Explore Jobs

  • Jobs Near Me
  • Remote Jobs
  • Full Time Jobs
  • Part Time Jobs
  • Entry Level Jobs
  • Work From Home Jobs

Find Specific Jobs

  • $15 Per Hour Jobs
  • $20 Per Hour Jobs
  • Hiring Immediately Jobs
  • High School Jobs
  • H1b Visa Jobs

Explore Careers

  • Business And Financial
  • Architecture And Engineering
  • Computer And Mathematical

Explore Professions

  • What They Do
  • Certifications
  • Demographics

Best Companies

  • Health Care
  • Fortune 500

Explore Companies

  • CEO And Executies
  • Resume Builder
  • Career Advice
  • Explore Majors
  • Questions And Answers
  • Interview Questions

Letter Of Interest Vs. Cover Letter: What’s The Difference?

  • Intercompany vs. Intracompany
  • Margin Account vs. Cash Account
  • Boss vs. Leader
  • Semi-monthly vs. Bi-weekly
  • Tactical vs. Strategic
  • Part-time vs. Full-time
  • Not-for-profit vs. Nonprofit
  • Stakeholder vs. Shareholder
  • Elastic vs. Inelastic
  • Amortization vs. Depreciation
  • FIFO vs. LIFO
  • Inbound vs. Outbound
  • Public vs. Private Sector
  • Stipend vs. Salary
  • Formal vs. Informal Assessment
  • Proceeds vs. Profits
  • Co-op vs. Internship
  • Transactional vs. Transformational Leadership
  • Union vs. Non-union
  • Revenue vs. Sales
  • Vertical vs. Horizontal Integration
  • Gross Sales vs. Net Sales
  • Business Casual vs. Business Professional
  • Absolute vs. Comparative Advantage
  • Salary vs. Wage
  • Income vs. Revenue
  • Consumer vs. Customer
  • Implicit vs. Explicit Costs
  • Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter
  • Cover Letter vs. Resume

Find a Job You Really Want In

So, you’re considering getting a new job. You’re weighing your options and are looking around at the companies you’d like to work for, all while polishing your resume . Now the question is: do I add a cover letter or letter of interest? Or do I need to add any sort of letter at all?

In general, it’s best to err on the side of including a letter. However, that still begs the question of which one. And, for that matter, when do you use each type of letter? The answer will depend on the circumstances of your application.

If you’re applying for a listed opening, then you want to enclose a cover letter. However, if you’re just looking to throw your hat in the ring at a particular company, then you’d send a letter of interest. Letters of interest show that you are interested in a position at that company and hope to be thought of and notified as soon as one becomes available.

Key Takeaways:

What Is a Letter of Interest?

Letters of interest are a lot less common than cover letters. You may have also heard them called an inquiry letter or a letter of introduction . As the various names imply, letters of interest are much more abstract than a cover letter.

The idea behind a letter of interest is that you’re letting the company know that you’re interested in them specifically – not so much in a particular job or getting a new position right now. What you’re looking for is being remembered – positively – so that they’re likely to think of you should a position come open.

Letters of interest are also sometimes used when you have a contact that informs you of a job that will open soon. You can send in a letter of interest as a sort of pre-application before the job opening is actually posted. That’ll put you in the running right away – if they like your letter – and show that you’re interested enough to jump on the opportunity right away.

As you’re aiming to make an impression, you want to make sure that you get a letter of interest right. That also means it should be pithy; letters of interest aren’t usually longer than a page. Make sure you:

Do your research. The point of this letter is to tell the company that you want to work for them in particular. Make it clear that you know some about the company in question, e.g., their goals, their culture, and their achievements.

Learn who the right person to send it to and address it to them. This just further shows that you’re the type of person who does their homework. It’s also important not to send it to someone who won’t even bother to read it, as it isn’t their job. In addition, making letters more personalized makes them more likely to be remembered.

Showcase your qualifications. Don’t be shy in a letter of interest. Think of it as a sales pitch; you’re telling the company why they want you in particular.

Bring up any relevant experience. Experience is a major selling point in job applications, and letters of interest are no exception. Be sure to point out what experience you have that will make you a good addition to their team.

And don’t be afraid to talk about yourself. In a letter of interest, you’re looking to be remembered and showcase yourself rather than point out how well you fit into a particular position.

This means that you need to introduce yourself and point out how your personality meshes well with the company culture , the job opening you’re expecting, or how your skill set is especially impressive.

Thank the recipient for their time. This is especially important with a letter of interest. This won’t be for a job that they’re looking to fill right now, so they’ll be taking time out of their schedule for something that isn’t immediately relevant.

That’s also why it’s important to make a letter of interest punchy – you don’t want them to feel that you wasted their time.

For example:

Dear Mr. Stanley Jones, My name is June Cooper, I’m a recent graduate from Mary Baldwin University with a degree in English, and I’m looking for a position in the marketing department. For the past five years, I have heard a tremendous number of positive things about Bright Electronics. Your innovative way of thinking and attention to detail in the field is precisely the environment that I would love to work in. For the past two years, I’ve been working as an administrative assistant . I’m sure that my ability to keep track of deadlines and my writing skills will make me an ideal candidate for this position and your company. I’d love to be considered for this position and the opportunity to work closely with you. Please let me know if you have any questions or need me to provide any additional information. Thank you for your time and consideration. Best regards, June Cooper LinkedIn [email protected] 555-555-5555

What Is a Cover Letter?

A cover letter is a letter that is included when you submit an application for a particular job opening. Often it goes with your resume and does the job of fleshing out your soft skills a bit, as well as showing your interest in the company you’re applying to.

Cover letters tend to be short and to the point; they shouldn’t be longer than a page. That means it’s vital to put in what’s important and leave out anything extraneous.

In a cover letter, you should:

Address it as personal as possible. If you know the manager’s name, address it to them directly. If not, then try to find out. This is a way of showing that you research the company you’re applying to.

Not all businesses will list the right person, or it may be unclear. So, if you’re unsure, then address it as best as you can, following business letter etiquette.

List soft skills and experience that didn’t fit well in your resume. Don’t be a braggart, but don’t forget that you’re trying to sell yourself to the company. Not all skills and experience will fit nicely inside a resume due to the format of them, so don’t be afraid to list relevant skills and experience here.

Mention why you think you’ll be a good fit. This generally goes in the last paragraph. Talk about the job or the company and how you think you’d be an asset to them. Hiring managers go through a lot of cover letters and resumes – they’ll take note of those who make an effort to personalize them.

Thank the recipient for their time. It’s important to realize that the person you’re writing to is taking time to read your letter. Be sure to thank them for their time and consideration. They’re likely to remember the polite gesture, even if they choose not to hire you. And it’s never good to be remembered as rude or unthoughtful.

Samantha Gordon 4200 Cypress St. Charlottesville, VA 22903 Phone: (847) 445-9607 Email: [email protected] University of Virginia School of Medicine Dear Mr. James Freeman, I am writing about the intermediate administrative assistant position listed on your human resources site. Administration is an area where I believe I will be very effective. I am organized, enjoy challenges, and have a level of autonomy, as well as strong interpersonal skills. Being an aspiring novelist , I am used to long-term projects and have spent considerable time strengthening my written communication and typing speed, as well as being extremely proficient with Microsoft Word and OpenOffice Writer . I am also practiced at altering plans and problem-solving, as I’ve had to come up with the most effective techniques and lessons for each client I’ve had in dog training. I have long wished to work at the University of Virginia, as I have great respect for institutions of learning. I am hoping to make a lasting career with an institution I respect. The field of medicine has always interested me, and I would enjoy learning more about it in my occupation. Working in conjunction with the pediatrics department would also be a fulfilling role to be in, as it would give me a sense of being able to help make a difference in people’s lives. Thank you for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you. Samantha Gordon

Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter FAQ

How do you address a letter of interest to the hiring manager?

It’s best to address a letter of interest directly to the hiring manager by using their full name. As a letter of interest implies a special interest in this company, in particular, using a generic “to whom it may concern” or “dear sir/madam” is likely to make them think that you didn’t do your research.

Most company websites will list who their hiring managers are, but if that fails, you can always try LinkedIn. If you can’t find it that way, then you can always try calling the company. If you’re willing to take the time to do that so that you can properly address your letter of interest, it’ll likely reflect well on you.

What are informational interviews for letters of interest?

Informational interviews are interviews done with current employees to find out more about the company. If it’s specifically for a letter of interest, then it’ll be focused on finding out how to write an excellent letter of interest.

That means you want information about the company and the hiring manager so that you can address it properly and highlight relevant skills and experience that you possess.

How often should I send letters of interest?

Letters of interest should be sent out regularly. Any time you run into a company that you believe you’d like to work for, you can send them a letter of interest. However, be sure to see if they have a relevant position already listed before doing this, as it could reflect poorly on you if they do; it’ll show a lack of attention to detail .

It should also be noted that many online systems don’t have any real way to send letters of interest. Be sure to check the company guidelines to make sure that they don’t ask prospective employees not to send letters of interest. Ignoring their request will not endear you to the hiring manager.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating / 5. Vote count:

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

' src=

Di has been a writer for more than half her life. Most of her writing so far has been fiction, and she’s gotten short stories published in online magazines Kzine and Silver Blade, as well as a flash fiction piece in the Bookends review. Di graduated from Mary Baldwin College (now University) with a degree in Psychology and Sociology.

Recent Job Searches

  • Registered Nurse Jobs Resume Location
  • Truck Driver Jobs Resume Location
  • Call Center Representative Jobs Resume Location
  • Customer Service Representative Jobs Resume
  • Delivery Driver Jobs Resume Location
  • Warehouse Worker Jobs Resume Location
  • Account Executive Jobs Resume Location
  • Sales Associate Jobs Resume Location
  • Licensed Practical Nurse Jobs Resume Location
  • Company Driver Jobs Resume

Related posts

cover letter statement of interest difference

Parameter Vs. Statistic: What’s The Difference?

cover letter statement of interest difference

Ph.D. Vs. MD: What’s The Difference?

cover letter statement of interest difference

OLTP Vs. OLAP: What’s The Difference?

cover letter statement of interest difference

Sample Vs. Population: What’s The Difference?

