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How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

how to address a cover letter to a large company

Options for Addressing a Cover Letter

  • Letter Without a Contact Person
  • Non-Gender-Specific Names

What Title to Use

  • Address an Email Cover Letter
  • Review a Sample Cover Letter

Before You Send Your Letter

One of the trickiest parts of writing a cover letter comes at the very beginning. Much of the time, you won’t know exactly who will read your letter. How do you address your cover letter when you don’t have the contact person’s name and/or gender ?

First of all, try to find out the name of the contact person. Some employers will think poorly of an applicant who does not take the time to learn the hiring manager’s name. Also, take care not to assume that you know the gender of the recipient based on the name. Many names are gender-neutral, and some hiring managers may identify as a gender other than male or female.

It’s also possible that you’ll do your research and still be unable to figure out to whom you are addressing your letter. In that case, it's better to be safe and use a generic greeting . It's also acceptable to start a letter without a greeting and start with the first paragraph of your letter .

You have a lot of options when addressing your letter. Learn more about the possibilities before you make your choice.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Contact Person

There are a variety of general cover letter salutations you can use to address your letter. These general cover letter salutations do not require you to know the name of the hiring manager.

In a survey of more than 2,000 companies, Saddleback College found that employers preferred the following greetings:  

  • Dear Sir/Madam (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern  (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)
  • Leave it blank (8%)

Do keep in mind that terms like "To Whom It May Concern" may seem dated, so the best options may be either to use "Dear Hiring Manager" or not to include a greeting at all. Simply start with the first paragraph of your letter.

How to Address a Cover Letter for a Non-Gender-Specific Name

If you do have a name but aren't sure of the person's gender, one option is to include both the first name and the last name in your salutation, without a title that reveals gender:

  • Dear Sydney Doe
  • Dear Taylor Smith
  • Dear Jamie Brown

With these types of gender-ambiguous names,  LinkedIn  can be a helpful resource. Since many people include a photo with their profile, a simple search of the person's name and company within LinkedIn could potentially turn up the contact's photograph.

Again, you can also check the company website or call the company’s administrative assistant to get more information as well.

Even if you know the name and gender of the person to whom you are writing, think carefully about what title you will use in your salutation.

For example, if the person is a doctor or holds a Ph.D., you might want to address your letter to “Dr. Lastname” rather than “Ms. Lastname” or “Mr. Lastname.” Other titles might be “Prof.,” “Rev.,” or “Sgt.,” among others.

When you address a letter to a female employer, use the title “Ms.” unless you know for certain that she prefers another title (such as “Miss” or “Mrs.”).

“Ms.” is a general title that does not denote marital status, so it works for any female employer.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

Hiring managers get a lot of emails each day. Make it easy for them to scan your email and follow up by including a clear subject line and a signature with your contact information. It's important to address the email cover letter correctly, including the name of the person hiring for the position if you have a contact, to ensure that your letter gets noticed.

Subject Line of Email Message

Never leave the subject line blank. There is a good chance that if a hiring manager receives an email with no subject line, they’ll delete it without even bothering to open it, or it could end up in their spam mailbox. Instead, write a clear subject indicating your intentions.

List the job you are applying for in the  subject line of your email message , so the employer knows what job you are interested in. They may be hiring for multiple positions, and you will want them to identify the position you’re interested in easily.

How to Address the Contact Person

There are a variety of  cover letter salutations  you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren’t given a contact person, check to see if you can  determine the email recipient's name .

If you can’t find a contact person at the company, you can either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and  start with the first paragraph  of your letter or use a  general salutation .

How to Format the Salutation

Once you have chosen a salutation, follow it with a colon or comma, a space, and then start the first paragraph of your letter. For example:

Dear Hiring Manager:

First paragraph of the letter.

Body of Email Cover Letter

The body of your cover letter  lets the employer know what position you are applying for, and why the employer should select you for an interview. This is where you'll sell yourself as a candidate. Review the job posting and include examples of your attributes that closely match the ones they are looking for.

When you're sending an  email cover letter , it's important to follow the employer's instructions on how to submit your cover letter and resume.

Make sure that your email cover letters are as well-written as any other documents you send.

If you have attached your resume, mention this as part of your conclusion. Then finish your cover letter by thanking the employer for considering you for the position. Include information on how you will follow up. Include a closing, then list your name and your  email signature .

Your email signature should include your name, full address, phone number, email address, and  LinkedIn Profile URL  (if you have one) so it is easy for hiring managers to get in touch.

Firstname Lastname  Street Address  (optional) City, State Zip Code  Email  Phone  LinkedIn

Sample Cover Letter

This is a cover letter example. Download the cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Sample Cover Letter (Text Version)

Mary Garcia 12 Rogers Avenue Townville, New Hampshire 03060 555-555-5555 mary.garcia@email.com

February 17, 2021

Franklin Lee

CBI Industries 39 Main Street Townville, New Hampshire 03060

Dear Mr. Lee:

I was excited to see your ad for the operations assistant position in your Townville offices.

I have five years of experience as an operations assistant/associate. In my most recent role at ABC Corp., I fulfilled orders, resolved customer issues, ordered supplies, and prepared reports. In previous roles, I’ve done bookkeeping, data entry, and sales support. Basically, anything your department needs to run smoothly, I can do – and most likely, I already have experience doing it.

My other skills include:

  • Strong communication skills, in person, in writing, and on the phone
  • Excellent attention to detail and organization skills
  • Top-notch customer service
  • Experience in the industry and passion for the product
  • Adept at all the usual professional software, including Microsoft Office Suite

I’ve included my resume for your review. Please contact me if you have questions or would like to schedule an interview. Thank you for your consideration.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Mary Garcia

Review Cover Letter Samples: It’s hard to write cover letters from scratch. To make life easier – and to make sure you don’t forget any of those pesky formatting rules —start by reviewing cover letter samples . Sending an email version instead? Look at a few examples of email cover letters to get started.

Customize Your Cover Letter: Why personalize your cover letter every time you apply for a job? Because even similar job titles have different requirements. The goal of a cover letter is to show the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for this particular job. Customizing your cover letter will help you emphasize your skills and experience and how they fit with the job requirements .

Spell-Check Names: Before sending your cover letter, make absolutely sure that you have spelled the hiring manager’s name correctly. That is the kind of small error that can cost you a job interview.

Carefully Proofread Your Letter: Whether you're sending an email or uploading or attaching a printable cover letter, it's important to make sure that your cover letter and resume are written as well as any other business correspondence. If you can, have a friend proofread before you hit send, to pick up any typos or grammatical errors.

Saddleback College. " Your Resume is Your 1st Interview ," Page 14. Accessed Feb. 17, 2021.

StandOut CV

How to address a cover letter | with examples

Andrew Fennell photo

The way you start your cover letter counts.

It’s the first thing a hiring manager sees when they open your application so you need to make them excited to peek into your CV .

In our guide, we’ll show you the ropes on how to address your cover letter, and even teach you how to find the recruiter or hiring manager’s name for maximum impact.

CV templates 

Address the hiring manager or recruiter directly

How to address a cover letter

Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name to start building a rapport with them.

Something simple like, “Hi Lucy” will do the trick.

According to recent research , simply seeing your own name can trigger a strong response in the brain. So, be sure to do this, to captivate the recruiter’s attention.

CV builder

How to find the recruiter or hiring manager’s name

You may be wondering, “How do I figure out their name?”

There are several ways to find out the name of the person handling the job opening, which we’ll look at below.

Recruiter's name in job advert

When you’re reading a job advert, you’ll sometimes find the name and email address of the person you need to get in touch with directly in the ad.

Look out for the section that says “For enquiries” or “Contact person”.

For example, the advert might say something like:

“For more info, please contact Susan Wright at [email protected].”

Usually, this person manages that job vacancy.

If you see this information, it’s your lucky day – job adverts are the simplest way to find the correct name.

Company website

Recruiter's name on website

If you can’t find the recruiter’s name on the job advert , and you’re applying for a job directly via a company, check out their website.

Keep an eye out for a “Who We Are” , “About Us” or “Our Team” section.

Here, you’ll usually be able to find the info about the people who work there, including the head of the department or hiring team connected to the position you’re applying for.

Look at the people’s profiles to get the one that fits your job’s department.

If you have trouble finding it directly, use the search bar on the company’s website and type in “Head of [Department Name]” or “HR Manager”.

You could also run a Google search for “[Company name] + team” for a quick way of finding an About Page for a particular team or department.

LinkedIn is one of the best ways to find a hiring manager or recruiter because millions of them are registered on the platform.

Firstly, ascertain the company that posted the position and the team it’s connected with from the information provided in the job advert.

When you know the department and organisation, head over to LinkedIn . Here, you can use the search bar to look for the company name, department or job title associated with the job opening.

Let’s say you’re applying for a marketing vacancy at Tesco. You can search for “Marketing Manager” in the search bar like this:

Recruiter's name on LinkedIn

Once the search results appear, click the “People” filter button to narrow down your findings further so that you’re only seeing people (and not companies or groups).

