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5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations)

5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations)

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

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An expository essay attempts to explain a topic in-depth, demonstrating expert knowledge and understanding.

This form of essay is structured around the clear, factual presentation of information, devoid of the writer’s personal opinions or arguments.

The primary goal is to inform or explain rather than persuade.

Unlike an argumentative essay, which is built around defending a particular point of view with evidence and persuasion, an expository essay maintains a neutral stance, focusing on delivering straightforward facts and explanations.

An example of expository writing could be an article explaining the process of photosynthesis.

The article would systematically describe each stage of how plants convert sunlight into energy, detailing the role of sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide.

It would explain the sequence of reactions – first, second, third, fourth, fifth – that occur and the importance of each step in supporting the life of the plant.

An expository essay generally follows this essay format:

expository essay format and structure template

  • A) To persuade the reader to adopt a particular viewpoint
  • B) To inform or explain a topic clearly
  • C) To present the writer’s personal opinions and arguments
  • D) To entertain the reader with creative writing
  • A) An expository essay uses creative storytelling techniques
  • B) An expository essay remains neutral and avoids personal opinions
  • C) An expository essay focuses on persuading the reader with evidence
  • D) An expository essay prioritizes the writer’s personal experiences

Expository Essay Examples

#1 impacts of technology on education.

955 words | 4 Pages | 15 References

impact of technology on education essay

Thesis Statement: “The integration of technology in education represents a complex and critical area of study crucial for understanding and shaping the future of educational practices.”

#2 Impacts of Globalization on Education

1450 words | 5 Pages | 9 References

impacts of globalization on education essay

Thesis Statement: “This essay examines the profound and multifaceted effects of globalization on education, exploring how technological advancements and policy reforms have transformed access to, delivery of, and perceptions of education.”

#3 The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Interpersonal Relationships

1211 Words | 5 Pages | 22 References

emotional intelligence essay

Thesis Statement: “The central thesis is that EI, defined as the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions, is a crucial determinant of success and well-being.”

#4 The Future of Renewable Energy Sources and Their Impact

870 words | 4 Pages | 20 References

renewable energy essay

Thesis Statement: “The essay posits that although renewable energy sources hold immense promise for a sustainable future, their full integration into the global energy grid presents significant challenges that must be addressed through technological innovation, economic investment, and policy initiatives.”

#5 The Psychology Behind Consumer Behavior

1053 words | 4 Pages | 17 References

consumer behavior essay

Thesis Statement: “The thesis of this essay is that consumer behavior is not merely a product of rational decision-making; it is deeply rooted in psychological processes, both conscious and subconscious, that drive consumers’ choices and actions.”

How to Write an Expository Essay

expository essay definition and features, explained below

Unlike argumentative or persuasive essays, expository essays do not aim to convince the reader of a particular point of view.

Instead, they focus on providing a balanced and thorough explanation of a subject.

Key characteristics of an expository essay include:

  • Clarity and Conciseness
  • Structured Organization (Introduction, Body, Conclusion)
  • Objective Tone
  • Evidence-Based (Cite academic sources in every body paragraph)
  • Objective thesis statement (see below)
  • Informative purpose (Not argumentative)

You can follow my expository essay templates with AI prompts to help guide you through the expository essay writing process:

Expository Essay Paragraph Guide

How to write a Thesis Statement for an Expository Essay

An expository thesis statement doesn’t make an argument or try to persuade. It uses ‘is’ rather than ‘ought’ statements.

Take these comparisons  below. Note how the expository thesis statements don’t prosecute an argument or attempt to persuade, while the argumentative thesis statements clearly take a side on an issue:


(Ought Statements)

“Governments should prioritize the adoption of electric vehicles over traditional gasoline-powered cars to combat climate change and reduce environmental pollution.”“Electric vehicles contribute to environmental sustainability by reducing carbon emissions and reliance on fossil fuels.”
“Online education should be widely adopted as it offers more inclusive and adaptable learning solutions compared to traditional classroom-based education.”“Online education provides accessible and flexible learning opportunities, utilizing digital platforms for course delivery and student-teacher interaction.”

💡 AI Prompt for Generating Sample Expository Thesis Statements An expository essay’s thesis statement should be objective rather than argumentative. Write me five broad expository thesis statement ideas on the topic “[TOPIC]”.

Go Deeper: 101 Thesis Statement Examples

Differences Between Expository and Argumentative Essays

Expository and argumentative essays are both common writing styles in academic and professional contexts, but they serve different purposes and follow different structures.

Here are the key differences between them:

  • Expository Essay : The primary purpose is to explain, describe, or inform about a topic. It focuses on clarifying a subject or process, providing understanding and insight.
  • Argumentative Essay : The goal is to persuade the reader to accept a particular point of view or to take a specific action. It’s about presenting a stance and supporting it with evidence and logic.
  • Expository Essay : It maintains a neutral and objective tone. The writer presents information factually and impartially, without expressing personal opinions or biases.
  • Argumentative Essay : It often adopts a more assertive, persuasive, and subjective tone. The writer takes a clear position and argues in favor of it, using persuasive language.
  • Expository Essay : The reader is expected to gain knowledge, understand a process, or become informed about a topic. There’s no expectation for the reader to agree or disagree.
  • Argumentative Essay : The reader is encouraged to consider the writer’s viewpoint, evaluate arguments, and possibly be persuaded to adopt a new perspective or take action.

Go Deeper: Expository vs Argumentative Essays

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Expository Essay Template

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Read Next: Process Essay Examples

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8th Grade Essay: Examples, Topics, & Writing Tips

The picture introduces to the requirements of an 8th grade essay.

If you find yourself on this page, you are probably going to another level of your education – the final year of Middle school!

Isn’t it exciting?

One of the most common assignments in the 8th grade is an essay. Indeed, it gains new features. An eighth-grade essay is not the same as the sixth or seventh-grade one. It has more requirements and needs a deeper level of analysis.

How to write an 8th-grade essay? How many paragraphs should it contain? What is a standard 8th-grade essay format? On this page, you’ll find the answers to these and other questions that might arise. We’ve prepared creative 8th-grade essay topics, examples, and tips to write an A+ informative, narrative, or persuasive essay.

  • 🧩 8th Grade Essay 101
  • 📑 8th-Grade Essay Types
  • 💾 Topics for the 8 th -Graders

🍎 8th Grade Essay Examples

🧩 8th-grade essay format explained.

Once again: the 8th-grade essay format is a bit different from that of the previous years.

Below, we thoroughly explain how long an 8th-grade essay should be and how to write it. We guarantee you’ll have no questions about the format and assessment of this type of work.

What Is the 8 th Grade Essay Format?

In this section, you’ll know which parts comprise any 8th-grade essay.

The first thing to remember: you’ve got onto an entirely new level. So, your writing isn’t as simple and short as it used to be in the previous school years.

Let’s start with the structure. The fundamental parts are the same as in any type of essay:

Introduction should contain something intriguing to catch your audience’s attention. It’s usually a hook: a starting point that makes your readers keep reading your essay.

The next significant part of your introduction is the It’s the leading thought of your paper that reveals to the reader the essay’s subject matter.
Body paragraphs contain supportive arguments and evidence. They have to be solid and persuasive.
ConclusionAfter everything is written, you are to the ideas you’ve delivered.

The picture contains information about the language style required for an 8th grade essay.

8th Grade Essay: How to Write & Typical Mistakes

With the help of this section, you’ll get to know the most straightforward and helpful tips for 8th-grade essay writing.

These are the things that any 8th grader should know!

8 th Grade Essay Do’s

  • Look for reliable sources to find arguments and evidence.
  • Try to arouse eagerness for writing: it surely will ease the whole process for you.
  • Choose the topic that is interesting for you if you have such an option.
  • Use academic language, special terms, consistent phrases, and correct grammar.
  • Use good quotations from reputable sources to solidify your ideas.

8 th Grade Essay Don’ts

  • Don’t write dully: an essay is a story. It should be exciting and consistent.
  • Don’t make all your examples too similar: diversity is of the essence.
  • Don’t let your text look like an unreadable pile of words: use graphic tools to highlight the most critical points.
  • Don’t use unreliable sources and websites for citation.
  • Don’t be afraid of honest self-expression. Your identity and thoughts are what make your 8th-grade essay unique.
  • Don’t forget to revise your text after you’ve finished writing it.

8th Grade Essay Rubric

Meet the assessment strategies for 8th-grade writing. Here you’ll also find some prompts that improve your essay and lead you to a higher score.

So, the assessment pattern of a written piece comprises several main points. These are the things that assessors pay attention to:

🗣️FluencyIf it’s easy to follow the stream of your thoughts, you got it right. Pay attention to the variety of sentence patterns.
📄ContentYour writing has to give off credibility. Remember to spice it up with reliable facts & details.
🖋️GrammarWatch the syntactic structures in sentences of your essay carefully.
🧱StructureAn 8th-grade essay must be consistently and logically organized.

