dissertation of planning

A Guide to Dissertation Planning: Tips, Tools and Templates

Dissertations are a defining piece of academic research and writing for all students. To complete such a large research project while maintaining a good work-life balance, planning and organisation is essential. In this article, we’ll outline three categories for dissertation planning including project management, note-taking and information management, alongside tools and templates for planning and researching effectively.

dissertation of planning

For both undergraduates and postgraduates, a dissertation is an important piece of academic research and writing. A large research project often has many moving parts from managing information, meetings, and data to completing a lengthy write-up with drafts and edits. Although this can feel daunting, getting ahead with effective planning and organisation will make this process easier. By implementing project management techniques and tools, you can define a research and writing workflow that allows you to work systematically. This will enable you to engage in critical thinking and deep work, rather than worrying about organisation and deadlines. 

To get prepared, you can do two things: First, start your preliminary readings and research to define a topic and methodology.  You can do this in summer or during the first few weeks of university but the sooner, the better. This gives you time to discuss things with your supervisor, and really choose a topic of interest. Second, begin preparing the tools and techniques you’ll be using for your research and writing workflow. You can use the preliminary research phase to test these out, and see what works for you. 

Below, we’ll cover three key aspects to consider when managing your dissertation, alongside some digital tools for planning, research and writing. 

The 3 Categories of Dissertation Planning

Project Management and Planning 

Your dissertation is a project that requires both long and short-term planning. For long-term planning, roadmaps are useful to break your work down into sections, chapters or stages. This will give you a clear outline of the steps you need to work through to complete your dissertation in a timely manner. 

Most likely, your roadmap will be a mixture of the stages in your research project and the sections of your write-up. For example, stage 1 might be defined as preliminary research and proposal writing. While stage 3 might be completing your literature review, while collecting data. 

This roadmap can be supplemented by a timeline of deadlines, this is when those stages or chapters need to be completed by. Your timeline will inform your short-term plans, and define the tasks that need completing on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. This approach, using a roadmap and timeline, allows you to capture all the moving parts of your dissertation, and focus on small sub-sections at a time. A clear plan can make it easy to manage setbacks, such as data collection issues, or needing more time for editing. 

Note-taking 

Whether you use a notebook, or digital tool, it’s ideal to have a dedicated research space for taking general notes. This might include meeting notes from supervision, important information from informational dissertation lectures, or key reminders, ideas and thoughts. It can be your go-to place for miscellaneous to-do lists, or to map out your thought processes. It’s good to have something on hand that is easy to access, and keeps your notes together in one place. 

Beyond this, you’ll also need a dedicated space or system for literature and research notes. These notes are important for avoiding plagiarism, communicating your ideas, and connecting key findings together. A proper system or space can make it easier to manage this information, and find the appropriate reference material when writing. Within this system, you might also include templates or checklists, for example, a list of critical reading questions to work through when assessing a paper. 

Information Management 

It’s important to consider how you plan to organise your literature, important documents, and written work. Note-taking is a part of this, however, this goes a step further to carefully organise all aspects of your dissertation. For example, it’s ideal to keep track of your literature searches, the papers you’ve read, and their citations but also, your reading progress. Being able to keep track of how many passes a paper has been through, how relevant it is, or where it fits within your themes, or ideas, will provide a good foundation for writing a well-thought out dissertation. 

Likewise, editing is an important part of the write-up process. You’ll have multiple drafts, revisions and feedback to consider. It’s good to have some way of keeping track of all this, to ensure all changes and edits have been completed. You might also have checklists or procedures to follow when collecting data, or working through your research. A good information management process can reduce stress, making everything easy to access and keep track of, which then allows you to focus on getting the actual work complete. 

Digital Project Management and Research Tools for Dissertation Planning 

Trello is a project management tool that uses boards, lists and cards to help you manage all your tasks. In a board, you can create lists, and place cards within these lists. Cards contain a range of information such as notes, checklists, and due dates. Cards and lists can be used to implement a digital kanban board system , allowing you to move cards into a ‘to-do’, ‘in progress’ or ‘complete’ list. This gives a visual representation of your progress.

This is a flexible, easy to use and versatile tool that can help with project management of your dissertation. For example, cards and lists can be used to track your literature, each card can represent a paper and lists could be 1st pass, 2nd pass, or be divided into themes. Likewise, you can use this approach to organise the various chapters or stages of your dissertation, and break down tasks in a visual way. Students have used Trello to manage academic literature reviews , daily life as an academic , and collaborate with their supervisors for feedback and revisions on their write-up. 

Notion is an all-in-one note-taking and project management tool that is highly customisable. Using content blocks, pages, and databases, this tool allows you to build a workspace tailored to your needs. Databases are a key feature of Notion, this function allows you to organise and define pages using a range of properties such as tags, dates, numbers, categories and more. This database can then be displayed in a multitude of ways using different views, and filters. 

For example, you can create a table with each entry being a page of meeting notes with your supervisor, you can assign a date, person, and tags to each page. You can then filter this information by date, or view it in a board format. Likewise, you can use the calendar to add deadlines, within these deadlines, you can expand the page to add information, and switch to ‘timeline’ view . This is perfect for implementing project management techniques when planning your dissertation. 

Although this may sound complicated, there are many templates and resources to get you started . Notion is an ideal tool for covering all three aspects of dissertation planning from project and information management to note-taking of all kinds. Students have used Notion for literature reviews , thesis writing , long-term PhD planning , thesis management , and academic writing . The best part, these students not only share their systems, but have also created free templates to help you build your own system for research. 

Asana is a project management and to-do list tool that uses boards, lists, timelines and calendars. If you’re someone who prefers using lists to organise your life and projects, Asana is ideal for you. You can use this tool to manage deadlines, reading progress, or break down your work into projects and sub-tasks. Asana can integrate with your calendar, which is perfect if you already use other calendar tools for organisation. If something like Notion is too overwhelming, using a mixture of tools with different purposes can be a more comfortable approach. 

Genei is an AI-powered research tool for note-taking and literature management. Your research and reading material can be imported, and organised using projects and folders. For each file, genei produces an AI-powered summary, document outline, keyword list and overview. This tool also extracts key information such as tables, figures, and all the references mentioned. You can read through documents 70% faster but also, collect related articles by clicking on the items in the reference list. Genei can generate citations, and be used alongside other popular reference management tools, such as Zotero and Mendeley . 

This tool is ideal for navigating information management and literature notes for your dissertation. You can compile notes across single documents or folders of documents using the AI-generated summaries. These notes remain linked to their original source, which removes the need for you to keep track of this information. If you find it hard to reword content, there’s also summarising and paraphrasing tools to help get you started. Genei is a great tool to use alongside project management solutions, such as Trello and Asana, and note-taking tools like Notion. You can define an efficient research and writing workflow using these range of tools, and make it easier to stay on top of your dissertation. 

dissertation of planning

Do you want to achieve more with your time?

98% of users say genei saves them time and helps them work more productively. Why don’t you join them?

About genei

genei is an AI-powered research tool built to help make the work and research process more efficient. Our studies show genei can help improve reading speeds by up to 70%! Revolutionise your research process.

Articles you may like:

dissertation of planning

Find out how genei can benefit you

Banner Image

Library Guides

Dissertations 1: getting started: planning.

  • Starting Your Dissertation
  • Choosing A Topic and Researching
  • Devising An Approach/Method
  • Thinking Of A Title
  • Writing A Proposal

Planning Your Time

The dissertation is a large project, so it needs careful planning. To organise your time, you can try the following:  

Break down the dissertation into smaller stages to complete (e.g., literature search, read materials, data collection, write literature review section…). 

Create a schedule. Working backwards from your deadline, decide when you will complete each stage. 

Set aside time to regularly work on the dissertation. 

Consider what times of day you are most alert and what makes a suitable space to study. 

Identify a specific task to work on. 

If overwhelmed, try to identify one task that needs doing rather than focusing on the larger project. 

Leave time to redraft, proof-read, format, and complete the reference list. 

Gantt Charts

As the dissertation project involves certain processes to take place simultaneously, rather than in a sequence, you can use a Gantt chart to organise your time.  

A Gantt chart is a bar chart which shows the schedule for a project. The project is broken down into key tasks/elements to be completed. A start and finish date for each task/element of the project is given. Some tasks are scheduled at the same time or may overlap. Others will start when a task has been completed. 

To produce a Gantt chart, you can use Word, Excel (see example in the attachment) or an online planner.

  • Tom's Planner . There's  an example  for you to use to complete your plan. 
  • Excel:  example of Gantt Chart in Excel . This is an example of a Gantt chart which can be used to generate a plan of work (timeline) for your dissertation. You can download and edit it as you please. The chart has been created by the University of Leicester. 

Gantt chart using Excel

Research Data Management

This video helps you to understand the importance of research data management and how you can plan, organise, store, preserve, and share your data.

  • Link to video on Research Data Management
  • Feedback Form Please give us feedback on our videos!
  • << Previous: Thinking Of A Title
  • Next: Writing A Proposal >>
  • Last Updated: Aug 1, 2023 2:36 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.westminster.ac.uk/starting-your-dissertation

CONNECT WITH US

  • 301 Academic Skills Centre
  • Study skills online

Dissertation planning

Information on how to plan and manage your dissertation project.

Students telescope

What is research?

A dissertation project is an opportunity to pursue your own ideas in an environment of relative intellectual freedom.

It also present a number of new challenges relating to the scale, scope and structure of a piece of work that is likely to be more substantial than any you have undertaken before.

These resources will help you to break the process down and explore ways to plan and structure your research and organise your written work.

A research-led university

Sheffield prides itself on being a  research-led university . Crucially, this means that teaching is informed by cutting-edge research in the academic field.

It also means that you are learning in an environment where you develop and use research skills as you progress. The most successful students tend to develop research skills early and use them consistently.

Research in higher education

Research sometimes just means finding out information about a topic. However, in the HE setting, specific understandings of 'research' carry a lot of weight.

The classic definition is that research leads to an original ' contribution to knowledge ' in a particular field of inquiry by defining an important question or problem and then answering or solving it in a systematic way.

You will build this contribution on the foundation of a robust structure of primary and secondary sources and evidence.

Differences across disciplines

Depending on the discipline you work in, there will be different ways of designing and articulating a research problem and different methods for answering these problems.

Not everything about research is 'original'. Sometimes the majority (or even all) of a research project will involve documenting or summarising information or ideas that are already available.

Not all research leads to answers. Sometimes research produces unusable results, or the inquiry leads to only more questions. Sometimes the originality of a research project is that it straddles more than one field of inquiry.

Some examples of approaches to research and what that contribution to knowledge might look like include:

  • Explore an under-researched area
  • Develop or test out a new methodology or technique
  • Extend or develop a previous study
  • Review the knowledge thus far in a specific field
  • Makes connections between disciplines
  • Replicate an existing study/approach in a different setting
  • Apply a theoretical idea to a real world problem

This all adds up to the fact that research is a complicated topic that seems to mean a lot to academic experts but is very difficult to understand intimately when you are a novice.

As someone new to research, you will need to do some work to find out how research is conceived of and done in your discipline.

301 Recommends:

Our Dissertation Planning Essentials workshop will look at the initial stages and challenges of preparing for a large-scale dissertation project.

Our Dissertation Writing workshop will break down the process of writing a dissertation and explore approaches to voice and style to help develop a way of writing academically.

Our Creativity and Research interactive workshop looks at how to identify, develop and apply your creativity and innovation skills to the research process, whatever stage you're at. In our Creativity and Problem Solving interactive workshop you'll learn how to identify and develop your creativity and innovation skills, address problems and challenges, explore creative models and strategies, and look at how you can apply this to your academic work.

Our Part 1 workshop on Setting Research Priorities will help to break down the research process by identifying the key information that you need to have in place to develop your project. It will help you to prioritise key tasks and create a project workflow to set targets, track progress and reach key milestones. Part 2 will revisit that workflow to assess progress. It will encourage you to reflect on your project so far, identify opportunities for feedback and review your intermediate targets to ensure that you stay on track towards your deadline.

Explore this Illustrated Guide to a PhD  by Matt Might as a visualisation of research to help you identify how you can develop your research ideas.  

Our Video Dissemination workshop will give you an insight into the best practices for using video to disseminate research and communicate your ideas. It will look at styles, common communication techniques and the pedagogy of visual mediums, as well as top production tips for making your content engaging, informative and professional.

Research proposals

A research proposal often needs to encompass many things: it is part description, part analysis, part review, part guesswork, part advert, part CV.

Writing a research proposal that can achieve all these things is an important first step towards realising your project idea. Your research proposal will allow you to receive some early feedback on your ideas and will act as a guide as you plan and develop your project more fully.

But how can you explain what you hope to discover in the project before you’ve done the research?

There are a number of things that you can do to make sure that your research proposal is professional, realistic and relevant:

  • Read around your topic of interest as much as possible. Getting a feel for what other kinds of research have been done will give you a much clearer idea of where your project might fit in. 
  • Create a mind map of relevant topics to explore the links and connections between themes. Which branches of your mind map seem most promising as an area for enquiry?
  • Be realistic. You may dream of making the next big breakthrough in the field, but this is probably unlikely! Set your self aims and objectives that are realistic within the timescales of your project. 
  • Finally, make sure you follow your department guidelines and include everything that you need to in your proposal. 

301 Recommends: Research Project Design Template

Make a copy of this Research project design template (google doc) to capture the key information you need to complete your research proposal.

Research ethics

Whenever you undertake research, no matter what level you are working at, it is always important to consider the immediate and continued impact of your project.

All research should be designed to ensure that individuals involved in the project as subjects or participants are treated with respect and consideration. In practice, this means that:

  • Participants have a right to full knowledge about the project and what its results will be used for.
  • You should also be mindful of an individual's rights to privacy and confidentiality.
  • You should consider the issue of data protection, how you will store project data safely and how long you will need to retain the data
  • The physical, emotional and psychological well-being of participants and researchers should be prioritised in your research design.
  • Environmental impacts of the research should be considered and mitigated where possible.
  • Longer-term impacts, for example, if you are planning to publish findings from the project, should also be considered. 

It is perhaps easy to think that working directly with living participants raises the most pressing ethical questions.

However, you equally need to give very important consideration to the ethics of working in text-based subjects, especially when considering unpublished material (see also copyright).

Your department will have its own guidelines on the area of research ethics and you should certainly consult your tutor or supervisor as s/he will be able to give you detailed topic-specific guidance. More more guidance on ethics in research, visit Research Services Ethics and Integrity pages here . 

Project management

The key to completing a research project successfully is to invest time in planning and organising your project.

A student research project, whether a dissertation or a research placement, will usually involve tight timescales and deadlines. Given the wealth of tasks involved in a typical dissertation project, this can seriously limit the time available for actual data collection or research. 

Setting yourself clear and achievable aims and objectives will help to ensure that the project is manageable within the timeframe available.

As an early stage of the planning process, have a go at breaking your project down into its constituent parts: i.e. all of the tasks that you will need to complete between now and the deadline. How long will each of them take? For example:

Task Timescale
Background reading 3 weeks
Literature review 2 weeks
Design and write methodology 1 week
Ethics review 3 weeks
Data collection 2 weeks
Data analysis 2 weeks
Produce figures 1 week
Write discussion 1 week
Draft to supervisor 1 week
Act on feedback 3 days
Formatting and bibliography 2 days
Editing and proofreading 2 days

Every project will have its own specific tasks, but breaking them down in this way will allow you to start planning ahead, adding milestones to your calendar and chipping away at the project task by task. 

301 Recommends: Trello

Trello is an online planning tool that allows you to create a project workflow. It is a simple and accessible tool that allows you to set yourself deadlines, colour code tasks and share your project plan with collaborators. View our example Dissertation Planning Trello board here and some guidance for students on using Trello (Linked In Learning) .

Working with your supervisor

Your supervisor will be your first point of contact for advice on your project and to help you to resolve issues arising. 

Remember, your supervisor will have a busy schedule and may be supervising several students at once. Although they will do their best to support you, they may not be able to get back to you right away and may be limited in their availability to meet you. 

There are a number of things that you can do to make the most out of the relationship. Some strategies to consider include:

  • Share plans/ideas/work-in-progress with your supervisor early 
  • Plan for meetings, sketch out an informal agenda 
  • Write down your main questions before the meeting. Don’t leave without answers!
  • Be receptive to feedback and criticism
  • Take notes/record the meeting on a smartphone with your supervisor’s permission!)

301 recommends: Supervisor and supervisee relationships interactive digital workshop

This interactive resource will help you to develop a positive and productive working relationship with your supervisor. 