LinkedIn people filter

Then make sure you choose your target company under “Current Company” – this ensures you only view people who are current employees.

You will need to type the name of the company into the text box like this:

LinkedIn current company filter

Click on the name of the company you typed in. In this case, it’s “Tesco.”

Then hit the blue “Show results” button.

LinkedIn show results button

And examine the profiles that come up.

LinkedIn profiles

You’ll be able to find the person handling the job applications by looking for titles such as “recruitment manager” or “team leader” .

And once you view their profiles you may even be able to get hold of their phone number or email address.

Contact info

Here is how you can find a person’s email address via the contact details, if they have entered them.

Click on their profile then seek out the “Contact info” section.

This sits under their profile picture and headline.

LinkedIn contact info

If the user has made their contact info visible, you’ll see it here.

LinkedIn user email address

About section

Often, you can locate additional contact info, such as email addresses, in the “About” or “Summary” section of their profile.

To do this, scroll down to the user’s “About” section.

If the user has decided to include their email address, you’ll see it here.

LinkedIn about section

If you can’t find an email, you can contact them directly through LinkedIn.

Here’s how you’d do this:

  • Send a connection request – Send the person a connection request and a message. When they accept your request, you’ll be able to write an accompanying message.
  • Use InMail – If this specific individual isn’t in your network, use the LinkedIn InMail. This is a premium feature which lets you send messages to LinkedIn members outside of your network – it’s useful but do. Of course, there is a fee to use this feature but it’s a useful tool.

What if you can’t find a name?

Addressing cover letter if you can't find a name

Don’t panic if you can’t find the name of the individual you’re trying to address. This will happen a lot during your job search .

In such cases, it’s absolutely fine to begin with a friendly “Hi.”

But don’t use expressions like “Dear Sir or Madam” – this sounds extremely outdated and aloof.

If you use the word “Hi”, this ensures your cover letter is more amicable and modern , even when you’re unsure of the person’s name.

This is a courteous and simple way to start if you have difficulty locating the specific hiring manager’s name.

How to write a cover letter email subject line

Cover letter email subject line

A recruiter’s inbox gets flooded with applications, so when you write your cover letter email , your initial goal is to entice them to read your email.

You must catch their attention with a compelling subject line and give a captivating reason for them to click on your message.

Avoid using generic subject lines, such as:

  • “Check This Out” – Subject lines like this sound spammy, and hiring managers may ignore it.
  • “Important” – Recruiters won’t know why your email is important – they might deem it clickbait.
  • “CV Attached” – This subject line doesn’t offer any context or engage the recruiter in any way at all.
  • “Hire Me” – This comes across as too blunt and provides no context.
  • “I Need a Job” – This sounds too direct and may sound a little too desperate.
  • “Looking for Work” – While you’re being upfront, this isn’t an engaging subject line.

Instead of including any of these generic subject lines, you must promote your selling points right off the bat.

For instance, use subject lines that highlight your skills and expertise in a concise, screen-friendly title.

Determine your main strengths as an applicant and invent a way to integrate them into your subject line.

You could say something like:

  • “Veteran Graphic Designer with a Portfolio of Projects”
  • “Registered Nurse with Intensive Care Unit Expertise”
  • “Committed Secondary School Teacher with 10 Years’ Classroom Expertise”
  • “Certified IT Professional with Experience in Network Security”

These subject lines are effective because they communicate key information and value to hiring managers clearly and concisely. Each tells the recruiter about your qualifications and expertise and is tailored to the specific job or field.

A recruiter is more likely to open an email from someone who can potentially meet their requirements.

A quick tip: Remember, subject lines have a limited amount of space – you’ll probably only be able to squeeze in between 30 and 35 characters.

How not to address a cover letter

When you’re addressing your cover letter , some things simply aren’t worth including. These old-fashioned or overly formal ways of starting a cover letter can make a negative first impression.

So, avoid the below phrases in your cover letter greeting:

  • “Dear Sir or Madam” – This is far too old-fashioned and doesn’t show much effort. It’s also fairly impersonal.
  • “What’s up, [Department Name]?” – This is excessively informal and will probably give hiring managers the wrong impression about you. It also doesn’t address the specific person.

Steer clear of these unimpressive ways to address your cover letter and plump for a more personal, engaging approach, like “Hi James” or “Hello Sarah”. Don’t forget, you need to get the perfect balance of friendliness and professionalism.

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  • Resume and Cover Letter
  • How to Address a Cover Letter...

How to Address a Cover Letter to Recruiter or Hiring Manager

5 min read · Updated on November 24, 2021

Lisa Tynan

Knowing how to effectively address a cover letter makes you a very visible and appealing candidate.

Did you know that the cardinal rule of cover letters is personalization? It impresses a hiring manager or recruiter because it tells them you took time to research the specific information for the letter rather than sending a generic version.

What many people forget, however, is that the greeting or salutation in a cover letter must also be personalized with the hiring professional's first and last name whenever possible.

There are several effective ways to find the hiring manager's name for your greeting — and some acceptable back-up strategies when you can't. Either way, knowing how to address a cover letter effectively can prevent you from ending your hiring chances before they even begin. 

When you know the hiring manager's name

More often than not, you'll be given the name of the hiring professional or the manager that you'll work for. Whoever it is, use their full name (first and last name) in the greeting. 

If you cannot definitively tell the gender of the hiring person, do not use a gender-based title such as “Mr.” or “Ms.” in the greeting. Instead just use the person's full name.

For example, Alex Johnson could be male or female. To avoid a gender mistake, use Dear Alex Johnson, Hello Alex Johnson, or simply Alex Johnson .

However, professional titles such as “Professor” or “Dr.” are definitely acceptable as a cover letter salutation and should be used as a sign of respect. Be on the lookout for these and other titles to include.

How to find a hiring manager's name for your cover letter

If you're not given the name of the hiring manager, here are some effective ways to discover their name by using:

The job description: Check this document for the hiring manager's name. While it's not generally listed, you never know. If it's not obvious, there's also a trick to quickly discover an email in the job description that might contain the name; while in the document, press Ctrl +F or run Command + F and search for the @ symbol.

An email address: If you discover an email address, it may not have a full name but rather a first initial and last name or just a first name like [email protected] or [email protected] . A Google search combining the person's name as shown in the email and the company name might find you the person's full name.

 A LinkedIn post: A name connected to the LinkedIn job posting is probably that of the hiring professional who posted it, so use that name in your greeting.

The supervisor's title: It's more likely that a job description will list who the new hire will report to — such as the director of accounting — without listing a name. In this case, there are several search options:

Search the company's website for listings of staff members by title.

Run an advanced LinkedIn or Google search for all directors of accounting at that specific company.

Check with your network for someone who might know the person's name or search the appropriate professional networking sites.

Contact the company by phone or email. Tell them you're applying for [job title] and want to address your cover letter to the right person.

In the end, this research can be the difference between making a great first impression and getting noticed for the position — or getting totally ignored by the hiring manager. 

Acceptable options in lieu of a name

If you try the steps above and come up empty, there are still some alternative greeting options that will put you in a professional light.

The idea is to show that you've read the job description and tailored your greeting based on the company department where the job is located, the hiring manager's title, or the team with which you'll potentially work.

Some good examples include:

Dear Head of Design

Hello IT Department

Dear Accounting Manager

To Company ABC Recruiter/Hiring Professional

Hello Marketing Hiring Team

Dear Customer Support Hiring Group

Dear Human Resources

If you still can't find any specific name or department information, go with “Dear Hiring Manager.” It sounds professional and it's not gender-specific. In fact, a recent survey of over 2000 companies by Saddleback College showed that 40 percent preferred “Dear Hiring Manager” as the best greeting when a manager's name can't be found. 

“Dear Sir or Madam” is another option that works because it's gender-neutral and respectful. However, it sounds a bit old-fashioned and may signal a hiring professional that you're an older worker or just not aware of other greeting options. It's perfectly acceptable, but the better choice is “Dear Hiring Manager.” 

In the end, an actual name or any of the alternative examples will let you stand out from the crowd, so do your best to find and use those whenever you can.

Never leave the greeting blank

Whatever information you may or may not find, it's important to never leave your greeting line blank.

A blank greeting line can make you come across as lazy or rude, or imply that you simply don't understand how to write a cover letter — all of which will immediately put you out of contention for the job. There's no reason to leave the greeting blank when there are so many options that can be used effectively.

When you spend the time and effort to personalize your cover letter, you don't want to come across as “just another candidate” by using a generic greeting or no greeting at all.

A personalized greeting will impress any hiring professional, increasing the chance they'll read your entire cover letter — and ask you for an interview.

Not sure if your cover letter is cutting it? Our writers don't just help you with your resume . 

Recommended Reading:

Do Hiring Managers Actually Read Cover Letters?

5 Things to Say in Your Cover Letter If You Want to Get the Job

How To Write a Cover Letter (With Example)

Related Articles:

How to Create a Resume With No Education

From Bland to Beautiful: How We Made This Professional's Resume Shine

See how your resume stacks up.

