity or ‘doing.’ These are very vital for your children’s grammar studies, as a sentence cannot be complete without a verb.
  • Adjective – An adjective is a term that describes something. An adjective is frequently used before a noun to add extra information or description.
  • Prepositions- A preposition is a term that expresses the location or timing of something in relation to something else.
  • Conjunction- Because every language has its own set of conjunctions, English conjunctions differ from those found in other languages. They’re typically used as a connecting word between two statements, concepts, or ideas.
  • Interjections- Interjections are words that are used to describe a strong emotion or a sudden feeling.

Relevant Read: Speech on the Importance of English

The way you start your English speech can set the tone for the remainder of it. This semester, there are a variety of options for you to begin presentations in your classes. For example, try some of these engaging speech in English language starters.

  • Rhetorical questions : A rhetorical question is a figure of speech that uses a question to convey a point rather than asking for a response. The answer to a rhetorical question may be clear, yet the questioner asks it to emphasize the point. Rhetorical questions may be a good method for students to start their English speeches. This method of introducing your material might be appealing to the viewers and encourage them to consider how they personally relate to your issue.
  • Statistics: When making an instructive or persuasive speech in an English class, statistics can help to strengthen the speaker’s authority and understanding of the subject. To get your point over quickly and create an emotional response, try using an unexpected statistic or fact that will resonate with the audience.
  • Set up an imaginary scene: Create an imaginary situation in your audience’s thoughts if you want to persuade them to agree with you with your speech. This method of starting your speech assists each member of the audience in visualizing a fantastic scenario that you wish to see come true.

Relevant Read: Reported Speech Rules With Exercises

Format of Speech Writing

Here is the format of Speech Writing:

  • Introduction : Greet the audience, tell them about yourself and further introduce the topic.
  • Body : Present the topic in an elaborate way, explaining its key features, pros and cons, if any and the like.
  • Conclusion : Summary of your speech, wrap up the topic and leave your audience with a compelling reminder to think about!

Let’s further understand each element of the format of Speech Writing in further detail:

After the greetings, the Introduction has to be attention-getting. Quickly get people’s attention. The goal of a speech is to engage the audience and persuade them to think or act in your favour. The introduction must effectively include: 

  • A brief preview of your topic. 
  • Define the outlines of your speech. (For example, I’ll be talking about…First..Second…Third)
  • Begin with a story, quote, fact, joke, or observation in the room. It shouldn’t be longer than 3-4 lines. (For Example: “Mahatma Gandhi said once…”, or “This topic reminds me of an incident/story…”)

This part is also important because that’s when your audience decides if the speech is worth their time. Keep your introduction factual, interesting, and convincing.

It is the most important part of any speech. You should provide a number of reasons and arguments to convince the audience to agree with you.

Handling objections is an important aspect of speech composition. There is no time for questions or concerns since a speech is a monologue. Any concerns that may occur during the speech will be addressed by a powerful speech. As a result, you’ll be able to respond to questions as they come in from the crowd. To make speech simpler you can prepare a flow chart of the details in a systematic way.

For example: If your speech is about waste management; distribute information and arrange it according to subparagraphs for your reference. It could include:

  • What is Waste Management?
  • Major techniques used to manage waste
  • Advantages of Waste Management  
  • Importance of Waste Management 

The conclusion should be something that the audience takes with them. It could be a reminder, a collective call to action, a summary of your speech, or a story. For example: “It is upon us to choose the fate of our home, the earth by choosing to begin waste management at our personal spaces.”

After concluding, add a few lines of gratitude to the audience for their time.

For example: “Thank you for being a wonderful audience and lending me your time. Hope this speech gave you something to take away.”

speech writing format

Practice Your Speech Writing with these English Speech topics for students !

A good speech is well-timed, informative, and thought-provoking. Here are the tips for writing a good school speech:

Speech Sandwich of Public Speaking

The introduction and conclusion must be crisp. People psychologically follow the primacy effect (tendency to remember the first part of the list/speech) and recency effect (tendency to recall the last part of the list/speech). 

Use Concrete Facts

Make sure you thoroughly research your topic. Including facts appeals to the audience and makes your speech stronger. How much waste is managed? Give names of organisations and provide numerical data in one line.

Use Rhetorical Strategies and Humour

Include one or two open-ended or thought-provoking questions.  For Example: “Would we want our future generation to face trouble due to global warming?” Also, make good use of humour and convenient jokes that engages your audience and keeps them listening.

Check Out: Message Writing

Know your Audience and Plan Accordingly

This is essential before writing your speech. To whom is it directed? The categorised audience on the basis of –

  • Knowledge of the Topic (familiar or unfamiliar)

Use the information to formulate the speech accordingly, use information that they will understand, and a sentence that they can retain.

Timing Yourself is Important

An important aspect of your speech is to time yourself.  Don’t write a speech that exceeds your word limit. Here’s how can decide the right timing for your speech writing:

  • A one-minute speech roughly requires around 130-150 words
  • A two-minute speech requires roughly around 250-300 words

Recommended Read: Letter Writing

Speech Writing Examples

Here are some examples to help you understand how to write a good speech. Read these to prepare for your next speech:

Write a speech to be delivered in the school assembly as Rahul/ Rubaina of Delhi Public School emphasises the importance of cleanliness, implying that the level of cleanliness represents the character of its residents. (150-200 words)

“Cleanliness is next to godliness,” said the great John Wesley. Hello, respected principal, instructors, and good friends. Today, I, Rahul/Rubaina, stand in front of you all to emphasise the significance of cleanliness.

Cleanliness is the condition or attribute of being or remaining clean. Everyone must learn about cleaning, hygiene, sanitation, and the different diseases that are produced by unsanitary circumstances. It is essential for physical well-being and the maintenance of a healthy atmosphere at home and at school. A filthy atmosphere invites a large number of mosquitos to grow and spread dangerous diseases. On the other side, poor personal cleanliness causes a variety of skin disorders as well as lowered immunity.

Habits formed at a young age become ingrained in one’s personality. Even if we teach our children to wash their hands before and after meals, brush their teeth and bathe on a regular basis, we are unconcerned about keeping public places clean. On October 2, 2014, the Indian Prime Minister began the “Swachh Bharat” programme to offer sanitation amenities to every family, including toilets, solid and liquid waste disposal systems, village cleanliness, and safe and appropriate drinking water supplies. Teachers and children in schools are actively participating in the ‘Clean India Campaign’ with zeal and excitement.

Good health ensures a healthy mind, which leads to better overall productivity, higher living standards, and economic development. It will improve India’s international standing. As a result, a clean environment is a green environment with fewer illnesses. Thus, cleanliness is defined as a symbol of mental purity.

Thank you very much.