Top Tips and resources

  • Read other dissertations from students in your department/discipline to get an idea of how similar projects are organised and presented. 
  • Break your project down into its constituent parts and treat each chapter as an essay in its own right.
  • Choose a topic that interests you and will sustain your interest, not just for a few days, but for a few months!
  • Write up as you go along - writing can and should be part of all stages of the diissertation planning and developing process. 
  • Keep good records – don’t throw anything out!
  • If in doubt, talk to your supervisor.

Internal resources

  • Library -  Research and Critical Thinking Resources
  • Library –  Digital Skills for Dissertations : Information, resources and training on developing your dissertation projects, including finding and referencing sources, your literature review and creating and using images and infographics.
  • ELTC -  Writing Advisory Service
  • 301 -  Dissertation Essentials lecture recording
  • 301 -  Dissertation Writing lecture recording

External resources

  • The Theis Whisperer -  Writing Blog
  • Gradhacker -  When it comes to dissertations, done is best

Related information

Scientific writing and lab reports

Proofreading

Academic Skills Certificate

The Summer Skills Spark: 5 weeks to ignite your research skills promo image

The Summer Skills Spark: 5 weeks to ignite your research skills

Are you working on a dissertation or research project this summer? 

The Summer Skills Spark offers workshops to support you through every step of the process. You'll have opportunities to plan your projects, develop your research skills, explore dissemination techniques, and consider a future career in research. 

Collaboration between 301 Academic Skills Centre, the University Library, Digital Learning, and the Careers and Employability Service.

Sheffield is a research university with a global reputation for excellence. We're a member of the Russell Group: one of the 24 leading UK universities for research and teaching.

Dissertations: Planning

  • Choosing a topic
  • Research Proposal
  • Reviewing the literature
  • Introductions & Conclusions
  • Writing Chapters
  • Wrapping Up
  • Abstracts & Summaries
  • Managing Expectations

Introduction

Planning your dissertation can be a daunting task, but it is a critical step in ensuring your research is focused, thorough, and well-executed. The dissertation is typically the culmination of a student's academic work and represents a significant contribution to the field. A well-planned dissertation helps to ensure that the research project is well-organized and the writing is structured in a logical and coherent manner. Additionally, a well-planned dissertation allows for efficient use of time and resources, reduces stress and anxiety, and increases the likelihood of producing a high-quality and impactful piece of research. In this guide, we will cover key steps to help you plan your dissertation and provide tips and strategies to make the process as smooth and successful as possible.

Planning Steps

  • Step 1: Check what is required
  • Step 2: Find inspiration
  • Step 3: Draft outline
  • Step 4: Plan your work

Before beginning to write your dissertation, make sure to check the exact requirements:

  • What is the word limit ? Is there a minimum word count? Does the word limit include words within tables, the abstract, the reference list, and the appendices?
  • What content is appropriate to place in the appendices rather than in the main text?
  • Which chapters should be included, in which order, and what kind of content is expected in each? 
  • Have you read and understood the guidelines and/or marking scheme ?

The structure of theses and dissertations is influenced by various factors such as the academic discipline, the research topic, the research methodology, the type of research (qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods), and the specific requirements of the academic institution or department.

The traditional dissertation structure includes: introduction, review of the literature, methodology, results, discussion, and conclusion.

However, there are many other ways of structuring your dissertation . This kind of thesis typically commences with an introductory chapter which is then followed by a series of chapters which have titles based on sub-topics of the topic under investigation. The thesis then ends with a ‘conclusions’ chapter.

[Source: Thesis and Dissertation Writing in a Second Language: A Handbook for Students and their Supervisors ]

Look at tables of content from previous dissertations and/or theses from University of Suffolk students or other universities to get inspiration of which structure would be most appropriate for presenting the content of your dissertation. 

Click here to find out how you can access dissertations and theses.

Once you have an idea of what dissertation type would best suit your research, you can plan a rough outline for the entire dissertation by considering the following questions:

  • What is the word count ?
  • How many chapters is your dissertation divided into?
  • Approximately how many pages/words would you used in each section?
  • Is a numbering system used for sections and subsections?

The example below offers a suggested structure and approximate word count for a 20,000-words dissertation. However, bear in mind that all dissertations are different, and your supervisor is the best person to talk to about your specific requirements.

Chapter Title Approximate no. of words
Chapter 1: Introduction 10% (2,000 words)
Chapter 2: Literature Review 30% (6,000 words)
Chapter 3: Methodology 15% (1,000-2,000 words)
Chapter 4: Results 5-10% (1,000,2000 words)
Chapter 5: Discussion 30% (6,000 words)
Chapter 6: Conclusion 10% (2,000 words)

After you have planned at dissertation level and you have a rough idea of the structure of your thesis/dissertation, you can use the same strategy to plan at chapter level. For example:

Chapter Sections Approximate no. of words
Chapter 1: Introduction 10% (2,000 words)
1.1. General Background 600 words
1.2 Justification 300 words
1.3 Aims and Objectives 300 words
1.4 Research Questions 200 words
1.5 Research Methodology and Ethical Considerations 200 words
1.6 Scope and Limitations 150 words
1.7 Organisation 250 words

Now it is time to plan your work!

Work from the deadline backwards to create a plan of key dates .

Download the template below to help you with your planning.

  • Dissertation Planner - Key Dates

Further Reading

Cover Art

Journal of Suffolk Student Research

The Journal of Suffolk Student Research is an online academic journal, dedicated to the publication of high-quality undergraduate and postgraduate student research undertaken by University of Suffolk students. The journal will showcase the most outstanding student research undertaken at the University of Suffolk. It aims to promote and recognise this outstanding student research by offering valuable early experience of academic publishing and the peer review process. 

Find out more here

  • << Previous: Research Proposal
  • Next: Reviewing the literature >>
  • Last Updated: Feb 1, 2024 4:22 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.uos.ac.uk/dissertations

➔ About the Library

➔ Meet the Team

➔ Customer Service Charter

➔ Library Policies & Regulations

➔ Privacy & Data Protection

Essential Links

➔ A-Z of eResources

➔ Frequently Asked Questions

➔Discover the Library

➔Referencing Help

➔ Print & Copy Services

➔ Service Updates

Library & Learning Services, University of Suffolk, Library Building, Long Street, Ipswich, IP4 1QJ

✉ Email Us: [email protected]

✆ Call Us: +44 (0)1473 3 38700

Banner

Dissertations and major projects

  • Introduction

What does a dissertation look like?

Finding a topic, going from a topic to a question, dissertation presentations.

  • Researching your dissertation
  • Managing your data
  • Writing up your dissertation

Useful links for dissertations and major projects

  • Study Advice Helping students to achieve study success with guides, video tutorials, seminars and one-to-one advice sessions.
  • Maths Support A guide to Maths Support resources which may help if you're finding any mathematical or statistical topic difficult during the transition to University study.
  • Academic writing LibGuide Expert guidance on punctuation, grammar, writing style and proof-reading.
  • Guide to citing references Includes guidance on why, when and how to use references correctly in your academic writing.
  • The Final Chapter An excellent guide from the University of Leeds on all aspects of research projects
  • Royal Literary Fund: Writing a Literature Review A guide to writing literature reviews from the Royal Literary Fund
  • Academic Phrasebank Use this site for examples of linking phrases and ways to refer to sources.

It's natural to feel slightly directionless at the start of any dissertation or major project because you are not sure what to research or how to find the information you need. Start early and allow yourself some time for reading around topics that interest you and scoping out the kinds of sources that are available. This initial reading, thinking and planning time is really valuable and will provide a good basis for focusing your ideas into a research question.

The guidance on this page gives strategies for identifying a topic, refining this into a clearer research question, and starting to plan how you will answer it.    

dissertation of planning

At one level all dissertations ask you to do broadly the same things:

  • Formulate a clear question that your dissertation seeks to answer
  • Review the relevant literature in your field
  • Engage in independent thought and research
  • Explain and justify whatever methods you use
  • Present your findings clearly and demonstrate how they relate to your original question

Ask if you can have a look at finished dissertations from your department to get an idea of how they look and what they should contain.

Finding the topic and question for your dissertation can take longer than you think. You shouldn't feel worried if you don't hit on the ideal topic straight away… you have enough time to be creative and enjoy exploring your subject. At this stage no ideas are barred!

dissertation of planning

  • Something you've always wondered about
  • Lecture notes and old essays
  • Flicking through current journals
  • Media / news items
  • Things you disagree with
  • A hunch that you have… is it true?
  • Controversies / new areas in your subject
  • Talking with friends

Thinking outside your subject area may also help – are there any current affairs issues or controversies that you can apply your subject to?

It's never too early to start thinking of ideas. Keep them in one place -  start an ideas book or a box file to keep any notes or articles you find that might be useful.

At this early stage, find out the word length and deadline for your dissertation – note them down somewhere obvious – this will influence the size of project you undertake.

  • Starting research for your dissertation (video) Watch this brief video tutorial for more on the topic.
  • Starting research for your dissertation (transcript) Read the transcript.

A dissertation question is not the same as a topic…it has to be phrased so that it can be answered in a specific and focused way . There are various ways that you can get from your topic to a question:

  • Do some reading around your topic – are there any gaps in current research that could provide a question?
  • If you usually write too much – think smaller and focus on one narrow aspect of your topic.
  • If you usually don't write enough – think bigger and link some related areas of your topic together.
Think of two factors that might influence your topic – could they be put together to make a question?

 = representation of women in the media

 = TV advertising

= Women's perception of their bodies

Does the depiction of women in TV advertising influence women's perceptions of their bodies

Keep asking yourself "what in particular about this do I want to study?" until you get down to a question.

 = sociology

= elderly people

= elderly people in care

 = elderly people in residential care

 = elderly people in warden-controlled residential care homes

What do retired people think of the service they get in warden-controlled residential care homes?

dissertation of planning

It is a good idea before you make any final decisions to discuss your choice of question with your supervisor, as they will have the academic experience to know what kinds of questions will be manageable, and which will need more refining.

Before settling on a question – ask yourself:

  • "Will it keep me interested for a long period?"
  • "Can I answer it with the time and resources I have?"
  • "Is there someone who can supervise me and can I get on with them?"
  • "Do I have some idea of how to go about answering it?"

Check what you will have to include in a dissertation proposal. It should contain a clear summary of what, why and how you are going to do your research.

  • Defining your research question (video) Watch this brief video tutorial for more on the topic.
  • Defining your research question (transcript) Read the transcript.

dissertation of planning

  • explain why your chosen topic is interesting;
  • show how it fits into the context of your course generally;
  • try out your plan for how to tackle the research.

Remember that you're not presenting the end result of your research, but work-in-progress. Think about including some questions for your audience to encourage useful feedback.

  • Giving presentations LibGuide Expert guidance on producing and delivering presentations at university.
  • << Previous: Home
  • Next: Researching your dissertation >>
  • Last Updated: May 14, 2024 8:59 AM
  • URL: https://libguides.reading.ac.uk/dissertations
  • +44 (0) 207 391 9032

Recent Posts

  • How to Write a Paragraph: Successful Essay Writing Strategies
  • Everything You Should Know About Academic Writing: Types, Importance, and Structure
  • Concise Writing: Tips, Importance, and Exercises for a Clear Writing Style
  • How to Write a PhD Thesis: A Step-by-Step Guide for Success
  • How to Use AI in Essay Writing: Tips, Tools, and FAQs
  • Copy Editing Vs Proofreading: What’s The Difference?
  • How Much Does It Cost To Write A Thesis? Get Complete Process & Tips
  • How Much Do Proofreading Services Cost in 2024? Per Word and Hourly Rates With Charts
  • Academic Editing: What It Is and Why It Matters
  • How to Identify Research Gaps
  • Academic News
  • Custom Essays
  • Dissertation Writing
  • Essay Marking
  • Essay Writing
  • Essay Writing Companies
  • Model Essays
  • Model Exam Answers
  • Oxbridge Essays Updates
  • PhD Writing
  • Significant Academics
  • Student News
  • Study Skills
  • University Applications
  • University Essays
  • University Life
  • Writing Tips

dissertation of planning

Planning a dissertation: the dos and don’ts

(Last updated: 20 December 2023)

Since 2006, Oxbridge Essays has been the UK’s leading paid essay-writing and dissertation service

We have helped 10,000s of undergraduate, Masters and PhD students to maximise their grades in essays, dissertations, model-exam answers, applications and other materials. If you would like a free chat about your project with one of our UK staff, then please just reach out on one of the methods below.

Your professor has told you that you must write a dissertation to complete your degree. At this point, you may begin to panic. What is a dissertation? It sounds difficult, or like a massive project that is going to require considerable organisation. For the typical undergraduate, who may be prone to procrastination, a dissertation requires not only the creation of a large piece of writing, but it also may require research to be conducted, data to be analysed, and an extensive bibliography to be compiled. That's why being thorough with your dissertation plan is essential. Starting with the initial phases of the dissertation and working through to the final stages of proofreading, this post should offer you a few tips and tricks for success along with some common mistakes to avoid.

Why do I need to do a dissertation?

The whole point of a dissertation is to convince your professor that you are a competent researcher. This can be challenging, because it is likely that this is your first real experience with research and the first time you will have to attempt a piece of research to this scale of magnitude. Becoming a competent researcher means you have to demonstrate proficiency in each of the phases of your dissertation. The following tale represents the typical path of the "Dissertation Life Cycle."

dissertation of planning

To complete the various stages of the Dissertation Life Cycle you are going to need to demonstrate a certain level of proficiency in all of these skills. You should know that while on paper, this life cycle follows a straightforward path; such is rarely the case in real life. Although you may think your dissertation plan is thorough and comprehensive, you should be prepared to modify and change your plans as challenges arise. There will also be the need to go back and modify previous parts. For example, while you might write the literature review first, this will likely require modification after you complete the data analysis for your study.

dissertation of planning

Managing your time and staying organised

An essential component of producing a great dissertation plan is good time management. You must be able to manage your time effectively. This can be done through the adoption of two specific time management strategies: the macro-management of time, and the micro-management of time. Macro-management equates to the bigger picture; you should be able to make well-informed estimates about how long it is going to take you to complete each section. Basically, to do this, you need to work backwards from the final submission date, creating a time framework. No dissertation is the same, so the amount of time that you spend on each section will vary from that of your peers. This is contrasted with micro-management, which examines the finer details of the dissertation, for example through the division of a chapter into subsections. As an example, you might allow yourself four weeks to write the literature review using the macro approach to time management. The micro approach would mean that your literature review might be divided into four subsections, a week devoted to each of those.

Time management goes hand in hand with organisation and you are going to require excellent organisational skills as you work to complete your dissertation. Organisation is not just about the writing. You are initially going to need to organise a number of meetings with your supervisor as you begin the dissertation process. As your dissertation is going to be different than that of your peers, it is your responsibility to come to the meeting with a plan in mind so that you can use the time you have effectively and efficiently.

"You must be able to manage your time effectively. But if you do fall behind schedule, do not despair. At the undergraduate level there are usually ample opportunities for you to make up time."

In addition to meetings with your supervisor, you are also going to have to arrange meetings and/or other activities with your participants. This might include the scheduling of interviews , the arrangement of observations, etc. You may also need to account for time that you will spend attending the library, searching for sources, and reading key materials. All of this requires you to be organised and to act in a methodical way.

If you do fall behind schedule, do not despair. At the undergraduate level there are usually ample opportunities for you to make up time. The project is rarely long enough for you to go completely off the rails. If you know that you are not a particularly organised person or that you struggle with time management skills, you may benefit from the use of a professional project management tool such as Trello or Asana.

Listen up: be social

To produce the best dissertation plan possible, there are other key skills that you are going to need to employ. Two that are going to be essential at the start are your listening and social skills. Listening skills come into play as you begin to work with your supervisor. At the undergraduate level, they are likely going to be somehow involved in the assessment of your written work, so if you can identify what exactly they are expecting of you, you are going to be in a better position to succeed. This includes making sure that you not only understand the directions, but that you take into consideration any feedback they are providing you as you progress throughout your project.

When your professor makes a suggestion about your work, they are typically expecting you to change it to align with their requests. You should attempt to do this in all possible cases, and if you want to disagree, you must have an appropriate justification as to why you wish to do so. In addition to listening, you need to be able to get on well with others. This means that you will need to employ appropriate strategies during both email and oral communication. This is a skill that is not only necessary when speaking with your professor, but also relates to working with other students, with your participants, and with administrators.

What other skills will I need?

Below is a list of skills and qualities that you might need to adopt in order to complete your dissertation well:

Skills Qualities
Time-management Self-motivation
Organisation Self-confidence
Self-discipline Self-centredness
Communication
Listening
Presentational
Social
Technical
Independent learner

Meetings with your supervisor

Now that you have a basic understanding of the skills you need, we can consider the finer points of your dissertation. One of these is understanding how to take advantage of the meetings you have with your supervisor.

