Results of the 2022-2023 White Rose Student Research Contest

The midwest center for holocaust education is pleased to announce the finalists and winners of its annual white rose student research contest., about the contest, the 2022-2023 contest theme was jewish resistance in the ghettos.

The enormity of the Holocaust was such that no victim response to it would have stopped the Germans from implementing genocide. Jews under Nazi control faced various and overwhelming obstacles to effective resistance. Despite this, Jews repeatedly sought to oppose Nazi policy in various ways. While armed uprisings or partisan activities are often held up as examples of successful Jewish resistance, not all resistance was armed. Often the only course of action available was an act of unarmed resistance.

Successful acts of resistance took many forms, ranging from personal acts to preserve dignity; social acts to preserve the community such as organizing clandestine schools and soup kitchens or underground record keeping; political acts such as the sabotage of the German war industry; and eventually, armed uprisings. Nowhere was resistance more robust than in the ghettos where Jews last lived as families and communities and resistance activities occurred amidst extreme conditions and against enormous odds.

2023 Contest Prompt

Using at least 3 of the documents provided by MCHE, plus a minimum of 2 outside resources, prepare an essay or documentary   that addresses all parts of the following topic:

RESEARCH: Describe the goals and obstacles to one specific form of Jewish resistance in the ghettos. Explain how that method was used by one Jewish person or group.

REFLECTION:  Consider the Kansas City Holocaust memorial and Nathan Rapoport’s Memorial to the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. After researching several types of resistance, why do you think that memorialization disproportionately focuses on armed resistance? How might you elevate forms of non-armed resistance in memorialization efforts.

Lower Division (Grades 8-9) Essay Finalists

white rose essay contest 2023

Mia Henry Oxford Middle School Blue Valley School District Jaida Anderlik, Sponsoring Teacher

Jacob Kephart Harmony Middle School Blue Valley School District Michelle Sutton, Sponsoring Teacher

Avital Mullokandova Hyman Brand Hebrew Academy R. Gina Renee, Sponsoring Teacher

Halima Talbi Indian Hills Middle School Shawnee Mission School District Theresa Jones, Sponsoring Teacher

Denah Thomas Hyman Brand Hebrew Academy R. Gina Renee, Sponsoring Teacher

Lower Division Winner Sylvie Idol Blue Valley North High School Blue Valley School District Barbara Turnbull, Teacher

white rose essay contest 2023

Upper Division (Grades 10-12) Essay Finalists

white rose essay contest 2023

Bailey Biggs Notre Dame de Sion Penny Selle, Sponsoring Teacher

Meredith Cole Lone Jack High School Lone Jack School District Angela Gottesburen, Teacher

Sarah Gillespie Lone Jack High School Lone Jack School District Angela Gottesburen, Teacher

Jack Stevenson Lone Jack High School Lone Jack School District Angela Gottesburen, Teacher

Upper Division Winner Makenzie Brantner Lone Jack High School Lone Jack School District Angela Gottesburen, Teacher

white rose essay contest 2023

Upper Division (Grades 10-12) Documentary Winner

Braden Thompson Home School Jennifer Thompson, Teacher

white rose essay contest 2023

Photos from a fabulous evening…

white rose essay contest 2023

The White Rose Resistance

The contest is named in memory of the White Rose , a resistance movement consisting of German university students. Among them were Hans and Sophie Scholl , along with several friends and their professor, were arrested and executed for distributing leaflets denouncing the policies of the Nazi regime. The project commemorates the efforts of these brave young people who gave their lives for what they believed in. May their memories inspire us to reflect upon our own responsibilities as citizens in a democratic nation.

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Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center

The Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center is pleased to announce our third annual White Rose Student Research Contest, open to 7th – 12th grade students.

About the Contest

The 2022-2023 contest theme is JEWISH RESISTANCE IN THE GHETTOS.

white rose essay contest 2023

Photograph by Arnold Kramer

The enormity of the Holocaust was such that no victim response to it would have stopped the Germans from implementing genocide. Jews under Nazi control faced various and overwhelming obstacles to effective resistance. Despite this, Jews repeatedly sought to oppose Nazi policy in various ways. While armed uprisings or partisan activities are often held up as examples of successful Jewish resistance, not all resistance was armed. Often the only course of action available was an act of unarmed resistance.

Successful acts of resistance took many forms, ranging from personal acts to preserve dignity; social acts to preserve the community such as organizing clandestine schools, soup kitchens and underground record keeping; political acts such as the sabotage of the German war industry; and eventually, armed uprisings. Nowhere was resistance more robust than in the ghettos where Jews last lived as families and communities and resistance activities occurred amidst extreme conditions and against enormous odds.