  • Career Advice >
  • Business Terms >
  • Letter Of Interest Vs Cover Letter

Frantically Speaking

Letter of Interest Vs Cover Letter (The Difference with Examples)

Hrideep barot.

  • Workplace Communication

Letter of Interest Vs Cover Letter

Letter of interest vs cover letter comes down to whether an open position is there for what you wish to apply for. If not, it’s a letter of interest and you do not have a job description to go by. Consequently, if an open position is there, then it’s a cover letter and you have a concrete job description to frame your content around.

We will first consider the definitions and how to write a letter of interest and a cover letter. Following this, we will talk about the main focus of this article- letter of interest vs cover letter and use examples to make this clear.

What is a letter of interest?

It is a letter that expresses interest in working for an organization. The main characteristic of this letter is that it is sent in the absence of an open position that fits what you’re looking for. For instance, you are trained as a software engineer but the current job openings do not include it, so you write a letter of interest.

It is also called a letter of inquiry or intent.

How do you write a letter of interest?

You start off with an introduction where you also state where your interest is coming from. Then you move on to the main body where you talk about what sort of role you’re looking for and how you’re what the organization needs. Lastly, you conclude by adding how you can be contacted for any details and that you look forward to hearing from them.

Before we delve into the structure, here are some pointers to keep in mind:

  • Focus on the company and what makes you apply to them in particular as opposed to some other company
  • Introduce your background briefly
  • Talk about your skills and experiences in terms of how they can benefit the company generally as well as in terms of any specific difficulty it has been facing
  • make sure to mention that you’re open to a discussion because the lack of job openings means they will need to evaluate you properly to find out what fits you

Now, let’s see the structure:

Introduction

Should include, in brief:

  • Why you have written the letter (i.e., are there any job opportunities?)
  • Current employment status (e.g., grad of B.Tech, working in tech for x years)
  • Where your interest came from (e.g., saw on television, connected with a current employee, heard from college)

Should include, in some detail:

  • What role you’re interested in
  • What skills, experiences, certifications, etc make you suitable (attach CV or Resume to support this)? You would be able to create or rewrite a letter of interest using ChatGPT as well. Here is an article on how to use prompts to get that done.
  • Lastly, if you’re flexible about the role, mention that and give them a good idea of your skillset so they can check if they have something that you do qualify for.

Should include, very concisely:

  • Your interest in discussing this further
  • How you can be contacted
  • How you’re looking forward to being contacted

What is a cover letter?

It is a letter that expresses interest in working for an organization. In this case, there is a job opening available . Hence, the reason you write it is to make the employer interested enough in you to read your resume or CV. For instance, you saw that the company is hiring for a position through their site so you email them with a cover letter.

How do you write a cover letter?

This is very similar to when you write a letter of interest. The main difference is that since the job requirement is clear, you can also be clear about how your skills and experiences match those requirements. You can frame your cover letter on the basis of the job description.

Here’s an article on how you can write your own cover letter along with examples.

Here are some pointers to keep in mind when writing a cover letter:

  • Make sure your skills, experiences, and interests all relate back to the job description. This will indicate to the hiring personnel that you’re right for the job.
  • Focus on how you can contribute to the organization with your characteristics. This should give an idea of what you can do well.
  • Add characteristics about yourself that set you apart from other applicants, be it soft skills or technical skills.
  • Use formal communication, being informal in a cover letter can appear unprofessional.

Also, note that headlines can have a powerful impact when writing cover letters. Check out this article to know more about headlines and examples for the same.

Difference between letter of interest and cover letter

What is the difference between a letter of interest and a cover letter?

As mentioned earlier, a letter of interest conveys interest in working for a particular organization in the absence of any explicitly mentioned job openings that you fit into. On the other hand, a cover letter addresses a particular position that the company has declared to be vacant in a posting.

Example 1: a letter of interest and then a cover letter to Google as a person with an engineering background.

I’m writing to say how eager I am to join Google. Coming from an engineering background, I have been working jobs in this field for 5 years now. My intrigue with your company dates back to my college days when I attended several of your eye-opening seminars, and I also keep hearing great things about the work culture from current employees. 

I am interested in the role of software engineering lead because I am highly specialized in [your specialization] and have been trained in this field comprehensively over the years. In my work journey, I have always been passionate about creative solutions, which I understand is a driving force at Google. I am proficient with [various engineering-related skills]. As evidenced by my past experiences, I am good at working with teams and my co-workers usually consider me to be quite reliable as a leader. Having worked in highly diverse work environments, I’m good at collaborating with others and getting things done.

I am attaching my resume for your reference and would love to discuss this further and demonstrate to you how my skills can prove valuable to the team. Please get in touch at [email] or [phone number] if needed. Looking forward to hearing from you.

Thank you for your time.

[Your Full Name]

[Attachment: Resume/CV]

Now, see the cover letter of the same, with changes being bolded:

I’m writing to say how eager I am to join the software engineering lead role at Google. Coming from an engineering background, I have been working jobs in this field for 5 years now. I have always taken a keen interest in your company after attending a few of its seminars back in college, and keep hearing great things about its work culture from current employees. 

I am interested in the role of software engineering lead because I am highly specialized in [your specialization] and have been trained in this field comprehensively over the years. In my work journey, I have always been passionate about creative solutions, which I understand is a driving force at Google. I am proficient with [various engineering-related skills mentioned in the job description] . I also think I would be a good fit for this role because [mention how your experience matches job requirements]. As evidenced by my past experiences, I am good at working with teams and my co-workers usually consider me to be quite reliable as a leader. Having worked in highly diverse work environments, I’m good at collaborating with others and getting things done.

I am attaching my resume for your reference. I would love to discuss this further and demonstrate to you how my skills can prove valuable to the team. Please get in touch at [email] or [phone number] if needed. Looking forward to hearing from you.

Example 2: a letter of interest and then a cover letter to a company as a fresher.

I’m writing to say how eager I am to join [company name]. As a recent graduate of [course name] from [university name], I’m incredibly passionate about [field name]. I have always taken a keen interest in your company because [mention reasons]. 

I am interested in the role of [role name]. My coursework including [module names] has helped me be proficient in [skills]. I have always been passionate about [write based on the role you’re interested in]. Although I do not have concrete work experience yet, I take an active role in learning and work well in teams.

Now, see the cover letter variant (changes have been bolded)

I’m writing to say how eager I am to join the role of [role name] at [company name]. As a recent graduate of [course name] from [university name], I’m incredibly passionate about [field name]. I have always taken a keen interest in your company because [mention reasons]. 

My coursework including [module names] has helped me be proficient in [skills mentioned in the role description] . I have always been passionate about [write based on the role you’re interested in]. Although I do not have concrete work experience yet, I take an active role in learning and work well in teams. [Try to mention a few more things that you can contribute well to based on the job description].

We covered what is a letter of interest and a cover letter, how to write these, and the difference between these along with examples to demonstrate it. We hope that the letter of interest vs cover letter distinction is clear by now.

Interested in public speaking? Check out coaching to know more and get a start on speaking amazingly.

Hrideep Barot

Enroll in our transformative 1:1 Coaching Program

Schedule a call with our expert communication coach to know if this program would be the right fit for you

cover letter statement of interest difference

7 Keys to Emcee Like a Pro: Unlock Your Hosting Potential

control noise while speaking

8 Ways to Rise Above the Noise to Communicate Better

how to negotiate

How to Negotiate: The Art of Getting What You Want

cover letter statement of interest difference

Get our latest tips and tricks in your inbox always

Copyright © 2023 Frantically Speaking All rights reserved

Kindly drop your contact details so that we can arrange call back

Select Country Afghanistan Albania Algeria AmericanSamoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Colombia Comoros Congo Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Rwanda Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Tajikistan Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe land Islands Antarctica Bolivia, Plurinational State of Brunei Darussalam Cocos (Keeling) Islands Congo, The Democratic Republic of the Cote d'Ivoire Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Guernsey Holy See (Vatican City State) Hong Kong Iran, Islamic Republic of Isle of Man Jersey Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Lao People's Democratic Republic Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Macao Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Mozambique Palestinian Territory, Occupied Pitcairn Réunion Russia Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan Da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Sao Tome and Principe Somalia Svalbard and Jan Mayen Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tanzania, United Republic of Timor-Leste Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Viet Nam Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, U.S.

Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: Differences & Which Is Best

A letter of interest is sent as an open job application. Meaning, you're interested in applying for a job even if it’s not being promoted but cover letters…

cover letter statement of interest difference

Cover letter vs letter of interest – aren’t they both the same thing? In this article, we’ll be covering all that you need to know about each type of letter without mixing one with the other. 

Imagine getting accepted to work for your dream company. 

Whether that’s Tesla, Apple, or Spotify… You decide to see if there are any vacant job positions online on a job board or careers page. 

One company is actively hiring whereas the other isn’t. 

Could you still send an application to both companies? 

The answer is yes. But the form of application you’d send to the company that isn’t actively hiring is a letter of interest. 

So cover letter vs letter of interest… Let's go through the differences, including how to write the latter. 

What is a Letter of Interest?

A letter of interest (or known as a letter of intent) is a job application letter used for inquiring about career opportunities for a specific organization. 

They’re usually sent alongside an attached resume for a job vacancy that isn’t currently being promoted. In other words, you might not find the role you’re applying for on their website careers page nor on a job board.

Professionals use this to introduce themselves to their dream company. It shows they’re interested in working specifically for them.

What is a Cover Letter?

Cover letters are job application letters sent along with your resume too. 