Relevant Read: Speech on Corruption

You are Sahil/Sanya, the school’s Head Girl/Head Boy. You are greatly troubled by the increasing instances of aggressive behaviour among your students. You decide to speak about it during the morning assembly. Create a speech about “School Discipline.” (150 – 200 words)

INDISCIPLINE IN SCHOOLS,

It has been reported that the frequency of fights and incidences of bullying in our school has increased dramatically in the previous several months. Good morning to everyone present. Today, I, Sahil/Sanya, your head boy/girl, am here to shed light on the serious topic of “Increased Indiscipline in Schools.”

It has come to light that instructor disobedience, bullying, confrontations with students, truancy, and insults are becoming more widespread. Furthermore, there have been reports of parents noticing a shift in their children’s attitudes. As a result, many children are suffering emotionally, psychologically, and physically. The impact of this mindset on children at a young age is devastating and irreversible.

Not to mention the harm done to the school’s property. Theft of chalk, scribbling on desks, walls and lavatory doors, destruction of CCTV cameras and so forth. We are merely depriving ourselves of the comforts granted to us by doing so.

Following numerous meetings, it was determined that the main reasons for the problem were a lack of sufficient guidance, excessive use of social media, and peer pressure. The council is working to make things better. Everyone is required to take life skills classes. Counselling, motivating, and instilling friendly ideals will be part of the curriculum. Seminars for parents and students will be held on a regular basis.

A counsellor is being made available to help you all discuss your sentiments, grudges, and personal problems. We are doing everything we can and expect you to do the same.

So, let us work together to create an environment in which we encourage, motivate, assist, and be nice to one another because we are good and civilised humans capable of a great deal of love.

Relevant Read: How to Write a Speech on Discipline?

The current increase in incidences of violent student misbehaviour is cause for alarm for everyone. Students who learn how to manage their anger can help to alleviate the situation. Write a 150-200-word speech about the topic to be delivered at the school’s morning assembly. (10)

HOW TO CONTROL ANGER

Honourable Principal, Respected Teachers, and Dear Friends, I’d like to share a few “Ways to Manage Anger” with you today.

The growing intolerance among the younger generation, which is resulting in violence against teachers, is cause for severe concern. The guru-shishya parampara is losing its lustre. Aggressive behaviour in students can be provoked by a variety of factors, including self-defence, stressful circumstance, over-stimulation, or a lack of adult supervision.

It has become imperative to address the situation. Life skills workshops will be included in the curriculum. Teachers should be trained to deal with such stubborn and confrontational behaviours. Meditation and deep breathing are very beneficial and should be practised every morning. Students should be taught to count to ten before reacting angrily. Sessions on anger control and its importance must also be held.

Remember that Anger is one letter away from danger. It becomes much more crucial to be able to control one’s rage. It’s never too late to start, as a wise man once said.

“Every minute you stay angry, you lose sixty seconds of peace of mind.”

Relevant Read: English Speech Topics for Students

Martin Luther King Jr’s ‘I Have A Dream’ is one of his most famous speeches. Its impact has lasted through generations. The speech is written by utilising the techniques above. Here are some examples:

“still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination” – emotive Language

“In a sense, we’ve come to our nation’s capital to cash a check” – personalising the speech

“to stand up for freedom together” – a call to action.

Importantly, this is an example of how the listener comes first while drafting a speech. The language chosen appeals to a specific sort of audience and was widely utilised in 1963 when the speech was delivered.

  • The Best Day of My Life
  • Social Media: Bane or Boon?
  • Pros and Cons of Online Learning
  • Benefits of Yoga
  • If I had a Superpower
  • I wish I were ______
  • Environment Conservation
  • Women Should Rule the World!
  • The Best Lesson I Have Learned
  • Paperbacks vs E-books
  • How to Tackle a Bad Habit?
  • My Favorite Pastime/Hobby
  • Understanding Feminism
  • Fear of Missing Out (FOMO): Is it real or not?
  • Importance of Reading
  • Importance of Books in Our Life
  • My Favorite Fictional Character
  • Introverts vs Extroverts
  • Lessons to Learn from Sports
  • Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

Also Read: How to Ace IELTS Writing Section?

Ans. Speech writing is the process of communicating a notion or message to a reader by employing proper punctuation and expression. Speech writing is similar to other types of narrative writing. However, students should be aware of some different punctuation and writing structure techniques.

Ans. Before beginning with the speech, choose an important topic. Create an outline; rehearse your speech, and adjust the outline based on comments from the rehearsal. This five-step strategy for speech planning serves as the foundation for both lessons and learning activities.

Ans. Writing down a speech is vital since it helps you better comprehend the issue, organises your thoughts, prevents errors in your speech, allows you to get more comfortable with it, and improves its overall quality.

Speech writing and public speaking are effective and influential. Hope this blog helped you know the various tips for writing the speech people would want to hear. If you need help in making the right career choices at any phase of your academic and professional journey, our Leverage Edu experts are here to guide you. Sign up for a free session now!

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Speech writing: Format, Types, Examples & Practice Questions in PDF

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In today’s era, everyone must have heard people presenting their views on any specific topic or subject, especially politicians addressing the general public. The intention behind giving or speech writing is to convey a strong message to the targeted audience in a persuasive tone.

Speech writing is added to the CBSE curriculum to help students research, gather, as well deliver their thoughts to an individual or a group. This writing piece will address speech, speech writing, and examples, followed by the techniques to write a strong and effective speech. 

Students can download this PDF for several invitations and replies to class 12 writing samples and practice questions.

<cta2> Download <cta2> ‍

Table of Contents

What is speech.

A speech is a formal and verbal communication to deliver thoughts, opinions, and perspectives addressing a large audience. The opinions conveyed by speech can convey strong opposition or view opinions on a specific topic or subject. 

Speech writing is the process of creating written content to deliver a strong message to the readers. It involves writing content that aligns with the idea behind the speech, it can be informative, entertaining, appealing, or engaging. It can greatly impact an audience if the delivered/written content can convey strong thoughts on a specific topic.

Writing a speech requires a speaker to be aware of the general issues prevailing in society. When delivering a speech, one must be able to comprehend the pros and cons of the topic one wants to deliver, along with relevant ideas, evidence, facts, and other details.

📈 Trending: 2024-25 CBSE Class 11 Syllabus

📝 Recommended: Important Questions PDFs for Class 11

📚 Don’t Miss: Class 11 2024-25 Question Banks

Format of Speech Writing

writing a speech questions

Title: The title must be catchy and related to the topic. 

  • Self-Introduction: Be it a formal or informal event or there is a master of ceremony available, introducing yourself is an integral part of writing and delivering a speech. The introduction should convey who the speaker is along with what they intend to deliver. The introduction can vary based on the target audience's nature. 
  • Opening Statement: It has been said that the average attention span for any human is 7 to 8.25 seconds and that makes it necessary to write an engaging opening statement. The speaker/writer can add a quote, ask some engaging questions, and can add a quote. 
  • Main Idea: The main idea should contain a detailed explanation of the topic that can impact the targeted audience. The said or written topics should be able to teach and inform the audience. 
  • Conclusion: The conclusion must be written or spoken in such a way that it would make the audience think about what was written/said

Speech Writing Examples

Keeping good personal and public hygiene can play a crucial role in mitigating the spread of deadly viral diseases. write a speech in 120 - 150 words on how it can be implemented in our personal and social lives. you are nayan/nidhi..