Contest Instructions

Using at least 3 of the documents provided below, plus a minimum of 2 outside resources, prepare an essay or documentary that addresses all parts of the following question:

Essential Question: Although armed resistance is often memorialized in art, literature and film, what other forms of resistance can people take when their beliefs, culture and lives are threatened?

  • Research: Describe the goals and obstacles to one specific form of Jewish resistance in the ghettos. Explain how that method was used by one Jewish person or group.
  • Reflection: Why do you think memorialization often focuses on armed resistance? Discuss how you might increase awareness and understanding through the memorialization of non-armed resistance.

You must base your research on at least three of the following documents. All documents referenced from this list are considered electronic sources and the Works Cited page should clearly denote that they were referenced from the HHREC site. That citation can take any format chosen by the teacher.

Though not one of the required documents, all students are encouraged to read United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Resistance During the Holocaust booklet for reference. Please note this does NOT count as one of the 3 required documents from the list below.

"Oneg Shabbat, "The Jewish Underground Archives in the Warsaw Ghetto

Vladka Meed discusses illegal gatherings in the ghetto

The Little Smuggler

Gela Seksztaja Paintings

"Our Town Is Burning" - Resistance Song

Testimony of Zenia Malecki

The Girl Couriers of the Underground Movement

Resistance Is . . .

The Discussion on Fighting Aims by the Activists of the Bialystok Members of the Dror Movement, February 27, 1943

Armed Resistance in the Ghettos: The Dilemma of Revolt

Call to Resistance by the Jewish Fighting Organization in the Warsaw Ghetto, January 1943

Beniaman Rosenfeld Drawings

Proclamation by Jewish Pioneer Youth Group in Vilna, Calling for Resistance, January 1, 1942

Resources for the Reflection

Rapoport's Memorial to the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising – a Personal Interpretation

The Garden of Remembrance

Additional Resources for Student Research  

Holocaust Encyclopedia - Jewish Resistance

And There Was Courage by Moshe Avital - Available through HHREC

Art and the Holocaust

Writers and Poets in the Ghettos

Spiritual Resistance in the Ghettos

Essay Requirements

  • Evidence of comprehensive and accurate historical research
  • Utilization and consistent citation of at least 3 of the designated documents and 2 additional resources
  • Adherence to theme, demonstrating substantial supporting detail
  • Proper citations – all citation styles are accepted, but citations must be consistent
  • Essays must be free of plagiarism.
  • Works Cited – Only sources cited in the body of the paper should appear on the Works Cited.
  • Maximum of 1200 words.
  • Submitted through the HHREC Website

All entries become property of the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center and will not be returned. Applicants give the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center permission to reprint entries. Decisions of the judges are final.

Documentary Requirements

  • A documentary is an audio/visual presentation that uses multiple source types such as images, video, and sound to communicate your historical argument, research, and interpretation of your response to this year’s topic. The reflection portion of your documentary should not exceed 90 seconds.
  • Your documentary must be an original production.
  • Documentaries should be at least seven minutes and not exceed ten minutes in length.
  • The last portion of your documentary must be a list of acknowledgments and credits for sources of moving footage, interviews, music, and images that appear in the documentary. These source credits must be brief—not full bibliographic citations and not annotated.
  • MP4 format submitted as a YouTube link.
  • If selected as a finalist, students must submit the mp4 file to HHREC.

Process Paper

  • Your entry must include a process paper. A process paper is a description of how you conducted your research and created your entry.
  • The process paper must be 500 words and must not include quotes, images, or captions. Your process paper must answer the following questions:
  • How did you choose your topic and how does it relate to this year’s theme?
  • How did you conduct your research?
  • How did you create your project?
  • What is your historical argument?

Works Cited

Your Works Cited must meet the following requirements:

  • List all sources that you utilized in developing your entry.
  • Separate your Works Cited into two sections: one for sources from the required set of documents and one for sources you found to supplement your research.
  • Do not attach materials to your Works Cited.
  • Entries must be in mp4 format and can be submitted via a YouTube link. Finalists will need to supply the original file.

All entries become property of the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center (HHREC) and will not be returned. Applicants give the HHREC permission to reprint entries. Decisions of the judges are final.

Guidelines for Educators

HHREC encourages teachers to utilize this contest as a classroom exercise.

  • Sponsoring teachers are limited to submitting no more than 10 essays and 10 documentaries per age division.
  • Educators must submit their finalist names and certify their participation through the entry form.
  • Each essay or documentary should reflect the student’s own work, guided and reviewed, but not edited in detail by the sponsoring teacher.
  • Entries must be submitted by the published deadline.
  • Finalists and their sponsoring teacher will be recognized at a reception in May.
  • All entries become property of the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center and will not be returned.
  • Applicants give the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center permission to reprint entries.
  • Decisions of the judges are final.