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How to Address a Cover Letter

Don't know how to address your cover letter in the most respectful and appropriate way? See the best tips on what business etiquette dictates and how to get points as a good candidate.

Making a great first impression is imperative to becoming the #1 candidate for the job. The first impression, as we found out in our previous articles, comes from the cover letter. An appropriate salutation secures the right tone for the rest of your cover letter and wins the recipient’s favor. By directing your cover letter to a specific person you simulate a dialog, a conversation, where you’ve been yielded the floor. Stop cranking out templatized impersonal covering letters — they end up in the discard pile!

In this article, we’ve drawn up an explicit guide on “how to” and “who to” for addressing a cover letter when applying for a job opening.

Addressing a Cover Letter: Why is it Important?

Imagine you’re a hiring manager. It’s an average day at work — your company is looking for a Sales Manager . You brew your daily cup of strong coffee and check your inbox. The inbox displays 200+ incoming emails from applicants for the job opening.

You open one email and it reads

The first idea in your head will probably be something like:

“Another cliched cover letter. I bet this applicant’s been sending this cover letter to dozens of companies. I’ll leave it for the end.

You open the next one and it starts

Easy, easy! My name is Rachel, I’ll have you know!

You’re not in the best mood already, right? Would you give a chance to an applicant who calls you “Sir”? Bet you won’t.

To make things worse, these examples are real-life cases. You can ask hiring managers and recruiters from different companies and they all will say that they read letters like this time and time again. Moreover, they will definitely tell you even more ridiculous stories from their experience.

Let’s move to our article and consider the best options for addressing a cover letter for a job and the mistakes to avoid.

Options for Addressing a Cover Letter

Our experts strongly suggest that job seekers address their cover letters using the recruiting manager’s name. Now, this is not always possible for various reasons, so what’s the next best thing? We’ll show you how to address a cover letter for an online application the right way in any situation.

Use the Hiring Manager’s Name

Always make the effort to find who to address cover letter to. How do you find the info?

You can say something like:

“Hello, my name is Theodore. I’m applying for the content writer position at your company. Do you by any chance know the name of the hiring manager responsible for the position? It would be much appreciated.”

You might think that this is a waste of time, but going out of your way to find the recruiter’s name really shows that you put in the effort to apply and have a genuine interest in working there.

Use the Recipient’s Title In Your Address

Dear Dr. House, Dear Maj. Payne, Dear Prof. Hulk,

Although finding the name of the hiring manager is always preferred, it’s not always possible. What should you do in these occasions? HR professionals have answered this question for you. In a recent study done by Saddleback College, which surveyed 2,000 hiring managers, the majority of the polled specialists liked to see “Dear Hiring Manager” if the name is unknown. Starting your cover letter , write the role you’re applying for and “Hiring Manager” in the recipient info section.

Hiring Manager for the Engineer Position

From: John Doe

11301 West Olympic Boulevard Apt. 100

Los Angeles, CA 90064

(212) 245-7154

[email protected]

To: Hiring Manager for the Engineer Position

XYZ Worldwide Inc.

28 Second Avenue, NY

(212) 244-7701

Dear Hiring Manager,

I’m writing to you to express my interest in the Engineer position that

is open on your company website with the job ID #10120.

What should you do when you have the name of the hiring manager but aren’t sure of the person’s gender? The answer is simple — include both the first name and the last name in your greeting.

- Dear Taylor Johnson,

- Dear Cory Morgan,

Mistakes to Avoid When Addressing a Cover Letter

Oftentimes, candidates write cover letters half-heartedly and make silly mistakes. You would probably assume that the majority of applicants mishandling cover letters are students because of the lack of experience, but it’s not a matter of experience. It’s a matter of underestimation. Inexperienced internal students sometimes write their applications for an internship much better and more professional than overqualified workers with a vast experience handle their cover letters for a job at a big company. It all depends on how the candidate celebrates this document and realizes the impact of a well-thought-out cover letter.

What's the Proper Format for a Cover Letter Address?

Get Cover Letter expert writers suggest using a traditional business letter format when writing a cover letter for employment. Keep in mind, that while the business style cover letter rules and requirements are pretty strict, there is still room for a free hand and individual approach.

Start with a header that includes the sender’s name, address, and contact info. Add date above or below the sender’s section. Skip 1 line after the sender section.

The recipient’s info section includes the recruiting manager's name, official title and company name, full address, including city, state and zip code, and phone number. Skip 1 line after the recipient section.

Write an appropriate salutation: “Dear Mr. Doe,”, “Dear Cpt. Donovan,”, “Dear Hiring Manager,”. Don’t forget a comma after your greeting and leave 1-2 blank lines before you get down to writing the introduction.

Introduce yourself and get straight to the point of your job application.

From: [Your Full Name]

[Street, City, State, Zip]

[Phone Number]

To: [Recipient’s Full Name]

[Recipient’s Company Name]

[Recipient’s Phone]

[Recipient’s Email]

Dear [Recipient],

First/Introductory Paragraph

Body: Qualifications, Interests, Background, Sales Pitch

Closing paragraph

Farewell words e.g. Best Regards,

[Your Full Name]

Want to know what to write in the rest of your cover letter? See our “ Complete Guide To Writing an Impressive Cover Letter That Gets You Hired”

Now you know how to address a cover letter to a company in any situation you face during your job search. Follow the rules and recommendations from our professional guide and craft outstanding cover letters. If you have specific questions about how to address someone in a cover letter, feel free to contact us for some extra tips and advice. Still doubting yourself or unsure and can’t get past writer's block? We’re here for you. Our company has been providing professional CV and cover letter writing services for thousands of clients from the US and overseas. As of today, over 130,000 cover letters have been successfully built with the help of our online service; thousands of our clients have landed jobs. We are here to assist with your career ambitions and help you land your dream job. Don’t miss a chance to become one of those delighted people!

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Business Cover Letter Example & How-To Guide in 2024

Background Image

You’re a master of negotiation.

You can analyze a balance sheet in your sleep, and you've got industry know-how down to a science.

But all your business acumen evaporates when you’re staring at a blank screen, trying to draft your cover letter.

Your career centers on effective communication and strategy, and yet this is the one place you’re lost.

Don’t worry. We know your struggle, and we’re here to help.

In this article, we’re going to teach you:

  • What a Job-Winning Business Cover Letter Looks Like
  • 5 Steps to Writing a Flawless Business Cover Letter
  • 3 Essential Cover Letter Tips for Business Professionals

Let’s get started.

Business Cover Letter Example

Business Cover Letter Example

5 Steps for the Perfect Business Cover Letter

You've just seen a top-notch business cover letter that's sure to get noticed.

Now it's your turn to learn how to write a cover letter that shows off your skills and lands you that job! Just follow the steps we're about to dive into:

#1. Put Contact Information in the Header

Start your business cover letter by putting your contact details at the top, just like you would on your resume header . Here's what you should have up there:

  • Full Name. Place your full name near the top corner of the page.
  • Job Title. Use the exact title mentioned in the job ad you're applying for. With hiring managers juggling multiple roles, being specific helps them, which helps you.
  • Email Address. Go with a professional email. Ditch quirky emails you might have had in your younger days. For example, [email protected] is a no-go, but [email protected] works just fine.
  • Phone Number. Make sure it's a number where you can be reached easily. If the job is international, include the dialing code.
  • Location. Your city and state (or country) are enough. But if you're looking for a remote role or planning to move, make that clear in both your resume and cover letter.
  • Relevant Links (optional). Adding links to any important websites or social media profiles, like LinkedIn, is always a good idea.

After sorting out your details, focus on the hiring manager's contact information :

  • Company Name. Write down the company's name.
  • Hiring Manager’s Name. Include the hiring manager’s name, if you can find it.
  • Hiring Manager’s Title. If you find out the hiring manager’s exact job title, say, the Director of Business Development , use that title instead of just "Hiring Manager."
  • Location. Add the city and state (or country) of the company, especially if they have multiple locations. You can add the street address if you want to be super specific.
  • Date (optional). Including the date you wrote the cover letter adds a professional flair.

#2. Address the Hiring Manager

Once you've got all your contact details down, it's time to address the person who'll be reading your cover letter .

Trust us, "To Whom It May Concern" is not how you want to start your first impression.

Do a little homework first. Look up the company website, the job ad, or their LinkedIn profile to find the person who’s hiring for the job you’re after. You should be able to find their name somewhere and add it to your cover letter.

Then address them by using "Mr." or "Ms.", followed by their last name. If you're not certain about their gender or marital status, their full name works fine. For instance:

  • Dear Mr. Thompson  
  • Dear Alex Thompson

But if you couldn't find any information on the hiring manager or the head of the business department you’re looking to join, no worries. You can still address your letter to the team or the company at large:

  • Dear Business Department  
  • Dear Hiring Team  
  • Dear Human Resources Team  
  • Dear Head of Business

#3. Write an Eye-Catching Opening Statement

Hiring managers spend just a few seconds on each application before deciding if it’s worth reading more into it.