Importance of Good Hygiene in Mitigating the Spread of Deadly Diseases

Good morning respected principal, teachers, and my dear friends. Today, I, Nidhi, stand before you all to discuss the importance of good hygiene in mitigating the spread of deadly diseases.

During the recent outbreak of the novel coronavirus, the government issued a list of preventive measures that could help us in keeping safe from infection. The guidelines included steps like washing your hands properly and frequently, covering your face while sneezing or coughing, and regularly cleaning commonly touched surfaces to stop the spread of the virus.

You see, all of these tips are not new to us. We have been aware of them since childhood, but somehow never followed them strictly.

However, we can promise ourselves to continue following these steps even after the threat of COVID-19 is lifted. Organizations like schools and offices should also continue enforcing these rules. We should all continue keeping our homes and roads clean to make this world a better place.

You are upset after reading a report in the newspaper that shows a shocking decline in the girl's population. Write a speech in 120-150 words that you will deliver during the school assembly highlighting the misconception still prevailing in our society that girls are considered a burden on the family. You are Rajesh/Rupali.

Decline in the Girl Child Population

Good morning everyone present here. Today, I, Rajesh of class XI A, am going to speak about the decline of the girl-child population.

According to the latest report, there is a gradual decline in the population of the girl child because of the misconception still prevailing in our society that girls are considered a burden on the family. We live in a country of Rani Laxmibai, Kalpana Chawla, Sarojini Naidu, and many other strong and inspirational women, still, this is the condition of the girls in our country. It is hard to believe that such atrocities prevail in the country which preaches "Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao".

To stop this, women have to become empowered with mental and emotional strength and with assertiveness to say NO, The solution to save the girl child lies in women. It is time women stood up together and took a resolution to put an end to all atrocities done to them.

How to Write a Speech?

Writing a speech requires students to be aware of the general issues prevailing in society. When delivering a speech, students must be able to comprehend the pros and cons of the topic he or she wants to deliver, along with relevant ideas, evidence, facts, and other details. Here are a few things one needs to keep in mind while writing a speech.

  • From the exam’s perspective, the proper speech writing format is needed. A speech is composed of an introduction, a stance or perception of the speaker on the given topic, and the conclusion thereof.
  • The speech must be conveyed in the first-person point of view. The conveyed information can be in favor or against it but it should be backed by sufficient evidence.
  • Try to write/deliver the speech with authenticity to appeal to the audience. Authenticity can be achieved by reciting anecdotes, stories, and experiences in a precise manner. Speak only when it’s necessary. 
  • Do not use colloquial language. Avoid repeating ideas or writing the same point again.

How to write a speech? 

Begin speech writing after thoroughly researching the topic. Start with the introduction and address the audience. The content must be in a persuasive tone and the first person’s perspective. Structure your speech in the introduction, body, and conclusion. 

What is the format of Speech writing?

The speech writing formats include the title and the content. The content section comprises the introduction followed by an opening statement. The persuasive main idea is followed by a conclusion.

How to download multiple examples of Speech Writing in PDF for class 11?

There are many practice questions and examples of Speech Writing that students can access by clicking on this link .

Practice Questions

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5 chatgpt prompts to improve your public speaking (wow your audience).

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5 ChatGPT prompts to be a better public speaker (wow your audience)

If you find yourself on a stage or in the spotlight, you had better take it seriously. People are watching, so don’t let them down. Open with confidence, deliver with passion, and close with a bang. There is no other way. But if you’re not sure how to begin preparing, this might seem like a mammoth task. Luckily, there’s time to learn.

These five public speaking experts have you covered, along with a little help from ChatGPT. Copy, paste and edit the square brackets in ChatGPT, and keep the same chat window open so the context carries through.

Wow your audience with your words: ChatGPT prompts for public speaking

Get ideas for keynotes.

Keynote speaker, leadership performance coach, and host of the Compete Every Day podcast Jake Thompson uses ChatGPT to get ideas for keynotes, “as a baseline to start and then adjust the copy and tune.” He said it’s helpful if you’re “stuck generating a strong starting point.” Don’t let the blank page intimidate you. Give ChatGPT information about your audience and their goals, to get brand new ideas you can roll with in minutes. Prompt like a winner from the very start, following Thompson’s lead.

“You are an expert marketing copywriter. Create a list of five ideas for keynote speech titles for my talk for [describe your audience, e.g. new managers and leaders], aspiring to be [describe their goal, e.g. high performance in their role].”

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Once you have options for ideas, choose your favorite and request a framework with examples tailored to your field of expertise.

“The talk will discuss the importance of [outline the key learning objectives, e.g. self-leadership, building rapport with team members, investing in your professional network]. Create a structure for the talk. Include titles and subtitles that incorporate examples and metaphors from [your signature topic, e.g. sports, business] to [outcome you want to achieve, e.g. inspire, motivate] the audience.”

Resonate with your audience

Keynote speaker, corporate facilitator and founder of Breakthrough Play , Gary Ware, has worked with some household name brands, including HP HP , Intuit Intuit and GoFundMe, to improve the public speaking skills of their outward-facing team members. Ware is all about the audience. Use these prompts to make a speech you have already written super relevant to the people in the room. Don’t miss the mark by taking them in turn.

“The audience of my next talk consists of [describe your audience including their profession, typical age, and any other characteristics] and the theme of the [event, e.g. conference] is [describe the theme, e.g. marketing]. Based on this information, outline the key interests or concerns my speech should address to be most relevant to them.”

When you have your answer, incorporate the learning into your speech, then check it aligns.

“Based on your recommendations given, review my attached talk to ensure my message is aligned with this audience’s expectations and needs. [Paste speech]”

Balance warmth and competence

Vanessa Van Edwards is founder of The Science of People and bestselling author of books Captivate, unpacking the science behind succeeding with people, and Cues, mastering the secret language of charismatic communication . She delivers 50 keynote speeches every year and knows how to make a great impression that lasts long after her talk is over.

“The best presenters have the perfect blend of warmth and competence,” Van Edwards explained. “But most of us have an imbalance between the two.” To redress the balance, Van Edwards pastes her script into ChatGPT and asks for recommendations. Here’s a prompt you can try for yourself.