🔣
ConventionsYour writing must also include proper punctuation, capitalization, and smooth transitions between the parts.

📑 Eighth Grade Essay Types

We suppose that you come across different types of assignments during middle school. Among them, there indeed were descriptive and narrative essays.

However, now you are to face other exciting formats of writing. In the section below, you’ll get to know a few new types.

8th Grade Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay is a piece of writing where you make a claim and prove your point of view with solid arguments. Your aim at this point is to make readers nod in contempt while reading and share your opinion.

The structure may be pretty familiar to you:

The picture contains an exemplary outline for an 8th grade argumentative essay.

In your argumentative essay, you should back up your opinion with some exact data: statistics, figures, research studies, and polls.

To solidify your claim, you can use three types of arguments:

  • Aristotelian . The classical way – you make a statement and try to persuade the audience that it is the one that is fair and right.
  • Rogerian . First, you display an issue, then present the opposing view. After that, reveal your own opinion and start convincing readers why they should take up your point.
  • Toulmin . Present your thesis statement, then provide the audience with the grounds to support it. The final touch is to connect these parts.

PRO TIP: Explain why you disagree with the opposing point of view on your issue.

8th Grade Persuasive Essay

A persuasive essay is very similar to argumentative writing. There you have to pick up a mainly burning issue and establish a firm opinion towards it. The primary goal is the same as in the argumentative essay: to make your readers believe you.

The picture contains an exemplary outline for an 8th grade persuasive essay.

Remember the three essentials of persuasive writing:

  • Logos appeals to logic, which is apparent. Deliver your thoughts cohesively and reasonably.
  • Ethos is about persuading the readers, appealing to their sense of ethics and morality.
  • Pathos helps you convince through emotions.

8th Grade Essay – Informative

An expository essay brings concepts to complete understanding. In other words, you explain something to give a clue about the subject in question. Successful expository writing makes the audience get the whole picture, leaving no questions or misunderstandings.

To familiarize yourself with expository essay structure, check our recently updated guide on writing an expository essay .

And briefly look at six major types of expository essays:

The picture contains brief descriptions of exposutory essay types.

💾 8th Grade Essay Topics

8th grade argumentative essay topics.

  • What is the main challenge you’ve ever met?
  • What was the happiest moment of your childhood?
  • Tell about the accomplishment you’re most proud of.
  • What are the personal qualities you like most?
  • Write about an inspiring celebrity.
  • What does emotional intelligence mean?
  • Write about the largest challenge of getting older.
  • How is adolescence different from childhood?

Read the list of topics we’ve prepared for an 8th-grade essay. Choose your favorite or use our Free Essay Topics Generator to find the best one.

Persuasive Essay Topics for 8th Grade

  • Would limited screen time be beneficial for health?
  • Will the global use of electric vehicles save us from the ecological crisis?
  • The government should provide citizens with more qualified psychological help.
  • What are the pros and cons of buying a pet for a child?
  • Should people use paper and textile bags instead of plastic ones?
  • Is it necessary to attend PE classes in school?
  • Is it ethical to use smartphones during the lesson?
  • Should parents forbid their children from watching TikTok?
  • Pros and cons of cheating on exams: immoral or beneficial?
  • Should there be only healthy snack vending machines at schools?
  • Is it acceptable for a teacher to raise the voice at a student?
  • Should modern rappers’ songs be put through censorship?
  • Is it ethical for students to discuss their teachers?
  • Should all cosmetic products become cruelty-free?
  • Should we stop the overconsumption of sugar for the sake of our health?
  • Should zoos and circuses be banned forever?

8th Grade Informative Essay Topics

  • Compare and contrast the environmental policies of the USA and Europe.
  • What are the harmful effects of CO 2 emissions on the environment?
  • How is the concept of freedom reflected in 20th-century literature?
  • Reveal the details of the famous friendship of Hemingway and Fitzgerald.
  • Brush off or fight: how to act when you come across bullying at school?
  • What are the most significant challenges school attendees usually face?
  • How to overcome your fears without getting traumatized?
  • How to prepare for the exam period and overcome anxiety?
  • Freedom or despair: the history and concept of trailer parks in the USA.
  • Explain the concept of sustainability and what benefits it has.
  • Provide a classification of American lifestyles based on location.
  • A reasonable person: describe the concept and the features.

Look at our 8th grade essay examples. These are mostly just excerpts, but we included the most significant parts. Approach us in case you need a similar paper or have any questions.

8th Grade Argumentative Essay Example (#1)

The most notorious substance in the ecological discourse: is CO 2 really that bad?

Did you know that it’s better for the earth if you work out or jog with your mouth tightly shut? It’s not common knowledge, but professionals know: we need a considerable amount of CO 2 in our blood. In some terms, it’s even more vital than oxygen. Undoubtedly, there has to be a proper balance, and here is the point: CO 2 can be beneficial.

Though what good does it make to nature and the environment?

It’s all the same as with our body: CO 2 is not evil on earth, but there must be a proper balance. Now, this balance is critical, and we must make serious efforts to change the situation.

  • According to last year’s research, the USA is in the second place among countries producing the most significant part of CO 2 in the whole world. The website statista.com published striking figures. 4.57 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions were produced in 2020 by the energy consumption sphere in the United States.
  • Besides, a recently published report from the IEA agency reveals another piece of statistics. Compared to the previous year, the amount of CO 2 emissions will rise to 5% in 2021. This year we’re facing 33 billion tons of this greenhouse gas.
  • These figures mean nothing without context. Here you are: nature suffers greatly from CO 2 influence. Due to the greenhouse effect caused by an excess of CO 2 , the water temperature in oceans and seas is rising. This process is not positive at all because the natural habitat for sea creatures is altering. The changes are dramatic and lead to the extinction of many species.

In conclusion, we need to find an efficient way to improve the ecological situation regarding CO 2 emissions. The key is global social and individual awareness and consciousness. Each and every inhabitant of the Earth has to understand the meaning of CO 2 for global warming clearly. So, try to jog with your lips closed and choose a bike instead of a car.

Example #2: 8th Grade Persuasive Essay

Is it essential to stay away from social media for the sake of mental health?

Nielsen Company conducted research that says that the average US adult spends more than 10 hours interacting with social media each day. Indeed, social media plays a very considerable role in the life of a modern person. Most of us are more likely to spend time watching short videos than reading a good book. But is it harmful to our mental health to the extent that we have to quit using social media platforms?

To my mind, we are greatly dependent on our Instagram and TikTok accounts, and the content posted there. It certainly has a negative impact, too. However, the complete cancellation of social media is not a way out. The key to good mental condition is in the skill of managing your relations with them.

  • One of the recent surveys by the Lancet reports that Facebook users who scroll the newsfeed before sleep tend to be more depressed. Apparently, the deprivation of sleep affects mental well-being to a great extent.
  • FInancesOnline has recently posted the results of the research. According to this data, Facebook constitutes 72% of people’s FOMO and anxiety. Posts about traveling and active social life create most of these feelings.
  • At the same time, healthy rivalry can motivate development and growth. There’s a reasonable quotation saying that one should compare themselves yesterday instead of comparing to others. The best thing one can do to take care of their mental health is to take a digital detox for a while.

Thus, it is vital to trace your obsessions with social media and negative feelings caused by comparison with others on the Internet. Try to get more aware of it, take your time to rest from social media, and plunge into real life.

5 Paragraph Essay Example for 8th Grade (#3)

The Financier and American Tragedy : compare and contrast two main characters of Dreiser’s novels.

Do you know that Theodore Dreiser is sometimes called an American Fyodor Dostoevsky? Both writers touched upon the most sensitive social and existential issues. However, the subject of this paper is not the comparison of the authors but two famous Dreiser characters: Clyde Griffiths and Frank Cowperwood.

Both of these young American men were striving to reach financial and social success in a world of brutal struggle and hardships.

  • Clyde Griffiths represents the desperate strive for American Dream. Born in a poor and religious family, he grows greedy for money and status. In his blind obsession with gaining a high social position, he doesn’t notice his spiritual degradation. He is smart enough to struggle his way into high society but not so witty to solidify his standing with decent means. He cheats, lies, and finally commits a murder: Clyde seems to be already born guilty at times. On reading the story, there doesn’t appear any sympathy toward him. On the contrary, he provokes feelings of abomination and disgust.
  • Frank Cowperwood also aims to become wealthy and socially firm. He wants to improve his family’s life quality. Still, his ways and means astonish. Frank is a natural-born predator and strategist. His sophistication and sharp wit show up in him since his very childhood. He isn’t a man of high moral standards: Frank doesn’t mind cheating on his wife and manipulating city treasure money. However, he’s a passionate man, honest and open in his heart urges and impulses. That is the reason why fortune favors him.

However, having similar goals but different personalities and mindsets, Griffiths and Cowperwood reach completely different destination points.

How to Write an Essay in 8th Grade?

– You should pick up a good topic and formulate your attitude to the problem. – Write an outline. – Make a clear and brief thesis statement. – Think of at least 3 firm arguments if the essay type demands it. – Impress your readers with a firm conclusion. Voila! Do not forget to proofread!