That's why nailing the start of your cover letter is key, especially when you're eyeing a business role. Lead with why this job catches your eye and some of the skills you’re bringing. Showing real enthusiasm for the role or the field can also make a hiring manager take a second look.

Doing your homework about the company pays off. The better you understand them, the more you can show how well you'd fit their culture. It's a strong signal that you're not just throwing applications left and right but are genuinely keen on this specific role.

Depending on your career stage, you might want to start your business cover letter with a standout achievement or any skills that make you a shoo-in for the job. Just keep it short and sweet. The goal here is to spark interest, so the hiring manager will read the rest of your letter.

#4. Use the Cover Letter Body for the Details

The core part of your cover letter is your chance to shine as a business professional . Here, you want to go beyond the bullet points on your resume to really sell your skills and experience.

And don't just repeat your resume. Use this space to highlight what sets you apart from the competition. If you have any big wins in the business world, this is where you want to mention them. Take cues from the job ad to tailor your letter accordingly. 

For example, if you're applying for a role that requires strong analytical skills, focus on achievements from your past that prove you've got what it takes. Instead of talking about general leadership qualities, point out how you've used analytics to drive business growth.

Being knowledgeable about the company you're applying to can earn you extra points. If you're familiar with their market presence or have insights into their business model, weave that into your letter. It makes the hiring manager see you as a more suitable candidate when compared to the rest.

Make sure your enthusiasm shines through your entire letter, so it’s obvious you want this job, not just a job. Express your excitement for the role and be confident in stating how you can add value to their team with your unique skills and experience.

Looking for more inspiration? Check out our other cover letter examples !

#5. Wrap It Up and Sign It

Nailing the conclusion of your cover letter is essential. You want to assure the hiring manager that they've made the right choice in reading your application to the end.

Write a brief conclusion to your cover letter so you can recap why you're the ideal candidate for the business role you’re targeting. Briefly reiterate some of your most relevant skills, but don’t go overboard. The idea here is to summarize your key selling points.

Then add a call to action. This could be an invitation for the hiring manager to further discuss your application or to arrange an interview. This leaves a lasting impression and nudges the hiring manager to do something, which increases your odds of progressing to the next step.

Lastly, sign your business cover letter like a real professional. Just pick an appropriate closing line and sign your name underneath. Here's a sample:

Feel free to contact me at your convenience so that we may arrange an interview and further discuss how I can contribute to your business goals.

Warm regards,

Alex Johnson

If "Warm regards" feels too clichéd, other professional yet approachable options include:

  • Yours sincerely,
  • Yours truly,
  • Thanks for your time,

business cover letter structure

3 Essential Business Cover Letter Tips

You already know the basics of crafting a solid business cover letter.

Now, let's take yours to the next level with some tailored cover letter tips for the business world.

#1. Match Your Resume

Your cover letter should echo the professionalism of your resume.

Presentation skills matter, and your application is the first place you get to showcase yours. If your resume and cover letter don’t pair well, you could come off as an unpolished candidate.

Make sure your text is positioned neatly on the page, and keep the font uniform all the way through. Just as you'd handle a business proposal, pay attention to those page margins and the line spacing. And while you’re at it, remember to keep it brief—an ideal cover letter is always one neat page.

Or Use A Cover Letter Template Instead

Are you trying to get your application out there as soon as possible?

Our resume builder is a lifesaver. Use it to create the best business resume in minutes, and grab one of our matching cover letter templates to complete your application. 

Every one of our templates is designed with feedback from hiring managers from around the globe, so they meet all industry standards and give your application a sleek, professional look.

business cover letter examples

#2. Mention Skills

Hiring managers want to know what you can bring to the table, and there’s no better way to show them than by mentioning your skills.

Your business cover letter should always include the most essential skills from your resume . Your skills tell the hiring manager what you can do and how much they might need to train you. But only if you mention your skills in the right way.

Don’t just toss them in there randomly, like a salad. Connect the dots for the hiring manager by weaving a narrative that backs up every skill you mention. For example, if you're good at data analysis, explain how that skill helped improve a past employer's quarterly earnings. 

The key here is relevance. Discussing your skills in context shows you're not only skilled but also aware of how those skills can benefit the company. It paints a picture of you as a well-rounded candidate who’s both qualified and ready to hit the ground running.

#3. Proofread the Final Draft

Never underestimate the importance of proofreading your cover letter.

A single typo or grammatical error might seem small, but to many hiring managers, it can scream "carelessness”—a crucial cover letter mistake for any candidate who claims to have “an eye for detail”.

Hundreds of applications get tossed aside for the same reason. So, to make sure your business cover letter is spotless, take the time to read it multiple times. Consider asking a friend for a fresh perspective, just in case you missed something yourself.

We recommend you also use a spell-checking tool like Grammarly . Don’t trust it blindly, though - you should always take the time to decide for yourself if it’s correct. Clean and polished writing shows professionalism, which can make all the difference in your application's success.

Key Takeaways

And that’s all there is to writing your business cover letter!

Hopefully, we’ve inspired you, and you’ve prepared your application for that job you’ve been eyeing.

But before we say goodbye, let’s do a brief recap of what we mentioned:

  • The top of your business cover letter should have a header where you include your contact information as well as the hiring manager’s. Just make sure it’s factually correct.
  • Your opening paragraph should be captivating, or else the hiring manager might not bother to read more of it. Mention why you’re writing and be enthusiastic, so it shows you’re genuinely interested.
  • The body of your cover letter should include the bulk of your sales pitch. Focus on your relevant achievements, qualifications, and skills and how they relate to the job you’re after.
  • Make sure your cover letter matches your resume. This shows a professional touch, and it helps the hiring manager pick out your application from all the rest.

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How To Address a Cover Letter (With Examples)

Becca Dershowitz

As a job seeker, the power of a well-crafted cover letter cannot be underestimated - it's your chance to make a compelling case for why you're the perfect fit for your dream job! Even if a cover letter is not explicitly requested in a job posting, it's generally a good idea to include one with every job application you submit.

Addressing your cover letter correctly is a crucial aspect of crafting the perfect cover letter. Whether you're applying for an internship, a position at a large company, or any other job opportunity, knowing how to professionally address your cover letter can leave a lasting impression.

In this article, we will delve into best practices and provide tips on how to effectively address your cover letter, including avoiding common mistakes and using appropriate salutations. Read on to learn the dos and don'ts of cover letter addressing to enhance your job application and increase your chances of landing that dream job!

3 key takeaways you'll get from this article

  • Cover letters should be address to a specific person by name, if possible.
  • Be aware of mistakes to avoid when addressing a cover letter.
  • Use Teal to quickly and easily generate multiple versions of your cover letter tailored to each job you're applying to.

What is a cover letter?

A cover letter is a formal letter that accompanies your resume or job application. It's like an introduction to yourself and a summary of your qualifications, skills, and interest in a specific job or company. It's typically submitted along with your resume when you're applying for a job or internship.

Think of it as your opportunity to make a compelling case for why you're the perfect fit for the position. You can highlight your relevant experiences, express your enthusiasm for the job or internship and the company, and show why you're the best candidate.

If you're looking for any job-specific guidance with your letter, we recommend exploring our selection of 1,200+ cover letter examples to see relevant samples for your career.

A well-written cover letter should be tailored to the specific job and company you're applying to. It should be concise, professional, and error-free to help you stand out from other candidates.

Do I need to add company contact information in a cover letter?

In general, you do not need to include the company's contact information in your cover letter address, as it is typically listed in the job posting or application materials. It's important to follow the specific instructions and requirements provided by the employer or job listing. If the employer specifically requests that you include their contact information in your cover letter, then it's a good idea to comply with that request. Otherwise, it's generally not necessary to include the company's contact information in your cover letter.

Who should a cover letter be addressed to?

Ideally, a cover letter should be addressed to a specific person, such as the hiring manager or recruiter responsible for the position you are applying for. Addressing your cover letter to a specific individual shows that you have taken the time and effort to research and personalize your application, which can make a positive impression and demonstrate your attention to detail.

Once you have a full name, be sure to use their surname when you address a cover letter to them. Using only their first name comes across as too familiar. While you don't want to be too formal, you also want to avoid being too casual when you address a cover letter.

If the job description or application instructions do not mention a specific name, you can try to find out the name of the hiring manager or recruiter by researching the company website, LinkedIn, other professional networking platforms, or doing a Google search.

How to address a cover letter without a name

After conducting some company research, if you are unable to find a specific name to address your cover letter to, there are alternatives to ensure you address it in a professional manner.

A generic but still professional way to address your cover letter is, "Dear Hiring Manager,". It shows that you are addressing your letter to the person responsible for hiring, even if you don't know their name.