Your resume is your primary application. The objective of your cover letter is to reinforce it. This means it’s there to help you highlight your professional skills and background by explaining why you’re a good fit.

The Difference Between a Cover Letter and Letter of Interest

The biggest distinction between a cover letter and a letter of interest is their purpose. 

A cover letter is a document that accompanies a job application and typically introduces the applicant, highlights their relevant skills and experiences, and explains why they are a good fit for the job. It is usually targeted to a specific job opening and is meant to convince the employer to invite the applicant for an interview.

A letter of interest, on the other hand, is a document that expresses an applicant's interest in working for a company, even if there is no specific job opening at the time. It may outline the applicant's skills and experiences, but the emphasis is on expressing enthusiasm for the company and a desire to contribute to its goals. A letter of interest may lead to a conversation about potential job opportunities, but it is not as focused on a specific job opening as a cover letter.

It’s subtle but the driving force behind them is as follows:

  • Letters of interest focus on your intentions and why you want to work for the company. 
  • Cover letters focus on why you’re the best person to hire for the job.

elements of a letter of interest

The Essentials of a Letter of Interest

In terms of the format for a letter of interest, it’s pretty much similar to a cover letter as it’s made up of the following:

  • Header section
  • Opening paragraph
  • Closing paragraph

What makes it different from a cover letter though, is the contents within each section. 

You’re not writing for an available vacancy. Instead, it’s tailored towards a specific position that isn’t currently being advertised or promoted. Therefore, there should be more emphasis on why you’re interested in working for them specifically and what makes you a good company fit. 

Letter of Interest Sample

letter of interest example

In the above cover letter template , the candidate states the position and company they’re interested in. Then, they introduce themselves by providing a brief background of their professional skills. They also make it clear why they’re making an application. 

At this stage, hiring managers aren’t actively looking for a new employee. That’s why it’s important to set the agenda and make the purpose of your letter clear. 

After the opening paragraph, they begin to focus on showing why they match the job position they seek. This is shown throughout the letter while displaying interest by describing the value they have to offer in phrases such as:

  • “My ability to work as a team player… have allowed me to excel in the field of Human Resources”
  • “What I would bring to the position includes…”
  • “I would come to work every day determined to fulfill Amazon’s vision…”
  • “In review of your team’s objectives…”

In the closing paragraph, they’ve tied it all back to the company objectives. You’ll notice too that they’ve referred back to the company’s mission statement alongside their business culture.

This time, we’ll analyze how cover letters are written and pick up on some key points. 

You’ll find that there are no huge differences between the two and that they’re both pretty similar to one another.

The Essentials of a Cover Letter

The format of a cover letter includes:

Compared to a letter of interest, you’re more focused on explaining why you’re best suited for the role. There’ll usually be more emphasis on the job description criteria rather than the company values (although this is an area that should still be focused on).

Cover Letter Sample

Cover letter example

Compared to the letter of interest example, the format is quite similar. 

You’ll notice the cover letter still talks about where the candidate’s enthusiasm comes from. 

However, it doesn’t revolve around the candidate’s interest and the company values as much. It revolves more around how and why they’re the best person for the job. As opposed to focusing on the company culture, it mainly focuses on their skills and what to write in a resume for work experience . 

How to Write a Letter of Interest

Your letter of interest lets employers know why they should value you as a professional. Aside from showcasing your desire to work for them, you’ll need to support your points by emphasizing some of your career highlights. 

Here’s the step-by-step process to follow! 

1. Know the Background Information

The background information includes the following:

  • Company culture
  • Mission statement
  • Social media profiles
  • Team members

It also includes being familiar with some of the content the organization has posted. This is important for not just showing you’re genuinely intrigued by what they’re doing. But to match their values. 

2. Use the Background Information in Your Letter

It’s time to put your research to use. 

For example, greet your employer by their name. On top of getting their attention, it indicates your level of interest alongside your research skills. 

Since you’re inquiring about working for an organization that isn’t actively hiring, you need a good reason why you’re making the application. That doesn’t just mean endlessly telling them about yourself and flattering them. It’s about showing how you’d be a committed asset that can help them reach their goals. 

3. Share Where Your Interest Comes From

What was the driving factor that made you reach out? 

This is a good way to get your reader curious from the start of your letter. Yes, you know a thing or two about them… 

But the next part is to focus on what that’s got to do with you. 

For instance, was there a recent post or project you saw that’s relevant to your skillset or career goals? Essentially, you’re using some of the details from the previous step with your reason for wanting to work with them to hook your hiring manager in. 

4. Clarify Your Interest

You’ve already mentioned where your interest comes from. 

Clarifying it means making it clear what you’re after (i.e. seeking a job opportunity) and why you’re after it. Be as specific as you can because it’s likely that they’re receiving all types of requests left and right. 

That said, do keep your letter of interest concise. Respect the company’s time and get straight to the point. 

5. Showcase Your Career Highlights

You’ve shown you know your stuff about the company. 

The next step is to showcase your career highlights to prove you’re someone that’s a good fit. Without any evidence of how you’d be beneficial, it won’t make yourself compelling enough to consider hiring. 

So, sell yourself. Demonstrate how you’d be valuable to their organization by sharing the following:

  • Workplace achievements
  • Qualifications

6. Link Back to the Company’s Needs

How will your strengths help to meet the needs of the company you’re applying for?

Reflect on what the company is working towards. It’s effective to link your skills back to their mission as well as what they’re looking to achieve. If you emphasize the fact you know what it takes to get results, it can make you stand out as a professional.

7. Make the Next Steps Clear

State how you’d like to proceed. That could mean following up via email or requesting a meeting to discuss further. 

Try to avoid using standard generic phrasing to reiterate your interest. On top of exuding self-confidence, it can impress your employers by the fact you’re not only skilled. But that you’re passionate enough about wanting to be of service. 

Do Letters of Interest Actually Work?

Yes, they work. It’s a good route to take when you’re looking to make a targeted application for a dream company you want to work for. To maximize your chances, you’ll need to show you’re an ideal fit in terms of both professional skills and company culture. 

Should You Use a Cover Letter or Letter of Interest?

If you’re applying for a specific position in the company that isn’t currently available but you’re open to future opportunities, use a letter of interest. But if you’re applying for an open job vacancy, use a cover letter . Even if they’re not requested by your employer, you can still send them along with your resume. 

In other words, only send a letter of interest to a company that isn't marketing an available job vacancy. Compared to a cover letter, this type of application is more long-term.

Tips for Writing a Letter of Interest

Showing no enthusiasm for a potential career opportunity doesn’t leave a good impression on your hiring manager. 

At the same time, you don’t want to sound too desperate. That’s what the tips below are for. 

Align With The Company Culture

There’s better chemistry and engagement when employees are fulfilled. It also helps to cultivate a positive environment, which leads to better work performance.

Part of the criteria of an ideal employee is someone that cares about the company’s success. These are the people who are passionate about achieving the set targets and goals. They’re also the type of people who are more likely to stay.

Use Your Personal Background 

Outside of your professional summary , do you have other relevant life experiences?

Personality traits or hobbies that align with the job and company values position you as someone who matches the role. It helps you stand out because you have something new to bring to the table. 

State Your Intentions & Motivations

Why are you applying for this specific company?

Let your employers know what you’re after. When your resume objectives correspond with the company’s goals, it can spark an interest in wanting to read the rest of your application. Even better if you could support your answer with previous experiences and accomplishments that prove your value. 

Action Verbs and Power Words 

Weak action verbs resume are words that convey action. It’s an easy yet effective way to add spice to your letter. These emphasize your impact and contributions when describing previous duties and responsibilities. 

Likewise, resume buzzwords to avoid make certain points stand out. 

Both types of words can improve your letter by making it twice more engaging when used in the right context. 

Include a Personalized Call to Action

Personalize your call to action at the end of your letter by tying it back to your intentions and the company’s needs. 

Here are a few example sentences:

  • “I believe that my proven experience and passion for digital marketing will…”
  • “I am confident that my skills, experience, and enthusiasm will be a great asset to…”

Then, clarify the next steps moving forward. 

For instance:

  • “I look forward to the opportunity to discuss how my experience would be…”
  • “I am available to discuss this position in more detail at a convenient time”

Improve Your Chances of Getting a Positive Response From Employers

Cover letters and letters of interest alike help you improve your chances of securing your next career opportunity. 

However, creating a personalized application takes time. 

It’s recommended to apply to as many ideal companies as you can to maximize your chances of getting an interview. 

To put it another way, it’s a numbers game. 

But even though quantity is important, you still need to maintain quality. We understand it’s difficult when you have other commitments…

You can do both at the same time though. Without having to spend hours writing and researching.

All you need to know is the following details:

  • Company name
  • Position/title
  • Previous job position highlight
  • Skills highlight

Then, Rezi’s AI writer will take care of the rest. 

Explore Rezi 🔥 Comes with 5,000 AI Credits, and is free forever, no credit card required.

Or, see below for a live demonstration of how to instantly generate a cover letter or letter of interest.

cover letter statement of interest difference

Cover letters are used for available job openings whereas letters of interest are used for a role that isn’t being advertised. While there’s a small distinction between their purposes, both will still highlight your value as a professional. 

Don’t be afraid to send your application details to a company that’s not currently recruiting. 

There’s no harm in trying to get in front of your dream company. At the very least, you’ll get to introduce yourself with the possibility of getting a positive response. 

Like how the saying goes, “if you don’t ask, you don’t get!”

Rezi is an ai resume builder to help you to create a resume that os sure to check the boxes when it comes to applicant tracking systems : Rezi Review by Ashley

Astley Cervania

Astley Cervania is a career writer and editor who has helped hundreds of thousands of job seekers build resumes and cover letters that land interviews. He is a Rezi-acknowledged expert in the field of career advice and has been delivering job success insights for 4+ years, helping readers translate their work background into a compelling job application.