Preparing for the meetings

Meetings that are well crafted generally offer better opportunities for you to advance with your dissertation. It is very common (and something you want to avoid) for students to arrive at the first meeting with the supervisor with no real idea about what they want to study. Instead, they ask the supervisor for ideas or inspiration on what they might do. This generally sets a bad impression; your supervisor can help you shape your initial ideas, but ultimately you want the ideas to be yours. In some instances, your supervisor may provide you with a topic or title, but this approach (which you may like in the beginning) can be difficult at later stages when you realise that your understanding of the topic is limited. Going back to the skills and qualities described above, if you fail to understand the topic, you are less likely to be motivated and confident when completing the work.

"Take advantage of the meetings you have with your supervisor. Meetings that are well crafted generally offer better opportunities for you to advance with your dissertation."

After you have scheduled your first meeting with your supervisor, ensure that you attend the meeting well equipped with both questions and a means to record the responses (e.g. laptop or pen & paper). In this initial meeting, you should be able to clearly state your area of study, overall aim, your objectives (related to the aim), and a rationale for the topic you have selected. You may also wish to call up some preliminary research studies related to your topic in order to demonstrate that you have taken the notion of this research project seriously and truly understand what it is you want to do.

During this first meeting, your supervisor is looking for the intended focus of your research, clarity of your objectives and that the objectives are achievable within the timescale. You should be posing these questions to your supervisor (e.g. are my objectives clear?).

This is also true for future meetings. It is important that you send your supervisor your work in progress prior to the meeting that you have scheduled. You can do this by email. Ensure that your email is properly formatted with detailed information and instructions that you would like your supervisor to consider. Make sure that you identify who you are, what the new work is that you are submitting, and what you would like the supervisor to do with it. Avoid sending the work at the last minute. Your supervisor is likely to have many different things on the go and so sending them work only 24 hours in advance is not appropriate. If you are unsure about how much in advance to send the information, you should clarify this with your supervisor.

dissertation of planning

Maximising the benefits of the meetings

A supervisory session should be more than just a question and answer session where your supervisor asks you questions and you answer them. This would constitute two monologues, but does not achieve the dialogue that is needed for effective communication. Your supervisor is looking to determine how your work is moving forward and to address any issues that s/he thinks are arising as a result of your project. It may be helpful for you to begin with a summary of what you have achieved followed by any issues that are currently concerning you. These meetings should be seen as opportunities to gauge how your supervisor is feeling about your work and as a way to seek corrective action when necessary. Any feedback that you get from your supervisor can be turned into additional marks and grades. Building a rapport with your supervisor is essential and is best achieved when you arrive prepared.

What to avoid

There are a few things that you are going to want to avoid during supervisions. The first is missing the meeting entirely. If you cannot make a meeting with your supervisor, make sure that you email them as soon as you can. In that email make sure that you include a reason and request to make another appointment immediately. Your reasoning for cancelling a meeting should not be due to the fact that you are considerably behind. Putting off the inevitable is never a good thing and you are better off facing the music. Obviously all of this is just considered good manners, so keep this in mind.

Finally, you are going to want to avoid walking into a meeting and uttering the phrase “I can’t find anything on this subject!” The first thing that your professor is likely to do is to plug your topic into Google and come back with thousands of hits on what you just said did not exist. Professors hear this phrase every year, and generally they tend to equate it with laziness on the part of the student and a lack of serious commitment.

"You become the content expert, while your supervisor becomes a guide to keep you on the right track. It requires effort on both parties, but it puts you in the driving seat."

Most students, at least upon first encounter with their supervisor, lack the ability to focus and to ‘run’ the meeting. Remember that your supervisor may not be as passionate about the topic as you are and thus, you may have done more reading than they have on your topic. Through this, you become the content expert, while your supervisor becomes a guide to keep you on the right track. It requires effort on both parties, but it puts you in the driving seat. This might be a new feeling for you, as you may have always felt like the supervisor is the one in charge. Making this transition will better prepare you for graduate school or any future research work that you may wish to undertake.

Where do I find resources and what is considered scholarly?

Finding the literature to become that content expert can be a challenge, especially if you don’t know where to look. It is in your best interest to use your school library to its full advantage. This includes not only borrowing books, but also using the ample online resources that are provided to you through your institution. The material you require is not simply going to appear in front of you. You are going to have to look for it . It may be easier for you to begin with a more random or general search. This can be done using sites such as Google Scholar (scholar.google.com). Remember, however that not everything that Google Scholar finds is of the same quality and if you choose to use this site, you must consider what is scholarly and what is not.

Defining scholarly is, perhaps, a somewhat challenging thing to do, as it is a sort of grey area. Generally, in an academic sense, if an article is published in a peer-reviewed journal, it is typically considered to be scholarly. That does not mean that anything else is ‘not scholarly’, but you must use your own judgement to make that determination. In addition, you must be able to differentiate between primary and secondary sources. While both types of sources are likely to be appropriate at the undergraduate level, you are better off to use more primary than secondary sources. Primary sources are classified as original documents with first hand evidence about an event, object, person, or work of art. Things you read in a scholarly book or journal article directly would be primary, as are interviews, fieldwork, communications by email, and empirical studies. Secondary sources describe or discuss the primary sources. Typically, these include things like newspaper articles, popular magazines, book reviews, or articles in journals that discuss someone else’s work. While both are useful, it is up to you to decide which are most appropriate.

Think critically and consider all your options

Finding sources is sort of like being a detective. In this case, you begin with some questions (in this case research questions or research objectives) that you want answered. You then search for clues as to how to answer these questions within the literature. You then get rid of any information that is irrelevant and use the information that you do find to lead you to other sources. This can be done by using the references of one article to lead you to the next one. Once you have enough ‘clues’ you can then construct a case based on evidence and explain the points as you see them. One way that you can get help with this whole process is by utilising your school librarian. Often there are librarians within the institution that specialise in the subject matter that you are studying. By approaching these librarians, you can often find better ways to search or strategies to locate sources that end up being key components in your research. Check out what your library has to offer and what resources are available.

How many sources should I use?

There is no corresponding number of sources that should appear in your dissertation. Obviously, your list will be extensive, but it also must be balanced. If you use too few sources, your argument may not appear convincing; if you use too many, your argument may be lost because there is no room for you to insert any of your own thoughts or demonstration of criticality. It is up to you to find that balance. In addition, the quality of the sources that you use matters. Using research from decades ago may not be beneficial in the current times, especially if you are focusing on an area that has rapidly changed (e.g. technology, education, etc.).

dissertation of planning

The literature review

It’s important to consider your reader as you craft your literature review . It may be beneficial for you to start by reminding the audience of your research objectives. That way, the reader is then better able to understand how it relates to your project. One common mistake that students often make is just jumping from one study they have read to the next - without warning. Providing your reader with an outline at the beginning of the chapter and including your own critical thought shows the reader that you are on the right track and gives them an idea about what to expect.

The common mistake described above often occurs because there has been a lack of planning. Students typically just sit down to write the literature review and find the material as they go. This then offers a very fragmented chapter. While creating a detailed outline is essential, so is the organisation of the literature. As suggested above, perhaps you have a literature review with four sections. You may, in a separate document want to collate and keep track of the useful sources you have found for each section. In these notes, you should maintain the citation of the source, a few notes on the summary, and how it might be useful.

It may also be beneficial to colour code these citations to the section to which they pertain. An example might look like:

dissertation of planning

Organising your notes and research

How you organise your notes is completely up to you. It really depends on what type of person you are. Some people like to organise their notes in a linear way; others want to organise by colour. Some people write detailed notes, others write very scarce notes and go back to the original article. Regardless of the type of person you are, some sort of organisation is going to be essential. Try a few different strategies to begin and see what works best for you.

Organisation of your sources and good citation is going to be important in the note taking process because you will need to cite these sources within your paper. Learn (if you do not know already) which referencing style is expected within your academic discipline. The above example uses APA, but there are many other referencing styles. You should apply this style throughout your paper. In the actual paper, you are usually going to require page numbers when you employ direct quotes, and sometimes when you paraphrase/summarize. Keep this in mind as you are taking your notes. For example, you could write ‘particularly useful quote on p. 166 about student mistakes in the dissertation.’ Then, you would know where to look in the original article to find the quote. Remember that quotes are only useful in moderation - you don’t want a dissertation filled with them. It is also essential that you provide critical insight into the quote you are using, so quotes should never appear at the end of a paragraph.

Research Strategy

At the same time that you are writing about your literature, or possibly just after you have finished, you are going to need to consider planning for your primary research . The dissertation is usually under a fairly tight timeline and so getting these aspects organised early on can save you some struggles as you progress through the dissertation.

You are initially going to need to come up with a research strategy. This strategy is a description of how you are going to implement the research within your own study. It's an essential component of your project, but not something that is going to require a detailed review of general research strategies. This is a common mistake by students who often spend a lot of time discussing all research strategies, rather than focusing on the one that they have chosen and the justification for this choice.

Research instruments

Once you have established a research strategy, you are going to need to consider what types of research instruments you are going to need to use - and how those research instruments are going to come about (i.e. are you going to create one, or are you going to use one that has been used in previous research). If you are creating a questionnaire for example, and you decide to create your own, you are likely going to need to pilot the questionnaire to determine whether or not your questions make sense. This can add additional time to the dissertation process, and so should be factored into your plan. Questionnaires, while a common tool among students, are generally not enough to stand alone as a research instrument. Quite commonly, students will use two or more research instruments.

Another common instrument is the interview. Planning for interviews has several challenges:

First, you must find a time and a location to hold the interview. Generally, this space is a quiet one, like an office or library study room. As an undergraduate student, you may not have access to these spaces at all times and so coordinating your interview participant with time available can be logistically challenging. Once you have secured a location and time for your interview, you must also be aware that other challenges may arise. Interviewees may cancel at the last minute or they may run late. It is your job, as a researcher, to try your best to accommodate their situations, as it is likely they are volunteering to participate in your study. You want to set your interviews up well in advance, but perhaps not too far in advance that people will forget. A reminder email or phone call to your interview subjects can be particularly beneficial in getting them there on time and to the correct location.

The home straight: editing and proofreading

The logistics of planning your research can be challenging; from finding the right sources to scheduling interviews, there are many things to consider. One aspect of the writing process that students often fail to consider is the editing and proofreading process. Editing occurs when you need to make considerable changes to parts of your dissertation because they are no longer relevant, or because you need to add/remove words. Sometimes, when students write, the editing process can be a real challenge because it is difficult to cut out words that you have spent considerable time writing. Remember, however, that it is the final mark that counts and having irrelevant information in the dissertation is going to harm you more than it is going to benefit you.

Proofreading is also essential. This is the final stage in your dissertation and considers aspects of grammar, spelling and punctuation. It often takes much longer than you initially anticipate because it is best to do it in short chunks, so you don’t get distracted. There are also additional difficulties with the proofreading process; often because you are so familiar with the work itself, you skip over errors. For example, errors such as using ‘form’ instead of ‘from’ or using the wrong version of ‘there/their/they’re’ can make your work seem unpolished, but it is easy to do.

For some students, it is better to get someone else to proofread your work . Not only can a third party comment on spelling, grammar, and punctuation, but they can also identify areas that come across as unclear. You may need to pay for a proofreading service - that is unless you have a parent or friend who is willing and able to help you out. When selecting a proofreading service, ensure that you pick one that is reputable - this is your final opportunity to make changes and you want the best possible outcome.

To summarise

Remember that dissertation writing is a challenging part of your undergraduate degree but with the right planning and strategies, you can be very successful. It is essential that you select a topic that is interesting to you from the outset, as long as it is related to your academic discipline. Further, you must ensure that you make a good first impression with your supervisor and that you utilize all the resources that you have available to you.

By reading this post, you are starting out well. Learn to develop the time-management, organisational and confidence-based skills for dissertation writing in your quest for success!

dissertation of planning

Dissertation research: how to find dissertation resources

dissertation of planning

Master’s dissertation research – library cataloguing

dissertation of planning

10 mistakes to avoid with dissertation writing

  • academic writing
  • dissertation help
  • dissertation tips
  • dissertation writing
  • study skills

Writing Services

  • Essay Plans
  • Critical Reviews
  • Literature Reviews
  • Presentations
  • Dissertation Title Creation
  • Dissertation Proposals
  • Dissertation Chapters
  • PhD Proposals
  • CV Writing Service
  • Business Proofreading Services

Editing Services

  • Proofreading Service
  • Editing Service
  • Academic Editing Service

Additional Services

  • Marking Services
  • Consultation Calls
  • Personal Statements
  • Tutoring Services

Our Company

  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Become a Writer

Terms & Policies

  • Fair Use Policy
  • Policy for Students in England
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms & Conditions
  • [email protected]
  • More contact options

Payment Methods

Cryptocurrency payments.

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • Dissertation
  • Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Published on June 7, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on November 21, 2023.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process . It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to your field.

Generally, an outline contains information on the different sections included in your thesis or dissertation , such as:

  • Your anticipated title
  • Your abstract
  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review, research methods, avenues for future research, etc.)

In the final product, you can also provide a chapter outline for your readers. This is a short paragraph at the end of your introduction to inform readers about the organizational structure of your thesis or dissertation. This chapter outline is also known as a reading guide or summary outline.

Table of contents

How to outline your thesis or dissertation, dissertation and thesis outline templates, chapter outline example, sample sentences for your chapter outline, sample verbs for variation in your chapter outline, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis and dissertation outlines.

While there are some inter-institutional differences, many outlines proceed in a fairly similar fashion.

  • Working Title
  • “Elevator pitch” of your work (often written last).
  • Introduce your area of study, sharing details about your research question, problem statement , and hypotheses . Situate your research within an existing paradigm or conceptual or theoretical framework .
  • Subdivide as you see fit into main topics and sub-topics.
  • Describe your research methods (e.g., your scope , population , and data collection ).
  • Present your research findings and share about your data analysis methods.
  • Answer the research question in a concise way.
  • Interpret your findings, discuss potential limitations of your own research and speculate about future implications or related opportunities.

For a more detailed overview of chapters and other elements, be sure to check out our article on the structure of a dissertation or download our template .

To help you get started, we’ve created a full thesis or dissertation template in Word or Google Docs format. It’s easy adapt it to your own requirements.

 Download Word template    Download Google Docs template

Chapter outline example American English

It can be easy to fall into a pattern of overusing the same words or sentence constructions, which can make your work monotonous and repetitive for your readers. Consider utilizing some of the alternative constructions presented below.

Example 1: Passive construction

The passive voice is a common choice for outlines and overviews because the context makes it clear who is carrying out the action (e.g., you are conducting the research ). However, overuse of the passive voice can make your text vague and imprecise.

Example 2: IS-AV construction

You can also present your information using the “IS-AV” (inanimate subject with an active verb ) construction.

A chapter is an inanimate object, so it is not capable of taking an action itself (e.g., presenting or discussing). However, the meaning of the sentence is still easily understandable, so the IS-AV construction can be a good way to add variety to your text.

Example 3: The “I” construction

Another option is to use the “I” construction, which is often recommended by style manuals (e.g., APA Style and Chicago style ). However, depending on your field of study, this construction is not always considered professional or academic. Ask your supervisor if you’re not sure.

Example 4: Mix-and-match

To truly make the most of these options, consider mixing and matching the passive voice , IS-AV construction , and “I” construction .This can help the flow of your argument and improve the readability of your text.

As you draft the chapter outline, you may also find yourself frequently repeating the same words, such as “discuss,” “present,” “prove,” or “show.” Consider branching out to add richness and nuance to your writing. Here are some examples of synonyms you can use.

Address Describe Imply Refute
Argue Determine Indicate Report
Claim Emphasize Mention Reveal
Clarify Examine Point out Speculate
Compare Explain Posit Summarize
Concern Formulate Present Target
Counter Focus on Propose Treat
Define Give Provide insight into Underpin
Demonstrate Highlight Recommend Use

If you want to know more about AI for academic writing, AI tools, or research bias, make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

Research bias

  • Anchoring bias
  • Halo effect
  • The Baader–Meinhof phenomenon
  • The placebo effect
  • Nonresponse bias
  • Deep learning
  • Generative AI
  • Machine learning
  • Reinforcement learning
  • Supervised vs. unsupervised learning

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

When you mention different chapters within your text, it’s considered best to use Roman numerals for most citation styles. However, the most important thing here is to remain consistent whenever using numbers in your dissertation .

The title page of your thesis or dissertation goes first, before all other content or lists that you may choose to include.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical first steps in your writing process. It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding what kind of research you’d like to undertake.

  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review , research methods , avenues for future research, etc.)