Eligibility & Entry Information

The White Rose Student Research Contest is open to 7th-12th grade students.

  • Each contestant is limited to one entry per year.
  • Previous winners may enter again.
  • Projects will be evaluated on historical accuracy, development of content and theme, and original expression according to this rubric.
  • Entries are accepted in two categories – documentary or essay.
  • Entries are accepted in three age divisions – 7-8th grade, 9-10th grade and 11-12th grade.
  • We ask students and educators to respect the privacy of the survivors and to refrain from conducting personal interviews.
  • Finalists will be identified by a panel of Blue Ribbon judges and honored at a reception in May.
  • The top prize winner in each category and age level will be awarded a $300 prize.
  • The sponsoring teacher of each first prize winner will be awarded a voucher worth $150 for use on professional development and/or Holocaust resources.

The contest is sponsored by the Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center and an anonymous donor.

Download 2023 Student Entry Form

Download Rubric

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MARCH 31, 2023

Questions? Contact Julie Scallero at [email protected] or Robin Schamberg at [email protected] .

white rose essay contest 2023

Members of the White Rose student resistance group, at the east railroad station in Munich, on the day the men departed to Russia for military service. Pictured are Hans Scholl (left), Alexander Schmorell (second from left, hidden), Sophie Scholl, and Christoph Probst (right). George J. Wittenstein (akg-images.co.uk)

The contest is named in memory of the White Rose, a resistance movement consisting of German university students. Among them were Hans and Sophie Scholl, along with several friends and their professor, were arrested and executed for distributing leaflets denouncing the policies of the Nazi regime. The project commemorates the efforts of these brave young people who gave their lives for what they believed in. May their memories inspire us to reflect upon our own responsibilities as citizens in a democratic nation.

2021 White Rose Student Research Competition

The Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center second annual White Rose Student Research Contest for Westchester County area 7th-12th grade students honored students and teachers from Irvington High School, Westchester Day School and Woodlands Middle/High School via Zoom.

Participating students who chose to compete in the contest submitted essays or original documentaries based on research of primary source and secondary source materials. Student and teacher entries included:

7th and 8th Grade Winners - Rachel Tratt, Westchester Day School and Jake Morton, Woodlands Middle School; and Finalist Annshiya Pulikkottil Sam, Woodlands Middle School.

11th and 12th Grade Winner - Alexandra Pollack, Irvington High School

Sponsoring Teachers - Christopher Barry, Irvington High School; Kasie Peralta, Woodlands Middle School; and Jill Rivel, Westchester Day School.

white rose essay contest 2023

Jake Morton, Woodlands Middle School 7th and 8th Grade Winner

Winning entries for the HHREC White Rose Student Research Contest were identified by a panel of Blue-Ribbon judges that included Richard Berman, Ph.D. Muma College of Business, University of South Florida; Debbie Lewis, HHREC GenerationsForward speaker; Elena Procario-Foley, Ph.D. Professor of Religious Studies, Iona College; Debbie Minchin HHREC Educators Program Committee; and Audrey Reich Art Specialist, The Birch Wathen Lenox School.

The top prize winner in each age level was awarded a cash prize, and the sponsoring teacher of each first prize winner was awarded a voucher for use on professional development and/or Holocaust resources.

white rose essay contest 2023

Jews from Subcarpathian Rus (then part of Hungary) undergo a selection on the ramp at Auschwitz-Birkenau. May 1, 1944. —Yad Vashem (Public Domain)

The 2021-2022 contest theme was Auschwitz and the Hungarian Deportations.

Seventy-seven years ago, in the spring of 1944, the Germans occupied Hungary. Between May 14 and July 9, approximately 440,000 Hungarian Jews—the last remaining intact Jewish community in Europe—were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where most were subsequently murdered. This swift, concentrated destruction was aided by local collaborators, the Hungarian government, and law-enforcement agencies. It occurred when the Vatican, the International Red Cross, the Allies, and the neutral powers already knew details of the Holocaust, especially the Hungarian situation.

Beyond the education gained exploring the museum's gallery space is the wealth of knowledge housed in our library and archive. Researchers of all backgrounds use these resources to learn more about Jewish history at-large and in Oklahoma, culture, art, liturgical studies, family lineage, and the Holocaust.

Both the archive and library are currently undergoing a digitization process that will make these resources more widely available. At this time, however, visitors will need to make an in-person appointment to access both collections.

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art’s Library contains over 1,950 titles. The collection is open by appointment only for in-person research with a focus on The Holocaust, Jewish Religious and Family Life, Oklahoma Jewish History, Jewish Artists and Art, and Genealogy.