Another way to address your cover letter if you can't find a specific name is to address the specific department or team responsible for the position you're applying for. Here are a few examples:

  • Dear Human Resources Director,
  • Dear Sales Team Hiring Manager,
  • To the Computer Science Recruitment Team,
  • Dear Customer Service Department,

If you are unable to obtain the department or team names after your research, you can address your cover letter to the company:

  • Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team,
  • Dear [Company Name] Recruiting Staff,

Remember, it's always best to try and find a specific name to address your cover letter to, but if you are unable to do so, using a professional and appropriate alternative can still make a positive impression.

How to address a cover letter to a large company

When addressing a cover letter to a large company, it's important to follow professional etiquette and make your letter as personalized as possible, even if you do not have a specific name.

If you are unable to obtain the hiring manager's name and the department or team names after your research, you can address your cover letter to the company directly:

How to address an email cover letter

When it comes to addressing an email cover letter, it's important to strike a friendly yet professional tone and adhere to best practices.

The subject line of an email cover letter should be concise and informative. It should include key information, such as the specific job title you are applying for and your name. This helps the recipient quickly identify the purpose of the email.

A well-crafted, clear subject line can help your email cover letter stand out in a busy inbox and increase the chances of it being opened and read by the recipient. For example:

  • Subject line: Tina Miller - Frontend Engineer Job Application
  • Subject line: Job Application for Marketing Manager Position - Tina Miller
  • Subject line: Tina Miller - Customer Success Job Application

Mistakes to avoid when addressing a cover letter

Addressing a cover letter is an important aspect of creating a professional and effective cover letter. Here are some best practices for addressing a cover letter:

Use the correct title

If the hiring manager has a professional or academic title like Dr., Professor, Reverend, or Captain, use that in place of a first name. You can shorten the title for brevity:

  • Dear Dr. Miller,
  • Dear Professor Miller,
  • Dear Sgt. Miller,

Be mindful of gender

It's important to be mindful of using gender-specific titles like "Dear Mr.", "Dear Mrs.", or "Dear Ms." in your cover letter. These titles assume the recipient's gender based on their marital status, which may not be accurate or inclusive. To ensure a friendly and professional tone, it's best to avoid using these titles unless you are certain of the recipient's preferred title.

If you are addressing a cover letter to a person with a gender-neutral name, or if you are unsure of the recipient's gender, it's best to use a gender-neutral title such as "[Dear Recipient's Title] or [Dear Recipient's Name]".

In general, avoid assumptions or guesses about the recipient's gender, as it may be incorrect and come across as unprofessional or insensitive.

Use formal salutations

Using "Hello" or "Hi" to address a cover letter may come across as overly informal, and can give the impression that you are not familiar with professional etiquette. Such a casual cover letter salutation may even be perceived as disrespectful and can suggest that you are not taking the job application process seriously.

Avoid impersonal greetings

When it comes to addressing your cover letter, it's recommended to steer clear of generic salutations like "To Whom It May Concern" or "Dear Sir/Madam." These can come across as impersonal and outdated, and may not leave the best impression. Opting for a more personalized and tailored greeting shows that you've taken the time to research and are genuinely interested in the recipient, which can make a positive impact.

Other cover letter format best practices

Having a properly formatted, easy-to-read cover letter is crucial in making a positive first impression on potential employers. You can even use ChatGPT to write your cover letter . Here are a few best practices to follow:

Use a header

Including a cover letter header is vital as it provides hiring managers and recruiters with essential information upfront, including your name and contact details. It's crucial to list a professional email address to maintain a polished and credible impression. By incorporating a well-designed header, you can ensure that your cover letter looks organized and conveys your professionalism from the very beginning.

Personally address the hiring manager

Personally addressing the hiring manager in your cover letter can make a significant impact. Using the recipient's name shows that you've taken the time to research and personalize your application, which demonstrates genuine interest and attention to detail. It also helps establish a connection and creates a sense of rapport, making your cover letter more engaging and memorable.

Make sure it's an appropriate length

An appropriate length for a cover letter is typically one page or less, even if you're writing a cover letter with no experience . It's important to keep your cover letter concise and focused, highlighting your relevant qualifications and experiences. Avoid lengthy paragraphs and unnecessary details that may dilute the impact of your message.

A well-structured cover letter that gets straight to the point and effectively communicates your skills and enthusiasm for the position is more likely to capture the attention of the hiring manager and make a positive impression.

Proofread and double-check for accuracy

Ensure you're using a standard business letter format with appropriate spacing, margins, fonts , grammar, and spelling.

How to quickly write a cover letter

You can quickly and easily create a personalized cover letter in just a few clicks with Teal's AI Resume Builder and AI functionality.

  • Step 1: Sign up for Teal
  • Step 2: Download Teal’s Chrome extension and start bookmarking jobs
  • Step 3: Build out an exhaustive career history
  • Step 4: Attach your desired job description and use Teal's AI Resume Builder with AI functionality to generate multiple versions of your cover letter tailored to each specific job

Related Articles

  • The ultimate guide on how to write a cover letter
  • A helpful cover letter checklist
  • Cover letter for an internship tips
  • A collection of short cover letter examples

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best way to address a cover letter when the hiring manager's name is unknown, is it appropriate to use a creative or casual salutation in a cover letter for a less formal company, can i use the teal cover letter generator to customize the salutation based on the job i'm applying for.

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The Top 6 Tips for Writing a Powerful Cover Letter

The Top 6 Tips for Writing a Powerful Cover Letter

A cover letter is a written, one-page document expressing your interest in a job opening. It should specifically address your interest in both the role and the company, and what skills and relevant experiences make you a great fit for the position. As importantly, it’s a chance to let your personality shine through and show off your communication skills.

Even when an employer is convinced that you meet all the qualifications based on your resume, a cover letter gives that extra spark that can greenlight your application to move through the hiring process and land you an interview. 

In this article, we’ll share the top 6 tips for writing a powerful cover letter and hopefully help you land the job you want.

1. Do Your Research

Start off your cover letter by addressing it to a specific person and not using the dreaded phrase of “To Whom it May Concern.” This shows that you took the extra time to do research on their website or Linkedin to identify the hiring manager’s name.

If you know any individuals from the company, ask them if you may “name drop” them in your introduction. To further demonstrate that you’ve done your homework on the organization, reference specific initiatives and programs. You could also cite other facts that prompted you to apply, such as a recent article or announcement.

The above recommendations showcase to the employer that you put in the extra effort to research them, which in turn, demonstrates your genuine interest in working for them.

2. Tailor Everything

Tailor each cover letter to both the organization you are applying to and the specific role. Make the case as to why you would be good at that particular job and an asset within the larger organization.

You should incorporate keywords and phrases from the job description into your cover letter. Make sure to tailor them to your specific experiences and accomplishments. It’s always helpful to reiterate job description language with data-driven details. 

Here’s an example from NYFA Classifieds Sales Manager, Mary-kate Grohoski, back when she applied to her current role:

The Sales Manager’s job description detailed the responsibility of “Managing the sales process from prospect identification, close of sales, and follow-up.” In her cover letter, she rephrased the above language and incorporated her experience with the following line: “By managing the sales process of over 10 Fine Books and Manuscripts auctions per year in the New York showroom, I oversee all client communications and portfolios, as well as the management of over 2,400 auctions lots per year, and develop and maintain long-term corporate relations.”

3. Be Authentic

In a sea of often standardized cover letters, being authentic could make you stand out. Sincere interest comes through in your writing, so take the time to truly reflect on what genuinely excites you about this opportunity. Speak to why you want the position and be specific about the aspects of the role that intrigue you and are aligned with the vision you have for yourself professionally.

When reviewing your cover letter, consider how the language you’ve chosen could inspire the hiring manager to look forward to what you could achieve together.

4. Solve a Problem for the Employer

Don’t make the cover letter all about you; it’s as much about the employer as it is about you. Connect how your previous experience would be an asset to this particular organization based on what they want to achieve. (Quick tip: Usually, their goals for the role are outlined in the job description.)

How can your skills benefit the organization and help them grow? Do you have ideas as to how you’d contribute to their specific programs and take them to the next level? Reference specific skills, experiences, and projects to demonstrate the value you would be bringing to the role.

Employers are always looking to bring new skills into their teams, to not only fill gaps, but to elevate their teams and organizations’ performance. By relating your experience back to the organization, you are helping them draw clear connections between your background and their goals for the role.

5. Keep it short

A good rule of thumb is to keep your cover letter under a page long, but even shorter is better. It’s a challenge to do so, since there is a lot you may want to cover, but there are some tricks to help you stay succinct.

Something to keep in mind is to not repeat what is in your resume, but instead, provide supplementary information and context to your resume’s content. Another tip is to focus on the 3-4 most relevant transferable skills you can bring to the role, instead of trying to cover every qualification and skill mentioned in the job description. Lastly, it’s always a good idea to have a friend or mentor review your resume and make recommendations on what you could cut.

At the end of the day, remember that the hiring manager is reading countless cover letters so try to make it as seamless for them as possible and make every word count.

6. Use a template, but mainly for formatting purposes

It’s a great time saver when you have a perfectly formatted cover letter template ready to be filled out so that you don’t have to deal with time consuming adjustments to margins, fonts, spacing, and alignment. 