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

George, T. (2023, November 21). Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates. Scribbr. Retrieved June 10, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/dissertation/dissertation-thesis-outline/

Is this article helpful?

Tegan George

Tegan George

Other students also liked, dissertation table of contents in word | instructions & examples, figure and table lists | word instructions, template & examples, thesis & dissertation acknowledgements | tips & examples, "i thought ai proofreading was useless but..".

I've been using Scribbr for years now and I know it's a service that won't disappoint. It does a good job spotting mistakes”

PDXScholar logo with slogan Access for All.

Home > School, College, or Department > CUPA > USP > Dissertations and Theses

Urban Studies and Planning Dissertations and Theses

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

E Hui me ke Kaiāulu: To Connect with the Community , Heather Kayleen Bartlett (Thesis)

The Affective Discourses of Eviction: Right to Counsel in New York City , Hadley Savana Bates (Thesis)

A Just Futures Framework: Insurgent Roller-Skating in Portland, Oregon , Célia Camile Beauchamp (Thesis)

Factors Affecting Community Rating System Participation in the National Flood Insurance Program: A Case Study of Texas , Ryan David Eddings (Dissertation)

LEED Buildings and Green Gentrification: Portland as a Case Study , Jordan Macintosh (Thesis)

Wasted Space , Ryan Martyn (Thesis)

The Use and Influence of Health Indicators in Municipal Transportation Plans , Kelly Christine Rodgers (Dissertation)

Uncovering the Nuance and Complexity of Gentrification in Asian Immigrant Communities: A Case Study of Koreatown, Los Angeles , Seyoung Sung (Dissertation)

Defining Dementia-Friendly Communities From the Perspective of Those Affected , Iris Alexandra Wernher (Dissertation)

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Heat, Wildfire and Energy Demand: An Examination of Residential Buildings and Community Equity , Chrissi Argyro Antonopoulos (Dissertation)

The Connections Between Innovation, Culture, and Expertise in Water Infrastructure Organizations , Alice Brawley-Chesworth (Dissertation)

The New Shiny Penny? Regenerative Agriculture Beliefs and Practices Among Portland's Urban Agriculturalists , Melia Ann Chase (Thesis)

Fortunate People in a Fortunate Land: Dwelling and Residential Alienation in Santa Monica's Rent-Controlled Housing , Lauren E.M. Everett (Dissertation)

In Favor of Bringing Game Theory into Urban Studies and Planning Curriculum: Reintroducing an Underused Method for the Next Generation of Urban Scholars , Brian McDonald Gardner (Thesis)

Transportation Mode Choice Behavior in the Era of Autonomous Vehicles: The Application of Discrete Choice Modeling and Machine Learning , Sangwan Lee (Dissertation)

An Analysis of the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Tulsa Remote Program, As an Effective Economic Development Strategy , Kristen J. Padilla (Thesis)

Geographies of Urban Unsafety: Homeless Women, Mental Maps, and Isolation , Jan Radle Roberson (Dissertation)

The Impact of New Light Rail Service on Employment Growth in Portland, Oregon , Lahar Santra (Thesis)

Examining Emergency Citizen Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Emergent Groups Addressing Food Insecurity in Portland, Oregon , Aliza Ruth Tuttle (Thesis)

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Nature-Based Solutions in Environmental Planning: Ecosystem-Based Adaptations, Green Infrastructures, and Ecosystem Services to Promote Diversity in Urban Landscapes , Lorena Alves Carvalho Nascimento (Dissertation)

Gas Stations and the Wealth Divide: Analyzing Spatial Correlations Between Wealth and Fuel Branding , Jean-Carl Ende (Thesis)

'There are No Bathrooms Available!': How Older Adults Experiencing Houselessness Manage their Daily Activities , Ellis Jourdan Hews (Thesis)

The Mode Less Traveled: Exploring Bicyclist Identity in Portland, OR , Christopher Johnson (Thesis)

The Soniferous Experience of Public Space: A Soundscape Approach , Kenya DuBois Williams (Dissertation)

Short-term and Long-term Effects of New Light Rail Transit Service on Transit Ridership and Traffic Congestion at Two Geographical Levels , Huajie Yang (Dissertation)

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Waste Management in the Global South: an Inquiry on the Patterns of Plastic and Waste Material Flows in Colombo, Sri Lanka , Katie Ann Conlon (Dissertation)

Unpacking the Process and Outcomes of Ethical Markets: a Focus on Certified B Corporations , Renée Bogin Curtis (Dissertation)

The Persistence of Indigenous Markets in Mexico's 'Supermarket Revolution' , Diana Christina Denham (Dissertation)

The Electronic Hardware Music Subculture in Portland, Oregon , James Andrew Hickey (Thesis)

"I Should Have Moved Somewhere Else": the Impacts of Gentrification on Transportation and Social Support for Black Working-Poor Families in Portland, Oregon , Steven Anthony Howland (Dissertation)

The Impacts of the Bicycle Network on Bicycling Activity: a Longitudinal Multi-City Approach , Wei Shi (Dissertation)

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

"Poverty Wages Are Not Fresh, Local, or Sustainable": Building Worker Power by Organizing Around (Re)production in Portland's "Sustainable" Food Industry , Amy Katherine Rose Coplen (Dissertation)

Manufacturing in Place: Industrial Preservation in the US , Jamaal William Green (Dissertation)

Can Churches Change a Neighborhood? A Census Tract, Multilevel Analysis of Churches and Neighborhood Change , David E. Kresta (Dissertation)

An Examination of Non-waged Labor and Local Food Movement Growth in the Southern Appalachians , Amy Kathryn Marion (Thesis)

Making Imaginaries: Identity, Value, and Place in the Maker Movement in Detroit and Portland , Stephen Joseph Marotta (Dissertation)

Recognizing and Addressing Risk Ambiguity in Sea Level Rise Adaptation Planning: a Case Study of Miami-Dade County, Florida , Mary Ann Rozance (Dissertation)

The Impact of Implementing Different Cordon Size Designs on Land Use Patterns in Portland, OR , Asia Spilotros (Dissertation)

Gentrification and Student Achievement: a Quantitative Analysis of Student Performance on Standardized Tests in Portland's Gentrifying Neighborhoods , Justin Joseph Ward (Thesis)

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Environmental Justice in Natural Disaster Mitigation Policy and Planning: a Case Study of Flood Risk Management in Johnson Creek, Portland, Oregon , Seong Yun Cho (Dissertation)

Our Town: Articulating Place Meanings and Attachments in St. Johns Using Resident-Employed Photography , Lauren Elizabeth Morrow Everett (Thesis)

Millennial Perceptions on Homeownership and Financial Planning Decisions , Margaret Ann Greenfield (Thesis)

Utilitarian Skateboarding: Insight into an Emergent Mode of Mobility , Michael Joseph Harpool (Thesis)

Consciousness Against Commodifcation: the Potential for a Radical Housing Movement in the Cully Neighborhood , Cameron Hart Herrington (Thesis)

News Work: the Impact of Corporate Newsroom Culture on News Workers & Community Reporting , Carey Lynne Higgins-Dobney (Dissertation)

Recent Advances in Activity-Based Travel Demand Models for Greater Flexibility , Kihong Kim (Dissertation)

An Analysis of the BizX Commercial Trade Exchange: the Attitudes and Motivations Behind Its Use , Ján André Montoya (Thesis)

Between a Rock and a Hot Place: Economic Development and Climate Change Adaptation in Vietnam , Khanh Katherine Pham (Thesis)

Neighborhood Economic Impacts of Contemporary Art Centers , Steve Van Eck (Closed Thesis)

Urban Geocomputation: Two Studies on Urban Form and its Role in Altering Climate , Jackson Lee Voelkel (Thesis)

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

Explaining Unequal Transportation Outcomes in a Gentrifying City: the Example of Portland, Oregon , Eugenio Arriaga Cordero (Dissertation)

Identifying Clusters of Non-Farm Activity within Exclusive Farm Use Zones in the Northern Willamette Valley , Nicholas Chun (Thesis)

Drivers' Attitudes and Behaviors Toward Bicyclists: Intermodal Interactions and Implications for Road Safety , Tara Beth Goddard (Dissertation)

Grassroots Resistance in the Sustainable City: Portland Harbor Superfund Site Contamination, Cleanup, and Collective Action , Erin Katherine Goodling (Dissertation)

Responsible Pet Ownership: Dog Parks and Demographic Change in Portland, Oregon , Matthew Harris (Thesis)

The Tension between Technocratic and Social Values in Environmental Decision-making: An'Yang Stream Restoration in South Korea , Chang-Yu Hong (Dissertation)

Regulating Pavement Dwellers: the Politics of the Visibly Poor in Public Space , Lauren Marie Larin (Dissertation)

Making Software, Making Regions: Labor Market Dualization, Segmentation, and Feminization in Austin, Portland and Seattle , Dillon Mahmoudi (Dissertation)

Knowing Nature in the City: Comparative Analysis of Knowledge Systems Challenges Along the 'Eco-Techno' Spectrum of Green Infrastructure in Portland & Baltimore , Annie Marissa Matsler (Dissertation)

Assessing the Impact of Land Use and Travel on Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Portland, Oregon , Zakari Mumuni (Thesis)

Trade-offs: the Production of Sustainability in Households , Kirstin Marie Elizabeth Munro (Dissertation)

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

The Kazaks of Istanbul: A Case of Social Cohesion, Economic Breakdown and the Search for a Moral Economy , Daniel Marc Auger (Thesis)

Citizen-led Urban Agriculture and the Politics of Spatial Reappropriation in Montreal, Quebec , Claire Emmanuelle Bach (Thesis)

Travel Mode Choice Framework Incorporating Realistic Bike and Walk Routes , Joseph Broach (Dissertation)

Cyclist Path Choices Through Shared Space Intersections in England , Allison Boyce Duncan (Dissertation)

Star Academics: Do They Garner Increasing Returns? , James Jeffrey Kline (Dissertation)

Configuring the Urban Smart Grid: Transitions, Experimentation, and Governance , Anthony Michael Levenda (Dissertation)

The Effects of Frequency of Social Interaction, Social Cohesion, Age, and the Built Environment on Walking , Gretchen Allison Luhr (Dissertation)

The Village Market: New Columbia Goes Shopping for Food Justice , Jane Therese Waddell (Dissertation)

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

Developing Key Sustainability Competencies through Real-World Learning Experiences: Evaluating Community Environmental Services , Erin Lorene Anderson (Thesis)

Beyond Fruit: Examining Community in a Community Orchard , Emily Jane Becker (Thesis)

Challenges, Experiences, and Future Directions of Senior Centers Serving the Portland Metropolitan Area , Melissa Lynn Cannon (Dissertation)

Building Social Sustainability from the Ground Up: The Contested Social Dimension of Sustainability in Neighborhood-Scale Urban Regeneration in Portland, Copenhagen, and Nagoya , Jacklyn Nicole Kohon (Dissertation)

The Effects of Urban Containment Policies on Commuting Patterns , Sung Moon Kwon (Dissertation)

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Attitudes: An Exploration of a Landscape of Choices , Mersiha Spahic McClaren (Dissertation)

The Impact of Communication Impairments on the Social Relationships of Older Adults , Andrew Demetrius Palmer (Dissertation)

The Scales and Shapes of Queer Women's Geographies: Mapping Private, Public and Cyber Spaces in Portland, OR , Paola Renata Saldaña (Thesis)

Caring for the Land, Serving People: Creating a Multicultural Forest Service in the Civil Rights Era , Donna Lynn Sinclair (Dissertation)

Theses/Dissertations from 2014 2014

Determinants of Recent Mover Non-work Travel Mode Choice , Arlie Steven Adkins (Dissertation)

Changing the Face of the Earth: The Morrison-­Knudsen Corporation as Partner to the U.S. Federal Government , Christopher S. Blanchard (Dissertation)

Participation, Information, Values, and Community Interests Within Health Impact Assessments , Nicole Iroz-Elardo (Dissertation)

The Objective vs. the Perceived Environment: What Matters for Active Travel , Liang Ma (Dissertation)

Implications of Local and Regional Food Systems: Toward a New Food Economy in Portland, Oregon , Michael Mercer Mertens (Dissertation)

Spirituality and Religion in Women's Leadership for Sustainable Development in Crisis Conditions: The Case of Burma , Phyusin Myo Kyaw Myint (Dissertation)

Street Level Food Networks: Understanding Ethnic Food Cart Supply Chains in Eastern Portland, OR , Alexander G. Novie (Thesis)

Dissertation Planner: Dissertation Planner

Dissertation planner.

  • Learning from lectures
  • Managing your time
  • Effective reading
  • Evaluating Information
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Studying online
  • Writing home
  • Maths and Statistics Support
  • Problem solving
  • Maths skills by discipline
  • Introduction to research skills
  • Primary research
  • Research methods
  • Managing data
  • Research ethics
  • Citing and referencing
  • Searching the literature
  • What is academic integrity?
  • Referencing software
  • Integrity Officer/Panel
  • Intellectual property and copyright
  • Digital skills home

Give Feedback

This Dissertation Planner is a step-by-step guide to help you write a dissertation from starting to think about your question through to final submission. At each stage you will find useful tips and support. You can return to the planner by bookmarking the URL. 

  • Last Updated: Mar 13, 2024 3:14 PM
  • URL: https://library.soton.ac.uk/sash/dissertation-planner

Logo

How to write a PhD thesis: a step-by-step guide

A draft isn’t a perfect, finished product; it is your opportunity to start getting words down on paper, writes Kelly Louise Preece

Kelly Louise Preece's avatar

Kelly Louise Preece

  • More on this topic

Man working on his PhD thesis

Created in partnership with

University of Exeter

You may also like

University tutor marking assessments

Popular resources

.css-1txxx8u{overflow:hidden;max-height:81px;text-indent:0px;} The secrets to success as a provost

Using non verbal cues to build rapport with students, emotionally challenging research and researcher well-being, augmenting the doctoral thesis in preparation for a viva, how hard can it be testing ai detection tools.

Congratulations; you’ve finished your research! Time to write your PhD thesis. This resource will take you through an eight-step plan for drafting your chapters and your thesis as a whole. 

Infographic with steps on how to draft your PhD thesis

Organise your material

Before you start, it’s important to get organised. Take a step back and look at the data you have, then reorganise your research. Which parts of it are central to your thesis and which bits need putting to one side? Label and organise everything using logical folders – make it easy for yourself! Academic and blogger Pat Thomson calls this  “Clean up to get clearer” . Thomson suggests these questions to ask yourself before you start writing:

  • What data do you have? You might find it useful to write out a list of types of data (your supervisor will find this list useful too.) This list is also an audit document that can go in your thesis. Do you have any for the “cutting room floor”? Take a deep breath and put it in a separate non-thesis file. You can easily retrieve it if it turns out you need it.
  • What do you have already written? What chunks of material have you written so far that could form the basis of pieces of the thesis text? They will most likely need to be revised but they are useful starting points. Do you have any holding text? That is material you already know has to be rewritten but contains information that will be the basis of a new piece of text.
  • What have you read and what do you still need to read? Are there new texts that you need to consult now after your analysis? What readings can you now put to one side, knowing that they aren’t useful for this thesis – although they might be useful at another time?
  • What goes with what? Can you create chunks or themes of materials that are going to form the basis of some chunks of your text, perhaps even chapters?

Once you have assessed and sorted what you have collected and generated you will be in much better shape to approach the big task of composing the dissertation. 

Decide on a key message

A key message is a summary of new information communicated in your thesis. You should have started to map this out already in the section on argument and contribution – an overarching argument with building blocks that you will flesh out in individual chapters.

You have already mapped your argument visually, now you need to begin writing it in prose. Following another of Pat Thomson’s exercises, write a “tiny text” thesis abstract. This doesn’t have to be elegant, or indeed the finished product, but it will help you articulate the argument you want your thesis to make. You create a tiny text using a five-paragraph structure:

  • The first sentence addresses the broad context. This locates the study in a policy, practice or research field.
  • The second sentence establishes a problem related to the broad context you have set out. It often starts with “But”, “Yet” or “However”.
  • The third sentence says what specific research has been done. This often starts with “This research” or “I report…”
  • The fourth sentence reports the results. Don’t try to be too tricky here, just start with something like: “This study shows,” or “Analysis of the data suggests that…”
  • The fifth and final sentence addresses the “So What?” question and makes clear the claim to contribution.

Here’s an example that Thomson provides:

Secondary school arts are in trouble, as the fall in enrolments in arts subjects dramatically attests. However, there is patchy evidence about the benefits of studying arts subjects at school and this makes it hard to argue why the drop in arts enrolments matters. This thesis reports on research which attempts to provide some answers to this problem – a longitudinal study which followed two groups of senior secondary students, one group enrolled in arts subjects and the other not, for three years. The results of the study demonstrate the benefits of young people’s engagement in arts activities, both in and out of school, as well as the connections between the two. The study not only adds to what is known about the benefits of both formal and informal arts education but also provides robust evidence for policymakers and practitioners arguing for the benefits of the arts. You can  find out more about tiny texts and thesis abstracts on Thomson’s blog.