“Review the script for an upcoming keynote I’m delivering. Identify three sections that lack warmth, and suggest the most appropriate way to improve that (for example, with a story, joke, case study, example or warm words) being specific about what to add or remove. Then, identify three sections with the potential to signal more competence, and suggest what to add (for example data, facts, analytics or competent words), being specific. [Paste script]”

Breathe more often

Founder of Best Speech Mike Pacchione, a keynote coach who has worked with renowned speakers such as James Clear , Donald Miller, Amy Porterfield and Olympic gold medalist Scott Hamilton, wants you to focus on breathing. Sounds simple? There’s much more to it. “Speakers can speak with more power when they breathe frequently,” he explained. “But they write notes in paragraphs and long sentences. That leads to being out of breath by the time you hit a full stop.”

Pacchionne recommends that speakers write their scripts as if they're song lyrics. In other words, format your keynote wording in such a way where you are reminded to take a breath. An ideal task for ChatGPT.

"Rewrite the following text with the exact same words, but add a line break every 7-10 words. The end product should resemble song lyrics instead of written paragraphs. [Paste your script]"

When you have your reworked speech, Pacchionne recommends you “go back and make sure the breathing breaks are in natural spots,” adding that “a speaker would be far better served with that format versus paragraphs.”

Make a backup plan

Entrepreneur, bestselling author, podcast host and keynote speaker Liz Bohannon is hired to give keynotes of different lengths, usually between 30 and 60 minutes. But the story is sometimes different on the day. “Often the event is running late, so I have less time than I'd planned for.” Bohannon uses ChatGPT to make a robust backup plan, so she’s prepared for any eventuality before she arrives.

"This speech is [duration]. I need to shorten it by [number] minutes but maintain [topic of speech, lesson or takeaway] as the main point. Make suggestions as to which parts I can cut while maintaining the powerful message: [Paste script]"

Stand out on stage: ChatGPT prompts to show up and wow

Give your audience everything they want and more when you prepare well using ChatGPT. Get ideas for talks with suitable examples, resonate with your audience whatever the event, and balance warmth and competence for charismatic delivery. Don’t forget to breathe by seeing your paragraphs as lyrics, and make a backup plan to fit in with questionable organizer timings.

Show up, stand tall, and say your words with pride. Secure raving fans and repeat bookings. The mic is yours, don’t let us down.

Jodie Cook

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Why writing by hand beats typing for thinking and learning

Jonathan Lambert

A close-up of a woman's hand writing in a notebook.

If you're like many digitally savvy Americans, it has likely been a while since you've spent much time writing by hand.

The laborious process of tracing out our thoughts, letter by letter, on the page is becoming a relic of the past in our screen-dominated world, where text messages and thumb-typed grocery lists have replaced handwritten letters and sticky notes. Electronic keyboards offer obvious efficiency benefits that have undoubtedly boosted our productivity — imagine having to write all your emails longhand.

To keep up, many schools are introducing computers as early as preschool, meaning some kids may learn the basics of typing before writing by hand.

But giving up this slower, more tactile way of expressing ourselves may come at a significant cost, according to a growing body of research that's uncovering the surprising cognitive benefits of taking pen to paper, or even stylus to iPad — for both children and adults.

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In kids, studies show that tracing out ABCs, as opposed to typing them, leads to better and longer-lasting recognition and understanding of letters. Writing by hand also improves memory and recall of words, laying down the foundations of literacy and learning. In adults, taking notes by hand during a lecture, instead of typing, can lead to better conceptual understanding of material.

"There's actually some very important things going on during the embodied experience of writing by hand," says Ramesh Balasubramaniam , a neuroscientist at the University of California, Merced. "It has important cognitive benefits."

While those benefits have long been recognized by some (for instance, many authors, including Jennifer Egan and Neil Gaiman , draft their stories by hand to stoke creativity), scientists have only recently started investigating why writing by hand has these effects.

A slew of recent brain imaging research suggests handwriting's power stems from the relative complexity of the process and how it forces different brain systems to work together to reproduce the shapes of letters in our heads onto the page.

Your brain on handwriting

Both handwriting and typing involve moving our hands and fingers to create words on a page. But handwriting, it turns out, requires a lot more fine-tuned coordination between the motor and visual systems. This seems to more deeply engage the brain in ways that support learning.

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"Handwriting is probably among the most complex motor skills that the brain is capable of," says Marieke Longcamp , a cognitive neuroscientist at Aix-Marseille Université.

Gripping a pen nimbly enough to write is a complicated task, as it requires your brain to continuously monitor the pressure that each finger exerts on the pen. Then, your motor system has to delicately modify that pressure to re-create each letter of the words in your head on the page.

"Your fingers have to each do something different to produce a recognizable letter," says Sophia Vinci-Booher , an educational neuroscientist at Vanderbilt University. Adding to the complexity, your visual system must continuously process that letter as it's formed. With each stroke, your brain compares the unfolding script with mental models of the letters and words, making adjustments to fingers in real time to create the letters' shapes, says Vinci-Booher.

That's not true for typing.

To type "tap" your fingers don't have to trace out the form of the letters — they just make three relatively simple and uniform movements. In comparison, it takes a lot more brainpower, as well as cross-talk between brain areas, to write than type.

Recent brain imaging studies bolster this idea. A study published in January found that when students write by hand, brain areas involved in motor and visual information processing " sync up " with areas crucial to memory formation, firing at frequencies associated with learning.

"We don't see that [synchronized activity] in typewriting at all," says Audrey van der Meer , a psychologist and study co-author at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. She suggests that writing by hand is a neurobiologically richer process and that this richness may confer some cognitive benefits.

Other experts agree. "There seems to be something fundamental about engaging your body to produce these shapes," says Robert Wiley , a cognitive psychologist at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. "It lets you make associations between your body and what you're seeing and hearing," he says, which might give the mind more footholds for accessing a given concept or idea.

Those extra footholds are especially important for learning in kids, but they may give adults a leg up too. Wiley and others worry that ditching handwriting for typing could have serious consequences for how we all learn and think.

What might be lost as handwriting wanes

The clearest consequence of screens and keyboards replacing pen and paper might be on kids' ability to learn the building blocks of literacy — letters.

"Letter recognition in early childhood is actually one of the best predictors of later reading and math attainment," says Vinci-Booher. Her work suggests the process of learning to write letters by hand is crucial for learning to read them.

"When kids write letters, they're just messy," she says. As kids practice writing "A," each iteration is different, and that variability helps solidify their conceptual understanding of the letter.

Research suggests kids learn to recognize letters better when seeing variable handwritten examples, compared with uniform typed examples.

This helps develop areas of the brain used during reading in older children and adults, Vinci-Booher found.

"This could be one of the ways that early experiences actually translate to long-term life outcomes," she says. "These visually demanding, fine motor actions bake in neural communication patterns that are really important for learning later on."

Ditching handwriting instruction could mean that those skills don't get developed as well, which could impair kids' ability to learn down the road.

"If young children are not receiving any handwriting training, which is very good brain stimulation, then their brains simply won't reach their full potential," says van der Meer. "It's scary to think of the potential consequences."