A cover letter format pretty much follows the standard business letter format which contains a header with yours and the hiring manager’s contact information, a salutation, an opening paragraph, one or two body paragraphs, a closing paragraph and a sign off. Quick tip: Include your email address in your contact information, in case the cover letter gets separated from your resume.

Apart from that, you can standardize some aspects of the content just to have a visual filler in place or even use the text as a starting point, but always plan to customize them further for each application.

Overall, as you are writing your cover letter, try to keep a fine balance between talking about yourself, the employer, and what you can achieve together. Always aim to be answering the question of “Why should we hire you?” and back up everything you say with specific examples from your background. 

– Katerina Nicolaou, Account Manager

Put these tips to use by finding your next job on NYFA Classifieds , the go-to listings site for artists, arts administrators, and museum professionals. Follow us @nyfa_classifieds on TikTok for more creative career tips.

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How To Address A Cover Letter In Australia (With Examples)

Dear Hiring Manager?

(36 votes, average: 4.6 out of 5)

Contributing Editor | HR, careers & job search

I founded three separate companies over the past decade to help leaders and organisations do their best work. Arielle Executive helps leaders get noticed while Arielle Partners & Talent Avenue connect organisations to Australia's best leadership talent.

Last updated: September 18th, 2023

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A well-written cover letter is essential for ensuring that your job application gets noticed by Australian hiring managers and recruiters.

However, you must address your cover letter correctly – and to the right contact person. Make a misstep here, and you’ll immediately send the wrong message to a potential employer.

Why Is It Important To Address Your Cover Letter Correctly?

A personal, precise greeting tells the hiring manager that you’ve invested time and effort into finding their contact details.

While this may seem like a trivial detail, it kicks off your relationship on the right foot by:

  • Building a connection.
  • Positioning you as a conscientious candidate with strong attention to detail.

The WRONG Way To Address Your Cover Letter.

Australian employers want to see your personality come through on your cover letter, but not to the point where it looks too casual and/or unprofessional.

Avoid the following, or any variations thereof:

  • “Hey, Tom!’
  • “Hola, Hiring Manager.”
  • “Sup Boss”

Who To Address Your Cover Letter To?

Ideally, you should target your cover letter to the person making the hiring decision.

  • In a small business, this may be the Managing Director or owner.
  • In a large business , this will probably be the hiring manager or a department head.
  • If the business uses an external recruitment firm , you should address the cover letter to the recruiter.

Getting the person’s title and gender is helpful, but the most important detail you need to list is the person’s actual name.

(Related: Best Resume And Cover Letter Builders in Australia ).

How To Find The Recipient’s Name.

There are a few steps that you can follow to make sure that your cover letter has the correct address at its beginning. If one step doesn’t work, then try the others.

1. Use The Job Description.

Job descriptions frequently – though not always – contain the hiring manager’s or the recruiter’s contact details.

The more senior the role is, the more likely the JD is to include a point of contact.

Expert Tip.

If all you have is a job ad that’s published by a recruitment firm rather than a company’s internal talent team (logos are a dead giveaway), you can always call the firm’s front desk and find out who on their team specialises in your type of role.

This Seek job ad doesn’t provide a recruiter’s details, but the recruitment firm’s name is clearly visible.

After hopping across into LinkedIn and discovering that Finite IT Recruitment Solutions has 123 employees, I narrowed my focus down to 39 people by filtering in only people with the word “Consultant” in the job title.

Using this method, it’s often possible to narrow your pool of possible targets to 1-3 people.

2. Use The Company Website.

Look for an “About Us” or “Our Team” page, with the names and roles of all their key employees.

Poke around until you understand their organisational structure well enough to find the most appropriate person.

Depending on company size, it will likely be one of the following:

  • The solo internal recruiter (e.g., “Recruitment Manager” or “Talent Acquisition Manager”)
  • The internal recruiter who specialises in your field (e.g., Recruiter – Sales).
  • Head of the department you’re likely applying to (e.g., Head of Sales).

If this approach doesn’t provide enough detail, call the company and ask for clarification. Explain that you’re applying for a role and would like to make a positive first impression by getting the hiring manager’s name right.

3. Use LinkedIn.

Find the company’s LinkedIn page, bring up the full list of its employees, and then use the filters to find either the head of the department you’re applying for, or the internal recruitment professional.

It’s often surprisingly easy to find the right person – even if the company is huge.

For example, if you were applying for a sales role with HubSpot in Australia, a LinkedIn search that filters out everyone except employees with the title “sales” would bring up 25 people.

You’ll need to use common sense and further research to narrow the list down further, but 25 people at a publicly listed global company with 883 million in revenue isn’t a bad starting point.

What If You Can’t Find The Hiring Manager’s Name?

If you have followed my earlier tips and could not find the name of the right person, you have the option of targeting the title.

Depending on the size and structure of the company, you’ll need to aim at either:

1. The Department Head.

Target your future boss or their boss. For example:

  • “Dear Head of Marketing”
  • “Dear CTO”
  • “Dear Sales Director”

2. The Head Of Talent Acquisition.

Companies increasingly roll up their recruitment and HR teams under the overall umbrella of “People and Culture”. Your cover letter could aim at any of the following:

  • “Dear Recruitment Manager”
  • “Dear Talent Acquisition Manager”
  • “Dear Head of People”

Larger companies with multiple departments and complex hierarchies are more challenging to target precisely. It’s not the end of the world if you can’t narrow your options down to one person. As long as you can make an educated guess that makes logical sense, you’ll be fine.

Can I Use The Hiring Manager’s First Name Only?

Yes, but tread with caution. Unless you’re certain that the company’s culture is very informal, it’s probably safer to use the person’s last name.

If you do use the first name only, the traditional approach is to prefix it with a title like “Mr” or “Mrs”, although a simple “Hello” is increasingly common.

Can I Use “To Whom It May Concern”?

Only as the very last resort. It’s distant, impersonal, and hints that you didn’t try to find the hiring manager’s real contact details.

Can I Use “Dear Sir/Madam”?

Same as above.

Can I Use “Dear Hiring Manager”?

Can i assume marital status.

I suggest you don’t. If you do get it wrong, you’ll end up looking unprofessional.

Instead of taking a stab guessing whether your hiring manager is a “Mrs” or a “Miss” Costanza, I suggest you stick to the more general “Ms” for all female recipients.

“Mr” is OK for all men, regardless of marital status.

Using gendered titles is becoming increasingly problematic. Avoid the possibility of misgendering someone by using a simple “Hello Jackie”.

How To Deal With Academic Titles?

Academic titles like “Dr” and “Professor” overrule the traditional “Mr” and “Mrs”. If you’re not sure, search the University’s website for the academic’s profile page.

What Is A Cover Letter?

A cover letter is a targeted career marketing document, which you must tailor to every job that you apply for.

It is a place to demonstrate to the recruiter why you are so interested in this particular role and why you’re a better fit than every other candidate.

While your resume provides an overview of your work history and commercial value, your cover letter is a 10-second elevator pitch that spotlights your most relevant and important accomplishments.

Your cover letter must be written in a professional tone, and be less than 1 page in length.

Cover letters should not be copied and pasted, because they need to be customised to the requirements of each job and each employer.

Do Recruiters And Hiring Managers Even Read Cover Letters?

I conducted a survey, which revealed that about 2/3 of recruiters and hiring managers never read cover letters.

As with most complex issues, the devil is in the details.

See, most cover letters get thrown in the bin not because hiring managers aren’t interested in cover letters per se, but because 90% of cover letters are generic, untargeted and dull.

Hiring managers don’t have an aversion to reading cover letters; rather, they have an aversion to cover letters that don’t reveal anything new, unique or valuable about the candidate.

Now that you know this fact, use it as an opportunity to set yourself apart from other job seekers:

  • Write the best cover letter you can
  • Target it to each role
  • Ensure it’s not a carbon copy of your resume

Which Font Type And Size Should You Use On Your Cover Letter?

The styling of your cover letter should match that of your resume. Start with the following parameters and micro-adjust if necessary:

  • Your Name : 32 points, Arial Nova, bold
  • Your Title : 13 points, Arial Nova, bold
  • Cover Letter Heading : 20 points, Calibri, all caps
  • Cover Letter Body : 11 points, Calibri

All the best in your job search!

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Click here to directly go to the complete cover letter without name sample

How to address a cover letter without a name?

According to a study, every corporate job opening gets roughly 250 resumes , out of which only 3-4 applicants land an interview.

That means if your cover letter feels generic and lacks personal touch, it may end up in the trash.

However, what if there is a circumstance for addressing a cover letter with no name?

Read on to get an insight into the following FAQs:

  • How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the hiring manager?
  • How to format the cover letter address correctly?
  • Who to write a cover letter to without a contact?
  • Which method of delivering a cover letter is not appropriate?
  • What are the practical ways to find the hiring manager’s name?
  • Additional tips to write a cover letter without name

Whom to Address a Cover Letter To?

Who do you address a cover letter to when there is no name?