  • Writing tips for higher education professionals
  • Resource collection on academic writing
  • What is your academic writing temperament?

Write a plan

You might not be a planner when it comes to writing. You might prefer to sit, type and think through ideas as you go. That’s OK. Everybody works differently. But one of the benefits of planning your writing is that your plan can help you when you get stuck. It can help with writer’s block (more on this shortly!) but also maintain clarity of intention and purpose in your writing.

You can do this by creating a  thesis skeleton or storyboard , planning the order of your chapters, thinking of potential titles (which may change at a later stage), noting down what each chapter/section will cover and considering how many words you will dedicate to each chapter (make sure the total doesn’t exceed the maximum word limit allowed).

Use your plan to help prompt your writing when you get stuck and to develop clarity in your writing.

Some starting points include:

  • This chapter will argue that…
  • This section illustrates that…
  • This paragraph provides evidence that…

Of course, we wish it werethat easy. But you need to approach your first draft as exactly that: a draft. It isn’t a perfect, finished product; it is your opportunity to start getting words down on paper. Start with whichever chapter you feel you want to write first; you don’t necessarily have to write the introduction first. Depending on your research, you may find it easier to begin with your empirical/data chapters.

Vitae advocates for the “three draft approach” to help with this and to stop you from focusing on finding exactly the right word or transition as part of your first draft.

Infographic of the three draft approach

This resource originally appeared on Researcher Development .

Kelly Louse Preece is head of educator development at the University of Exeter.

If you would like advice and insight from academics and university staff delivered direct to your inbox each week, sign up for the Campus newsletter .

The secrets to success as a provost

Emotions and learning: what role do emotions play in how and why students learn, the podcast: bringing an outsider’s eye to primary sources, a diy guide to starting your own journal, formative, summative or diagnostic assessment a guide, harnessing the power of data to drive student success.

Register for free

and unlock a host of features on the THE site

Grad Coach

Dissertation Structure & Layout 101: How to structure your dissertation, thesis or research project.

By: Derek Jansen (MBA) Reviewed By: David Phair (PhD) | July 2019

So, you’ve got a decent understanding of what a dissertation is , you’ve chosen your topic and hopefully you’ve received approval for your research proposal . Awesome! Now its time to start the actual dissertation or thesis writing journey.

To craft a high-quality document, the very first thing you need to understand is dissertation structure . In this post, we’ll walk you through the generic dissertation structure and layout, step by step. We’ll start with the big picture, and then zoom into each chapter to briefly discuss the core contents. If you’re just starting out on your research journey, you should start with this post, which covers the big-picture process of how to write a dissertation or thesis .

Dissertation structure and layout - the basics

*The Caveat *

In this post, we’ll be discussing a traditional dissertation/thesis structure and layout, which is generally used for social science research across universities, whether in the US, UK, Europe or Australia. However, some universities may have small variations on this structure (extra chapters, merged chapters, slightly different ordering, etc).

So, always check with your university if they have a prescribed structure or layout that they expect you to work with. If not, it’s safe to assume the structure we’ll discuss here is suitable. And even if they do have a prescribed structure, you’ll still get value from this post as we’ll explain the core contents of each section.  

Overview: S tructuring a dissertation or thesis

  • Acknowledgements page
  • Abstract (or executive summary)
  • Table of contents , list of figures and tables
  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Chapter 2: Literature review
  • Chapter 3: Methodology
  • Chapter 4: Results
  • Chapter 5: Discussion
  • Chapter 6: Conclusion
  • Reference list

As I mentioned, some universities will have slight variations on this structure. For example, they want an additional “personal reflection chapter”, or they might prefer the results and discussion chapter to be merged into one. Regardless, the overarching flow will always be the same, as this flow reflects the research process , which we discussed here – i.e.:

  • The introduction chapter presents the core research question and aims .
  • The literature review chapter assesses what the current research says about this question.
  • The methodology, results and discussion chapters go about undertaking new research about this question.
  • The conclusion chapter (attempts to) answer the core research question .

In other words, the dissertation structure and layout reflect the research process of asking a well-defined question(s), investigating, and then answering the question – see below.

A dissertation's structure reflect the research process

To restate that – the structure and layout of a dissertation reflect the flow of the overall research process . This is essential to understand, as each chapter will make a lot more sense if you “get” this concept. If you’re not familiar with the research process, read this post before going further.

Right. Now that we’ve covered the big picture, let’s dive a little deeper into the details of each section and chapter. Oh and by the way, you can also grab our free dissertation/thesis template here to help speed things up.

The title page of your dissertation is the very first impression the marker will get of your work, so it pays to invest some time thinking about your title. But what makes for a good title? A strong title needs to be 3 things:

  • Succinct (not overly lengthy or verbose)
  • Specific (not vague or ambiguous)
  • Representative of the research you’re undertaking (clearly linked to your research questions)

Typically, a good title includes mention of the following:

  • The broader area of the research (i.e. the overarching topic)
  • The specific focus of your research (i.e. your specific context)
  • Indication of research design (e.g. quantitative , qualitative , or  mixed methods ).

For example:

A quantitative investigation [research design] into the antecedents of organisational trust [broader area] in the UK retail forex trading market [specific context/area of focus].

Again, some universities may have specific requirements regarding the format and structure of the title, so it’s worth double-checking expectations with your institution (if there’s no mention in the brief or study material).

Dissertations stacked up

Acknowledgements

This page provides you with an opportunity to say thank you to those who helped you along your research journey. Generally, it’s optional (and won’t count towards your marks), but it is academic best practice to include this.

So, who do you say thanks to? Well, there’s no prescribed requirements, but it’s common to mention the following people:

  • Your dissertation supervisor or committee.
  • Any professors, lecturers or academics that helped you understand the topic or methodologies.
  • Any tutors, mentors or advisors.
  • Your family and friends, especially spouse (for adult learners studying part-time).

There’s no need for lengthy rambling. Just state who you’re thankful to and for what (e.g. thank you to my supervisor, John Doe, for his endless patience and attentiveness) – be sincere. In terms of length, you should keep this to a page or less.

Abstract or executive summary

The dissertation abstract (or executive summary for some degrees) serves to provide the first-time reader (and marker or moderator) with a big-picture view of your research project. It should give them an understanding of the key insights and findings from the research, without them needing to read the rest of the report – in other words, it should be able to stand alone .

For it to stand alone, your abstract should cover the following key points (at a minimum):

  • Your research questions and aims – what key question(s) did your research aim to answer?
  • Your methodology – how did you go about investigating the topic and finding answers to your research question(s)?
  • Your findings – following your own research, what did do you discover?
  • Your conclusions – based on your findings, what conclusions did you draw? What answers did you find to your research question(s)?

So, in much the same way the dissertation structure mimics the research process, your abstract or executive summary should reflect the research process, from the initial stage of asking the original question to the final stage of answering that question.

In practical terms, it’s a good idea to write this section up last , once all your core chapters are complete. Otherwise, you’ll end up writing and rewriting this section multiple times (just wasting time). For a step by step guide on how to write a strong executive summary, check out this post .

Need a helping hand?

dissertation of planning

Table of contents

This section is straightforward. You’ll typically present your table of contents (TOC) first, followed by the two lists – figures and tables. I recommend that you use Microsoft Word’s automatic table of contents generator to generate your TOC. If you’re not familiar with this functionality, the video below explains it simply:

If you find that your table of contents is overly lengthy, consider removing one level of depth. Oftentimes, this can be done without detracting from the usefulness of the TOC.

Right, now that the “admin” sections are out of the way, its time to move on to your core chapters. These chapters are the heart of your dissertation and are where you’ll earn the marks. The first chapter is the introduction chapter – as you would expect, this is the time to introduce your research…

It’s important to understand that even though you’ve provided an overview of your research in your abstract, your introduction needs to be written as if the reader has not read that (remember, the abstract is essentially a standalone document). So, your introduction chapter needs to start from the very beginning, and should address the following questions:

  • What will you be investigating (in plain-language, big picture-level)?
  • Why is that worth investigating? How is it important to academia or business? How is it sufficiently original?
  • What are your research aims and research question(s)? Note that the research questions can sometimes be presented at the end of the literature review (next chapter).
  • What is the scope of your study? In other words, what will and won’t you cover ?
  • How will you approach your research? In other words, what methodology will you adopt?
  • How will you structure your dissertation? What are the core chapters and what will you do in each of them?

These are just the bare basic requirements for your intro chapter. Some universities will want additional bells and whistles in the intro chapter, so be sure to carefully read your brief or consult your research supervisor.

If done right, your introduction chapter will set a clear direction for the rest of your dissertation. Specifically, it will make it clear to the reader (and marker) exactly what you’ll be investigating, why that’s important, and how you’ll be going about the investigation. Conversely, if your introduction chapter leaves a first-time reader wondering what exactly you’ll be researching, you’ve still got some work to do.

Now that you’ve set a clear direction with your introduction chapter, the next step is the literature review . In this section, you will analyse the existing research (typically academic journal articles and high-quality industry publications), with a view to understanding the following questions:

  • What does the literature currently say about the topic you’re investigating?
  • Is the literature lacking or well established? Is it divided or in disagreement?
  • How does your research fit into the bigger picture?
  • How does your research contribute something original?
  • How does the methodology of previous studies help you develop your own?

Depending on the nature of your study, you may also present a conceptual framework towards the end of your literature review, which you will then test in your actual research.

Again, some universities will want you to focus on some of these areas more than others, some will have additional or fewer requirements, and so on. Therefore, as always, its important to review your brief and/or discuss with your supervisor, so that you know exactly what’s expected of your literature review chapter.

Dissertation writing

Now that you’ve investigated the current state of knowledge in your literature review chapter and are familiar with the existing key theories, models and frameworks, its time to design your own research. Enter the methodology chapter – the most “science-ey” of the chapters…

In this chapter, you need to address two critical questions:

  • Exactly HOW will you carry out your research (i.e. what is your intended research design)?
  • Exactly WHY have you chosen to do things this way (i.e. how do you justify your design)?

Remember, the dissertation part of your degree is first and foremost about developing and demonstrating research skills . Therefore, the markers want to see that you know which methods to use, can clearly articulate why you’ve chosen then, and know how to deploy them effectively.

Importantly, this chapter requires detail – don’t hold back on the specifics. State exactly what you’ll be doing, with who, when, for how long, etc. Moreover, for every design choice you make, make sure you justify it.

In practice, you will likely end up coming back to this chapter once you’ve undertaken all your data collection and analysis, and revise it based on changes you made during the analysis phase. This is perfectly fine. Its natural for you to add an additional analysis technique, scrap an old one, etc based on where your data lead you. Of course, I’m talking about small changes here – not a fundamental switch from qualitative to quantitative, which will likely send your supervisor in a spin!

You’ve now collected your data and undertaken your analysis, whether qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods. In this chapter, you’ll present the raw results of your analysis . For example, in the case of a quant study, you’ll present the demographic data, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics , etc.

Typically, Chapter 4 is simply a presentation and description of the data, not a discussion of the meaning of the data. In other words, it’s descriptive, rather than analytical – the meaning is discussed in Chapter 5. However, some universities will want you to combine chapters 4 and 5, so that you both present and interpret the meaning of the data at the same time. Check with your institution what their preference is.

Now that you’ve presented the data analysis results, its time to interpret and analyse them. In other words, its time to discuss what they mean, especially in relation to your research question(s).

What you discuss here will depend largely on your chosen methodology. For example, if you’ve gone the quantitative route, you might discuss the relationships between variables . If you’ve gone the qualitative route, you might discuss key themes and the meanings thereof. It all depends on what your research design choices were.

Most importantly, you need to discuss your results in relation to your research questions and aims, as well as the existing literature. What do the results tell you about your research questions? Are they aligned with the existing research or at odds? If so, why might this be? Dig deep into your findings and explain what the findings suggest, in plain English.

The final chapter – you’ve made it! Now that you’ve discussed your interpretation of the results, its time to bring it back to the beginning with the conclusion chapter . In other words, its time to (attempt to) answer your original research question s (from way back in chapter 1). Clearly state what your conclusions are in terms of your research questions. This might feel a bit repetitive, as you would have touched on this in the previous chapter, but its important to bring the discussion full circle and explicitly state your answer(s) to the research question(s).

Dissertation and thesis prep

Next, you’ll typically discuss the implications of your findings . In other words, you’ve answered your research questions – but what does this mean for the real world (or even for academia)? What should now be done differently, given the new insight you’ve generated?

Lastly, you should discuss the limitations of your research, as well as what this means for future research in the area. No study is perfect, especially not a Masters-level. Discuss the shortcomings of your research. Perhaps your methodology was limited, perhaps your sample size was small or not representative, etc, etc. Don’t be afraid to critique your work – the markers want to see that you can identify the limitations of your work. This is a strength, not a weakness. Be brutal!

This marks the end of your core chapters – woohoo! From here on out, it’s pretty smooth sailing.

The reference list is straightforward. It should contain a list of all resources cited in your dissertation, in the required format, e.g. APA , Harvard, etc.

It’s essential that you use reference management software for your dissertation. Do NOT try handle your referencing manually – its far too error prone. On a reference list of multiple pages, you’re going to make mistake. To this end, I suggest considering either Mendeley or Zotero. Both are free and provide a very straightforward interface to ensure that your referencing is 100% on point. I’ve included a simple how-to video for the Mendeley software (my personal favourite) below:

Some universities may ask you to include a bibliography, as opposed to a reference list. These two things are not the same . A bibliography is similar to a reference list, except that it also includes resources which informed your thinking but were not directly cited in your dissertation. So, double-check your brief and make sure you use the right one.

The very last piece of the puzzle is the appendix or set of appendices. This is where you’ll include any supporting data and evidence. Importantly, supporting is the keyword here.

Your appendices should provide additional “nice to know”, depth-adding information, which is not critical to the core analysis. Appendices should not be used as a way to cut down word count (see this post which covers how to reduce word count ). In other words, don’t place content that is critical to the core analysis here, just to save word count. You will not earn marks on any content in the appendices, so don’t try to play the system!

Time to recap…

And there you have it – the traditional dissertation structure and layout, from A-Z. To recap, the core structure for a dissertation or thesis is (typically) as follows:

  • Acknowledgments page

Most importantly, the core chapters should reflect the research process (asking, investigating and answering your research question). Moreover, the research question(s) should form the golden thread throughout your dissertation structure. Everything should revolve around the research questions, and as you’ve seen, they should form both the start point (i.e. introduction chapter) and the endpoint (i.e. conclusion chapter).

I hope this post has provided you with clarity about the traditional dissertation/thesis structure and layout. If you have any questions or comments, please leave a comment below, or feel free to get in touch with us. Also, be sure to check out the rest of the  Grad Coach Blog .

dissertation of planning

Psst... there’s more!

This post was based on one of our popular Research Bootcamps . If you're working on a research project, you'll definitely want to check this out ...

You Might Also Like:

The acknowledgements section of a thesis/dissertation

36 Comments

ARUN kumar SHARMA

many thanks i found it very useful

Derek Jansen

Glad to hear that, Arun. Good luck writing your dissertation.

Sue

Such clear practical logical advice. I very much needed to read this to keep me focused in stead of fretting.. Perfect now ready to start my research!

hayder

what about scientific fields like computer or engineering thesis what is the difference in the structure? thank you very much

Tim

Thanks so much this helped me a lot!

Ade Adeniyi

Very helpful and accessible. What I like most is how practical the advice is along with helpful tools/ links.

Thanks Ade!

Aswathi

Thank you so much sir.. It was really helpful..

You’re welcome!

Jp Raimundo

Hi! How many words maximum should contain the abstract?

Karmelia Renatee

Thank you so much 😊 Find this at the right moment

You’re most welcome. Good luck with your dissertation.

moha

best ever benefit i got on right time thank you

Krishnan iyer

Many times Clarity and vision of destination of dissertation is what makes the difference between good ,average and great researchers the same way a great automobile driver is fast with clarity of address and Clear weather conditions .

I guess Great researcher = great ideas + knowledge + great and fast data collection and modeling + great writing + high clarity on all these

You have given immense clarity from start to end.

Alwyn Malan

Morning. Where will I write the definitions of what I’m referring to in my report?

Rose

Thank you so much Derek, I was almost lost! Thanks a tonnnn! Have a great day!

yemi Amos

Thanks ! so concise and valuable

Kgomotso Siwelane

This was very helpful. Clear and concise. I know exactly what to do now.

dauda sesay

Thank you for allowing me to go through briefly. I hope to find time to continue.