Many states are trying to avoid these risks by mandating cursive instruction. This year, California started requiring elementary school students to learn cursive , and similar bills are moving through state legislatures in several states, including Indiana, Kentucky, South Carolina and Wisconsin. (So far, evidence suggests that it's the writing by hand that matters, not whether it's print or cursive.)

Slowing down and processing information

For adults, one of the main benefits of writing by hand is that it simply forces us to slow down.

During a meeting or lecture, it's possible to type what you're hearing verbatim. But often, "you're not actually processing that information — you're just typing in the blind," says van der Meer. "If you take notes by hand, you can't write everything down," she says.

The relative slowness of the medium forces you to process the information, writing key words or phrases and using drawing or arrows to work through ideas, she says. "You make the information your own," she says, which helps it stick in the brain.

Such connections and integration are still possible when typing, but they need to be made more intentionally. And sometimes, efficiency wins out. "When you're writing a long essay, it's obviously much more practical to use a keyboard," says van der Meer.

Still, given our long history of using our hands to mark meaning in the world, some scientists worry about the more diffuse consequences of offloading our thinking to computers.

"We're foisting a lot of our knowledge, extending our cognition, to other devices, so it's only natural that we've started using these other agents to do our writing for us," says Balasubramaniam.

It's possible that this might free up our minds to do other kinds of hard thinking, he says. Or we might be sacrificing a fundamental process that's crucial for the kinds of immersive cognitive experiences that enable us to learn and think at our full potential.

Balasubramaniam stresses, however, that we don't have to ditch digital tools to harness the power of handwriting. So far, research suggests that scribbling with a stylus on a screen activates the same brain pathways as etching ink on paper. It's the movement that counts, he says, not its final form.

Jonathan Lambert is a Washington, D.C.-based freelance journalist who covers science, health and policy.

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Sudden Resignations. A Leaked Letter. What’s Happening Inside Miss USA?

Noelia Voigt’s announcement this week that she was stepping down as Miss USA set off a string of departures and prompted larger questions about the inner workings of the organization.

UmaSofia Srivastava and Noelia Voigt sit side by side in short bejeweled dresses with pageant sashes.

By Madison Malone Kircher

When the reigning Miss USA, Noelia Voigt, announced this week she would be resigning from her position, she cited her mental health and wrote about her gratitude for the opportunity.

“As individuals, we grow through experiencing different things in life that lead us to learning more about ourselves,” she wrote on Instagram on Monday.

But an internal resignation letter by Ms. Voigt to Miss USA leadership and the Miss Universe Organization, obtained on Friday by The New York Times, presented a much darker picture.

In the eight-page letter, Ms. Voigt, who represented the state of Utah and was crowned in September, described “a toxic work environment within the Miss USA Organization that, at best, is poor management and, at worst, is bullying and harassment.” She also complained in her letter that the organization had delayed making good on her prize winnings.

The Miss USA Organization did not respond to request for comment.

Ms. Voigt’s departure has spurred at least two other resignations. UmaSofia Srivastava, Miss Teen USA, announced she was stepping down from her role on Wednesday. Arianna Lemus, who represented Colorado at Miss USA in 2023, said on Friday she was resigning in solidarity after seeing Ms. Voigt’s post.

“That was a call to help,” Ms. Lemus, 27, said in an interview.

The sudden departures have touched off wider speculation in the pageant world that crowned winners are legally barred from speaking freely about their experiences with the Miss USA Organization. Many of Ms. Voigt’s past competitors, including Ms. Lemus, shared a statement demanding that she be released from any nondisclosure agreements.

In her resignation letter, Ms. Voigt said she experienced an incident of sexual harassment when, during a Christmas parade last year in Sarasota, Fla., a driver made inappropriate comments toward her.

She said in her letter that the organization failed to support her when she reported the incident.

Ms. Voigt went on to write that serving as Miss USA took a toll on her health, adding that she now struggled with anxiety and took medication to manage her symptoms.

She said she had begun experiencing “heart palpitations, full body shakes, loss of appetite, unintentional weight loss, loss of sleep, loss of hair and more.”

Some people believed Ms. Voigt’s Instagram post announcing her resignation contained a secret message. The first letter of each of the first 11 sentences of the statement spell the phrase “I AM SILENCED,” which some have interpreted as a signal that Ms. Voigt is unable to speak openly about her experience.

Just a few days after Ms. Voigt’s announcement, Ms. Srivastava, who was crowned Miss Teen USA in 2023, also resigned from her post .

“After careful consideration, I have decided to resign as I find that my personal values no longer fully align with the direction of the organization,” Ms. Srivastava, who represented the state of New Jersey at the Miss Teen USA pageant in September, wrote on Instagram.

Her post included a quote from the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche: “There are no beautiful surfaces without a terrible depth.”

“I know all of us who love the program want to rush out and do something,” Laylah Rose, the president and chief executive of the Miss USA Organization, wrote in an email to The Times earlier this week, regarding Ms. Voigt’s and Ms. Srivastava’s resignations. “My goal is to provide truly helpful steps we can take together.”

“Our all-encompassing goal at Miss USA is to celebrate and empower women,” Ms. Rose added, saying she was taking “these allegations seriously.”

Through a representative, both Ms. Srivastava and Ms. Voigt declined to comment, citing a nondisclosure agreement. (A copy of the 2023 Miss USA contract obtained by The New York Times appears to bar signees from disclosing any information about Miss USA while employed by the organization.)

After Ms. Voigt’s announcement, several of her fellow Miss USA 2023 competitors posted a statement on Instagram demanding that the Miss USA Organization release Ms. Voigt from any such agreement.

Juliana Morehouse, who competed at Miss USA representing Maine and lives in South Carolina, said in an interview with The Times that the letter originated in a group chat of 2023 participants who were “shocked and saddened” to hear of Ms. Voigt’s resignation. On a Zoom call, they hashed out the message they wanted to share in support of Ms. Voigt.

(Ms. Morehouse did not provide an exact figure but said the number of women who wrote and shared the letter comprised a majority of the 51 competitors at Miss USA in 2023.)

Claudia Michelle Engelhardt, who stepped down from her role as social media director for Miss USA this month, said she felt the Miss USA participants were unfairly pressured into signing their contracts.

“It was pretty much, ‘You have to sign this or you’re not going to compete,’” Ms. Engelhardt, 24, said. “You just worked your butt off to get here. You won your state. What, are you not going to go because you don’t want to sign a contract? They are basically holding you hostage, for lack of a better term, to sign this contract.”

Ms. Morehouse said she was given “a little over 24 hours” to review the contract.

“I don’t think any of us sought legal representation to review it with us,” she said in an interview with The Times. “We had never heard of such an ironclad NDA being implemented in previous years, because this was the first year of the new leadership.” (Ms. Rose became president of the organization last year.)