To understand how to address a cover letter, you need to know to whom to address it.

A cover letter should be addressed in the following ways:

  • If the hiring manager’s name is given in the job description, you should always address the cover letter to them.
  • If the hiring manager’s email address is not there in the job description, you can address the cover letter to the department manager.

There is no point in sending the cover letter to the CEO or founders because they are not the ones who usually handle the recruitment process.

Also Read: How to address a cover letter?

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name?

A cover letter for a job is not similar to a letter to a friend.

The purpose of a cover is to impress the hiring manager with your professional expertise to score an interview.

But addressing cover letters with no name may get rejected by the recruiters.

We understand how important it is to know how to write a cover letter without a name as per these statistics.

Also Read: How to write a cover letter?

Here are some steps on how to address a cover letter without a name:

1. Address the Cover Letter with “Dear Hiring Manager”

It is the most common way to address a hiring manager with no name and hiring managers prefer this salutation over no salutation at all.

This salutation allows the hiring manager to quickly focus on the main body of the cover letter, instead of rejecting the cover letter right away.

However, the best way to address a cover letter is by personalizing it.

2. Address the Cover Letter to the Team

When in doubt, you can address the whole team so that anyone from the team can receive your cover letter and respond accordingly.

It can be the hiring manager, assistant, or anyone from the department who may interview you during the job application process.

You can phrase it as:

  • Dear Recruiting Team
  • Dear Project Manager Hiring Team
Also Read: What can a cover letter explain that a résumé cannot?

3. Maintain Professional Approach

Maintain a professional approach and avoid informal phrases or words such as "Hello!", "Good Evening/Morning", or "Hi!"

Keep it simple and professional by using the term, "Dear" followed by the designation.

For Example:

  • Dear Hiring Head
  • Dear Recruitment Supervisor

4. Do Not Assume Gender or Marital Status

You often know the hiring manager’s name but do not know their gender or marital status.

Assuming someone's gender may seem disrespectful and unprofessional hence you should avoid making such mistakes by keeping it gender-neutral. Avoid the term "Sir" or "Madam" and simply address the recipient as "Dear (Profile)".

The best way to find the hiring manager’s gender is by doing a quick LinkedIn search.

The LinkedIn profile may contain a profile picture wherein you can determine the hiring manager’s gender.

If the hiring manager’s gender is Male, address the hiring manager with “Mr.”.

  • “Mr. Xavier,”

If the hiring manager is female, it can be confusing.

As you don’t know the marital status, avoid using Miss. or Mrs. to address the hiring manager. Instead, use a generic “Ms..”

  • Dear Ms. Moore
  • Dear Ms. Kyle
  • Dear Mrs. Lane
  • Dear Miss Maximoff
Also Read: How to reach out to recruiters on LinkedIn?

5. Include Job Profile and Professional Titles

Are you asking yourself continuously, “How to address a cover letter without a contact name?”

Here is the answer for you.

Instead of using only “ Dear Hiring Manager ,” include the department name or the title of the person who will be reading the cover letter to make it more specific.

  • Dear Marketing Department,
  • Dear Head of the Sales Department,
  • Dear VP of Marketing

By personalizing the addresses in this way, you can grab the hiring manager’s attention to read your resume.

This shows that you are not throwing a rock blindly. You have done your research and have some idea about the company.

Don’t forget to include the hiring manager’s academic title or professional title in the cover letter address.

These types of hyper-personalization can grab the hiring manager’s attention even more and entice them to read your cover letter.

How to Write the Academic Title in the Cover Letter Address?

You can write the academic title in full form.

  • Dear Doctor Green,
  • Dear Professor Geller,

Alternatively, you can use the abbreviation of the titles as well.

  • Dear Dr. Murphy,
  • Dear Prof. Goodwin,
  • Dear Sgt. Moore,
  • Dear Principle Alan,

Where to Place the Cover Letter Address?

Not just the proper format, but the placement of the cover letter address also plays an important role.

  • The cover letter heading will go at the top.
  • Write the date below the heading.
  • Leave one line space and write the hiring manager’s name.
  • Write the address of the company.
  • Leave one space and then write the position you are applying for.
  • Leave one space and then write the salutation.

Cover letter without name

Best Way to Address a Cover Letter with No Name or Email

Writing an email cover letter address is fundamentally similar but with some tweaks.

If you are sending a digital cover letter, you need to start with a professional subject line.

John Doe: Application for Video Editor Position, Reff: Anthony Moore

Then add your cover letter salutation based on the same rule.

Add a line space and then start your cover letter by adding the necessary information that gives an insight into your professional experience and skills.

Subject Line: John Doe: Application for Project Manager Position, Reff: Charles Moore

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am a 5+ years experienced project management professional…

Appropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Committee
  • Dear (department name) Hiring Committee
  • Dear Hiring Team
  • To the (department name) Hiring Manager
  • Dear Team (For smaller companies)
  • To the Recruiting Team
Also Read: What are the benefits of using a cover letter builder?

Inappropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Sir or Madam — Ancient salutation does not work anymore
  • To Whom It May Concern — It is not personalized
  • Hello, Hi, or Greetings — Informal salutation
  • Happy Sunday! — Casual salutation
  • Good Morning — Not practical as you have no idea when they will read the letter
Also Read: How to draft a professional message to the hiring manager?

How to Find the Hiring Manager's Name?

How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the name?

Well, you can simply address your cover letter as, "Dear Hiring Manager". But if you feel the need to add the name of the hiring manager then there are ways to do so.

Finding the hiring manager’s name is the best way to address a cover letter.

So, before calling it quits, let us look at some ways to find the hiring manager’s name.

Read the Job Description Thoroughly

Always read the job description carefully!

Usually, the hiring manager’s name or the title of the reporting manager is given in the job description or under the job description.

For instance, “ The digital marketer will report to the Marketing Manager. ”

You can use the title to then find their name on the company website or LinkedIn.

Sometimes the job description includes the hiring manager’s email address.

For Example: “ Send your cover letter and resume to johndoe@hiration[dot]com" .

You can find the hiring manager’s name in the email address.

Visit the Profile of the Job Publisher

Sites like LinkedIn or AngelList have this unique feature to show you the name of the one who posts the job.

You can go to their profile to see if they are the hiring manager and include their name in the cover letter.

Call the Company Front Desk

Calling the company is the easiest way to find the hiring manager's name. But, job candidates reserve it as the last option.

  • Call the company desk
  • Tell them that you are applying for a “vacant position” in their company and would like to know the hiring manager’s name.

Here’s an example of the script:

“ Hi, my name is Alex, and I’m currently applying for the video editor position in your company. Would it be possible for you to provide me the name and email id of the hiring manager so that I can address the cover letter properly?”

Do a Quick LinkedIn Search

According to a study, 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn regularly . That means, if you search for the hiring manager of a certain company on LinkedIn, there is a high chance for you to find their name.

Many job descriptions specifically tell the reporting manager’s title in the job description. Then you need to address the cover letter to the reporting manager.

The process of finding the reporting manager’s name is similar.

  • Go to LinkedIn
  • Search the job title and company name
  • In the search result, you can find the profile of the designated person
  • Sometimes, there might be more than one similar position for a big company so you need to narrow your search by location to find the reporting manager
Also Read : How to Make the Best Use of LinkedIn Search Feature?

Network with People

LinkedIn is the best way to find and connect with people who have connections in the company you are applying for. If you can create a good rapport with these professionals, you can ask for a reference.

It is an easy but time-consuming process.

  • Search the company name and see the professionals active on LinkedIn
  • Start engaging with their content and leave thoughtful comments
  • Send them a personalized connection invite after engaging with their content for a couple of days
  • Do not ask for a reference abruptly; instead, start building a rapport with them by sharing helpful industry information, blog, article links, videos, etc.
  • If possible, move the connection offline and meet in person
  • After you develop a good rapport with the professionals, you can ask for a reference or introduce yourself to the hiring manager
Also Read : How to Connect with People on LinkedIn?

Tips for Addressing a Cover Letter with No Name

Always use a formal address in the cover letter.

Whether you know the hiring manager’s name or not, always keep the address formal in the cover letter. Even if the company has an informal culture, do not use any casual address unless you are a part of the organization.

  • Dear Ms. Lane,
  • Dear Prof. Luther,
  • Dear Ms. Ann,
  • Hello Maya,
  • Greetings Max,

Avoid Using “To Whom It May Concern”

This salutation is too generic and does not address anyone at all; however, according to a survey, 17% of hiring managers prefer this salutation over others .

But the problem is 83% of hiring managers don’t prefer it.

So we suggest that you avoid it altogether.

Avoid Addressing the Cover Letter to the Recruiters

A recruiter’s job is to sort the resumes based on skills and experience and pass them to the hiring managers. They don’t generally read the cover letter.

So, it’s a waste of opportunity if you address the cover letter to the recruiter.

Instead, always address the cover letter to the hiring manager.

Ensure That You Are Addressing the Cover Letter to the Right Person

Online information is not updated regularly. Often, the concerned persons leave the job, but their email id is still there on the website.