How Long Is an Essay in 8th Grade?

The length of the 8th-grade essay slightly depends on the format and the particular type of writing. However, it varies from approximately 500 to 800 words. Within this framework, you have to make yourself clear and deliver all necessary points.

How Many Sentences Are in a Paragraph for 8th Grade?

The size of a paragraph in the 8th-grade essay has to be not less than 8 sentences in each. Besides that, mind that the sentences are primarily compound or complex, error-free, and coherent. Also, remember to connect the sentences and paragraphs with particular language means.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay in 8th Grade?

Choose an exciting and acute topic. Make up a thesis statement out of the problem. Draft an outline or a brief plan. Explore some reliable sources for the evidence and arguments for your essay. Organize the facts and information into a cohesive structure.

I’m an 8th grade student at a private school, and my teacher assigns us up to 4-6 pages most to write. First of all we get other essays on top of this, and usually have nearly to a week to finish. Me and my classmates struggle with this. Do you guys think this is too much for an average 8th grade student?

i am writin apaper right now and it is averreding and its about the changes we woud make to our cafeteria it has to be 5 paragraphs long

Thanks for stopping by at our blog. We would be happy to help you with your paper. You can be interested in some other posts on this blog (https://overnightessay.com/blog/category/essay-tips/) or contact our friendly Support Team to get professional writign help from experienced writers. Good luck with your paper! Best regards,

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best ideas for your essay

A List of Unique 8th Grade Expository Essay Writing Prompts

Expository writing tests the ability of an 8th grader to understand a scenario, idea or event and describe it. Prompts are used to provide a scenario or context which the 8th grader is supposed to expound. Prompts for 8th graders should revolve around imagination and things that they come into contact with on regular basic.

Here is a list of prompts that would enable 8th graders to produce excellent expository essays.

  • You have been invited to a basketball event that will be graced by your favorite NBA star. Describe how you would prepare when given the opportunity to shake his hand.
  • Describe your favorite spot in town to a friend who has never visited the area.
  • What is your favorite sport and why?
  • You have woken up in the middle of the desert. You have no idea where you are. Describe how you would find your way around.
  • It is 1500 and you are the king of your territory. Describe the one weapon you would recommend to your army to ensure that you are adequately protected.
  • Imagine you are in front of the crowd at the United Nations plenary hall. You have been invited to speak on how to improve the education standards for grade 8. What issues would top your agenda?
  • If you were to return to grade five, what things would you do more and better?
  • Assume that you are living in a society that has no law. What thing would you enjoy doing that is prohibited for now?
  • If you had a chance to become a pet, what would your favorite animal be and why?
  • Write an essay explaining to a friend how to learn riding a bicycle
  • You have been given an opportunity to become a teacher today. Which teacher would you become and why?
  • One morning you wakeup and you have a button in front of you. The button is used to decide which weather will prevail for the day. Explain the weather you would choose and why.
  • You have been given an opportunity to organize an event that will be enjoyed by everyone in your neighborhood. What event would you organize and how will you make sure that everyone enjoys?
  • If today was your last day alive, what would you do?
  • Who is your favorite musician and what do you like about him/her?

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  • How to write an expository essay

How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples

Published on July 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

“Expository” means “intended to explain or describe something.” An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn’t set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

Expository essays are usually short assignments intended to test your composition skills or your understanding of a subject. They tend to involve less research and original arguments than argumentative essays .

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Table of contents

When should you write an expository essay, how to approach an expository essay, introducing your essay, writing the body paragraphs, concluding your essay, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about expository essays.

In school and university, you might have to write expository essays as in-class exercises, exam questions, or coursework assignments.

Sometimes it won’t be directly stated that the assignment is an expository essay, but there are certain keywords that imply expository writing is required. Consider the prompts below.

The word “explain” here is the clue: An essay responding to this prompt should provide an explanation of this historical process—not necessarily an original argument about it.

Sometimes you’ll be asked to define a particular term or concept. This means more than just copying down the dictionary definition; you’ll be expected to explore different ideas surrounding the term, as this prompt emphasizes.

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See an example

expository essay 8th grade

An expository essay should take an objective approach: It isn’t about your personal opinions or experiences. Instead, your goal is to provide an informative and balanced explanation of your topic. Avoid using the first or second person (“I” or “you”).

The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It’s worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline .

A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Like all essays, an expository essay begins with an introduction . This serves to hook the reader’s interest, briefly introduce your topic, and provide a thesis statement summarizing what you’re going to say about it.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

The body of your essay is where you cover your topic in depth. It often consists of three paragraphs, but may be more for a longer essay. This is where you present the details of the process, idea or topic you’re explaining.

It’s important to make sure each paragraph covers its own clearly defined topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Different topics (all related to the overall subject matter of the essay) should be presented in a logical order, with clear transitions between paragraphs.

Hover over different parts of the example paragraph below to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

The invention of the printing press in 1440 changed this situation dramatically. Johannes Gutenberg, who had worked as a goldsmith, used his knowledge of metals in the design of the press. He made his type from an alloy of lead, tin, and antimony, whose durability allowed for the reliable production of high-quality books. This new technology allowed texts to be reproduced and disseminated on a much larger scale than was previously possible. The Gutenberg Bible appeared in the 1450s, and a large number of printing presses sprang up across the continent in the following decades. Gutenberg’s invention rapidly transformed cultural production in Europe; among other things, it would lead to the Protestant Reformation.

The conclusion of an expository essay serves to summarize the topic under discussion. It should not present any new information or evidence, but should instead focus on reinforcing the points made so far. Essentially, your conclusion is there to round off the essay in an engaging way.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a conclusion works.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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An expository essay is a broad form that varies in length according to the scope of the assignment.

Expository essays are often assigned as a writing exercise or as part of an exam, in which case a five-paragraph essay of around 800 words may be appropriate.

You’ll usually be given guidelines regarding length; if you’re not sure, ask.

An expository essay is a common assignment in high-school and university composition classes. It might be assigned as coursework, in class, or as part of an exam.

Sometimes you might not be told explicitly to write an expository essay. Look out for prompts containing keywords like “explain” and “define.” An expository essay is usually the right response to these prompts.

An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

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25 Expository essay topics for Middle School by Category

expository-essay-topics-middle-school-crunchgrade

Expository Essays explain a particular topic in a detailed, logical and straightforward manner. These types of essays are completely informative. They do not include any references or any opinion of the writer. The tone of an expository essay is kept neutral. Hence, while writing an expository essay you will be expected to illustrate, define, explain or clarify the topic in a way that the readers can easily understand it completely. You may provide arguments, conduct an investigation or evaluate things in order to provide a clear explanation to your readers.

Essay writing is an art. It is an essential skill to have which is why you’re going to require essay topics for Grade 7 , 8, 9, and 10. You may have to do a lot of creative writing in middle school . Writing is a must-have school and these activities in school prepare you for it.

Types of Expository Essays

  • Descriptive Essay – describes a place, thing or an experience
  • Problem-Solution Essay – presents a problem and its solution
  • Cause-Effect Essay – finds the cause of something and its impact
  • Comparison Essay – compares and contrasts two things
  • Process Essay – explains a process

How to Choose a Topic for your Expository Essay?

The most difficult and important aspect of essay writing is choosing the ‘right topic’. Many times students choose a difficult topic for which they need to conduct a lot of research which however makes essay writing difficult. Here are 4 quick tips on picking up the right topic –

  • Understand the purpose of writing the essay
  • Brainstorm some ideas and hence make an informed choice
  • Always conduct background research on the topic that you choose to understand its scope
  • Start with an outline first! Do not start writing straight away.

Expository Essay Samples

To help you get a better idea of what an expository essay is, consider the samples given below –

Topic: How Students can spend Their Leisure Time

Students have got a lot to handle! From attending classes to completing assignments, and participating in extracurricular activities, the small amount of leisure time that remains for them should be utilized in the best way possible. Students must choose their activities wisely as the way they spend their leisure time can reflect upon their physical and mental well-being.

Sports and Exercises

With most activities being sedentary nowadays, students should find some time to indulge in any kind of sports activity or a workout routine of their choice. Studies have shown that continuous sitting can lead to adverse effects on the health of students. Hence exercise and sports are good choices for students.

Developing Hobbies

Gardening, reading, writing, drawing, painting, or even cooking, there are numerous hobbies to choose from. Students should find some time for pursuing their hobbies, exploring new ones and enhancing their skills as a part of their leisure activity. No one knows when your hobby becomes your passion and hence gives a pathway to your success!

Time to Relax!

It is essential for us to learn to quiet our minds in this busy world. Hence students should develop a habit to relax and practice mindfulness every day. They can pick up any activity for this like meditation, yoga, listening to music, or even sitting with their family and friends. It is crucial for students to stay calm and find time, particularly for them for their mental and spiritual well-being.