ResumeKit logo

Resume builder

Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: Difference, Tips and Examples

Applying for the job of your dreams can be stressful — but it doesn’t have to be. With the right tools by your side, you will stay focused and composed even through the toughest application process.

But where do you start? We suggest you start at the beginning and build a strong application base — this includes a strong resume, cover letter and letter of intent. Below, we will look into the differences between a cover letter and a letter of interest and focus on the best practices for writing them both.

Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: Difference, Tips and Examples

Table of Contents

What is the difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest?

The primary difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest is the purpose for which the letter is written.

A letter of interest is sent as an open offer and indicates that you are interested in working for a specific company in a potentially available role that matches your skillset and experience.

A cover letter, on the other hand, is typically sent out alongside your resume in response to a specific vacancy advertised by the company.

Basically, letters of interest focus on why you want to work for this company. Cover letters aim to explain why you are the best candidate for a specific job.

Cover letter example

cover letter example

Letter of interest example

Letter of interest example

How to write a letter of interest?

As we’ve mentioned above, when you write a letter of interest, you are not applying for a specific position. Instead, you are expressing your interest in working for a particular company.  Because of this, your job with the letter of interest is to emphasize that you have the overall skillset that would be beneficial to the company you are applying for. If there is a specific position you are aiming for, you can also try to tailor your letter of interest to that specific post and highlight relevant qualifications.

So, then what is the purpose of a cover letter?  Compared to the letter of interest, a cover letter is typically sent alongside your resume ( here’s how to write a resume ) and is used to apply for a specific position — you will typically send the resume and cover letter combo in reply to an advertised job offer. A cover letter is basically a collection of selling points that will get the recruiter interested in reading the rest of your application. Here’s how to write a cover letter . 

Let’s see how to best structure a letter of interest

First paragraph: introduction.

You should start off your letter of intent by introducing yourself and explaining what kind of work you do. This is also where you should explain why you are passionate about working for this company and what problems you can help them solve.

You can mention here that you know that they are not currently recruiting — but you may have the skillset and expertise that they wouldn’t want to miss out on.

Second paragraph: work experience

In this paragraph, you will need to pull out all the stunts to impress the recruiter with your experience and expertise. The goal is to make yourself as memorable as possible so that the recruiter will think of you the moment a position opens up.

In this part of your letter of interest, it’s best to focus on concrete achievements you’ve had in previous positions. You can mention the biggest projects you’ve worked on and how they’ve benefited the company, a crisis situation that you’ve handled, the amount of new business you’ve brought to the company — and more.

It’s also a good place to mention your most valued skills (foreign languages you speak, software you can use, personality traits that make you a good professional, etc.).

Third paragraph: call to action

Now it’s time to ask the reader of your letter to act. Think of what kind of outcome you are expecting out of your letter. Do you want them to email you, invite you for an interview, offer feedback on your letter, etc.

Include your most reliable contact information. Even if you have your email and phone in the header of your letter, you can repeat them here.

Tips for writing a letter of interest

When reading your letter of interest, the hiring manager should feel your enthusiasm and passion for working for their company. The tips below can help you make sure your enthusiasm and passion come through in your application.

  • Personalize your application . This is one of the most important factors when it comes to the success of your application. Make sure you study the company you are applying for, learn about their mission and company culture. Then, do your best to make these elements come through in your letter of intent to illustrate that you are a good match for the in-company environment.
  • Leverage your background . Include specific examples from your work experience that have allowed you to become a better professional. Avoid generalities and be as specific as possible — this will let the hiring professional see that you are genuinely passionate about your job and plan to bring all of your expertise to the new position.
  • Explain your motivation . Another important piece of information to include is what has motivated you to write this letter and why you want to work for this specific company. This can include your career goals and how they align with the position you are applying for.

Letter of intent vs letter of interest

Even though these two terms are sometimes used interchangeably, there is actually a slight difference between the letter of interest and the letter of intent. This difference lies in the nature of commitment.

Basically, a letter of intent shows a higher degree of commitment compared to a letter of interest. It states your intentions to work for this particular company — and you may even have a particular role in mind. It’s very similar to a letter of interest in the sense that you should focus on why you want to work for this specific company. However, a letter of intent is more “serious” than a letter of interest and signifies that this company is your first and sometimes only choice.

Summing thins up

  • A letter of interest is a letter that aims to express your interest in working for a particular company and inquire about potential employment opportunities.
  • A cover letter is a letter that you send together with your resume when applying for a specific position. It serves as a brief introduction of your best qualities and aims to “sell” your application and get the recruiter interested.
  • A letter of intent is similar to the letter of interest but presupposes a stronger level of commitment.

We hope that this has been helpful and you are now one step closer to landing the job of your dreams. Learn more about the application process in our blog. Here’s the next read we suggest: Cover Letter vs. Resume: What’s the Difference ?

Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: What Is the Difference?

Quick Navigation:

What is a letter of interest?

What is a cover letter, letter of interest vs. cover letter, how to write a letter of interest.

Although they have similarities, a letter of interest and a cover letter are two distinctly different documents. While both are used for the end goal of obtaining a job, they have varying purposes and should have different content. Learn more about the differences between a letter of interest and cover letter, when you should use each type of letter and what to include in them.

A letter of interest is a document that someone seeking a job sends to a company that they wish to work for. The letter explains the sender’s interest in working for the company, introduces the sender and usually asks for information about job opportunities. A letter of interest can also be called a prospecting letter or a letter of inquiry.

A cover letter is a document that a job candidate sends as part of an application for a certain position. A cover letter accompanies the applicant’s resume and should detail the sender’s explanation for why they are a good fit for the open position.

The main differences between a letter of interest and a cover letter include:

Timing of the letter

A letter of interest can be sent at any time. It is usually sent when the company has not advertised any open positions, but the sender wants to communicate their interest in working for the company anyway. Since many jobs are filled internally or through networking before they are posted publicly, sending a letter of interest can help you discover job opportunities that are not public yet or will not be made public.

A cover letter is sent in response to an open position advertised by a company. 

Purpose of the letter

The purpose of a letter of interest is to communicate the sender’s desire to work for the company and to ask for information about whether there might be job opportunities available now or in the future. Occasionally, a letter of interest is used to ask for more information or additional opportunities besides the open jobs that are already posted.

The purpose of a cover letter is to apply for a specific open position at a company.

Accompanying material with the letter

Since a letter of interest is not applying for a certain position, it can be sent as a stand-alone document or with a resume.

A cover letter should always be sent in addition to a resume and any other application materials the job advertisement requested, such as letters of recommendation, transcripts, proof of certifications, portfolios or other qualifications.

The content of a letter of interest is more general than a cover letter. It should express the sender’s interest in the company and provide a general explanation of skills and experience that could add value to the company.

A cover letter’s content should be specific to the open position, explaining in more detailed terms than the accompanying resume why the applicant is an excellent candidate for the role. It should include a statement of what position the sender is applying to and focus on their education, work experience and skills that are relevant to that position.

If you want to send a letter of interest to a company, consider using these steps:

1. Firstly, research the company

Before composing your letter of interest, you should thoroughly research the company you want to send it to. Your letter will be more effective if you understand the company’s purpose and needs and can tailor its content to that information. It will also be more effective if you can find a specific person to address your letter to, instead of ‘To Whom It May Concern’ or ‘Dear Hiring Manager.’

You should also research whether you have any contacts at the company or know anyone who has contacts there and could assist you. You could ask your contact to introduce you to someone at the company or ask their permission to use their name as a way of introducing yourself in your letter.

2. Secondly, begin with a brief introduction

After the opening greeting of your letter, you can begin by briefly stating your name and who you are. This should only be one or two sentences, as you will explain more about yourself later.

3. Thirdly, state and explain your interest in the company

Immediately after your brief introduction, you should explain the purpose of your letter by stating your interest in the company. Use your research to show that you understand the company’s current state, mission and goals. It is good to be complimentary in this section (without overpraising) to communicate your sincere admiration and interest in the business. Explain why you are interested in working for the company by giving details about the work the company is doing. Focus this section more on the company than on yourself.

4. Fourthly, describe how you can add value to the company 

The most important part of a letter of interest is connecting your interest in the company with your value to the company. Include a general description of your background, including education, work experience and skills, but focus on transferable skills or employability skills to communicate that you could be an asset to any area of the company. You can include your resume with the letter to provide the recipient with more particular details of your qualifications.

You can also use your knowledge of the company to propose a specific way that you could help or benefit them or solve a problem within their business.

5. Then, request to be considered  

After explaining your interest and value, directly request information about possible job opportunities and to be considered for those job opportunities. You can also ask for a meeting or phone call with the letter’s recipient to discuss your value proposition and any opportunities in person.

6. Next, use a professional format 

When you have composed the main content of the letter, take some time to make sure it’s presented professionally. Use a business letter format, including a formal heading, greeting, closing phrase and signature. Make sure your contact information is accurate and easy to find on the page. Keep the letter to the length of one page only.

7. Finally, proofread carefully

Before sending the letter, closely edit and proofread it. Revise any typos, grammatical mistakes or inaccurate information to ensure that you make a good impression on the reader.

  • Knowledge Base
  • Free Resume Templates
  • Resume Builder
  • Resume Examples
  • Free Resume Review

Is a letter of interest same as a cover letter?

If you are a job seeker confused between a letter of interest and a cover letter, you are not alone.

While both these letters are formal letters written to a recruiter you want to work for, the purpose of these letters is different.

A letter of interest is written to express your interest in working for a company before the company advertises a job opening.

Whereas, a cover letter is written as an accomplice to support your resume for a specific job vacancy at a company.

So, to address the question directly, a letter of interest is not the same as a cover letter.

Read on to learn more about a letter of interest vs a cover letter and related questions like the following:

  • What is a letter of interest for a job?
  • What is a cover letter for a resume?
  • What is the difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest?
  • What is an example of a letter of interest?

What Is a Letter of Interest?