Patrick Mwathi

Really useful to me. Thanks a thousand times

Adao Bundi

Very interesting! It will definitely set me and many more for success. highly recommended.

SAIKUMAR NALUMASU

Thank you soo much sir, for the opportunity to express my skills

mwepu Ilunga

Usefull, thanks a lot. Really clear

Rami

Very nice and easy to understand. Thank you .

Chrisogonas Odhiambo

That was incredibly useful. Thanks Grad Coach Crew!

Luke

My stress level just dropped at least 15 points after watching this. Just starting my thesis for my grad program and I feel a lot more capable now! Thanks for such a clear and helpful video, Emma and the GradCoach team!

Judy

Do we need to mention the number of words the dissertation contains in the main document?

It depends on your university’s requirements, so it would be best to check with them 🙂

Christine

Such a helpful post to help me get started with structuring my masters dissertation, thank you!

Simon Le

Great video; I appreciate that helpful information

Brhane Kidane

It is so necessary or avital course

johnson

This blog is very informative for my research. Thank you

avc

Doctoral students are required to fill out the National Research Council’s Survey of Earned Doctorates

Emmanuel Manjolo

wow this is an amazing gain in my life

Paul I Thoronka

This is so good

Tesfay haftu

How can i arrange my specific objectives in my dissertation?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  • What Is A Literature Review (In A Dissertation Or Thesis) - Grad Coach - […] is to write the actual literature review chapter (this is usually the second chapter in a typical dissertation or…

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Print Friendly

University Library

Doctoral Theses in Urban and Regional Planning

A chronological checklist.

The following are doctoral theses completed by individual students in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  Please see Find Dissertations for more details about locating doctoral theses in general.  Check the online catalog for doctoral theses not listed here.

Most call numbers and locations are given after each entry; if not available, search the online catalog under author or title. Call numbers are linked to the entry in the online catalog or IDEALS when available.

Yu, Chenxi. Three papers in urban and regional economic and development/ by Chenxi Yu. Dissertation (Ph.D.) – University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign , 2015. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library Regional Planning/    Found in IDEALS

Kashem, Md Shakil Bin. Moving towards disaster: examining the changing patterns of social vulnerability in a multi-hazard urban environment/ by Md Shakil Bin Kashem. Dissertation (Ph.D.) – University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign , 2015. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library Regional Planning/    Found in IDEALS

Lee, Sungwon. The role of urban spatial structure in reducing VMT and GHG emissions/ by Sungwon Lee. Dissertation (Ph.D.) – University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2015. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library Regional Planning/   Found in IDEALS

Vincentelo Lupa, Claudia Mariella . Planning in cyberenvironments: an analysis of the impacts of open data in Chicago / by Claudia Mariella Vincentelo Lupa. Dissertation (Ph.D.)—University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2015. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library Regional Planning/    Found in IDEALS

Figueroa, Carlos. Wage equations and the regional economics in Guatemala/ by Carlos Figueroa. Dissertation (Ph.D.)—University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2014. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library Regional Planning/    Found in IDEALS

Green, Timothy. Cluster Planning and Cluster Strategy in Regional Economic Development Organizations/ by Timothy Green. Thesis (Ph.D.)—University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2014. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Irawan, Andi. Regional Income Disparities in Indonesia: Measurements, Convergence Process, and Decentralization/ by Andi Irawan. Thesis (Ph.D.)—University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2014. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Allred, Dustin. Examining the Effectiveness of Voluntary Coordination among Local Governments: Evidence from a Regional Land Use Planning Process/ by Dustin Allred. Thesis (Ph.D.)—University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 2013. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Boyer, Robert. Transitioning to Sustainable Urban Development: A Niche-Based Approach / by Robert Boyer. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Rahe, Mallory. Building Prosperous Communities: The Effects of Social Capital, Financial Capital, and Place / by Mallory Rahe. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Honey-Roses, Jordi. Ecosystem Services in Planning Practice for Urban and Technologically Advanced Landscapes / by Jordi Honey-Roses. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2012. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Found in IDEALS

Nesse, Kate. How Do We Know? Determining School District Fiscal and Administrative Policy in Rural Hispanic Boomtowns in the Midwest / by Kate Nesse. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2012. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Found in IDEALS

Sarraf, Saket. Three essays on Social Dynamics and Landuse Change: Framework, Model, and Estimator / by Saket Sarraf. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2012. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Found in IDEALS

Borich, Genevieve. The Broader Social Network of Community Planning: A Diagnostic Tool for Communities to Assess Their Planning Capacity / by Genevieve Borich. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2011. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Wan, Jun. Three Papers in Regional Economics: Energy Productivity Convergence, Water Resource Planning, and Workforce Occupation-Industry Dynamics / by Jun Wan. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2011. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Araj, Fidaa I. Planning Under Deep Political Conflict: The Relationship Between Afforestation Planning and the Struggle Over Space in the Palestinian Territories / by Fidaa Ibrahim Mustafa Araj. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Brody, Jason. Constructing Professional Knowledge   :  The Neighborhood Unit Concept and the Community Builders Handbook / by Jason Brody. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning   /    Found in IDEALS

Budhathoki, Nama R. Participants’ Motivations to Contribute Geographic Information in an Online Community / by Nama Raj Budhathoki. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning   /    Found in IDEALS

Chandrasekhar, Divya. Understanding Stakeholder Participation in Post-Disaster Recovery (Case Study: Nagapattinam, India) / by Divya Chandrasekhar   .  Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning   /    Found in IDEALS

Dringo, Marina V. Why Use Agent-Based Models To Explore Social Issues? The Case Of Intimate Partner Violence and Social Support Systems / by Marina V. Dringo. 2010.   Found in IDEALS

Gamal, Ahmad. Appropriating decentralization: how urban poverty project triggers advocacy / by Ahmad Gamal. 2010.   Found in IDEALS

Ganning, Joanna P. Growth Effects of Urban-Rural and Intra-Regional Linkages on Non-Metropolitan Counties and Communities in the U.S. / by Joanna Paulson Ganning. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning   /    Found in IDEALS

Iuchi, Kanako. Redefining a Place to Live: Decisions, Planning Processes, and Outcomes of Resettlement after Disasters / by Kanako Iuchi. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Kim, Jae H. Land Use, Spatial Structure, and Regional Economic Performance: Assessing the Economic Effects of Land Use Planning and Regulation / by Jae Hong Kim. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Found in IDEALS

Robles, Johanna D. The FDI and regional development in Chile / by Johanna D. Robles. 2010.  Found in IDEALS

Finn, Donovan. Our Uncertain Future: Can Good Planning Create Sustainable Communities? / by Donovan Flinn. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009. iv, 203 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 192-202). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Q. 338.927 F497o

Li, Jinghuan. Developing a Markup Language for Encoding Graphic Content in Plan Documents / by Jinghuan Li. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Found in IDEALS

Sandiford, Glenn. Transforming an Exotic Species: Nineteenth-Century narratives about Introduction of Carp in America / by Glenn Sandiford. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009. xiv, 320 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 639.37483 Sa568t

Zapata, Marisa. Planning Across Differences: Collaborative Planning in the California Central Valley / by Marisa Zapata. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Found in IDEALS

Ha, Soo J. Integrated Assessment of Structural Change and Sustainability in the Chicago Region / by Soo Jung Ha. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2008. v, 117 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 104-111). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 354.34 B433r

Kang, Sangjun. Spatial Distribution of Best Management Practices for Stormwater Management / by Sangjun Kang. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2008. v, 113 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 87-99). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /   Q. 628.1 K131s

Kaza, Nikhil. Reasoning With Plans: Inference of Semantic Relationships among Plans about Urban Development / by Nikhil Kaza. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2008. xiv, 181 leaves, bound : ill., maps (some col.) ; 29 cm. + cdrom. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 168-175). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning / Q. 711.4 K189r ; Found in IDEALS

Koschinsky, Julia. Modeling Spatial Spillover Effects from Rental to Owner Housing: The Case of Seattle / by Julia Koschinsky. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2008. ix, 172 leaves, bound : ill., maps (some col. ) ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 108-114). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning / Q. 307.76097977 K846m

Warren, Drake Edward. The regional economic effects of commercial passenger air service at small airports / by Drake Edward Warren. viii, 414 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 398-413). Q. 338.1 Tbp08w

Wildermuth, Todd A. Yesterday’s city of tomorrow : the Minnesota Experimental City and green urbanism / by Todd A. Wildermuth. v, 278 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 271-276). Q. 630 Tbp08w

Xiao, Yu. Local Labor Market Adjustment and Economic Impacts after a Major Disaster: Evidence from the 1993 Midwest Flood / by Yu Xiao. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2008. xii, 219 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 197-205). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning / Q. 363.34097738 X4l

Bendor, Todd K. Redistribution effects of wetland mitigation over space and time / by Todd K. Bendor. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007. v, 117 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 104-111). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 354.34 B433r

Lim, Jaewon. Interregional Migration and Regional Economic Structure / by Jaewon Lim. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007. xiii, 143 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 129-134). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 304.81 L628i

Lufin Varas, Marcelo Leonardo. Essays in social space : applications to Chilean communities on inter-sector social linkages, social capital, and social justice / by Marcelo Leonardo Lufin Varas. v, 254 leaves, bound : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 153-173).  Q. 711.40983 L967e

Maeng, Da-Mi. Information and Communications Technologies and Urban Environment: Empirical Analysis of the Washington DC Metropolitan Region / by Da-Mi Maeng. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007. x, 119 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 104-115). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 711.4 M268i

Silva, Carlos E. Three Essays on Regional Economics / by Carlos Eduardo Silva. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007. iv, 112 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 106-111). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 330.9 Si382t

Sorensen, Janni. Challenges of Unequal Power Distribution in University-Community Partnerships / by Janni Sorensen. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007. ix, 212 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 175-189). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 711.58 So684c

Varas, Marcelo L. Essays in Social Space: Applications to Chilean Communities on Inter-Sector Social Linkages, Social Capital, and Social Justice / by Marcelo Leonardo Lufin Varas.Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007. v, 254 leaves, bound : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 153-173). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 711.40983 L967e

Wang, Yun. Predicting long-term impacts of urbanization in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area on regional emissions of air pollutants from residential fuel combustion : a dynamic geographic information systems approach / by Yun Wang. viii, 142 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 62-69).  Q. 711.40977866 W184p

Aldegheishem, Abdulaziz J. Geospatial sharing as an effective governance tool for policy decision : comparative analysis and implication to Saudi Arabia / by Abdulaziz J. Aldegheishem.  Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2006. xiv, 221 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 204-220). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 910.28509538 Al21g

Shammin, Md Rumi. Opportunity and challenges for sustainability in urban planning and the energy sprawl / by Md Rumi Shammin. xvi, 211 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 136-145).  Q. 630 Tbp06s

Sofhani, Tubagus Furqon. Toward empowered participatory planning: the role of planners in the local planning paradigm change in Indonesia / by Tubagus Furqon Sofhani. xii, 173 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 158-167).  Q. 307.1216 So232t

Vial, Jose Fernando. Interlinking interregional economic models with infrastructure networks : three essays / by Jose Fernando Vial. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2006. ix, 184 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 175-182). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 330.9 V651i

Bonet, Jaime Alfred. Decentralization, structural change and regional disparities in Colombia / by Jaime Alfred Bonet. x, 128 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 106-113).  Q. 986.1063 B641d

Guo, Dong. Structure and structural change in China’s economy / by Dong Guo. 2005. xi, 130 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 116-125). Theses –UIUC –2005 –Urban and Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 338.951 G959s

Jang, Sung-Gheel. Interoperable multimodal travel guide system : modeling and implementation – a canonical model approach / by Sung-Gheel Jang. 2005. xi, 132 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 119-128). Theses –UIUC –2005 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning.  Q. 388.0285 J254i

Lee, Jong Sung. Developing spatio-temporal models for retrofit and reconstruction strategy under unscheduled events / by Jong Sung Lee. 2005. x, 102 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 94-98). Theses –UIUC –2005 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library City Planning /  Q. 353.9 L517d

Prasai, Sagar R. Transnational migration-development nexus and the capability approach : reframing the linkages/ by Sagar R. Prasai. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2005. vii, 145 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 132-140). Theses –UIUC –2005 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /  Q. 331.544 P886t

Balta, Nazmiye. Climate change policy in an enlarged European Union : institutions, efficiency, and equity / by Nazmiye Balta. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004. xvii, 285 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 279-284). Theses–UIUC–2004–Urban and Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /  Q. 363.7 B216c

Kim, Jungik. An assessment of the discommodity effects of swine production on rural property values : a spatial analysis / by Jungik Kim. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004. xi, 186 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 177-185). Theses–UIUC–2004–Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning.   Q. 333.3352 K56a

Plotnikova, Maria. Determinants of household housing privatization decision in Russia / by Maria Plotnikova. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004. vii, 98 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 91-97). Theses–UIUC–2004 –Urban and Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning.   Q. 363.50947 P724d

Sumadi, Pungky. Governance in a democratic transition : the case of the Urban Poverty Project in Cirebon / by Pungky Sumadi. 2004. xv, 225 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 204-218). Theses –UIUC –2004 –Urban and Regional Planning. Printout.  Q. 320.85095982 Su61g

Budthimedhee, Kanjanee. Effective visualization interfaces for planning support systems / by Kanjanee Budthimedhee. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2003. vi, 158 leaves, bound : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 152-156). Theses–UIUC–2003–Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /    Q. 005.118 B859e

Deal, Brian Michael. Sustainable land-use planning: the integration of process and technology / by Brian Michael Deal. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2003. viii, 115 leaves, bound : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 79-85). Theses–UIUC–2003–Urban and Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /    Q. 307.1216 D342s

Haddad, Monica Amaral. Human development and regional inequalities: spatial analysis across Brazilian municipalities / by Monica Amaral Haddad. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2003. xiv, 144 leaves, bound : ill. (some col.) maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 133-140). Theses–UIUC–2003–Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /  Q. 307.140981 H117h

Nazara, Suahasil. An exploration of interaction effects in Indonesian regional economic development / by Suahasil Nazara. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2003. xiii, 156 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 149-155). Theses–UIUC–2003–Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning./   Q. 330.9598 N236e

Henne, Lisa Jean. Power and science in participatory watershed planning: a case study from rural Mexico / by Lisa Jean Henne. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2002. ix, 170 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 157-166). Theses–UIUC–2002–Regional Planning.Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /  Q. 333.730972 H391s

Song, Yan. Valuing the impacts of new urbanism on prices of single-family homes: a case study of Portland, Oregon / by Yan Song Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2002. xvi, 137 leaves, bound : ill., maps. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 130-136). Theses–UIUC–2002–Urban and Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /  Q. 728.370979549 So581v

Wu, Yueming. Seismic risk analysis for Mid-America communities / by Yueming Wu Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2002. ix, 208 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 203-207). Theses–UIUC–2002–Urban and Regional Planning. Printout. Available on microfilm from Pro Quest Information and Learning. /  Q. 551.220287 W950s

Kumar, Sandeep. Role of information in design review : a case study / by Sandeep Kumar. 2001. ix, 189 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Printout. Vita. Theses–UIUC–2001–Regional Planning. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001.  Q. 711.40973 K96r

Tyler, Elizabeth Holl. Development of an environmental values typology / by Elizabeth Holl Tyler. xi, 256 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 131-146).  Q. 363.7 T971d

Matier, Debra Anne. A cross-national study of policy entrepreneurship on the part of technical-professional bureaucrats in national environmental agencies : the case of household waste reduction policy in Germany, France and the United States / by Debra Anne Matier. 2000. vii, 269 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Theses–UIUC–2000–Regional Planning. /  Q. 658.421

Tyler, Elizabeth Holl. Development of an environmental values typology / by Elizabeth Holl Tyler. 2001. xi, 256 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 131-146). Theses –UIUC –2001 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from Bell & Howell Information and Learning.  Q. 363.7 T971d

You, Jinsoo. Development of a hybrid travel time forecasting model with GIS : design and implementation issues / by Jinsoo You. 2000. xv, 171 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Printout. Vita. Theses–UIUC–2000– Regional Planning. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2000. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 161-167).  Q. 388.10113 Y83d

Alvares, Lucia Maria Capanema. Classifying intermediary non-governmental organizations according to their strategies to empower local grassroots groups / by Lucia Maria Capanema Alvares. c1999. xiv, 443 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. Printout. Vita. Data for this research was collected in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1999. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 427-440). 1. Non-governmental organizations–Case studies. 2. Community development–Brazil–Belo Horizonte–Case studies. I. Title. Other: Theses–UIUC–1999–Regional Planning.   361.763 Al86c