These activities can help students take control of their lives. Picking up an activity that does not involve intellect, that is unlike school activities, can help students find a balance in their life. They can relax, play, grow and discover their true potential only through proper utilization of their leisure time.

Expository Essay Topics

Got a gist of how to write an expository essay? Let us have a look at some easy yet interesting expository essays that you can use –

Descriptive Essay

1. Describe your School 2. Describe your Pet 3. How Diversity can affect a Classroom? 4. Why do we Celebrate Christmas? 5. When you saw Snow for the first time

Problem-Solution Essay

1. Many students do not watch the news. How can this be a matter of concern for them? Are there any solutions to this issue? 2. Animal Abuse and Its Solutions 3. Global Warming and Its Solutions 4. What is Deforestation? Why is it a serious issue? How can this issue be solved? 5. How can we make our Community a Better Place?

Cause-Effect Essay

1. How air Pollution is affecting our Health? 2. Bullying in Schools – Causes and Effects 3. Peer Pressure and its Effects 4. Effects of Using Social Media 5. How Poverty affects urban and rural areas

Comparison Essay

1. Compare your two favourite sportspersons 2. Compare your current house to your dream home 3. Compare your two favourite TV shows 4. Watches – then and now! 5. Compare a place you visited recently with your city

Process Essay

1. How to Make Friends 2. How to Study 3. How to Take Care of your Dog 4. How to Fix a Table Fan 5. How to Write a Diary Entry

Got some inspiration to start with your own essay? So why delay? Start wiring your essay today itself. We hope that these topics would have given you a fair idea of what topic you can choose for your expository essay. Happy Writing!

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Literacy Ideas

How to Write Excellent Expository Essays

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WHAT IS AN EXPOSITORY ESSAY?

An Expository essay ‘exposes’ information to the reader to describe or explain a particular topic logically and concisely.

The purpose of expository writing is to educate or inform the reader first and foremost.

Though the term is sometimes used to include persuasive writing , which exposes us to new ways of thinking, a true expository text does not allow the writer’s personal opinion to intrude into the text and should not be confused.

Expository Writing follows a structured format with an introduction, body paragraphs presenting information and examples, and a conclusion summarising key points and reinforcing the thesis. Common expository essays include process, comparison/contrast, cause and effect, and informative essays.

EXPOSITORY ESSAY STRUCTURE

TEXT ORGANIZATION Organize your thoughts before writing.

CLARITY Use clear and concise wording. There is no room for banter.

THESIS STATEMENT State position in direct terms.

TOPIC SENTENCE Open each paragraph with a topic sentence.

SUPPORTING DETAIL Support the topic sentence with further explanation and evidence.

LINK End each body paragraph by linking to the next.

EXPOSITORY ESSAY TYPES

PROCESS Tell your audience how to achieve something, such as how to bake a cake.

CAUSE & EFFECT Explore relationships between subjects, such as climate change and its impact.

PROBLEM & SOLUTION Explain how to solve a problem, such as improving physical fitness.

COMPARE & CONTRAST Compare and contrast two or more items, such as life in China life vs life in the United States or Australia.

DEFINITION Provides a detailed definition of a word or phrase, such as self-confidence.

CLASSIFICATION Organizes things into categories or groups, such as types of music.

STRUCTURE & FEATURES OF EXPOSITORY WRITING

While there are many types of expository essays, the basic underlying structure is the same. The Hamburger or 5-Paragraph Essay structure is an excellent scaffold for students to build their articles. Let’s explore the expository essay outline.

INTRODUCTION:

This is the top bun of the burger, and here the student introduces the exposition topic. This usually consists of a general statement on the subject, providing an essay overview. It may also preview each significant section, indicating what aspects of the subject will be covered in the text. These sections will likely relate to the headings and subheadings identified at the planning stage.

If the introduction is the top bun of the burger, then each body paragraph is a beef patty. Self-contained in some regards, each patty forms an integral part of the whole.

EXPOSITORY PARAGRAPHS

Each body paragraph deals with one idea or piece of information. More complex topics may be grouped under a common heading, and the number of paragraphs will depend on the complexity of the topic. For example, an expository text on wolves may include a series of paragraphs under headings such as habitat, breeding habits, what they eat, etc.

Each paragraph should open with a topic sentence indicating to the reader what the paragraph is about. The following sentences should further illuminate this main idea through discussion and/or explanation. Encourage students to use evidence and examples here, whether statistical or anecdotal. Remind students to keep things factual – this is not an editorial piece for a newspaper!

expository essays | BlueandCreamSimpleExpositoryGraphicOrganizer | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

Expository writing is usually not the place for flowery flourishes of figurative imagery! Students should be encouraged to select a straightforward language that is easy for the reader to understand. After all, the aim here is to inform and explain, and this is best achieved with explicit language.

As we’ve seen, several variations of the expository essay exist, but the following are the most common features students must include.

The title should be functional. It should instantly inform the reader what they will learn about in the text. This is not the place for opaque poetry!

A table of contents in long essays will help the reader locate helpful information quickly. Usually, the page numbers found here will be linked to headings and subheadings to be found in the text.

HEADINGS / SUBHEADINGS:

These assist the reader in finding information by summarizing the content in their wording.

expository essays | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

Usually listed alphabetically, the glossary defines unusual or topic-specific vocabulary and is sometimes accompanied by pictures, illustrations etc.

The index lets the reader identify where to find specific information in longer texts. An index is much more detailed than a table of contents.

VISUAL FORMS OF INFORMATION

Expository essays sometimes support the text with visuals, such as:

  • Pictures / Illustrations / Photographs:

These can be used to present a central idea or concept within the text and are often accompanied by a caption explaining what the image shows. Photographs can offer a broad overview or a close-up of essential details.

expository essays | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

Diagrams are a great way to convey complex information quickly. They should be labelled clearly to ensure the reader knows what they are looking at.

  • Charts and Graphs:

These are extremely useful for showing data and statistics in an easy-to-read manner. They should be labelled clearly and correspond to the information in the nearby text.

Maps may be used to explain where something is or was located. 

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Types of expository essay

There are many different types of expository texts (e.g. encyclopaedias, travel guides, information reports , etc.), but there are also various expository essays, with the most common being.

  • Process Essays
  • Cause and Effect Essays
  • Problem and Solution Essays
  • Compare and Contrast Essays
  • Definition Essays
  • Classification Essays

We will examine each of these in greater detail in the remainder of this article, as they have slight nuances and differences that make them unique. The graphic below explains the general structure for all text types from the expository writing family.

THE PROCESS ESSAY

expository essays | expository essay types1 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

This how-to essay often takes the form of a set of instructions. Also known as a procedural text , the process essay has very specific features that guide the reader on how to do or make something.

To learn more about this type of writing, check out our information-packed article here .

Features of a process essay

Some of the main features of the process essay include:

  • ‘How to’ title
  • Numbered or bullet points
  • Time connectives
  • Imperatives (bossy words)
  • List of resources

Example Expository Process Essay:

The cause and effect essay.

expository essays | expository essay types4 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

The purpose of a cause-and-effect essay is to explore the causal relationships between things. Essays like this often bring the focus back to a single cause. These essays frequently have a historical focus.

The text should focus on facts rather than assumptions as an expository essay. However, cause-and-effect essays sometimes explore hypothetical situations too.

There are two main ways to structure a cause-and-effect essay.

The Block Structure presents all the causes first. The writer then focuses on the effects of these causes in the second half of the essay.

The Chain Structure presents each cause and then immediately follows with the effects it created.

expository essays | expository essay template4 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

Example Expository Cause and Effect Essay:

The problem and solution essay.

expository essays | expository essay types5 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

In this type of essay, the writer first identifies a problem and then explores the topic from various angles to ultimately propose a solution. It is similar to the cause-and-effect essay.

While the problem and solution essay can use the block and chain structures as outlined above – substitute cause with problem and effect with a solution – it will also usually work through the following elements:

  • Identifies a problem
  • Contains a clear thesis statement
  • Each paragraph has a topic sentence
  • Supports with facts, examples, evidence
  • The conclusion summarizes the main points

Suggested Title: What Can Be Done to Prevent Bullying in Schools?

Example Expository Problem and Solution Essay:

The compare and contrast essay.

expository essays | expository essay types6 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

In this type of essay, students evaluate the similarities and differences between two or more things, ideas, people, etc. Usually, the subjects will belong to the same category.

The compare-and-contrast expository essay can be organized in several different ways. Three of these are outlined below.

In the three structures outlined, it is assumed that two subjects are being compared and contrasted. Of course, the precise number of paragraphs required in the text will depend on the number of points the student wishes to make and the number of subjects being compared and contrasted.

Suggested Title: In-Class or Remote Learning: Which Is Best?

expository essays | expository essay template1 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

DEFINITION ESSAYS

expository essays | expository essay types2 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

This type of essay provides a detailed description and definition of a word or phrase. It can be a concrete term, such as car or glass, or a more abstract concept, such as love or fear .