If you have a dream company that you would love to work for, you don’t have to wait for them to advertise a job vacancy.

Yes, even before they have an opening, you can write to the company expressing your genuine interest in working for them.

This is exactly what a letter of interest is.

A letter of interest, also known as the statement of interest for a job or letter of intent, is an official letter that lets the hiring manager know ‌you are interested in working for the company and explains why you would be a great addition to their team.

It further describes your qualifications, skills, experiences, and which position you see yourself working in at the company.

You can also explain your reasons for wanting to work for the company in your letter of interest.

Also read: How to write a letter of intent for a job?

What Is a Cover Letter for a Resume?

A cover letter is a formal document that you send with your resume when applying for a specific job vacancy.

The purpose of a cover letter is to align your skills and experiences with the ‌job requirements and showcase yourself as the ideal candidate.

Although there are some similarities between a letter of interest and a cover letter, like in both these letters, you need to highlight your skills and experiences, the latter is tailored to a job description.

A cover letter also needs to describe how you will benefit the company and provide a more insightful glimpse into your career trajectory.

Also read: How to write a cover letter for a resume?

What Is a Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter

Now that you have learned the difference between a statement of interest vs cover letter based on their definitions, it’s time to look at some of the key differences between the two.

Given below are some aspects in which a letter of interest vs cover letter differs:

The Purpose

The sole purpose of a letter of interest, as the name suggests, is to express your interest in working for a company in a position that is not yet vacant.

The focus of the letter is to explain why you’re interested in the company and role and why the recruiters should consider your candidacy when and if any vacancy comes up in the near future.

Whereas, a cover letter’s purpose is to support your resume for an advertised position to make the recruiters see how and why you are the perfect fit for the position.

The Content

Since a letter of interest is written with more focus on the company than the role, the content of this letter differs from a cover letter.

This means that you need to write a letter of interest before a job vacancy is posted. Hence, there is no job listing or job description that you can tailor your letter to.

Whereas, while writing a cover letter, the content is tailored to fit the job description provided in the listing, and only a couple of lines are focused on the company.

Given that a letter of interest is written before any vacancy is advertised, when exactly should you be writing and sending it?

Can you randomly write a letter of interest and send it to a company? Not exactly.

Listed below are a few scenarios when you can send a letter of intent:

  • You come across a company that matches your work values and skillset
  • You hear about a future opening at a company you are interested in working for
  • You get an internal referral for a job opening that hasn’t been advertised yet
  • You get information about the expansion of a company you’re interested in

Meanwhile, a cover letter is sent along with a resume only when there is a job vacancy that has been advertised and you meet the recruiters’ requirements.

Also read: How should you write an email cover letter in 2022?

Letter of Interest Sample

For your reference, given below is a sample of sample letter of interest for a job:

Dear Ms. Ridder,
My name is James Cameron, and I’m a graduate of New York University with a Bachelor of Arts in Marketing and Communication. I read an article in Forbes magazine about the expansion of Hudson Corporation and am extremely interested in learning more about the possible job openings that might come up following the expansion.
I’m seeking an entry-level position in the marketing department of your company as I believe that I have all the right qualifications and skills to become a contributing member of your workforce.
I have completed two internships in the marketing and sales department at Hartford, where I was able to assist my seniors to increase product sales by 10% and I’m adept at organizing effective online marketing campaigns. I enjoy working in fast-paced environments like the work culture that your company is famous for having.
I’d appreciate the opportunity to further discuss my suitability and qualifications for a job position in your marketing team. I am available for an informational interview at your convenience at 923-9876-0983 or [email protected] .
Sincerely, Becca Swan
Also read: What are some of the best job listing sites in the US?

Key Points from the Blog

  • A letter of interest is written to express your interest in working for a company before the company advertises a job opening. Whereas, a cover letter is written as an accomplice to support your resume for a specific job vacancy at a company.
  • A letter of interest describes your qualifications, skills, experiences, and which position you see yourself working in at the company.
  • A cover letter aligns your skills and experiences with the requirements of the job and showcases you as the ideal candidate.
  • A letter of interest and a cover letter differs in terms of their purpose, content, and timing.

Should you require expert assistance in any of your career-related dilemmas, visit Hiaration’s Career Activator Platform which offers 24x7 chat support. You can also reach us at [email protected] .

cover letter statement of interest difference

Share this blog

Subscribe to Free Resume Writing Blog by Hiration

Get the latest posts delivered right to your inbox

Stay up to date! Get all the latest & greatest posts delivered straight to your inbox

Is Your Resume ATS Friendly To Get Shortlisted?

Upload your resume for a free expert review.

cover letter statement of interest difference

Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: What's the Difference?

Avatar image

In This Guide:

What is a cover letter, what is a letter of interest, what’s the difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest, how to write a cover letter, how to write a letter of interest.

Resume image 1

In your job seeking process, you will encounter various documents you can use to boost up your application.

However, some of them may seem almost identical, which puts the question – how to know which one to use?

A great example of that are the cover letter and the letter of interest.

They are quite similar in their structure and content, but if you use the wrong one, you will most probably mess up.

But how to know which one is the right one?

We’ve got you covered, in this article, we are going to find out the answers to the following questions:

  • What's the difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest?

And we are going to leave you off with an example of a letter of interest, so that you can fully understand its structure and purpose.

So, if you are ready to dive into the topic, let’s get started.

Upload & Check Your Resume

Drop your resume here or choose a file . PDF & DOCX only. Max 2MB file size.

A cover letter is a one-page document that goes hand-in-hand with your resume.

It is a part of your application documents for a dedicated open position that the company is actively looking for an employee.

If you want to really get it right with this one, you should know how to tell a story with your cover letter .

A letter of interest is a one-page document that is sent out to a company that you desire to work for.

Unlike the cover letter, a letter of interest is not sent out for a specific position, but rather for a company, no matter if they currently have an open position.

In your letter of interest, you describe your interest in the company, as well as your qualifications, and ask your potential employer if they have open positions that would suit your expertise.

When it comes to choosing between a cover letter and a letter of interest, it is essential for you to know what sets them apart.

While exploring what each type of letter is, we encountered their biggest difference. A cover letter is used for applying for specific positions, but a letter of interest presents an interest in the company and explores any possibilities for an unlisted job opening.

But that is not the only difference between the two letters.

The second difference between the two is directly connected to the first one, and it is about the timing for sending the letter out.

As the cover letter is designated for a specific position, it is supposed to be sent out while the position is active.

However, the letter of interest can be sent out at any time, as it is not connected to any job opening, but expresses your interest in a company.

A big difference between the two is the accompanying documents. While a cover letter has to always go hand-in-hand with a resume and any other needed application documents, a letter of interest can be sent out without any other documents.

Furthermore, their content also can differ because of it, because unlike your cover letter, your letter of interest would no longer be used to compliment your resume, and thus, it can be kept more general in its content.

Now that you know the differences between the two letters, it would really help you out to get a better understanding by exploring how each is written.

When it comes to writing a cover letter , there is a clear structure you need to follow to get it right.

It goes like this:

How to write a cover letter

  • Introduce yourself – that’s where you provide basic information about yourself, and you present your interest in the position you are applying for
  • Explain why you are the right person for the job – that’s a key moment where you need to match the company’s culture and mission, so that they would see you not only as a fit for the position, but a fit for the company
  • Use your past accomplishments – you should mention your work-related accomplishments to strengthen up what you have included in your resume, and demonstrate your skills and expertise
  • Finish with a call-to-action – that’s a key moment, as you would want to make the recruiter check out your resume, as that’s where you can really shine with all your skills and expertise

If you want to take an extra step and really nail your cover letter, don’t hesitate and check out our Cover Letter Builder .

When it comes to your letter of interest, there is a quick way around it – you can just trim down your cover letter from any position specific information, and add in a little bit about what made you write to the company.

But if you really want to nail it, you can start building it from the ground up.

In order for you to do it right, you need to take some steps, that are really similar to building a cover letter:

How to write a letter of interest

  • Introduce yourself – provide basic information about yourself and provide a summary of your background
  • Explain why you are writing – provide some information about why you have chosen to write to the company and what makes them appealing to you
  • Show that you are a good fit to the company – do your research in the company’s mission and culture, and use everything you find to highlight how you would fit perfectly into their team
  • Highlight your experience and skills – don’t forget to outline your expertise, using your work history , skill set, as well as any degrees , certifications , awards , and any other specific achievements
  • Ask for an informational interview – that’s the letter of interest’s version of the call to action in the cover letter, as it once again prompts the recruiter to contact you

Example letter of interest

And now, just to get a better understanding of how a letter of interest should be structured, check out our example:

Dear Ms. Doe,

My name is John Doe, and I recently graduated from Georgia Institute of Technology with a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering. I came across an article in the Indianapolis Star about the expansion of the IU Health Center and am interested in learning more about the job opportunities that this may provide in the next few months. I’m seeking employment opportunities for biomedical equipment technicians and engineers and I would be interested in pursuing any opportunities available in the new health center upon its opening.

I have completed three internships in biomedical engineering and have a strong background working with medical equipment in hospital settings. I am extremely organized and detail-oriented and enjoy working in fast-paced environments. I’m located just a three-minute drive from the site of the new medical center and could easily be on-call and respond quickly as needed.

I appreciate your time and consideration. I am available for an informational interview at your convenience. I look forward to discussing potential opportunities with the IU Health Center.

Sincerely, John Doe

We are all done, now you know what are the differences between a letter of interest and a cover letter, and how to use them right.

Let’s go through the main differences one more time:

  • The purpose – a cover letter is aimed at a specific open position, but a letter of interest targets a company that you like, no matter if they have open positions or not
  • The timing – you can send out a cover letter only while the position is still open, but a letter of interest can be sent out at any moment, as it is not connected to a job position
  • The accompanying documents – a cover letter is always send out along with a resume and any additional application documents, but when you send out a letter of interest, you don’t need to send out anything else, unless you don’t want to
  • The content – your cover letter should always be oriented toward the job position you are applying for, but a letter of interest should be more focused on the company you are applying for, why you are interested in it, and what makes you a good fit

Now that you know all that, check out our example letter of interest once again, and master whichever you need to write for your job hunt.