She emphasized that while her personal experience with Miss USA was a positive one, she hoped speaking out would ensure that was the case for all participants in the future.

Ms. Lemus, the former Miss Colorado USA, said she saw some irony in how Miss USA appeared to be operating.

“This is an organization that preaches women’s empowerment,” she said.

Madison Malone Kircher is a Times reporter covering internet culture. More about Madison Malone Kircher

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Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker uses commencement speech to deride LGBTQ+ and question women's place in the workforce

Sport Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker uses commencement speech to deride LGBTQ+ and question women's place in the workforce

Harrison Butker

The commencement speaker at Kansas' Benedictine College, a private Catholic liberal arts school, congratulated the women receiving degrees — and said most of them were probably more excited about getting married and having children.

Harrison Butker, the kicker for the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs, is getting attention for those and other comments last weekend in which he said some Catholic leaders were "pushing dangerous gender ideologies onto the youth of America".

Butker, who's made his conservative Catholic beliefs well known, also assailed Pride month, a particularly important time for the LGBTQ+ rights movement, and President Joe Biden's stance on abortion.

"I think it is you, the women, who have had the most diabolical lies told to you," Butker said.

"Some of you may go on to lead successful careers in the world, but I would venture to guess that the majority of you are most excited about your marriage and the children you will bring into this world.

"I can tell you that my beautiful wife Isabelle would be the first to say that her life truly started when she started living her vocation as a wife and as a mother."

Butker said that his wife embraced "one of the most important titles of all. Homemaker".

He also criticised as disparaging to the Catholic Church an article by The Associated Press highlighting a shift toward conservativism in some parts of the church.

The three-time Super Bowl champion delivered his roughly 20-minute address on Saturday at the Catholic school in Atchison, Kansas, which is located about 97 kilometres north of Kansas City.

He received a standing ovation from graduates and other attendees.

Butker, 28, referred to a "deadly sin sort of pride that has a month dedicated to it" in an oblique reference to Pride month.

He also took aim at Biden's policies, including his condemnation of the Supreme Court's reversal of the 1973 Roe vs Wade decision and advocacy for freedom of choice — a key campaign issue in the 2024 presidential race.

Butker and Kelce

Biden, who is Catholic, has a fraught history on the issue. He initially opposed the Roe vs Wade decision, saying it went too far. He also opposed federal funding for abortions and supported restrictions on abortions later in pregnancy.

"Our own nation is led by a man who publicly and proudly proclaims his Catholic faith, but at the same time is delusional enough to make the sign of the cross during a pro-abortion rally," Butker said.

"He has been so vocal in his support for the murder of innocent babies, that I'm sure to many people, it appears that you can be both Catholic and pro-choice."

Butker also tackled Biden's response to COVID-19, which has killed nearly 1.2 million people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"While COVID might have played a large role throughout your formative years, it is not unique," he said.

"Bad policies and poor leadership have negatively impacted major life issues. Things like abortion, IVF, surrogacy, euthanasia, as well as a growing support for degenerate cultural values and media all stem from pervasiveness of disorder."

Butker also criticised the "tyranny of diversity, equity, and inclusion".

Harrison Butker

Graduates had mixed views on the speech.

ValerieAnne Volpe, 20, who graduated with an art degree, lauded Butker for saying things that "people are scared to say".

"You can just hear that he loves his wife. You can hear that he loves his family," she said.

Elle Wilbers, 22, who is heading to medical school, said she was shocked by Butker's criticism of priests and bishops and his reference to the LGBTQ+ community, one that she described as "horrible".

"We should have compassion for the people who have been told all their life that the person they love is like, it's not OK to love that person," Wilbers said.

Kassidy Neuner, 22, who will spend a gap year teaching before going to law school, said being a stay-at-home parent is "a wonderful decision".

"And it's also not for everybody," Neuner said.

"I think that he should have addressed more that it's not always an option. And, if it is your option in life, that's amazing for you. But there's also the option to be a mother and a career woman."

The Chiefs declined to comment on Butker's commencement address.

The 2017 seventh-round pick out of Georgia Tech has become of the NFL's best kickers, breaking the Chiefs' franchise record with a 62-yard field goal in 2022.

Butker helped them win their first Super Bowl in 50 years in 2020, added a second Lombardi Trophy in 2023, and he kicked the field goal that forced overtime in a Super Bowl win over San Francisco in February .

It has been an embarrassing off-season for the Chiefs, though.

Last month, voters in Jackson County, Missouri, soundly rejected a ballot initiative that would have helped pay for an $800 million renovation to Arrowhead Stadium, home of the Chiefs. Many voters criticised the plan put forward by the Chiefs as catering primarily to VIPs and the wealthy.

The same week, wide receiver Rashee Rice turned himself in to Dallas police on multiple charges, including aggravated assault, after he was involved in a high-speed crash that left four people with injuries.

Rice has acknowledged being the driver of one of the sports cars that was going in excess of 160kph.

Last week, law enforcement officials told The Dallas Morning News that Rice also was suspected of assaulting a person at a downtown nightclub. Dallas police did not name Rice as the suspect in detailing a report to The Associated Press.

Chiefs coach Andy Reid said he had spoken to the receiver and the team was letting the legal process play out.

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Ohio State commencement speaker says he got help from psychedelics while writing speech

writing a speech questions

Ohio State's chosen commencement speaker for the class of 2024, entrepreneur Chris Pan, was high on ayahuasca while he wrote his speech, according to posts he made on social media.

"Got some help from AI (Ayahuasca Intelligence) this week to write my commencement speech for 60k grads and family members at Ohio State University next Sunday," he wrote in a LinkedIn post before graduation.

Ayahuasca is a psychedelic liquid made from heating or boiling multiple psychoactive plants from South America, according to the Alcohol and Drug Foundation of Australia.

Pan also said he tried using ChatGPT and artificial intelligence to write his speech, according to his LinkedIn post and an Instagram post.

Ohio State graduation death: Coroner identifies woman who died in fall from Ohio Stadium

In the weeks preceding graduation, Pan shared multiple drafts of his speech on Instagram. His earliest posted draft included a lengthy section about the Israel-Palestine conflict and a moment where he removed his shirt.

But on Sunday, Pan did not explicitly mention Gaza, Israel or Palestine (or remove his shirt). Rather, he remarked, how after holding multicultural events over the past few months, we must "end suffering on both sides."

Here's what we know: Ohio State graduation death

"What I learned is that there is so much pain and trauma in both communities. Pain causes hate and violence. Hurt people hurt people. Healed people help people," he said. "When we heal ourselves, we heal the world. World peace starts with inner peace."

Pan also led the crowd through two brief musical numbers  — "What's Going On?" by the 4 Non Blondes and "This Little Light of Mine" by Harry Dixon Loes — and espoused how he thinks Bitcoin is "a very misunderstood asset class," which was met by groans from audience members. (He promised everyone in attendance a free bracelet from his company, MyIntent, "as an apology for listening to me talk about Bitcoin.").