A definition essay comprehensively explains a term’s purpose and meaning. It will frequently contain some or all of the following elements:

  • A definition of the term
  • An analysis of its meaning
  • The etymology of the term
  • A comparison to related terms
  • Examples to illustrate the meaning
  • A summary of the main points

Example Expository Definition Essay:

CLASSIFICATION ESSAYS

expository essays | expository essay types3 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

Like definition essays, a classification essay sorts or organizes things into various groups or categories and explains each group or category in detail.

Classification essays focus on:

  • Sorting things into functional categories
  • Ensuring each category follows a common organizing principle
  • Provides examples that illustrate each category.

Example Expository Classification Essay:

expository essays | what is an expository essay | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

One of the best ways to understand the different features of expository essays is to see them in action. The sample essay below is a definition essay but shares many features with other expository essays.

expository essays | expository essay example | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

EXPOSITORY WRITING PROMPTS

expository essays | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

Examples of Expository Essay Titles

 Expository essay prompts are usually pretty easy to spot.

 They typically contain keywords that ask the student to explain something, such as “define,” “outline,” “describe,” or, most directly of all, “explain.”

 This article will examine the purpose of an expository essay and its structure. It will also examine the primary language and stylistic features of this vital text type.

 After this, we’ll explore five distinct tips for helping your students get the most out of writing their expository essays.

Expository Essays vs Argumentative Essays

 Expository essays are often confused with their close cousin, the argumentative essay. Still, it’s easy to help students distinguish between the two by quickly examining their similarities and differences.

 In an expository essay, students will attempt to write about a thing or a concept neutrally and objectively, unlike an argumentative essay where the writer’s opinions permeate the text throughout. Simple as it sounds, this may take some doing for some students as it requires the writer to refine their personal voice almost out of existence!

 Luckily, choosing the correct viewpoint from which to write the essay can go a long way to helping students achieve the desired objectivity. Generally, students should write their expository essays from the third-person perspective.

Contrastingly, argumentative essays are subjective in nature and will usually be written from the first-person perspective as a result.

 In an expository essay, the text’s prime focus is the topic rather than the writer’s feelings on that topic. For the writer, disassociating their personal feelings on a topic is much easier when they’re a step removed from the narration by using the third-person POV rather than the first-person POV.

Expository Essay Tips

Follow these top tips from the experts to craft an amazing expository essay.

expository essays | img 60ffaf0c39e69 | How to Write Excellent Expository Essays | literacyideas.com

 Tip #1: Choose the Right Tool for the Job

writing-tools

Surprising as it may seem, not all expository essays are created equal.

 In fact, there are several different types of expository essays, and our students must learn to recognize each and choose the correct one for their specific needs when producing their own expository essays.

 To do this, students will need to know the 5 types of expository essays:

  • The Cause and Effect Essay : This type of essay requires that the writer explain why something happened and what occurred due to that event and subsequent events. It explores the relationship between people, ideas, events, or things and other people, ideas, events, or things.
  • The Compare and Contrast Essay: In a compare and contrast essay, the writer examines the similarities and differences between two subjects or ideas throughout the body of the piece and usually brings things together in an analysis at the end .
  • The Descriptive Essay: This is a very straightforward expository essay with a detailed description or explanation of a topic. The topic may be an event, place, person, object, or experience. This essay’s direct style is balanced with the freedom of the writer can inject some of their creativity into the description.
  • The Problem and Solution Essay : In this expository essay, the student will work to find valid solutions to a specific problem or problem.
  • The Process Essay : Also called a how-to essay, this essay type is similar to instruction writing, except in essay form. It provides a step-by-step procedure breakdown to teach the reader how to do something.

 When choosing a specific topic to write about, students should consider several factors:

 ●      Do they know the topic well enough to explain the ins and outs of the subject to an unfamiliar audience?

 ●      Do they have enough interest in this topic to sustain thorough research and writing about it?

 ●      Is enough relevant information and credible sources available to fuel the student’s writing on this topic?

Tip # 2: Research the Topic Thoroughly

Regardless of which type of expository essay your students are working on, they must approach the research stage of the writing process with diligence and focus. The more thorough they are at the research stage, the smoother the remainder of the writing process will be.

A common problem for students while researching is that sometimes they don’t have a clear understanding of the objective of their research. They lack a clear focus on their efforts.

Research is not mindlessly scanning documents and scrawling occasional notes. As with any part of the writing process, it begins with determining clear objectives.

Often, students will start the research process with a broad focus, and as they continue researching, they will naturally narrow their focus as they learn more about the topic.

Take the time to help students understand that writing isn’t only about expressing what we think; it’s also about discovering what we think.

When researching, students should direct their efforts to the following:

REad our complete guide to researching here

  • Gather Supporting Evidence : The research process is not only for uncovering the points to be made within the essay but also the evidence to support those points. The aim here is to provide an objective description or analysis of the topic; therefore, the student will need to gather relevant supporting evidence, such as facts and statistics, to bolster their writing. Usually, each paragraph will open with a topic sentence, and subsequent sentences in the paragraph will focus on providing a factual, statistical, and logical analysis of the paragraph’s main point.
  • Cite Sources : It’s an essential academic skill to be able to cite sources accurately. There are several accepted methods of doing this, and you must choose a citation style appropriate to your student’s age, abilities, and context. However, whatever style you choose, students should get used to citing any sources they use in their essays, either in the form of embedded quotations, endnotes, or bibliography – or all three!
  • Use Credible Sources: The Internet has profoundly impacted knowledge sharing as the Gutenberg Press did almost 600 years ago. It has provided unparalleled access to the sum total of human knowledge as never before, with each student having a dizzying number of sources available at their fingertips. However, we must ensure our students understand that not all sources are created equal. Encourage students to seek credible sources in their research and filter out the more dubious sources. Some questions students can ask themselves to help determine a source’s credibility include:

●      Have I searched thoroughly enough to find the most relevant sources for my topic?

●      Has this source been published recently? Is it still relevant?

●      Has the source been peer-reviewed? Have other sources confirmed this source?

●      What is the publication’s reputation?

●      Is the author an expert in their field?

●      Is the source fact-based or opinion-based?

Tip #3: Sketch an Outline

Every kid knows you can’t find the pirate treasure without a map, which is true of essay writing. Using their knowledge of the essay’s structure, students start whipping their research notes into shape by creating an outline for their essay.

The 5-paragraph essay or ‘Hamburger’ essay provides a perfect template for this.

Students start by mapping out an appealing introduction built around the main idea of their essay. Then, from their mound of research, they’ll extract their most vital ideas to assign to the various body paragraphs of their text.

Finally, they’ll sketch out their conclusion, summarize their essay’s main points, and, where appropriate, make their final statement on the topic.

Tip #4: Write a Draft

Title chosen? Check! Topic researched? Check! Outline sketched? Check!

Well, then, it’s time for the student to begin writing in earnest by completing the first draft of their essay.

They’ll already have a clear idea of the shape their essay will take from their research and outlining processes, but ensure your students allow themselves some leeway to adapt as the writing process throws up new ideas and problems.

That said, students will find it helpful to refer back to their thesis statement and outline to help ensure they stay on track as they work their way through the writing process towards their conclusions.

As students work through their drafts, encourage them to use transition words and phrases to help them move smoothly through the different sections of their essays.

Sometimes, students work directly from an outline as if on a checklist. This can sometimes be seen as the finished essay resembling Frankenstein. That is an incongruous series of disparate body parts crudely stitched together.

Learning to use transitions effectively will help students create an essay that is all of a whole, with all the joins and seams sanded and smoothed from view.

Tip #5: Edit with a Fresh Pair of Eyes

eagle-owl-fresh-eyes.jpg

Once the draft is complete, students enter the final crucial editing stage.

But, not so hasty! Students must pencil in some time to let their drafts ‘rest’. If the editing process occurs immediately after the student finishes writing their draft, they’ll likely overlook much.

Editing is best done when students have time to gain a fresh perspective on their work. Ideally, this means leaving the essay overnight or over a few nights. However, practically, this isn’t always possible. Usually, though, it will be possible for students to put aside their writing for a few hours.

With the perspective that only time gives, when returning to their work, students can identify areas for improvement that they may have missed. Some important areas for students to look at in the editing process include:

  • Bias : Students need to remember the purpose of this essay is to present a balanced and objective description of the topic. They need to ensure they haven’t let their own personal bias slip through during the writing process – an all too easy thing to do!
  • Clarity : Clarity is as much a function of structure as language. Students must ensure their paragraphs are well organized and express their ideas clearly. Where necessary, some restructuring and rewriting may be required.
  • Proofread: With stylistic and structural matters taken care of, it’s now time for the student to shift their focus onto matters of spelling , vocabulary choice, grammar, and punctuation. This final proofread represents the last run-through of the editing process. It’s the students’ final chance to catch mistakes and errors that may bias the assessor (aka You! ) against the effectiveness of the piece of writing. Where the text has been word-processed, the student can enlist inbuilt spelling and grammar checkers to help. Still, they should also take the time to go through each line word by word. Automatic checkers are a helpful tool, but they are a long way from infallible, and the final judgement on a text should employ the writer’s own judgement.