Author image

  • Cover Letter Guides

How To Spot Toxic Work Culture At The Interview: 17 Signs To Watch Out For

How to make a dating resume your professional one has all the answers, how to write an effective personal resume, how to write a high school resume, 5 things we learned from helping 249 engineers write their resumes, destinee, an ambitious techie that never settles.

  • Create Resume
  • Terms of Service
  • Privacy Policy
  • Cookie Preferences
  • Resume Examples
  • Resume Templates
  • AI Resume Builder
  • Resume Summary Generator
  • Resume Formats
  • Resume Checker
  • Resume Skills
  • How to Write a Resume
  • Modern Resume Templates
  • Simple Resume Templates
  • Cover Letter Builder
  • Cover Letter Examples
  • Cover Letter Templates
  • Cover Letter Formats
  • How to Write a Cover Letter
  • Resume Guides
  • Job Interview Guides
  • Job Interview Questions
  • Career Resources
  • Meet our customers
  • Career resources
  • English (UK)
  • French (FR)
  • German (DE)
  • Spanish (ES)
  • Swedish (SE)

© 2024 . All rights reserved.

Made with love by people who care.

  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar

Statement of Purpose vs Cover Letter: What’s the Difference?

Recent posts.

  • Can AI Write My Resume?
  • Best Job Search Sites – 2024
  • 2024 LinkedIn Profile Character Limits
  • How Many Jobs Should I List on my Resume?
  • 19 Flexible Work from Home Jobs for 2024

December 10, 2023

cover letter statement of interest difference

When embarking on the path to higher education or stepping into the job market, understanding the “statement of purpose vs cover letter” distinction is not just beneficial—it’s essential. This article aims to demystify these two critical documents, highlighting their unique purposes and guiding you on how to craft each one effectively. While both are pivotal in their respective arenas—be it applying for a graduate program or a new job position—they serve different goals and address different audiences. The statement of purpose is your ticket to showcasing academic prowess and research aspirations to admissions committees. In contrast, the cover letter is your opportunity to demonstrate to a potential employer how your past experiences and skills make you the ideal candidate for a specific job opening. Navigating these distinctions can be the difference between a successful application and a missed opportunity.

Understanding the Basics

What is a statement of purpose (sop).

An SOP is a formal document required for graduate school applications. It’s where you describe your academic journey. You highlight why you’re interested in a particular program. It’s your chance to showcase your passion for the subject. The SOP should reflect your research interests. It also shows how you can contribute to the program.

Role in Graduate Program Applications: The SOP is vital in grad school applications. It helps the admissions committee understand you better. They learn about your academic interests and goals. It’s more than just your grades and scores. The SOP paints a picture of you as a prospective student.

Emphasis on Academic Background and Research Interests: In the SOP, your academic history is crucial. You talk about key research projects you’ve been part of. Discuss how these experiences have shaped your career goals. The SOP should connect your past studies to your future plans.

What is a Cover Letter?

A cover letter is a professional letter used in job applications. It complements your resume. The cover letter gives a personal touch to your application. It’s where you connect your skills to the job requirements.

Usage in Job Applications: In job searches, a cover letter is often required. It’s your first direct communication with a potential employer. The cover letter can set you apart from other applicants. It’s a chance to show why you’re a good fit for the job.

Focus on Past Experiences and Relevance to the Specific Job Opening: In your cover letter, highlight your work experience. Link your skills to the job description. Show how your past roles have prepared you for this new position. It’s about making a clear connection between your abilities and the employer’s needs.

Key Differences between Statement of Purpose and Cover Letter

Purpose and Audience: Firstly, the Statement of Purpose (SOP) specifically targets admission committees. Students use it for graduate school applications. It’s a tool to showcase academic potential and research aspirations. On the other hand, a cover letter addresses potential employers or hiring managers. Its goal is to connect the applicant with a job opportunity.

Content and Structure: Furthermore, the SOP involves a detailed discussion. It delves into your academic and research projects, along with future plans. This document allows you to elaborate on your educational journey and aspirations. Conversely, the cover letter aligns your professional experience with the job’s requirements. It relates your past roles and skills to what the employer seeks.

Tone and Style: Additionally, the tone of an SOP is notably academic. It focuses on intellectual pursuits and academic achievements. This style suits the purpose of impressing an admissions committee. In contrast, a cover letter adopts a professional tone. It’s tailored to demonstrate how you’re a good fit for the company. The style is direct and geared towards convincing an employer of your suitability for the job.

Importance in Application Processes

Statement of Purpose (SOP): The Gatekeeper for Graduate School Applications Primarily, the SOP serves as a gatekeeper in the graduate school application process. It plays a crucial role in determining your admission. This document allows you to showcase your academic strengths and research interests. Importantly, it gives the admissions committee a glimpse into your potential as a graduate student. Essentially, the SOP can make or break your application. Therefore, crafting an impactful SOP is critical for aspiring graduate students.

Cover Letter: Essential for a Strong First Impression in Job Searches Similarly, in the realm of job searches, the cover letter holds immense importance. It acts as your first point of contact with a potential employer. The cover letter provides a unique opportunity to make a strong first impression. It enables you to highlight how your experiences align with the job requirements. Effectively, a well-crafted cover letter can set you apart from other candidates. As such, dedicating time to personalize and polish your cover letter is key to a successful job application.

How to Write an Effective Statement of Purpose

Discussing Career Goals, Motivation, and Relevant Experiences First and foremost, clearly articulate your career goals in your Statement of Purpose (SOP). Explain why you are passionate about the specific degree program. Additionally, connect these goals to your motivation for pursuing higher education. Moreover, don’t forget to include relevant experiences. These could be academic projects, internships, or relevant work experience. These details provide a solid foundation for your SOP.

Tips for Highlighting Particular Interests and Connections Furthermore, it’s beneficial to highlight your specific research interests. This approach shows the admissions committee that you have a clear direction. Also, if applicable, mention any connection with specific professors or schools. For instance, you might be interested in a particular professor’s research. Or, you might find a school’s program aligns perfectly with your interests. Importantly, such details make your SOP stand out. They demonstrate your commitment and thorough research about the program.

Personalizing Your SOP Lastly, personalize your SOP. It should reflect your unique journey and aspirations. Avoid generic statements. Instead, offer a compelling narrative about your academic pursuits. This personal touch can greatly enhance the impact of your SOP.

Crafting the Perfect Cover Letter

Matching Skills and Experiences with the Job Description Firstly, when crafting a cover letter, it’s crucial to align your skills and experiences with the job description. Carefully analyze the job posting. Identify the key skills and experiences the employer is seeking. Then, reflect these in your cover letter. For example, if the job emphasizes teamwork, include a relevant experience where you excelled in a team setting.

Addressing the Letter and Including Contact Information Moreover, the way you address your cover letter sets the tone. Use a professional greeting like “Dear Hiring Manager.” This approach is respectful and universally appropriate. Also, ensure your contact information is clearly visible. Typically, include this at the top of the letter. This makes it easy for potential employers to reach out to you.

Enhancing Your Cover Letter with Professional Help Additionally, for those seeking an extra edge, Simply Great Resumes offers an invaluable resource. Their all-in-one bundle includes four professional resume and matching cover letter templates. These templates provide a unified and polished look. Notably, they are ATS optimized. This means they are designed for maximum compatibility with Applicant Tracking Systems. Moreover, the templates offer user-friendly customization. This allows you to easily adapt them to showcase your unique skills and experiences. For a one-time purchase of $29.99, you gain immediate, lifetime access to all these templates. This is an excellent value for those looking to streamline their application process.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Avoiding Overlaps in Content between SOP and Cover Letter Firstly, a common mistake is overlapping content between your Statement of Purpose (SOP) and cover letter. Although they may seem similar, it’s crucial to differentiate the two. The SOP should focus on your academic interests and research goals. In contrast, your cover letter should align your professional experiences with the job you’re applying for. Therefore, tailor each document to its specific purpose to avoid redundancy.

Steering Clear of Generic Statements Moreover, generic statements are a pitfall in both SOPs and cover letters. They lack personalization and fail to engage the reader. Instead, customize your content to the specific position or graduate program. For a cover letter, relate directly to the job description and company culture. For an SOP, discuss specific aspects of the graduate program that excite you. This approach shows you’ve done your research and are genuinely interested.

Emphasizing Unique Personal and Professional Qualities Furthermore, it’s important to highlight what makes you unique. In your SOP, share personal stories or experiences that led you to your academic interests. In your cover letter, mention specific professional achievements that make you stand out. This personal touch can make a significant difference in catching the reader’s attention.

Additional Considerations

Incorporating Volunteer Work, Extracurricular Activities, and Relevant Skills Firstly, when crafting your Statement of Purpose or cover letter, consider including volunteer work and extracurricular activities. These experiences often demonstrate skills that are valuable in both academic and professional settings. Additionally, they can showcase your character and personal values. Moreover, don’t forget to highlight other relevant skills that may not be directly related to your field of study or work but still add value to your profile.

The Importance of Tailoring Each Document Furthermore, tailoring each document to a specific company, school, or program is crucial. For the SOP, research the particular school or program. Then, mention aspects of it that align with your academic goals. Also, show how you can contribute to their academic community. Similarly, for the cover letter, study the company and the job description. Subsequently, align your experiences and skills with what the company seeks. Tailoring documents in this way not only demonstrates your interest but also shows that you have put thought and effort into your application.

Reflecting a Well-Rounded Personality Lastly, it’s important to present a well-rounded image of yourself. Both in the SOP and the cover letter, balancing professional achievements with personal qualities is key. This holistic approach can significantly enhance the appeal of your application, making you more memorable to the committee or potential employer.