Carvajal N., Ana Maria . Evaluating the impact of rail-trail conversion projects on property values : empirical evidence from the Illinois Prairie Path / by Ana Maria Caraval N. 1999. vi, 37 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 34-37).   796.509773 C253e

Hanley, Paul Francis, 1965- Simulating land developers’, sewer providers’, and land owners’ behavior to assess sewer expansion policies / by Paul Francis Hanley. 1999. viii, 89 leaves : ill., maps ; 28 cm. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. “The research design uses a stochastic simulation model of development behavior to capture alternative explanations of sewer provider and developer behaviors. The input data and model parameters are based on 26 years of historical data for a 12 square mile study area in Washington County, Oregon…”–p.2. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Ilinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1999. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 78-80) 1. Sewage disposal–Mathematical models. 2. Stochastic processes. 3. Sewerage–Oregon–Washington County–Mathematical models. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1999–Regional Planning.   363.7284 H194s

Okuyama, Yasuhide. Analyses of structural change : input-output approaches / by Yasuhide Okuyama. 1999. xii, 141 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1999. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 126-136). Analyzes structural change in the Chicago economy between 1980 and 1997 and the effects of the 1998 earthquake in the Hanshin region of Japan. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. 1. Input-output analysis. 2. Chicago (Ill.)–Economic conditions. 3. Hanshin region (Japan)–Economic conditions. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1999–Regional Planning.   339.23 Ok7a

Ellis, Christopher D. The effectiveness of qualitative spatial representation in supporting spatial awareness and spatial decision making / by Christopher D. Ellis. 1998. xii, 154 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 148-151). Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. 1. Space perception– Case studies. 2. Qualitative reasoning–Case studies. 3. Geographic information systems. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1998–Regional Planning.  Q.910.285El59e

Larsen, Larissa Susan. A comparison of Chicago’s scattered site and aggregate public housing residents’ psychological self-evaluations / by Larissa Susan Larsen. c1998. viii, 171 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1998. Includes bibliographical records (leaves 144-152). Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. 1. Public housing– Resident satisfaction. 2. Public housing–Illinois–Chicago–Case studies. 3. Human ecology–Case studies. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1998– Regional Planning.  Q.363.58509773L329c

Lindsey, Timothy Craig. Promoting the adoption of pollution prevention innovations with the assistance of publicly owned treatment works / by Timothy Craig Lindsey. c1998. x, 220 leaves, bound ; 28 cm. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 209-212). Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. 1. Sewage–Purification. 2. Membrane separation. 3. Pollution prevention–Case studies. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1998–Regional Planning.  Q. 628.50286 L645p

Brodjonegro, Bambang. The econometric input-output model of Jakarta, Indonesia, and its application for economic impact analysis / by Bambang Brodjonegoro. 1997. viii, 142 leaves, bound: ill.; 28 cm. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph.D.) — University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 138-141). 1. Econometric models–Indonesia–Jakarta. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1997–Regional Planning.   Q.330.015195 B784

Guo, Jiemen. Comparative study of economic structure of Chinese regional economies using new input-output techniques / by Jiemen Guo. x, 139 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 126-135).   Q. 338.951 G957c

Kim, Sung-Ho. Modeling resident satisfaction : comparison of the Francescato and Fishbein-Ajzen TRA models / by Sung-Ho Kim. 1997. xiii, 180 leaves, bound: ill.; 28 cm. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997. 1. Action theory–Research. 2. Housing– Resident satisfaction. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1997–Regional Planning.   Q.155.945 K56m, cop.2

Knowles-Yanez, Kimberley Lynne. Contested land use planning: a case study of a grassroots neighborhood organization, a medical complex, and a city / by Kimberley Lynne Knowles-Yanez. xiv, 178 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 140-144).   Q. 333.77 K764c

Miller, Claire Ellen. Managing local sustainability : a game theoretic analysis of natural resource conservation / by Claire Ellen Miller. 1997. vii, 195 leaves, bound: ill.; 28 cm. Printout. Thesis (Ph.D.) — University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 161-175). 1. Conservation of natural resources–United States. 2. Habitat conservation–United States–Planning. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1997–Regional Planning.   Q.333.72M612m

Montagu, Allen Simon. Natural resource management in Papua New Guinea : an analysis of the forestry sector / Allen Simon Montagu. xiii, 308 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 284-304).   Q. 337.75 M76n

Chin, Yoihee. Multi-stage and multi-objective allocation procedures of urban parks using location decision support system (UPLDSS). vi, 129 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 100-103).   Q. 711.5580113 C441M ;   Found in IDEALS

Ding, Chengri. Managing urban growth for efficiency in infrastructure provision : dynamic capital expansion and urban growth boundary models / by Chengri Ding. 1996. x, 118 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 112-117). Infrastructure (Economics). Capital –Management. Urban economics –Management. Theses –UIUC –1996 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International.   Q. 658.152 D613M ;   Found in IDEALS

Moore, Alan Wesley. An investigation of a collaborative meeting room supporting small group planning and decision making / by Alan Wesley Moore. x, 163 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 157-162).   Q. 658.4030285 M781I ;   Found in IDEALS

Mukherjee, Jaideep. Environment and development : a study of north-south conflict / by Jaideep Mukherjee. 1996. xvii, 274 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 264-268).  Theses –UIUC –1996 –Regional Planning. Printout.   Q. 333.70285 M896E ;  Found in IDEALS

Ortiz, Alexandra. Economic analysis of a land value capture system used to finance road infrastructure : the case of Bogota, Colombia / by Alexandra Ortiz. 1996. viii, 109 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-91). Theses –UIUC –1996 –Regional Planning. Printout.   Q. 333.332 Or8e ;   Found in IDEALS

Schintler, Laurie A. Managing pavement in a busy urban highway network / by Laurie Shintler. 1996. iii, 103 leaves, bound ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 95-99).   Q. 388.411 Sch34m ;   Found in IDEALS

Vos, Jacobus Johannes . Environmental perceptions and participation in environmental decision-making among blacks : a study of environmental justice and solid waste management planning in two Illinois counties / by Jacobus Johannes Vos. 1996. xii, 142 leaves, bound : map ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 111-118).   Q. 363.72850977 V92E ;   Found in IDEALS

Westervelt, James Dahl. Simulating mobile objects in dynamic landscape processes / by James Dahl Westervelt. 1996. ix, 144 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 105-114).  Digital computer simulation. Landscape –Computer simulation. Theses –UIUC –1996 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International.   Q. 003.3 W525S ;   Found in IDEALS

Al-Kodmany, M. Kheir Al-Din. Cultural change and urban design: women’s privacy in traditional and modern Damascus / by M. Kheir Al-Din Kodmany 1995. viii, 199 leaves, bound: ill.,maps; 28 cm. Includes bibliographic references (leaves 172-196). 1. Neighborhood–Syria–Damascus. 2. Community development–Syria–Damascus. 3. City planning–Syria–Damascus. 4. Women in Islam–Syria–Damascus. 5. Women and city planning–Syria–Damascus 6.Theses–UIUC–1995–Regional Planning. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. Vita. City Planning Call Number:   Q. 307.09569101 ;   Found in IDEALS

Dickson, Bruce C. Ecorestoration of riparian forests for nonpoint source pollution control : policy and ecological considerations in Illinois agroecosystem watersheds / by Bruce Cameron Dickson. 1995. vii, 119 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 28 cm. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1995. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 101-117). 1. Environmental policy–Illinois. 2. Ecosystem management–Illinois. 3. Water–Pollution–Illinois. 4. Riparian forests–Illinois. 5. Riparian ecology–Illinois. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1995–Regional Planning.   Q.363.73946D55E ;   Found in IDEALS

Kim, Hyong-Bok. Capacity expansion modeling of water supply in a planning support system for urban growth management / by Hyong-Bok Kim. 1995. xiv, 216 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 206-215). Water-supply –Mathematical models. Urbanization –Water-supply. Water resources development –Mathematical models. Theses –UIUC –1995 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International.   Q. 363.61011 K56C ,   Found in IDEALS

McGurty, Eileen Maura. The construction of environmental justice : Warren County North Carolina / by Eileen Maura McGurty. 1995. ix, 220 leaves, bound : maps ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 206-220). Environmental responsibility –North Carolina –Warren County. Hazardous waste sites –North Carolina –Warren County. Sanitary landfills –North Carolina –Warren County. Land use –North Carolina –Warren County. NIMBY syndrome –North Carolina –Warren County. Environmental ethics –North Carolina –Warren County.  Theses –UIUC –1995 –Regional Planning. Printout. Vita.    Q. 363.7009756 M179C ;   Found in IDEALS

Simon, Allison. Sequencing infrastructure development in the barrios marginales of Quito, Ecuador : policy findings of a hedonic price model. 1995. ix, 104 leaves, bound : col. maps ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references.   Q. 307.1409866 SI53S ; Found in IDEALS

Douglas, Judy Carol. Aesthetic-based conflict in highway planning : Federal Highway Administration putting planners at risk / by Judy Carol Douglas. 1994. xiii, 223 leaves ; ill. ; 30 cm. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1994. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 210-219). 1. Highway planning–United States. 2. Roads–United States–Design and construction. 3. Highway law–United States. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1994–Regional Planning.   Q.625.725D746A ;   Found in IDEALS

Lee, Insung. Development of procedural expertise to support multiattribute spatial decision making / by Insung Lee. 1994. xi, 153 leaves ; 29 cm. Vita. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International. Thesis ( Ph. D. )–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1994. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 144-151). 1. City planning–Computer programs 2. City planning I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1994–Regional Planning.   Q.307.1L521D ;   Found in IDEALS

Choi, Keechoo. The implementation of an integrated transportation planning model with GIS and expert systems for interactive transportation planning / by Keechoo Choi. 1993. xviii, 217 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1993. Bibliography: leaves 198-216. 1. Transportation–Planning. 2. Geographic information systems. 3. Information storage and retrieval systems–Transportation 4. Expert systems. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1993–Regional Planning.   Q.388.0285C452I ;   Found in IDEALS

Edwards, Hazel Ruth. The role of the residential environment in defining quality of life / by Hazel Ruth Edwards. 1993. xix, 402 leaves, bound : maps ; 29 cm. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Printout. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1993. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 368-394) 1. Quality of life 2. Housing–Resident satisfaction I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1993–Regional Planning.   Q.155.945ED96R ;   Found in IDEALS

Mitchell, Martin D. Changes in landscape forms and functions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 1920-1993 / by Martin D. Mitchell. xii, 329 leaves, bound : maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 297-328).   Q. 333.7153 M6946C

El-Kholei, Ahmed Osman. The role of the government in housing in developing countries : the case of Egypt / by Ahmed Osman El-Kholei. 1992. xviii, 181 leaves, bound : ill., map ; 29 cm. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1992. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 160-169). 1. Housing–Developing countries. 2. Housing–Egypt. 3. Housing–Economic aspects–Egypt. 4. Housing policy–Egypt. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1992–Regional Planning.   Q.363.5EL52R ;   Found in IDEALS

Fields, Deborah Lynn. The application of computer-aided expert decision support systems to developing countries : a case of rural development in Kenya / by Deborah Lynn Fields. 1992. xiii, 283 leaves, bound: 29 cm. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1992. Includes bibliographic references (leaves 267-281). 1. Rural development–Kenya–Decision making. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1992–Regional Planning.   Q.307.1412F46A ;   Found in IDEALS

Shiffer, Michael Joseph. A hypermedia implementation of a collaborative planning system / by Michael Joseph Shiffer. 1992. ix, 188 leaves, bound : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Printout. Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1992. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 180-184) 1. Hypermedia systems. 2. User interfaces (Computer systems) 3. City planning I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1992–Regional Planning.   Q.307.120285SH61H ;   Found in IDEALS

Almansouri, Majdi Ahmed. The role of the Friday mosque (Al-Jami) in Islamic cities / by Majdi Ahmed Almansouri. 1991. xv, 301 leaves, bound : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Printout. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1991. Includes bibliographic refernces (leaves 248-291) 1. Architecture, Islamic–Middle East 2. Cities and towns, Islamic–Middle East–Planning–History. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1991–Regional Planning.   Q.711.40956AL62R ;   Found in IDEALS

Sen, Siddhartha. Role of Indian NGO’s in housing and development : a critical appraisal / by Siddhartha Sen. 1991. vii, 204 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1991. Includes bibliographic references (leaves 187-198) 1. Poor–Housing–India. 2. Non-governmental organizations– India. 3. Community development, Urban–India. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1991–Regional Planning.   Q.363.596942SE55R ;   Found in IDEALS

Tazik, David J. Proactive management of an endangered species on army lands : the black-capped vireo on the lands of Fort Hood, Texas / by David John Tazik. 1991. x, 247 leaves, bound : ill., maps (some col.) ; 29 cm. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Printout. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1991. Includes bibliographic references (leaves 218-226) 1. Birds, Protection of–Texas–Fort Hood. 2. Black-capped vireo–Texas–Fort Hood. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1991–Regional Planning.   Q.333.954816T219P ;   Found in IDEALS

Chin, Yangkyo. Resident housing satisfaction in multi-family housing environments in Korea / by Yangkyo Chin. 1990. x, 222 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Vita. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1990. Bibiliography: leaves 118-130. 1. Housing–Resident satisfaction–Korea. 2. Apartment houses– Korea. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1990–Regional Planning.   Q.155.94509519C441R ;   Found in IDEALS

Doak, Jill Ann. Regional economic development marketing : process, preparation and organization / by Jill Ann Doak. 1990. v, 83 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Printout. Thesis (MUP)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1990. Bibliography: leaves 79-83. 1. Regional planning–Illinois–Economic aspects. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1990–Urban Planning.  Q.338.9773D65R

Han, Sang-Yun. The application of computer-based information systems to urban planning and public policy making / by Sang-Yun Han. 1990. xvi, 206 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Vita. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Printout. Thesis (Ph. D)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1990. Includes bibliographic references (leaves 188-205) 1. City planning–Decision making–Automation. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1990–Regional Planning.   Q.307.120285H19A ;   Found in IDEALS

Lai, Shih-Kung. A comparison of multiattribute decision making techniques using an iterative procedure to derive a convergent criterion / by Shih-Kung Lai. 1990. viii, 144 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Printout. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1990. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 138-141) 1. Multiple criteria decision making. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1990–Regional Planning.   Q.658.4035L14C ;   Found in IDEALS

Lee, Man-Hyung. Chinese housing policy : socio-historical analysis and policy evaluation / by Man-Hyung Lee. 1990. xi, 229 leaves, bound ; 29 cm. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Printout. Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1990. Includes bibliographic references (leaves 187-218) 1. Housing policy–China–History. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1990–Regional Planning.   Q.363.50951L514C ;   Found in IDEALS

Glosser, Deanna Simmons. Differing perceptions and the resulting uncertainty of public policy : an examination of the Clean Water Act’s Section 404 regulatory program / by Deanna Simmons Glosser. 1989. viii, 165 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Vita. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1989. Includes bibliographical references. 1. Regional planning–Decision making. 2. Water–Pollution–Law and legislation–United States. 3. Policy sciences I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1989–Regional Planning.   Q.307.12068G516D ;   Found in IDEALS

Suh, Sunduck. Implementation and evaluation of nonlinear bilevel programming model of equilibrium network design problem / by Sunduck Suh. 1989. xiii, 179 leaves, bound : ill., maps ; 29 cm. Includes bibliographical references.   Q. 388.3140113 SU36I;     Found in IDEALS

Rho, Jeong Hyun. Implementation and evaluation of a nonlinear three dimensional urban activity model / by Jeong Hyun Rho. 1988. xii, 164 leaves, bound : ill. ; 29 cm. Vita. Printout. Available on microfilm from University Microfilms. Thesis (Ph. D.)–University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1988. Includes bibliographical references. 1. Traffic congestion–Mathematical models. 2. City traffic– Illinois–Chicago. 3. Land use, Urban–Mathematical models. I. Title. Other: 1. Theses–UIUC–1988–Regional Planning.  Q.388.41310151R346I ;  Found in IDEALS

Briassoulis, Helen. An integrated modeling approach for the study of the impacts of acid deposition control regulations / by Helen Briassoulis. 1985. vii, 178 leaves ; 29 cm. Bibliography: leaves 171-177.   FILM 1985 B762 ;   Found in IDEALS

  • Locations and Hours
  • UCLA Library
  • Research Guides

Urban Planning

  • Dissertations
  • Statistics, Data and Reference
  • Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Urban Studies
  • Maps, Atlases, Aerial Images and Cartographic Resources
  • California Planning

United States and International

Ucla urban planning theses and projects.