Expository essays are relatively straightforward pieces of writing. By following the guidelines mentioned above and practising them regularly, students can learn to produce well-written expository essays quickly and competently.

Explaining and describing events and processes objectively and clearly is a useful skill that students can add to their repertoire. Although it may seem challenging at first, with practice, it will become natural.

To write a good expository essay, students need a good understanding of its basic features and a firm grasp of the hamburger essay structure. As with any writing genre, prewriting is essential, particularly for expository writing.

Since expository writing is designed primarily to inform the reader, sound research and note-taking are essential for students to produce a well-written text. Developing these critical skills is an excellent opportunity for students through expository writing, which will be helpful to them as they continue their education.

Redrafting and editing are also crucial for producing a well-written expository essay. Students should double-check facts and statistics, and the language should be edited tightly for concision.

And, while grading their efforts, we might even learn a thing or two ourselves!

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28 Expository Writing Prompts for Middle School

October 12, 2014 in  Pedagogy

Expository Writing Prompts Middle School

The ability to provide information in different contexts is essential to effective communication. Students must practice expository writing throughout their academic careers. The sooner they start, the better. Below are some descriptive, sequential, compare and contrast, cause and effect, and problem/solution writing prompts to help you give your students the practice they need.

Descriptive

  • Write an essay describing your school to a potentially new student.
  • Write an essay describing the appeal of reality TV shows.
  • Write an essay describing a rainy night.
  • Write an essay describing your first pet.
  • Write an essay describing your first memory.
  • It’s Christmas morning and there is a package under the tree containing exactly what you requested. Describe the contents of your package..
  • Write an essay describing how you feel when you wake up and discover snow on the ground outside — and school has been cancelled.
  • Writing an essay explaining the process you use to style your hair in the morning.
  • You have invited your two best friends to spend the afternoon at your home. Write an essay telling how your prepare for their visit.
  • Everyone has lost something at one time or another. Write an essay telling what you did to find what you had lost.
  • Describe how to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
  • Tell how you wash your hair.
  • Describe the plot of your favorite book.

Compare and Contrast

  • Write an essay comparing and contrasting ownership of cats and dogs.
  • Compare and contrast this year in school to last year.
  • Compare and contrast your two favorite characters.
  • Compare and contrast your family’s home and the home of your dreams.
  • Compare and contrast a typical day in your life today and what you think a typical day in your life will be like when you are 25.
  • Compare and contrast your two favorite teachers.

Cause and Effect

  • Write an essay telling how peer pressure has affected you this year.
  • Write an essay explaining what causes students to drop out of high school.
  • Discuss the causes and effects of bullying in schools.
  • Discuss the causes and effects of poverty in rural (urban) areas.
  • Discuss the causes and effects of drug or alcohol use on families.

Problem/Solution

  • Most students do not read or watch news, resulting in a lack of knowledge about the world outside of their immediate neighborhood. Write an essay describing why this is a problem and telling how this problem might be solved.
  • Think about the community in which you live. What could you do to make it a better place? Choose one problem that needs to be solved to make your community a better place to live. Write a letter to the editor describing how solving this problem would make your community a better place, and tell what you would do. Give reasons why you think your plan would work.
  • Think about what you could do to make your school more beautiful. Think about how you would do this. How could you persuade the people in your school that your idea is a good one? Write a letter to the principal of your school asking for support for your plan for making your school more beautiful. Tell what you would do and how you would do it. Explain why you think your plan is important and why it would work.
  • Think about animal abuse. Some people abuse animals by being intentionally cruel to them or neglecting their basic needs; others abuse animals out of ignorance. Think about what could be done to prevent both kinds of animal abuse. Write a letter to leaders in your community describing how you would solve this problem, and how treating animals better would improve the lives of animals and people. Explain why you think your plan will work.

Related topics: Informative Writing , Quickwriting

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About the author 

Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.

I am a secondary English Language Arts teacher, a University of Oklahoma student working on my doctorate in Instructional Leadership and Academic Curriculum with an concentration in English Education and co-Editor of the Oklahoma English Journal. I am constantly seeking ways to amplify students' voices and choices.

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the prompt should be harder,and including a think about and quote.

Thank you very much for your input, Amelia!

this info is very helpful and all but right now at school (i am in middle school) i have to write an expisitory essay on any topic i am really having trouble finding a topic but it has to be something u can argue like for example: football: people think it is a dangerous sport but the rules have changed more saftey… yeah stuff like that something u can argue ur opinion and so far i have nothing i was really hoping this would help but no but thx anyways i am gonna go to another website but in the future this could really help thx!!!!

But it makes your teacher happy to know what your input is for example what your input is about bullying and drugs.

Thank you so much for this. I need to give my 8th-grader, reluctant writer, some options for what he writes as practice on spring break. This is a great list. I added one about describing the appeal of the YouTube videos he watches, and another about the cause-and-effect of DOnald Trump’s candidacy, since my son is very interested in Trump.

Thank you this helped a lot when I didn’t know what to write for my essay.

I really like this website because i like writing essays for practice and these are a little difficult but It is good for it to be a little diffcult because it is more challenging.

These are great! I will be using these suggestions with my 6th graders! I love expository writing!!!! 🙂

Comments are closed.

61 General Expository Essay Topic to Practice Academic Writing

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Expository essays discuss topics by using facts rather than opinions, requiring students to evaluate and investigate while setting forth their arguments clearly and concisely. Teachers often include expository essays as part of assessments , especially in college-level courses, so students can help themselves succeed by practicing writing these types of essays. When teachers are integrating writing throughout the curriculum, students can use expository essays to demonstrate what they've learned in other courses.

Sample Expository Essay Topics From Students

There is no best topic for an expository essay since everyone is inspired by different subjects. Tenth-graders wrote the following general expository essay topics. Students can practice writing these topics or use the list to come up with ideas of their own. The important thing to remember is that these expository essays are based on facts rather than the writer's beliefs or feelings.

  • Explain why you admire a particular person.
  • Explain why someone you know should be regarded as a leader.
  • Explain why parents are sometimes strict.
  • If you had to be an animal, which would you be and why?
  • Explain why you especially enjoy a particular teacher.
  • Explain why some cities have curfews for teens.
  • Explain why some students are forced to leave school once they are sixteen.
  • Explain how moving from place to place affects teens.
  • Explain why getting a driver's license is an important event in the lives of many teenagers.
  • Describe the major stressors in teens' lives.
  • Explain why you like or don't like working in a team.
  • Describe some nonmaterial things that make you happy.
  • Explain why some teens commit suicide.
  • Explain how music affects your life.
  • Explain the impact of different music genres on society.
  • Explain why students listen to a particular type of music.
  • Explain why some teens skip school.
  • Explain the likely consequences of skipping school.
  • Describe the likely consequences of doing poorly in school.
  • Explain why some teens do drugs.
  • Describe the likely consequences of selling drugs.
  • Describe the likely consequences of taking drugs.
  • Explain why some teens smoke cigarettes or vape.
  • Explain the likely consequences of being kicked out of school.
  • Explain the likely consequences of skipping classes.
  • Explain the likely consequences of siblings constantly fighting.
  • Explain why some teens wear makeup.
  • Explain the consequences of having alcohol on the school campus.
  • Explain the likely consequences of being sexually active without using protection.
  • Explain why some teens' parents do not like to be alone with their child's boyfriend or girlfriend.
  • Explain the likely consequences of increasing the time between classes from five to 15 minutes.
  • Explain why some teens join gangs.
  • Explain the difficulties teens have once they are in gangs.
  • Explain how life for a teenager changes once they have a baby.
  • Describe what you feel a boy should do if he finds out his girlfriend is pregnant.
  • Explain why you should or should not laugh at embarrassing moments.
  • Describe the effects of marijuana.
  • Explain the likely consequences of teens becoming sexually active.
  • Explain why it is helpful to organize your materials and activities.
  • Explain why your schoolwork is important.
  • Describe the ways you help out at home.
  • Explain the likely consequences of abolishing capital punishment.
  • Explain the consequences of adopting a pass/fail grading system.
  • Explain the likely consequences of enforcing an 11:00 p.m. curfew.
  • Explain the likely consequences of ending forced busing.
  • Explain why some teenagers dislike saying the Pledge of Allegiance.
  • Explain why some schools don't have open lunch policies.
  • Explain why some teenagers are materialistic.
  • Explain why some teens get jobs.
  • Explain the consequences of having a job while in high school.
  • Explain the likely consequences of dropping out of school.
  • Describe some productive ways students can spend their leisure time.
  • Explain why dealing with divorce can be difficult for many teens.
  • Explain why teens love their parents even when family situations are difficult.
  • Describe the things that bring you the greatest happiness.
  • Describe three things you would like to change about the world and explain why you would change them.
  • Explain why you prefer living in an apartment (or house).
  • Describe the likely consequences of requiring a childbearing license.
  • Describe three objects that symbolize your culture and explain why you selected them.
  • Explain why you are interested in a particular career.
  • Explain the likely consequences of requiring students to wear school uniforms.
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Journal Buddies Jill | December 27, 2023 November 17, 2021 | Prompts by Grade , Writing by Grade Level

33 Excellent Expository Writing Prompts

Hooray! Our list of expository writing prompts was created with younger writers in mind, but these ideas are actually very useful good for writers of many ages and stages of life.