Final Thoughts: Sealing Your Academic and Professional Journey

In conclusion, understanding the distinctions between a Statement of Purpose (SOP) and a cover letter is crucial for your success, whether in academia or the job market. The SOP, targeting admissions committees, emphasizes your academic journey and research aspirations. It’s your platform to showcase intellectual curiosity and suitability for a graduate program. Conversely, the cover letter, aimed at potential employers, highlights how your experiences and skills align with a specific job’s requirements. It’s your chance to demonstrate professional fit and interest in a particular role.

The key differences in purpose, audience, content, structure, tone, and style between these two documents cannot be overstated. A well-crafted SOP can open doors to academic opportunities, while an effective cover letter can pave the way to your dream job. Therefore, investing time and effort into personalizing these documents is essential. Tailoring them to specific programs or job descriptions, and ensuring they reflect your unique skills and experiences, will significantly enhance your applications.

Remember, these documents are more than just formalities; they are opportunities to make a meaningful impression. So, take the time to craft them thoughtfully, making sure they authentically represent your ambitions and abilities. With the right approach, your SOP and cover letter can become powerful tools for achieving your academic and professional goals.

Additional Resources

Here are links to resources for further reading on crafting excellent Statements of Purpose:

  • Purdue OWL’s Guide on Drafting Your Statement of Purpose : A comprehensive guide from Purdue University offering detailed advice on writing Statements of Purpose for graduate school applications. Access it here: Purdue OWL – Statements of Purpose: Drafting Your Statement .
  • Northeastern University’s Guide on Writing a Statement of Purpose : This article from Northeastern University breaks down the SOP writing process into manageable steps, providing insights on how to impress admissions committees. You can find it here: Northeastern University – How to Write a Statement of Purpose for Graduate School .
  • Scribbr’s Example and Guide for Statement of Purpose : Scribbr offers a detailed example of a successful Statement of Purpose for a Classical Archaeology program, highlighting key aspects to include in your SOP. Explore it here: Scribbr – How to Write a Statement of Purpose .

Letter of Interest Writing Guide in 2024 [+Sample Included]

Background Image

Most job seekers at least have a sense of their ‘dream position’. That, or a perfect company they would like to work for.

But monitoring career pages or LinkedIn in hopes that a posting for the right job will magically appear one day can mean a loooong wait.

So what to do? How do you take charge and angle yourself for getting hired into your ideal role with the ideal organization? Enter the letter of interest.

This brief guide gives you the run-down on this oft-overlooked piece of the job application puzzle. We’ll cover:

  • What a letter of interest is and isn’t 
  • What to include in your letter of interest
  • Keys to a successful letter of interest
  • Letter of interest example

With the advice below, you will come to realize that job searching isn’t only about reacting to job openings: forging your own opportunities is also an effective strategy.

Call it what you want: a letter of interest, expression of interest, prospecting letter, statement of interest…They’re all the talking about the same document. We’ve chosen the ‘letter of interest’ label in this article.

A letter of interest is a letter that expresses your interest in learning more about a particular organization’s employment opportunities and/or working for that organization.

It is NOT a cover letter ! The difference is that a cover letter is sent along with your resume or CV in response to a specific advertised position. Meanwhile, a letter of interest is not tailored to a specific job posting. It is sent unsolicited to employers to make it known that you are interested in learning about future opportunities.

As a job seeker, you’ll often run into the situation of an organization not having any current job openings listed on its website. But their career pages often include a message encouraging you to submit your resume or CV for future consideration. This is precisely when you want to use a letter of interest.

Of course, there are plenty of other scenarios when you should make use of a letter of interest. In fact, the point of this article is to help you realize that whenever you find an organization that you really want to work for, you should find a way to get on that organization’s radar using a letter of interest.

job search masterclass novoresume

What Content to Include in a Letter of Interest?

Unlike a cover letter, when writing a letter of interest you don’t have an exact job description along with its list of requirements and qualifications to guide you.

However, the reason you are writing to the employer in the first place is because you think you are a good fit for their team. So, you need to show them why. 

In terms of the basic structure of letter of interest, a three-paragraph format is your best bet. Here’s how that looks:

1) Introduction

Introduce yourself, where/how you heard about the organization, and why you are contacting them (I.e. to inquire about job opportunities).

This is where you prove that you have skills and experience that are valuable to the employer. At the same time, you want to be clear about what types of work you are pursuing. You don’t just want any job with the organization, but rather a position that suits your background and interests.

3) Closing Statement 

Here’s where to include a call to action. You want to make it crystal clear that you are interested in speaking more about the organization and work opportunities. Keep in mind that the employer may not have any openings at the moment, so what you are asking for is essentially an informational interview.

Writing an Effective Letter of Interest

Besides a solid structure, there are several elements that make for an effective letter of interest. In other words, if you want your letter to get read and to actually make someone at your target organization excited to get to know you, be sure to follow the principles below.

Personalize it

Please, please do not send a letter of interest with a salutation like “To whom it may concern” or “Dear Human Resources Manager”. Put in the extra effort and find an actual person to whom you can address your letter, specifically someone who is in a position to actually help you get what you want. 

Your letter can be sent to someone in human resources who is responsible for recruiting, or a manager in the department that you see yourself working in. Either way, it’s much easier to persuade someone to give you the time of day by establishing a personal connection.

Find a Hook

You need to find a way to grab the attention of your recipient. Keep in mind that the person on the other end probably isn’t expecting to hear from you. And that same person is under no obligation to help you get what you want.

Your job is to convince your recipient that you are worth his/her time. And a great way to do that is to show off how much you know about the organization and the value you can contribute.

This is where in-depth research of your target organization comes in handy. Try to find a project, event, person, etc., that can connect you with the organization in some way. For example, you may have heard a news interview with CEO who mentioned plans to expand operations. Well this is a great entry point for you to articulate how your skills and experience might support those plans.  

Be Specific

Again, the letter of interest is about persuasion ( just like a cover letter ). So the more specific you can be about what you have to offer, the better your chances that a recruiter will be able to picture you working for his/her organization. 

Once you’ve done your research and identified the main attributes that your target organization want in their employees, focus on two or three of these and relate them to your work history or skill set. 

Qualify your statements as much as possible by pointing to specific examples of your achievements . For example, if you are interested in working for a sales team, highlight an example of how you’ve achieved exceptional sales results in the past. Use metrics to illustrate your point.  

Keep it Concise

You may feel the urge to share as much as possible about yourself in your letter of interest so the employer sees you as the total package. Here’s the problem with this strategy: 1) your reader isn’t expecting your email and may be deterred by large amounts of text 2) you risk losing focus on the most important attributes that the employer values 3) you are attaching a resume or CV along with your letter, which already offers a more complete story.

Like we said before, keep your letter of interest to a tight three paragraphs, and really home in on two or three points that convey the most relevant contributions you can make.

One final thought: Remember that there is a good chance that your letter doesn’t receive an immediate reply. So be ready to follow-up with a phone call to the employer, especially if you say you will in the contents of your letter. Now go find your ideal job or company, and then put your new letter of interest writing skills to the test.

Suggested reading:

  • Strengths and Weaknesses for Job Interviews [Best Answers]
  • How to Write a Resume | Beginner's Guide
  • 150+ Must-Have Skills for Any Resume [With Tips + Tricks]

cookies image

To provide a safer experience, the best content and great communication, we use cookies. Learn how we use them for non-authenticated users.

Search Career Services and Development

  • Graduating Students
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Parents & Families
  • Prospective Students
  • First Generation
  • International
  • Students With Disabilities
  • Arts, Marketing, Multimedia & Communications
  • Business and Economics
  • Education & Training
  • Entertainment, Hospitality, Performing Arts, & Sports
  • Finance & Accounting
  • Graduate / Professional School
  • Health Professions
  • Human Services
  • Law & Policy, Government & Public Administration
  • Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) & Kinesiology
  • Create a Resume / Cover Letter
  • Expand Your Network / Mentor
  • Explore Your Interests / Self Assessment
  • Find Scholarship & Funding Opportunities
  • Negotiate an Offer
  • Prepare for an Interview
  • Prepare for Graduate School
  • Labor Market Insights
  • Search for a Job / Internship
  • Search for Jobs in Our Database
  • Share Your Internship Experience
  • Career Outcomes
  • CLI/TADA Industry Tour
  • International Spring Tour

Tips for Writing a Statement of Interest

  • Share This: Share Tips for Writing a Statement of Interest on Facebook Share Tips for Writing a Statement of Interest on LinkedIn Share Tips for Writing a Statement of Interest on X

What is a Statement of Interest?

When applying for certain positions or opportunities, you may be asked to submit a statement of interest. Also called a letter of intent, this document is a helpful way to introduce yourself, your interest in the position or organization, and how you can add value. A statement of interest is also used when you would like to work for a company, but they are not advertising any openings.

What is the Difference Between a Statement of Interest and a Cover Letter?

A cover letter is written for a specific position; it should be tailored to that opportunity and show a strong connection between your abilities and the requirements. A statement of interest should demonstrate that you have a clear understanding of the organization as well as the skills you would bring to support the mission.

Before Writing Your Statement of Interest

  • Research the organization. Learn about the mission, purpose, and what they are seeking in candidates. 
  • Ask yourself: Why am I interested in this opportunity or organization? What is drawing me to this role? Be sure that you can clearly articulate your reasons.
  • Seek out connections. Reach out to individuals in your network who may have insight about the organization. Ask them if there is any essential information that you should know to improve your statement. Some organizations may provide resources, such as sample letters or tips from previous candidates which you can use to put together a stronger submission.
  • Follow the instructions provided by the organization. If there are specific prompts or questions that you must respond to, be sure that you address ALL points. This includes staying within the word or page limit provided.
  • Keep your statement targeted. When reading a letter of interest, it should be clear that it is written for a specific organization or opportunity. If it sounds like you are just looking to apply for any and everything, the reader may not consider your interest genuine. Go back to what attracted you to this specific opportunity and rework your statement. 
  • Review your statement and ensure that it is written in a professional tone, without any grammar or spelling errors. Unless requested, it is not appropriate to delve too deeply into your life story for a letter of interest. Stick to expressing your interest and demonstrating how your background, skills, and experiences align with the organization.