  • Reports and Policy Papers
  • Researching Buildings
  • Transportation This link opens in a new window
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Profile Photo

  • Center for Research Libraries (CRL) Foreign Dissertations Search the CRL Catalog for dissertations already held at the Center. If a foreign dissertation is not at CRL, UCLA's Interlibrary Loan Service will request that CRL acquire it for your use. This special issue of Focus on Global Resources describes CRL's extensive collection of foreign dissertations.
  • eScholarship, University of California This link opens in a new window UC's open access repository. May include recent (2012–present) theses or dissertations not available in ProQuest. Search for author or title of the dissertation.

For research from students in UCLA's Urban Planning Program, see the below instructions for searching the Library Catalog .  Some of the projects are available full-text online, others are deposited in the SRLF.  

To locate a UCLA U.P. dissertation:

  • Do an Any Field search for dissertations urban planning ucla .
  • To see the most recent dissertations, Sort by Date — newest .
  • You can also browse dissertations by call number
  • From the Browse search screen, copy and paste the following call number LD791.9 U7; select Call Number from the drop-down menu.

To locate a UCLA M.A. thesis:

  • Do an Any Field search on thesis urban planning ucla m a
  • You can also browse theses by call number
  • From the Browse search screen, copy and paste the following call number LD 791.8 U7; select Call Number from the drop-down menu.

To locate a UCLA M.A. client project or comprehensive project:

  • Do an Any Field search on projects ucla urban planning

UCLA Urban Planning Research

  • Urban Planning Student Research Links to the undergraduate capstone projects, master's theses, comprehensive projects, applied research projects and dissertations.
  • << Previous: California Planning
  • Next: News >>
  • Last Updated: May 31, 2024 2:09 PM
  • URL: https://guides.library.ucla.edu/urban-planning

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Thesis and Dissertation

OWL logo

Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

In this section

  • How it works

researchprospect post subheader

Useful Links

How much will your dissertation cost?

Have an expert academic write your dissertation paper!

Dissertation Services

Dissertation Services

Get unlimited topic ideas and a dissertation plan for just £45.00

Order topics and plan

Order topics and plan

Get 1 free topic in your area of study with aim and justification

Yes I want the free topic

Yes I want the free topic

Urban Planning Dissertation Topics Ideas and Examples

Published by Owen Ingram at January 5th, 2023 , Revised On March 24, 2023

Urban planning is an essential tool in creating vibrant and healthy communities. It is the practice of balancing the needs of a society with limited resources to ensure equitable development and long-term sustainability. Urban planners work at all scales, from local communities to global initiatives, helping to shape cities, regions and even entire countries.

At its core, urban planning focuses on improving the quality of life through efficient use of land, transportation networks and public services such as education and healthcare facilities.

Planning can be a powerful tool in tackling social issues like poverty, inequality and environmental degradation by finding smart solutions that meet people’s needs while preserving natural resources.

This can include everything from designing walkable neighbourhoods that promote physical activity to creating green spaces that clean air pollutants out of the atmosphere.

Conducting research on urban planning topics is essential for students writing dissertations because it allows them to understand the field better while developing critical thinking skills.

Researching urban planning topics gives students insight into life within various cities and towns worldwide. Knowing how different areas have developed over time can help inform future decisions shaping our society.

Research projects give students hands-on experience conducting surveys and collecting data, which can then be used to formulate opinions about current issues facing cities and regions today.

How to Choose the Best Urban Planning Dissertation Topic

Choosing a dissertation topic for urban planning can be one of the most challenging and rewarding. It’s essential for students to take the time to carefully research and assess different topics, as this will form the basis for their entire dissertation project.

The following tips will help students choose a dissertation topic that connects with their interests while also contributing something new and exciting to urban planning literature.

  • First, students must consider what topics they are passionate about within urban planning.
  • Doing so may reveal potential research gaps or intersections, which could become their project’s focus.
  • Identifying any specific industry trends or current debates in this area is also beneficial and could provide an impetus for conducting original research.

List of Urban Planning Dissertation Topics

  • Chinese urban planning at fifty: an assessment of the planning theory literature
  • Shifting approaches to planning theory: Global North and South
  •  Disintegrated development at the rural-urban fringe: Re-connecting spatial planning theory and practice
  • Computer-supported participation in urban planning from the viewpoint of “Communicative Planning Theory.”
  • Jaqueline Tyrwhitt: a transnational life in urban planning and design
  • A serious Digital game for urban planning: “B3—Design your marketplace!”
  • The value of community informatics to participatory urban planning and design: a case study in Helsinki
  • Urban planning and development in Tehran
  • Application of system dynamics model as a decision-making tool in urban planning process toward stabilising carbon dioxide emissions from cities
  • Property, politics, and urban planning: a history of Australian city planning, 1890-1990
  • The making of urban America: a history of city planning in the United States
  • Slope instability in static and dynamic conditions for urban planning: the ‘Oltre Po Pavese’case history (Regione Lombardia–Italy)
  • The impact of sanitary reform upon American urban planning, 1840-1890
  •  The capital of Europe: Architecture and urban planning for the European Union
  • Settlement history and urban planning at Zincirli Höyük, southern Turkey
  • Urban transportation planning in the United States: history, policy, and practice
  • Beyond the colonial city: Re-evaluating the urban history of India, ca. 1920–1970
  • Shadows of planning: on landscape/planning history and inherited landscape ambiguities at the urban fringe
  • White cities, linguistic turns, and Disneylands: The new paradigms of urban history
  • Analysis of problems in urban green space system planning in China
  • Lagos (Nigeria) flooding and influence of urban planning
  • Reusing organic solid waste in urban farming in African cities: A challenge for urban planners
  • An assessment of public participation GIS and Web 2.0 technologies in urban planning practice in Canela, Brazil
  • City of change and challenge: Urban planning and regeneration in Liverpool
  • Urban planning in Russia: towards the market

What is the Importance of Choosing the Correct Urban Planning Research Topic

Urban planning is a very important topic for students to study, as it helps them understand the complexities of city life and its many related disciplines. When researching an urban planning dissertation topic, students should carefully consider their approach and the structure of their research project.

An excellent urban planning dissertation topic can help students better understand the issues, provide insight into potential solutions, and even develop new ideas for further investigation.

When selecting an urban planning dissertation topic, it is important for students to consider their interests in the subject matter. Choosing a topic that aligns with students’ interests will often result in more meaningful results and may lead to exciting discoveries.

Students should also be aware of current events or trends relevant to their chosen field, as these can provide invaluable insights into urban planning topics.

How Can ResearchProspect Help?

ResearchProspect writers can send several custom topic ideas to your email address. Once you have chosen a topic that suits your needs and interests, you can order for our dissertation outline service which will include a brief introduction to the topic, research questions , literature review , methodology , expected results , and conclusion . The dissertation outline will enable you to review the quality of our work before placing the order for our full dissertation writing service!

FAQ’s About Urban Planning Dissertation Ideas

When to choose the urban planning dissertation topic.

In terms of choosing a topic for the dissertation, students should take into account the time of their academic year. Having enough time for research is important. In case you do not have time to write your dissertation, visit our website and see our services .

How do I choose the most appropriate urban planning dissertation topic?

The best way to choose an appropriate topic is by doing research on various topics related to urban planning. Consider what research you want to do and how much time you have to write your dissertation.

Examining journals and publications that explore urban planning issues can give you ideas about potential topics for your dissertation. Additionally, attending conferences or seminars related to urban planning can provide insight into current research in this field.

Can I use these topics for my dissertation?

The topics listed here can be used for your dissertation. There are a variety of topics you can use depending on the type of research project you are doing.

Have other students used these topics already?

These dissertation topics may have already been used by other students. You can order unique dissertation topics on our website if you need topics that have never been used before.

Can ResearchProspect provide unique and customised urban planning dissertation topics?

Yes, ResearchProspect provide unique and customised Urban Planning dissertation topics.

Can you make a research proposal on my selected topic?

Yes, we can develop a research proposal for your chosen topic. On our website, you can order research proposal topics or learn more about our proposal writing services .

You May Also Like

Need interesting and manageable literature dissertation topics or thesis? Here are the trending literature dissertation titles so you can choose the most suitable one.

A good real estate dissertation requires a catchy research topic. Here is a list of 65 latest real estate dissertation topic ideas.

Need interesting and manageable sustainability and green technology dissertation topics or thesis? Here are the trending sustainability and green technology dissertation titles so you can choose the most suitable one.

USEFUL LINKS

LEARNING RESOURCES

researchprospect-reviews-trust-site

COMPANY DETAILS

Research-Prospect-Writing-Service

  • How It Works

IMAGES

  1. Planning dissertation

    dissertation of planning

  2. (PDF) Successful thesis proposals in architecture and urban planning

    dissertation of planning

  3. Essay Planning

    dissertation of planning

  4. Dissertation Process Framework With Planning And Writing

    dissertation of planning

  5. Writing dissertation with a perfect plan and structure

    dissertation of planning

  6. (PDF) Planning the Research Dissertation Project

    dissertation of planning

VIDEO

  1. So, You Are Planning to Write a Dissertation?

  2. Introduction to the Development Planning Unit

  3. How to Write Research Proposal

  4. What is Planning? Importance of Planning-Benefits/Pitfalls of Planning, Urdu/Hindi

  5. Week in my life vlog: reading slowly, working on my dissertation & planning large projects

  6. Graduate Writing: Literature Reviews

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Dissertation Planner: step-by-step

    Dissertation Planner: step-by-step. This planner is designed to help you through all the stages of your dissertation, from starting to think about your question through to final submission. At each stage there are useful prompts to help you plan your work and manage your time.

  2. PDF The Dissertation Journey

    The Dissertation Journey offers both scholarly and practical guidance about planning, writing, and defending a dissertation. Doctoral stu-dents will (1) understand it as a research study as well as a psychological and human relations venture; (2) get a clear picture of what it takes to

  3. A Guide to Dissertation Planning: Tips, Tools and Templates

    In this article, we'll outline three categories for dissertation planning including project management, note-taking and information management, alongside tools and templates for planning and researching effectively. Amirah Khan. October 13, 2022. For both undergraduates and postgraduates, a dissertation is an important piece of academic ...

  4. Dissertations 1: Getting Started: Planning

    The dissertation is a large project, so it needs careful planning. To organise your time, you can try the following: Break down the dissertation into smaller stages to complete (e.g., literature search, read materials, data collection, write literature review section…). Create a schedule.

  5. What Is a Dissertation?

    A dissertation is a long-form piece of academic writing based on original research conducted by you. It is usually submitted as the final step in order to finish a PhD program. Your dissertation is probably the longest piece of writing you've ever completed. It requires solid research, writing, and analysis skills, and it can be intimidating ...

  6. How to Write a Dissertation or Thesis Proposal

    Dissertation proposals can be up to 25-30 pages in length. Note Sometimes, a research schedule or detailed budget may be necessary if you are pursuing funding for your work. Dissertation prospectus examples. ... The writing process involves researching the topic, planning the structure, drafting the text, revising, editing and proofreading. 871.

  7. Dissertation planning

    301 Recommends: Our Dissertation Planning Essentials workshop will look at the initial stages and challenges of preparing for a large-scale dissertation project. Our Dissertation Writing workshop will break down the process of writing a dissertation and explore approaches to voice and style to help develop a way of writing academically.

  8. Planning

    Planning your dissertation can be a daunting task, but it is a critical step in ensuring your research is focused, thorough, and well-executed. The dissertation is typically the culmination of a student's academic work and represents a significant contribution to the field. A well-planned dissertation helps to ensure that the research project ...

  9. Planning your dissertation

    A dissertation is an extended piece of written work which communicates the results of independent research into a topic of your own choice. At one level all dissertations ask you to do broadly the same things: Formulate a clear question that your dissertation seeks to answer. Review the relevant literature in your field.

  10. PDF Planning an undergraduate dissertation in

    It should include: The background information to and context for your research. This often takes the form of a literature review. Explanation of the focus of your work. Explanation of the value of this work to scholarship on the topic. List of the aims and objectives of the work and also the issues which will not be covered because they are ...

  11. Planning a dissertation: the dos and don'ts

    Managing your time and staying organised. An essential component of producing a great dissertation plan is good time management. You must be able to manage your time effectively. This can be done through the adoption of two specific time management strategies: the macro-management of time, and the micro-management of time.

  12. Thesis and Dissertation: Getting Started

    Thesis and Dissertation: Getting Started. The resources in this section are designed to provide guidance for the first steps of the thesis or dissertation writing process. They offer tools to support the planning and managing of your project, including writing out your weekly schedule, outlining your goals, and organzing the various working ...

  13. Dissertation & Thesis Outline

    Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates. Published on June 7, 2022 by Tegan George.Revised on November 21, 2023. A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process.It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to ...

  14. PDF PLANNING YOUR DISSERTATION

    Planning and writing your dissertation can be overwhelming. This resource will provide you with some practical tips to effectively plan, research, write and submit your final project. The Goals of a Dissertation It is important to remember what the point of dissertation is or to know what you are supposed to achieve because it you can easily ...

  15. PDF SUGGESTED DISSERTATION OUTLINE

    Dissertation proposals should include the elements normally found in Chapters 1, 2, 3, and the References of a dissertation. Both your proposal and dissertation are major written documents that must convey complex ideas. It is your responsibility to present those ideas clearly and concisely. Both documents are also to comply

  16. Urban Studies and Planning Dissertations and Theses

    Environmental Justice in Natural Disaster Mitigation Policy and Planning: a Case Study of Flood Risk Management in Johnson Creek, Portland, Oregon, Seong Yun Cho (Dissertation) PDF Our Town: Articulating Place Meanings and Attachments in St. Johns Using Resident-Employed Photography , Lauren Elizabeth Morrow Everett (Thesis)

  17. Planning Your Dissertation

    Books. Planning Your Dissertation. Kate Williams. Bloomsbury Publishing, Aug 30, 2018 - Study Aids - 170 pages. This essential guide takes students through the planning for each stage of their dissertation, from hatching an idea to handing in their finished project. Short, succinct chapters cover everything from devising a research question and ...

  18. Dissertation Planner: Dissertation Planner

    This Dissertation Planner is a step-by-step guide to help you write a dissertation from starting to think about your question through to final submission. At each stage you will find useful tips and support. You can return to the planner by bookmarking the URL. Last Updated: Mar 13, 2024 3:14 PM;

  19. How to write a PhD thesis: a step-by-step guide

    It often starts with "But", "Yet" or "However". The third sentence says what specific research has been done. This often starts with "This research" or "I report…". The fourth sentence reports the results. Don't try to be too tricky here, just start with something like: "This study shows," or "Analysis of the data ...

  20. Dissertation Structure & Layout 101 (+ Examples)

    Time to recap…. And there you have it - the traditional dissertation structure and layout, from A-Z. To recap, the core structure for a dissertation or thesis is (typically) as follows: Title page. Acknowledgments page. Abstract (or executive summary) Table of contents, list of figures and tables.

  21. PDF Urban Planning and Design Recent Theses 2010/11-present

    Kaplan, Jennier. "Rebuildin as Opportunity: Youth Enaeme nt as Planning in Post-Tsunami Miyai." (Advisor: Abby Spinak) Ndam Njoya, Amirah. "Public Markets the Stae o Food Distribution and Urban Dialogues— The ase o Moundi Market." (Advisor: Sai alakrishnan) O'onnor, Eamon. "Sharin More Than Space: Social Integration on a Diverse Urban

  22. Doctoral Theses in Urban and Regional Planning

    The following are doctoral theses completed by individual students in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Please see Find Dissertations for more details about locating doctoral theses in general. Check the online catalog for doctoral theses not listed here.. Most call numbers and locations are given after each entry; if not available ...

  23. Dissertations

    To locate a UCLA U.P. dissertation: Do an Any Field search for dissertations urban planning ucla. To see the most recent dissertations, Sort by Date — newest. You can also browse dissertations by call number. From the Browse search screen, copy and paste the following call number LD791.9 U7; select Call Number from the drop-down menu.

  24. Thesis and Dissertation

    Thesis & Dissertation; Thesis & Dissertation Overview Thesis and Dissertation: Getting Started; Conducting a Personal IWE; Setting Goals & Staying Motivated Ways to Approach Revision; Genre Analysis & Reverse Outlining; Sentences: Types, Variety, Concision; Paragraph Organization & Flow; Punctuation; University Thesis and Dissertation Templates

  25. Urban Planning Dissertation Topic Ideas

    Published by Owen Ingram at January 5th, 2023 , Revised On March 24, 2023. Urban planning is an essential tool in creating vibrant and healthy communities. It is the practice of balancing the needs of a society with limited resources to ensure equitable development and long-term sustainability. Urban planners work at all scales, from local ...