Expository Writing Prompts for Students

You see…

The basics are a fantastic starting point regardless of the writer’s age. So take a look now and enjoy!

A Few Words on Expository Writing

This form of writing is a method of writing in which the author describes, informs, or explains a topic to the reader.

Learning how to write an expository paper (or essay) is one of the most important skills that students can develop from an early age. Of course, it is also a skill one may develop or refine at any age or stage in school or life.

Expository writing is a lifelong skill that will serve students not only throughout the rest of their school years but also throughout their entire lives.

Great Topic Choices for Your English Classes

Again, our list of expository prompts while created with younger students in mind is also appropriate for writers of all ages.

Some of the ideas to write about are listed below ask your students and writers to explain a concept (such as why it’s so important to eat healthy foods).

Other expository topic ideas allow them to practice their expository writing skills by explaining why they hold a particular viewpoint or belief (such as why a person they find heroic should be admired by others).

As students and their classmates go through these descriptive prompts, they’ll improve their descriptive writing skills and will gain a better understanding of what it means to explain or teach something to another person.

33 Expository Writing Prompts for Everyone

Use this fantastic list of prompts with your writers today!

  • Think of your most valued possession. Explain why it is so important to you.
  • Explain why it is so important for kids to attend school.
  • Think about a time when you did something that you didn’t want to do. Explain why you did it anyway.
  • Think of a person whom you consider to be a hero. Explain why other people should admire this person.
  • Explain three ways that people can do nice things for one another.
  • Explain what you would do if a friend got mad at you for something that you didn’t do.
  • Think about a famous person whom you would like to meet and explain why you would want to meet them.
  • Choose an important tool that can be found in our classroom. Explain how it has made an impact on teachers and students.
  • Think about a time when you couldn’t stop laughing and explain what happened.
  • Explain why it is important to eat healthy foods.
  • Explain why you shouldn’t have too many sweets or snacks.
  • Think of something your parents always tell you and explain why it is or isn’t true.
  • Are you the oldest, middle, or youngest child in your family? Explain what you like or dislike about your position.
  • Think about what you want to be when you grow up and explain why you think that would be the best job.

Expository Writing for Students

  • Choose your favorite holiday and explain why people celebrate it.
  • Think about one of your best friends and explain why you like them.
  • Explain what it means to be a good person.
  • Explain what you would do if you were at a store and couldn’t find your grownup.
  • Choose a type of transportation (car, bike, plane, etc.) and explain why it is beneficial for people who use it.
  • Explain what you like most about living in our city.
  • Think of one of your family’s traditions. Explain why it matters to your family and how you perform the tradition.
  • Explain why it is important for students to learn how to do math.
  • Think of something that you know how to do well and explain how to do it as if you were teaching someone who didn’t know.
  • Explain why it is important for students to follow our classroom rules.
  • Explain what you would do if you saw someone being bullied.
  • Choose a food that you love and explain what you like about it.
  • Think of your favorite TV show and explain why you like it better than other programs.
  • Explain what you like most about summer vacation.
  • Choose your favorite book and explain what elements made it a good book.
  • Think about how you feel when someone notices something you’ve done well. Explain what kinds of feelings you get.
  • Choose one of your favorite activities and explain what you like most about it.
  • Explain why it is important to help people who are less fortunate than us.

Bonus List of Simple Ideas Expository Essays or Compositions

Write about your:

  • Favorite movie 
  • Favorite toy
  • Favorite music
  • Favorite animal or
  • A particular animal

and explain in detail what you like most about it. 

We hope your writers enjoyed this bonus list of things to write about for youngsters.

Maybe they’ll even share them with a good friend who isn’t in their English or writing class. Now, wouldn’t that be a hoot!

A Few Final Thoughts

These all-new expository writing prompts are full of interesting topics and ideas that writers will be excited to describe.

Use these ideas with your students and kids. By doing so, you’ll help your students learn the valuable skill of narrative writing, composition, and expository writing skill development.

Now is the perfect time for your young students to pick a good topic they enjoy and practice this form of writing. Doing so will help them refine their writing skills and help give them a boost when they have to write more elaborate essays later on in life (such as I in middle school, high school, college and beyond).

Links & Resources

  • 30 Expository Writing Prompts for 4th Grade
  • Explanatory Writing: 22 Writing Prompt Ideas for Students
  • Opinion Writing Topics for 2nd Grade
  • What is Expository Writing?

Well, that’s all for today.

Until next time, write on…

If you enjoyed these Expository Writing Prompts, please share them on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Pinterest. I appreciate it!

Sincerely, Jill journalbuddies.com creator and curator

Expository Writing Prompts for Kids

Tap to See Prompts 30 Fun Expository Writing Prompts 4th Grade Super Sweet List of Prompts for 1 -5 Graders 30 Opinion Writing Prompts for 2nd Grade ------------Start of Om Added --------- @media (min-width: 320px) and (max-width: 767px) { .inside-right-sidebar { display: none !important; } } Search Now Offering You 18,000+ Prompts!

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Best expository essay topics to cover all your needs

expository essay 8th grade

8th Grade Essay Topics and Ideas

The 8th grade is the peak of middle school and the stage where students transition to a higher level of learning. While 8th graders are not considered children, they are also not seen as exactly mature enough; hence, 8th grade essay topics may be a bit tricky. Essay topics for 8th grade may cut across different fields of life to help students explore their creativity. Be that as it may, there are equally expository writing prompts 8th grade students can employ to help them write smarter. Here, you’ll find 8th grade essay topics students would need to effectively write an essay.

The Best Essay Topics for Grade 8

  • Should alcohol consumption be made legal for all ages?
  • Why people would rather travel outside their homes for the holidays
  • What is the difference between getting a tan and toning?
  • The advantages and disadvantages of shopping online
  • How an average kid spends the day after school hours
  • What is your view on people who smoke and consume alcohol?
  • At what age should people ideally move out of their parent’s home?
  • Should 8th graders be considered old enough to start dating?
  • The different ways that people express their feelings
  • Volunteering is a fairly satisfying event
  • Would you rather be a vegetarian or eat meat?
  • Do people prefer to eat in a restaurant than cook at home?
  • Different ways that people take part in cyberbullying
  • Should 8th grade students be automatically promoted to 10th grade?
  • The commonest myths surrounding going to high school
  • What factors should influence your choice of high school?
  • Does attending high school mean getting a job?
  • What are the differences between private schools and public schools?
  • Would you rather attend a boarding school or go to school from home daily?
  • All high school students should own a car to help make going to school easier
  • Does friendship last all through middle school
  • What are the differences between being homeschooled and being classroom schooled?
  • Why 8th grade is considered to be the most difficult in middle school?
  • The importance of getting full scholarship funding for school
  • 8th grade students are responsible for bullying younger grade students
  • Should active sports members be given automatic scholarships
  • The importance of exercising regularly
  • What does intermittent fasting mean?
  • The dangers of air pollution to the human body
  • What are the health benefits of eating vegetables?
  • What does the saying “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” mean?
  • In what ways can we avoid discriminating against people living with disabilities?
  • Practical ways to prevent chronic illnesses in the future
  • What are the dangers of being overweight?
  • Why mental stability matters to our wellbeing?
  • In what ways can we help prevent the spread of Covid19
  • Why everyone should learn the basic emergency medicine needed
  • Should the voting age be reduced to accommodate middle school and high school students?
  • What is the difference between a democratic and nondemocratic state?
  • What are the fundamental human rights?
  • Why is racism bad?
  • What are the characteristics of bad government?
  • Everyone needs to know the independent history of their country
  • What are your obligations as a citizen of a state?
  • Can middle school students carry out acts of patriotism?

Abuse and Crime

  • How can we help prepare as lo during high school students for possible bullying in school?
  • What are the best steps to take when sexually abused by a family member?
  • Should all bad guys be made to pay bigger fines or face stricter punishments?
  • How do we help rape victims get past their terrible experiences?
  • What is PTSD and what are its symptoms?
  • Some of the ways that we unknowingly perpetrate abuse
  • What are the signs to look out for in an abusive relationship?

Expository Writing Prompts 8th Grade Students Need

  • Technology and its effect on academics; should all schoolwork be carried out on the internet?
  • The changing times of the global pandemic; what are the differences in human activities before and after the outbreak of Covid19?
  • Superhero movies: what are the differences between villains and heroes?
  • Unwanted pregnancies are often difficult to deal with; what are the dangers of unprotected sex?
  • Blending into junior high school may prove to be a lot of work; what ways can you help yourself prepare better for high school?
  • Global warming is a threat to the world; how can we reduce the risks of global warming?
  • Friendships sometimes last for a lifetime; are you looking forward to making new friends in high school?
  • Owning pets comes with a huge responsibility; why there should be an age limit for parenting a pet?
  • The internet is home to many activities; what are some of the dangers of early exposure to the internet?