Check out these letter of interest templates to help you draft your letter:

  • Indeed Statement of Interest Example
  • Resume Genius Letter of Interest Template

Resources: University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy – Writing an Effective Statement of Interest , Resume Genius – Letter of Interest: Samples & How to Write , Indeed – How To Write a Statement of Interest (Plus Example)

SJSU | School of Information

Cover letter or letter of interest – what’s the difference.

Here is a question I received from a student:

I am graduating this term and am applying for library jobs in all sorts of different libraries. I have noticed that most academic library jobs request a letter of interest not a cover letter. I have done some research and come across conflicting information about a letter of interest. Can you summarize what you think a letter of interest is and how it differs from a cover letter?

This is a great question. The term Letter of Interest is confusing for many students. In my opinion, it is much like a cover letter but it allows you to write in more detail. You want to express specifically WHY you are interested in this particular position and identify WHY you are the best candidate i.e.: how your skills and qualifications are a perfect match for the position.

Here is a web site I found that gives some basic tips about writing a Letter of Interest that you might find helpful: http://www.letterwritingguide.com/interest.htm

Here are some additional tips I pulled from another web site:

  • The letter of interest introduces you and your background of professional skills to the prospective employer.
  • The letter of interest is the first thing an employer is going to read, so it needs to be clear, concise, to the point, and eye catching.

The letter of interest has several purposes:

  • to convince the employer that you have the best skills, qualifications, and job experience to be the perfect candidate for the position;
  • to convince the employer to read your resume; and
  • to convince the employer that it would be very worthwhile to invite you for interview.

So before you begin writing your Letter of Interest, find out as much as possible about the company to which you are writing your letter, identify their mission and goals, and become familiar with the products or services they offer. Then, weave your knowledge of that information into your letter.

I would like to read your comments on writing a Letter of Interest.

Post new comment

  • Request new password
  • Support portal

cover letter statement of interest difference

IMAGES

  1. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: Writing Tips to Ace Both Tools

    cover letter statement of interest difference

  2. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: What's The Difference?

    cover letter statement of interest difference

  3. The Difference Between Cover Letter, Motivation Letter and Letter of

    cover letter statement of interest difference

  4. 30+ Amazing Letter of Interest Samples & Templates

    cover letter statement of interest difference

  5. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: Writing Tips to Ace Both Tools

    cover letter statement of interest difference

  6. Difference Between Cover Letter And Statement Of Interest For Your

    cover letter statement of interest difference

VIDEO

  1. Typewriting Exam Feb

  2. CASH FLOW STATEMENT- CALCULATION OF INTEREST ON DEBENTURES Class 12 Accounts

  3. How to find Simple Interest|RPF|PYQ|SUDHEER MISHRA SIR|DMC CLASSES| #viral #shorts #short #SI

  4. SI & CI- to find rate of interest and Principal when 2 yrs CI & SI

  5. How to write Motivation Letter?

  6. Concept of Compound Interest

COMMENTS

  1. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: Definitions, Tips and Examples

    A cover letter is a document that accompanies your resume and briefly explains your interest in a particular job posting. The elements of a cover letter are similar to those of a letter of interest. However, a cover letter refers to a specific job that the company has advertised. Your cover letter helps your resume stand out and should make the ...

  2. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: Differences & Examples

    The main difference between the two is: a cover letter is used to apply for a job opening. a letter of interest is used to express interest in working at a company that isn't necessarily hiring. Picking which type of letter to use is simple: If you're applying for an open job, write a cover letter. When writing, target the hiring manager ...

  3. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: Differences and Tips

    Letter of interest vs. cover letter. So what's the difference between a letter of interest and the probably-more-familiar cover letter? Basically, a cover letter targets a specific job opening and a letter of interest (sometimes called a letter of intent) expresses a desire to work for a specific company even though you haven't seen a job ...

  4. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: What's the Difference?

    A cover letter is for advertised jobs. A letter of interest is for jobs that don't exist or haven't been advertised. An LOI is shorter, with a brief three paragraphs. Cover letters mention the job ad and requirements in paragraph #1. Letters of interest focus instead on good things about the business.

  5. Letter Of Interest Vs. Cover Letter: What's The Difference?

    This type of letter is used when there isn't a relevant position open. This type of letter is sent when there is a specific, listed position that you're applying for. Letters of interest are a type of sales pitch to convince the hiring manager that they should think of you if a new position comes. A cover letter is an addition to a resume ...

  6. Letter of Interest Vs Cover Letter (The Difference with Examples)

    What is a letter of interest? It is a letter that expresses interest in working for an organization. The main characteristic of this letter is that it is sent in the absence of an open position that fits what you're looking for. For instance, you are trained as a software engineer but the current job openings do not include it, so you write a letter of interest.

  7. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: Differences & Which Is Best

    A letter of interest may lead to a conversation about potential job opportunities, but it is not as focused on a specific job opening as a cover letter. It's subtle but the driving force behind them is as follows: Letters of interest focus on your intentions and why you want to work for the company. Cover letters focus on why you're the ...

  8. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter · Resume.io

    The difference between an expression of interest vs. cover letter occurs mostly in the first paragraph. In one, you are introducing yourself and letting the employer know you're interested and either know they may have an opening soon or are aware there is no opening. In a cover letter, you are letting the employer know that you are ...

  9. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: Difference, Tips and Examples

    The primary difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest is the purpose for which the letter is written. A letter of interest is sent as an open offer and indicates that you are interested in working for a specific company in a potentially available role that matches your skillset and experience. A cover letter, on the other hand ...

  10. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter

    A cover letter accompanies the applicant's resume and should detail the sender's explanation for why they are a good fit for the open position. Letter of interest vs. cover letter. The main differences between a letter of interest and a cover letter include: Timing of the letter. A letter of interest can be sent at any time.

  11. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: Differences and How to Write

    The difference between a statement of interest vs. a cover letter lies in their purpose. Think of the letter of interest as a cold call for a job that is not being advertised, whereas a cover letter should go with a job application for an open job vacancy. In many cases, you need to demonstrate your passion as well as your interest in a specific position to further impress the hiring manager ...

  12. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: What Are the Key Differences?

    A letter of interest is written to express your interest in working for a company before the company advertises a job opening. Whereas, a cover letter is written as an accomplice to support your resume for a specific job vacancy at a company. So, to address the question directly, a letter of interest is not the same as a cover letter.

  13. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter (With Steps and Samples)

    5 steps on how to compose a letter of interest vs. a cover letter. Follow these five steps to write a letter of interest and a cover letter: 1. Learn more about the firm. Conduct a background check on the corporation you wish to work for to understand its vision. It's also advisable to know the exact individual to address your letter to instead ...

  14. Letter of Interest vs. Cover Letter: What's the Difference?

    A cover letter is used for applying for specific positions, but a letter of interest presents an interest in the company and explores any possibilities for an unlisted job opening. But that is not the only difference between the two letters. The second difference between the two is directly connected to the first one, and it is about the timing ...

  15. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: The Differences and When ...

    Key Takeaways. The biggest difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest is their purpose. One is used for available job openings whereas the other is used for a job posting that isn ...

  16. Letter of interest and Cover Letter Differences

    Here are a few things you might notice about a letter of interest: Often slightly shorter. Requires more research. Inquiring about a job without a listing. Often doesn't accompany a resume. On the other hand, here are a few things that you may notice about a cover letter: Often slightly longer.

  17. Statement of Purpose vs Cover Letter: What's the Difference?

    Purpose and Audience: Firstly, the Statement of Purpose (SOP) specifically targets admission committees. Students use it for graduate school applications. It's a tool to showcase academic potential and research aspirations. On the other hand, a cover letter addresses potential employers or hiring managers.

  18. Cover letter v/s statement of research interests

    1. Statement of research interest seems to deal specifically with you potential future research. Though, you can obviously base your future project describing your proved past record. The cover letter seems to be a general info, something that you are XYZ who completer PhD in ABC university, has the following background and you are interested ...

  19. Letter of Interest Writing Guide in 2024 [+Sample Included]

    Top ↑ What Content to Include in a Letter of Interest? 1) Introduction 2) Body 3) Closing Statement Writing an Effective Letter of Interest Personalize it Find a Hook Be Specific Keep it Concise. Most job seekers at least have a sense of their 'dream position'. That, or a perfect company they would like to work for.

  20. Letter of Interest vs Cover Letter: The Differences and When ...

    Key Takeaways. The biggest difference between a cover letter and a letter of interest is their purpose. One is used for available job openings whereas the other is used for a job posting that isn ...

  21. Tips for Writing a Statement of Interest

    What is the Difference Between a Statement of Interest and a Cover Letter? A cover letter is written for a specific position; it should be tailored to that opportunity and show a strong connection between your abilities and the requirements. A statement of interest should demonstrate that you have a clear understanding of the organization as ...

  22. Letter of Intent vs Cover Letter: What's the Difference?

    You can mention something you know about them (for example their product) and show you're keeping up with the industry. Cover letters and letters of intent also aren't sent in the same ways. Letters of intent can be sent at any moment while cover letters are sent only when you are applying for a specific position.

  23. Cover Letter or Letter of Interest

    The letter of interest is the first thing an employer is going to read, so it needs to be clear, concise, to the point, and eye catching. The letter of interest has several purposes: to convince the employer that you have the best skills, qualifications, and job experience to be the perfect candidate for the position; to convince the employer ...