Pan graduated from OSU in 1999 and went on to receive an MBA from Harvard Business School. He worked at consulting firm McKinsey and Company, PepsiCo and Facebook before starting his own business, MyIntent.org, in 2014, according to his LinkedIn profile.

MyIntent sells jewelry with a custom word of the customer's choosing etched in it, according to the company's website.

Dispatch reporter Sheridan Hendrix contributed to this report.

[email protected]

@NathanRHart

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Drake-Kendrick Lamar feud: What does the law say about defamatory lyrics?

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PhD Candidate, Law, Western University

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Lisa Macklem does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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The feud between rappers Drake and Kendrick Lamar reached a fever pitch recently, with both dissing each other in songs featuring harsh accusations . This kind of beef between rap artists isn’t new, but the severity of the insults traded in this feud has galvanized fans and the attention of the broader public.

In his lyrics, Lamar claimed Drake has an 11-year-old daughter that he abandoned and calls him a “ certified pedophile .” For his part, Drake called Lamar a “ pipsqueak ” and accused him of abusing his fianceé.

The salvos of diss tracks raise interesting questions about defamation in music lyrics. If either Drake or Lamar decided to sue the other for defamation, what would the law say?

Defamation includes both slander (verbal attacks) and libel (written attacks). Musical lyrics and audio recordings can qualify as libel . The standards for libel differ whether you are in Canada or the United States , so should one or the other decide to sue for libel, it would make a difference where they filed the lawsuit.

Freedom of speech

Libel requires that a derogatory statement is made that clearly refers to a person and that the statement is made to a third party. In this feud, there is no doubt about who is being accused of what, and the derogatory accusations are being communicated to millions, so technically, these lyrics look like libel.

Nonetheless, there are a number of defences available. A first response would be to claim a defence based on freedom of expression in Canada or First Amendment rights to free speech in the U.S .

Free speech rights in the U.S. have a longer reach than freedom of expression laws in Canada. Several cases in the U.S. have specifically cited artistic expression as protected speech.

California passed the Decriminalizing Artistic Expression Act in 2022. Nationally, the Restoring Artistic Protection Act (the RAP Act) is currently before the U.S. Congress. It aims to protect artists from having their words used against them in court.

The Canadian Supreme Court, in R v Simard , also rejected using lyrics as evidence . That case involved a criminal matter, and libel is a civil matter, but Drake and Lamar have accused each other of criminal activity.

Truth defence

Truth is the first defence available in a libel case. If Lamar or Drake have evidence that what they’ve said is substantially true, it is not defamation. In The Heart Part 6 , Drake says that Lamar should check his facts and claims that he’s actually fed Lamar false information about having a love child.

In 2005, one court in the U.S. ruled that rap lyrics were simply “rhetorical hyperbole” if they didn’t contain any verifiable true statements. Even if statements are false, if the defamed person can’t prove they suffered harm, there may be no damages.

Fair comment

The next possible defence would be fair comment, which leans into the importance of free speech. This applies to information with a strong public interest, and helps to defend news outlets when they publish something they believe to be true.

There is certainly an argument to be made that protecting young girls and all women from abuse is important to the public interests. The burden of proof lies with the defendant. The plaintiff only needs to prove the elements of libel.

A major difference between libel in the United States and Canada is that in the U.S. a public figure has to prove that the person acted with actual malice ; that is, that they intended to harm the other person.

That could potentially make a libel case easier for a plaintiff to win in Canada. However, Canadian courts, like U.S. ones, will focus on whether the statements were false and whether they caused harm.

Consent defence

The most applicable defence in this case would likely be consent, which leans into the long history of rap and diss tracks . Rap battles have been compared to boxing . When you step into a boxing ring, you consent to being punched. Similarly, when you step into a rap battle, you expect, and accept, that you will be dissed.

Eminem called Muhammad Ali an inspiration . Ali was known for delivering pre-fight rhyming disses of his opponents, and it’s easy to see a link between Ali’s single Round 5: Will the Real Sonny Liston Please Fall Down and Eminem’s lyric “ Will the real Slim Shady please stand up .”

Diss tracks are a great way for artists to garner attention . Drake and Lamar fans have been vocal in their opinions, and their songs have gone viral online. Both Lamar’s Euphoria and Drake’s Push Ups made the top 20 on Billboard’s Hot 100 . Overall, streams of Lamar’s back catalogue are up 49 per cent .

It’s been suggested that in meet the grahams , Lamar was intending for their exchanges to simply be an informal competition game . There is no shortage of artists in all genres taking aims at rivals or exes — just look at Taylor Swift’s latest offering .

It’s easy to see Drake and Lamar as consenting to this exchange in the tradition of diss tracks. In a high-profile jury trial, such as the Johnny Depp and Amber Heard case , it might come down to whoever the jury finds most sympathetic.

Regardless of how extreme this war of words has become, demonstrating actual harm due to the various allegations might prove difficult. However, the likelihood of this beef ever reaching the courts is low. Should Drake or Lamar decide to sue for defamation, it might be seen as admitting defeat in this artistic war of words. And so, it will likely remain up to the fans to decide who the winner of this rap beef is.

  • Music industry
  • Defamation law
  • Kendrick Lamar

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COMMENTS

  1. 259 Interesting Speech Topics [Examples + Outlines]

    Here is our list of 10 interesting speech topics. Beauty is not only in the eye of the beholder. Children don't play enough. Animal testing is necessary. Girls are too mean to each other. Men should get paternity leave. Tattoos are an addiction. If I had a year to do what I want. Butterflies: deadly creatures.

  2. How to Write a Good Speech: 10 Steps and Tips

    Create an outline: Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval. Write in the speaker's voice: While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style.

  3. How to use Rhetorical Questions in your Speech, with Examples

    2. Personalise your questions. Make the audience feel as though you are speaking to each member individually by using "you" and "your.". For example: asking "Do you want to lose weight without feeling hungry?" would be more effective than asking "Does anyone here want to lost weight without feeling hungry?". 3.

  4. Speeches

    Ethos refers to an appeal to your audience by establishing your authenticity and trustworthiness as a speaker. If you employ pathos, you appeal to your audience's emotions. Using logos includes the support of hard facts, statistics, and logical argumentation. The most effective speeches usually present a combination these rhetorical strategies.

  5. Speechwriting 101: Writing an Effective Speech

    Give it rhythm. A good speech has pacing. Vary the sentence structure. Use short sentences. Use occasional long ones to keep the audience alert. Fragments are fine if used sparingly and for emphasis. Use the active voice and avoid passive sentences. Active forms of speech make your sentences more powerful.