So, who to address cover letter to if unknown? Or you are unsure? It is best to acresully research the hiring manager’s name and crosscheck if you have any doubts by calling the company directly.

Do Not Mess up the Hiring Manager’s Name

There is a saying that “The first impression is the last impression.”

Try to make an excellent first impression by writing the hiring manager’s name using the correct spelling.

Don’t Stress Too Much

If you have the relevant skills and experience for a job, addressing a cover letter to the wrong person might not be a big deal. So, if you can’t find the hiring manager’s name and wondering how to address a cover letter without a name, just write “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Make Sure the Cover Letter is Short and Easy to Read

You should not make the cover letter more than 400-500 words long. It will make it difficult to read.

A short and crisp cover letter will intrigue the hiring managers as compared to a long one.

Also Read: How long should a cover letter be?

Cover Letter Without Name Sample

Hiration cover letter builder.

Create a polished, professional cover letter in minutes with an AI-powered tool that helps you create a personalized cover letter based on the job description.

It comes with the following features:

  • Option to save unlimited cover letters
  • Intuitive next text suggestion
  • 15+ cover letter designs
  • Full rich-text editor
  • Unlimited PDF downloads
  • 30+ pre-filled cover letter templates
  • 1-click design change
  • A sharable link
  • LIVE cover letter editor

FAQs on "How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name?"

With that, we have answered all of your questions on “how to address a cover letter without a name?”.

Addressing a cover letter to an unknown person should not be difficult if you can keep some points in mind regrading how to go about in this situation. Here are a few FAQs that will help you gain a quick recap:

Q. How to address a cover letter to an unknown person?

A. In cases where you are wondering how to address a cover letter without name, you can opt for "Dear Hiring Manager," or "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team,".

Q. Who to address cover letter to with no contact?

A. When addressing a cover letter without a specific contact, it's best to use a generic but professional greeting such as "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team" or "Dear Hiring Team." This shows that you have taken the time to tailor your application to the company while acknowledging that you don't have a specific contact person.

Hiration provides you with a personalized 360-degree ChatGPT-powered career service platform for all your professional needs - from building a shortlist-worthy resume and cover letter to optimizing your LinkedIn profile, preparing for interviews, and more!

For any queries or concerns, feel free to drop a mail at support{@}hiration.com

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how to address a cover letter to a large company

IMAGES

  1. How to Address a Cover Letter: A 2022 Guide with 10+ Examples

    how to address a cover letter to a large company

  2. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024: Complete Guide

    how to address a cover letter to a large company

  3. How To Address A Cover Letter Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown

    how to address a cover letter to a large company

  4. How to Address a Cover Letter: 9 Steps (with Pictures)

    how to address a cover letter to a large company

  5. How to Properly Address a Cover Letter (with Examples)

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  6. How to Address a Cover Letter—20+ Examples & 3 Easy Steps

    how to address a cover letter to a large company

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Address a Cover Letter (With Examples)

    The headline on the image says, "Cover letter format" A woman sits at a table writing on a piece of paper. There's a simple cover letter represented by lines. On one side of the cover letter, there are labels for the sections of the cover letter. The labels are: 1. Date and contact information 2. Salutation/greeting 3. First, introduce yourself 4.

  2. How to Address a Cover Letter (and Who to Address)

    Here are the most common ways to address a cover letter without a name: To Whom It May Concern. Dear Human Resources Director. Dear Hiring Manager. Dear Recruitment Manager. Additionally, if you want to add a personal touch, address your cover letter to your prospective department or manager.

  3. How to Address a Cover Letter: A 2022 Guide with 10+ Examples

    And if your cover letter does not have a subject line, it will not show in the hiring manager's list. Here is an example cover letter subject line : Subject line: Job Application for Video Editor Position, Ref: Hanna Moore. 2. Address the Cover Letter in the Correct Way.

  4. How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

    Carefully Proofread Your Letter: Whether you're sending an email or uploading or attaching a printable cover letter, it's important to make sure that your cover letter and resume are written as well as any other business correspondence. If you can, have a friend proofread before you hit send, to pick up any typos or grammatical errors.

  5. How to Address Your Cover Letter in 2023

    Rule #1: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager using a formal, full-name salutation (if possible). For a cover letter, you should always default to addressing it to the hiring manager for the position you're applying to. Unless you know for sure that the culture of the company is more casual, use the hiring manager's first and ...

  6. How To Address a Cover Letter

    For example, 'Dear Austen Myers' is acceptable and considered a professional way to address a cover letter. If you know their gender and wish to use a title in the address, use either 'Ms.' or 'Mr.' to avoid inaccurately describing the recipient's marital status. For example, you'd write 'Dear Ms. Myers' rather than 'Dear ...

  7. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024 (with Examples)

    There's a right and wrong way to address a cover letter. Way #1: The employer thinks, "This applicant's got a brain.". Way #2: She thinks, "Yuck. Another dud.". It's not rocket science. Just pick the right salutation and the right address cover letter format. In this guide, you'll learn: Who to address a cover letter to.

  8. How to Address a Cover Letter: Tips + Examples for Every Type

    A cover letter is a formal document, and so it should be addressed as such. The most professional way to do this is with "Dear.". For example: Dear Mr. Miller, Dear Ms. Jones, Dear Dr. Lopez, If you don't know the person's gender or preferred pronouns, you can use their first name. For example: "Dear James Miller.".

  9. How to address a cover letter + 11 examples [Get noticed]

    When you're reading a job advert, you'll sometimes find the name and email address of the person you need to get in touch with directly in the ad. Look out for the section that says "For enquiries" or "Contact person". For example, the advert might say something like: "For more info, please contact Susan Wright at susan-wright ...

  10. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024: Complete Guide

    Addressing a cover letter with "Hello" or "Hi" is a tad too informal for many companies. 2. Using Dear Sir or Madam. WRONG. Dear Sir or Madam, Don't use Dear Sir or Madam even if you're not sure who to address a cover letter to. It's a very outdated phrase, and it will make you look lazy.

  11. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024

    In that case, you can address your cover letter to the department, faculty, or the company. Alternatively, if you don't have enough information either about the department or the team, you can opt for addressing the cover letter directly to the company's hiring staff, as follows: Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team.

  12. How to Address a Cover Letter to Recruiter or Hiring Manager

    Whoever it is, use their full name (first and last name) in the greeting. If you cannot definitively tell the gender of the hiring person, do not use a gender-based title such as "Mr." or "Ms." in the greeting. Instead just use the person's full name. For example, Alex Johnson could be male or female. To avoid a gender mistake, use Dear ...

  13. How to Address a Cover Letter: Step-by-Step Tips, Examples

    Save the "Hi" for your friends and refrain from using it in your cover letter. 4. Leaving it Blank. You should never leave it blank. As we mentioned above, if you can't find the name, consider addressing a cover letter to HR by using the position title and "hiring manager" or just "Dear Hiring Manager". 5.

  14. Business Cover Letter Example & How-To Guide in 2024

    Top ↑ Business Cover Letter Example 5 Steps for the Perfect Business Cover Letter #1. Put Contact Information in the Header #2. Address the Hiring Manager #3. Write an Eye-Catching Opening Statement #4. Use the Cover Letter Body for the Details #5. Wrap It Up and Sign It 3 Essential Business Cover Letter Tips #1.

  15. How To Address a Cover Letter (With Examples)

    When addressing a cover letter to a large company, it's important to follow professional etiquette and make your letter as personalized as possible, even if you do not have a specific name. If you are unable to obtain the hiring manager's name and the department or team names after your research, you can address your cover letter to the company ...

  16. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    Hey - A simple "hey" is too casual for a cover letter. Dear Sir/Madam - Many recruiters think this greeting is old-fashioned. Ladies and Gentlemen - This salutation is both too formal and generic. Esteemed Hiring Manager - While this greeting is polite, it can come across as insincere.

  17. The Top 6 Tips for Writing a Powerful Cover Letter

    A cover letter format pretty much follows the standard business letter format which contains a header with yours and the hiring manager's contact information, a salutation, an opening paragraph, one or two body paragraphs, a closing paragraph and a sign off. Quick tip: Include your email address in your contact information, in case the cover ...

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    Depending on the size and structure of the company, you'll need to aim at either: 1. The Department Head. Target your future boss or their boss. For example: "Dear Head of Marketing". "Dear CTO". "Dear Sales Director". 2.

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  20. How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name: 2023 Guide (10 ...

    If the hiring manager's gender is Male, address the hiring manager with "Mr.". For Example: "Mr. Xavier,". If the hiring manager is female, it can be confusing. As you don't know the marital status, avoid using Miss. or Mrs. to address the hiring manager. Instead, use a generic "Ms..".

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    As a candidate making a career shift, it will benefit you most to focus your cover letter on mapping the soft skills you've already demonstrated to the new career you're pursuing. Soft skills are highly transferable, even across industries. "If you were a Chef, for instance, you have experience with working under pressure," says Jean.

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