8th grade essay topics cannot possibly be exhausted. The topics here will help you start writing immediately or draft out a unique topic that you’d like to write on. Pick the best essay topics for grade 8 and get creative.

expository essay 8th grade

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Expository Paragraph Lesson Plan

Expository Paragraph

This expository paragraph lesson plan also includes:.

  • Teacher Reference
  • Graphic Organizer
  • Join to access all included materials

Upper elementary and middle school writers learn how to craft an expository paragraph by following the six steps detailed in a 48-page instructional guide. Learners learn how to write six different types of informational paragraphs: to inform; to explain; to describe; to analyze for cause and effect; to analyze for compare and contrast; and to analyze for problem and solution. They create graphic organizers with symbols that represent the various required elements (hook, topic sentence, details, and conclusion) and then learn gestures that represent the elements. The process described is designed to engage all learning styles and deserves a special place in your curriculum.

Instructional Ideas

  • Introduce only one type of expository paragraph at a time
  • As a brain break and preparation for writing, have class members stand and do the gestures together, calling out the appropriate term
  • Post the symbols and their explanations on the classroom walls
  • Laminate the cards and posters to permit reuse

Classroom Considerations

  • Most appropriate for upper elementary and middle school writers
  • The resource includes step-by-step directions, graphic organizers, and symbols to represent the required elements
  • Blueprint cards are included to help writers make more sophisticated sentences
  • The full body response gestures (FBL) add a kinesthetic element to the lesson

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  1. How To Write An Expository Essay (7 Best Tips)

    expository essay 8th grade

  2. 8th Grade Expository Essay Sample

    expository essay 8th grade

  3. Expository Essay

    expository essay 8th grade

  4. Examples Of Expository Essays For 8th Grade

    expository essay 8th grade

  5. Expository Essay: Examples and Tips of a Proper Writing That Will Be

    expository essay 8th grade

  6. How To Write An Expository Essay in 6 Steps

    expository essay 8th grade

VIDEO

  1. 8th Expository Essay- Introduction/ Research/ Prewrite

  2. Expository Essay Conventions

  3. EXPOSITORY ESSAY FC

  4. Expository Essay Full and Final Thesis Statements videoo

  5. Expository Essay

  6. Expository Essay Brainstorming Video

COMMENTS

  1. Expository Essay Examples for Middle and High School

    Get past the thesis statement with two examples of expository essays. Learn more about the format, requirements, and types of expository writing for middle and high school.

  2. 5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations)

    5 Expository Essay Examples (Full Text with Citations) An expository essay attempts to explain a topic in-depth, demonstrating expert knowledge and understanding. This form of essay is structured around the clear, factual presentation of information, devoid of the writer's personal opinions or arguments. The primary goal is to inform or ...

  3. 8th Grade Essay: Examples, Topics, & Writing Tips

    8th Grade Essay - Informative. An expository essay brings concepts to complete understanding. In other words, you explain something to give a clue about the subject in question. Successful expository writing makes the audience get the whole picture, leaving no questions or misunderstandings.

  4. A List of Unique 8th Grade Expository Essay Writing Prompts

    Expository writing tests the ability of an 8th grader to understand a scenario, idea or event and describe it. Prompts are used to provide a scenario or context which the 8th grader is supposed to expound. Prompts for 8th graders should revolve around imagination and things that they come into contact with on regular basic.

  5. How to Write an Expository Essay

    The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It's worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline. A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

  6. 25 Best Expository Essay Topics for Middle School

    Expository Essays explain a particular topic in a detailed, logical and straightforward manner. These types of essays are completely informative. ... It is an essential skill to have which is why you're going to require essay topics for Grade 7, 8, 9, and 10. You may have to do a lot of creative writing in middle school. Writing is a must ...

  7. Expository Writing

    Expository essays are used throughout academia, but this type of writing is also used in magazines, newspapers, technical writing and other areas. ... Common Core ELA Grade 8 - Writing: Standards ...

  8. How to write Excellent Expository Essays

    Tip # 2: Research the Topic Thoroughly. Regardless of which type of expository essay your students are working on, they must approach the research stage of the writing process with diligence and focus. The more thorough they are at the research stage, the smoother the remainder of the writing process will be.

  9. 28 Expository Writing Prompts for Middle School

    The ability to provide information in different contexts is essential to effective communication. Students must practice expository writing throughout their academic careers. The sooner they start, the better. Below are some descriptive, sequential, compare and contrast, cause and effect, and problem/solution writing prompts to help you give your students the…

  10. PDF 8th Grade Reading & Writing Expository / Informational Text Unit

    Week 8. Snapshot: This week has students reviewing all kinds of elements of literature and literary devices through Gwendolyn Brook's short story "Home". Activities include plot, theme, mood, figurative language, various opportunities for using text evidence effectively, and, of course, writing activities!

  11. 8 Eighth Grade Expository Writing Unit

    This unit introduces eighth grade students to strategies for writing expository essays, including conducting research, organizing ideas, using the writing process, and incorporating specific elements into their writing. Students will learn how to find and cite sources, take notes, write drafts, and produce a final informative essay. The unit is intended to improve students' expository writing ...

  12. A List of General Expository Essay Topics

    Expository essays discuss topics by using facts rather than opinions, requiring students to evaluate and investigate while setting forth their arguments clearly and concisely. Teachers often include expository essays as part of assessments , especially in college-level courses, so students can help themselves succeed by practicing writing these ...

  13. 33 Excellent Expository Writing Prompts » JournalBuddies.com

    This form of writing is a method of writing in which the author describes, informs, or explains a topic to the reader. Learning how to write an expository paper (or essay) is one of the most important skills that students can develop from an early age. Of course, it is also a skill one may develop or refine at any age or stage in school or life.

  14. PDF Grade 8 B.E.S.T. Writing Sample Test Materials

    The purpose of these sample test materials is to orient teachers and students to the appearance of passages and prompts on paper-based accommodated. B.E.S.T. Writing tests. Each spring, students in grades 4-10 are administered one text-based writing prompt for the B.E.S.T. Writing test. Students will respond to either an expository prompt or ...

  15. 8th Grade Essay Topics and Ideas

    Conclusion. 8th grade essay topics cannot possibly be exhausted. The topics here will help you start writing immediately or draft out a unique topic that you'd like to write on. Pick the best essay topics for grade 8 and get creative. The 8th grade is the peak of middle school and the stage where students transition to a higher level of learning.

  16. Expository Paragraph Lesson Plan for 5th

    This Expository Paragraph Lesson Plan is suitable for 5th - 8th Grade. Upper elementary and middle school writers learn how to craft an expository paragraph by following the six steps detailed in a 48-page instructional guide. Learners learn how to write six different types of informational paragraphs: to inform; to explain; to describe; to analyze for cause and effect; to analyze for compare ...

  17. Free 8th grade writing-expository lessons

    The guides includes a process with steps that will guide students through each of the 6 traits of writing (i.e., ideas & content, sentence fluency, word choice, organization, voice, conventions) for 6-8th grade. The new updated version includes both color and black and white pages, a fun design, and all the same helpful content!

  18. PDF New York State Grade 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric

    New York State Grade 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. If the prompt requires two texts and the student only references one text, the response can be scored no higher than a 2. If the student writes only a personal response and makes no reference to the text(s), the response can be scored no higher than a 1.

  19. PDF Expository Rubrics

    Expository Rubrics The following rubrics provide a scale of 1-4 (with 4 being the highest) for scoring each of the six specific skills for Expository writing. These rubrics can be used successfully to assess any piece of expository writing. Use each skill rubric individually or combine each skill rubric for a total score - maximum score of 24;

  20. PDF Writing an Expository Essay

    Section 1 Essay structure An essay is a piece of writing made up of a number of paragraphs. Each paragraph has a specifi c role in an essay. In a fi ve-paragraph essay, the fi rst paragraph is an introduction; the second, third, and fourth paragraphs form the body of the essay; and the fi fth paragraph is a conclusion (see diagram on page 4).

  21. Best Expository Essay Examples for Students of All Levels

    8th Grade Expository Essay Examples. 9th Grade Expository Essay Examples. Expository Essay Examples for Different Academic Levels. Expository essays explain and evaluate an idea and provide an argument in a clear and concise manner. Similar to other types of essays, expository essays also consist of an introduction, body paragraphs, and a ...

  22. PDF 8th Grade Expository Essay Examples

    8th Grade Expository Essay Examples. Example 1: The Art of Healthy Eating. Obesity among adults and teenagers is considered to be one of the most common and disturbing problems globally, at least in economically-prosperous countries. Though food manufacturers notify customers about the nutritional value and the amounts of proteins, fats, and ...