  6. How to Write a Speech to Engage your Audience

    Open Question - ask the audience a provocative question or a call to action to perform some task on the back of your speech. For additional tips on how to write a speech, in particular how to close your speech, read: 5 great ways to end a speech; 10 ways to end your speech with a bang; Presentations: language expert - signposting

  7. PDF Writing a speech

    Plan where you want to finish your speech and how you will get there before you start writing . The structure of a speech is often in three parts. For example: 1. an opening that grabs your audience's attention and makes the overall topic of your speech clear - for example, pose a question to the audience where you can predict the answer. 2.

  8. How to Write a Speech

    Choose your topic and the main points that your speech will cover. Know your audience and get to know what they are looking for. Pay attention to their needs. Define the purpose of the speech and properly organize it. Introduction. A strong statement to grab the reader's attention. Refine the thesis statement.

  9. How to Write a Speech Your Audience Remembers

    Knowing your audience is as important as knowing your readers. Your audience and readers have expectations. You make a promise by stepping to that podium that you will connect with them, even if it is only for a few minutes. We've all sat through a boring or ineffective talk, lecture, or speech.

  10. Writing a speech

    The purpose of a speech is often to inform or persuade an audience. Speeches are usually written to be spoken directly to an audience and can be used to entertain, influencing the listeners that the viewpoint of the speaker is correct. Speeches can also be used to encourage the audience to take action or to change their behaviour in some way ...

  11. How to Write an Engaging Speech for GCSE English

    When planning, remember to: Underline key words from the question and blurb. Underline the audience you will be delivering your speech to. Decide on your "voice" and point of view. Write a one-sentence statement that summarises your point of view. Note down the points you can develop to support your point of view.

  12. How to Write and Structure a Persuasive Speech

    The purpose of a persuasive speech is to convince your audience to agree with an idea or opinion that you present. First, you'll need to choose a side on a controversial topic, then you will write a speech to explain your position, and convince the audience to agree with you. You can produce an effective persuasive speech if you structure your ...

  13. How to Write an Effective Speech Outline: A Step-by-Step Guide

    When outlining your speech, make sure to decide how much time you'd like to give each of your main points. You might even consider setting specific timers during rehearsals to get a real feel for each part's duration. Generally speaking, you should allot a fairly equal amount of time for each to keep things balanced.

  14. How To Write A Speech Outline

    To create a working outline, you will need: A speech topic. An idea for the "hook" in your introduction. A thesis statement. 3-5 main points (each one should make a primary claim that you support with references) A conclusion. Each of your main points will also have sub-points, but we'll get to those in a later step.

  15. 370+ Speech Writing Topics For Students

    Writing and delivering a speech can be nerve-wracking, especially for the first time. Explore our top speech writing topics for college and high school students and get answers to your frequently asked questions about how to choose a speech topic and overcome anxiety surrounding public speaking. For tips on how to write a speech, check out our ...

  16. 15 Powerful Speech Opening Lines (And How to Create Your Own)

    Analyze their response and tweak the joke accordingly if necessary. Starting your speech with humour means your setting the tone of your speech. It would make sense to have a few more jokes sprinkled around the rest of the speech as well as the audience might be expecting the same from you. 4. Mohammed Qahtani.

  17. 15 Informative Speech Examples to Inspire Your Next Talk

    Below are 15 examples of informative speech topics that are sure to engage and educate your audience. The history and evolution of social media platforms. The benefits and drawbacks of renewable energy sources. The impact of sleep deprivation on mental and physical health. The role of emotional intelligence in personal and professional success.

  18. Speech Writing Format, Samples, Examples

    Speech Writing Format, Topics, Class 11, 12, Samples, Format Class 8, Class 10, Examples Class 9, Templates, Samples; What is the format of speech writing? ... Rhetorical questions: A rhetorical question is a figure of speech that uses a question to convey a point rather than asking for a response. The answer to a rhetorical question may be ...

  19. Question 1 Directed Writing: How to Write a Speech

    One of the three formats that you may be asked to write in for Question 1 is a speech. This may be to your class or students in your school or college, or something more formal intended for broadcast. The opinions and ideas you put forward in your speech should be based on what you have read in the reading passages given, and your writing marks ...

  20. Speech Writing Format, Topics, Examples Class 11, 12

    Tips on Speech writing - Here are a few valuable tips for you to attempt the class 12 English writing skills - speech writing question in a better way-. 1. Make sure you use language which is suitable for the audience you are addressing. Usage of complex vocabulary for addressing children is not advisable. 2.

  21. How to write a speech for KS3 English students

    The opening. Start with an opening that hooks your audience before making the overall topic of your speech clear. Get their attention and prepare them to focus on the words that will follow. For ...

  22. Speech writing: Format, Types, Examples & Practice Questions in PDF

    This writing piece will address speech, speech writing, and examples, followed by the techniques to write a strong and effective speech. Students can download this PDF for several invitations and replies to class 12 writing samples and practice questions. Download ‍.

  23. 5 ChatGPT Prompts To Improve Your Public Speaking (Wow Your ...

    5 ChatGPT prompts to be a better public speaker (wow your audience) Mike Pacchione. If you find yourself on a stage or in the spotlight, you had better take it seriously. People are watching, so ...

  24. Why writing by hand beats typing for thinking and learning

    Writing by hand also improves memory and recall of words, laying down the foundations of literacy and learning. In adults, taking notes by hand during a lecture, instead of typing, can lead to ...

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    Prior to GPT-4o, you could use Voice Mode to talk to ChatGPT with latencies of 2.8 seconds (GPT-3.5) and 5.4 seconds (GPT-4) on average. To achieve this, Voice Mode is a pipeline of three separate models: one simple model transcribes audio to text, GPT-3.5 or GPT-4 takes in text and outputs text, and a third simple model converts that text back to audio.

  26. Inside Miss USA Turmoil: A Leaked Letter and String of Resignations

    Noelia Voigt's announcement this week that she was stepping down as Miss USA set off a string of departures and prompted larger questions about the inner workings of the organization.

  27. Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker uses commencement speech to

    Graduates had mixed views on the speech. ValerieAnne Volpe, 20, who graduated with an art degree, lauded Butker for saying things that "people are scared to say". "You can just hear that he loves ...

  28. OSU commencement speaker took psychedelic to write speech, he says

    Ohio State commencement speaker says he got help from psychedelics while writing speech. Ohio State's chosen commencement speaker for the class of 2024, entrepreneur Chris Pan, was high on ...

  29. Paper 2 Question 5: Speech Model Answer

    In Question 5, you will be presented with a writing task based on a statement. The subject matter will be related to the reading topic in Section A. This means you can adapt some of the ideas in the texts you read and use them in your own writing. The question asks you to write for a specific purpose and in a specific form.

  30. Drake-Kendrick Lamar feud: What does the law say ...

    Truth defence. Truth is the first defence available in a libel case. If Lamar or Drake have evidence that what they've said is substantially true, it is not defamation. In The Heart Part 6 ...