Livingston Archive

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art’s archival collection includes personal letters, event materials, personal and event photos, ephemera, magazine and newspaper articles, vacation photos, and objects from multiple local Jewish families and businesses. The majority of the archival material is in English and Hebrew, with minor amounts in Yiddish and German.

  • National Council of Jewish Women Collection
  • The Tulsa Jewish Review Collection
  • Jewish Welfare Board Publications Collection
  • B’nai Emunah Collection
  • Temple Israel Collection
  • Jewish Federation of Tulsa Collection
  • Tulsa Jewish Community Charity Event Collection
  • Ardmore Jewish Community Collection
  • Enid Jewish Community Collection
  • Seminole Jewish Community Collection
  • Ponca City Jewish Community Collection
  • Oklahoma City’s Emanuel Synagogue Collection
  • Muskogee Jewish Community Collection
  • Fenster Gallery Slide and Photo Collection
  • Theodore Fried Collection
  • Fred Strauss Collection
  • Slides, photos, and documentation from SMMJA past exhibits

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tulsa

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tulsa plays a prominent role in originating many of the exhibits and programs that are held both at the Sherwin Miller Museum and elsewhere in the country.

The organization was established in September 2005 and remains the only Jewish Genealogical Society in Oklahoma. Its goals are to:

  • Pursue, encourage, and preserve Jewish family history and genealogical data.
  • Assist and promote the research of Jewish family history while elevating the status and role of genealogy in the Community.
  • Provide opportunities for sharing Jewish Genealogical information.

Yearly memberships are $18/year. All Jewish Genealogical Society members must also be current Museum members. Join the JGS today by signing up below!

If you have questions about the Jewish Genealogical Society of Tulsa, please contact Phil Goldfarb, President JGS of Tulsa at: [email protected]

white rose essay contest 2023

Education & Art Contests

The Council for Holocaust Education exists to assist and coordinate the Holocaust educational efforts of teachers and students in the greater Tulsa area and beyond. 

The Council focuses on Holocaust commemoration and education through several avenues. Among these are:

  •  Hosting the annual Interfaith Yom HaShoah Commemoration event
  •  Hosting the Kristallnacht Remembrance event
  •  Facilitating the Kristallnacht and Yom HaShoah Art Contests
  •  Facilitating the White Rose Essay Contest

We take seriously our responsibility to ensure that the lessons of the Holocaust are not forgotten. The Holocaust is more than a Jewish story. It is a pivotal event that continues to influence today’s world by addressing the consequences of bullying, bigotry, stereotyping and discrimination, and encouraging the acceptance of diversity. The poetry, art, essays, and exposure to the important lessons of the Holocaust produce benefits beyond measure.

Senate Bill 1671 requiring Oklahoma public school students in grades six through 12 to learn about the Holocaust was recently signed into law by Gov. Stitt. This Bill enhances the teaching of Holocaust Education in all Oklahoma schools by allowing students to learn about the Holocaust, not only in their Social Studies classes, but also in their English/Language Arts and Visual Arts classes.  We are excited about facilitating the instruction teachers will need to provide this life-changing opportunity to their students.

Educational Opportunities

Purim mask invitational.

February 23, 2024

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art would like to invite your school to participate in the 17th Annual Purim Mask Invitational Competition. It is the goal of the Museum to promote understanding of Jewish life and culture through learning about the Jewish holiday of Purim. Students may explore the holiday by learning about the traditions, foods, and celebration of the story of Esther and her rescue of the Jews of Persia. The winning masks will be exhibited from March 7 – May 1, 2024, at The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. Other masks will be included in the exhibition as allowed by space and number of entries.

2024 White Rose Memorial Contest

March 29, 2024

The Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education’s Sixteenth Annual White Rose Memorial Essay Contest For Middle and High School Students

ESSAY PROMPT:

Consider the following: Antisemitism worldwide has sharply increased since October 7, 2023,and continues to rise. Research and describe parallels between the events leading up to the Holocaust and recent events in society today, including an example of a person or organization that has spoken out against antisemitism.

2024 Yom Hashoah (Holocaust) Art Contest

April 5, 2024

More information coming early 2024.

intro copy + link to press kit

  • Adults (age 21+) dots $6.50
  • Seniors (age 55+) dots $5.50
  • Students (ages 13-21) dots $3.50
  • Groups of 10+ dots $3.00/person
  • Museum Members
  • Children 12 & under
  • School teachers with school ID
  • “Blue Star Families” & uniformed services

2021 E 71st St, Tulsa, OK 74136

white rose essay contest 2023

  • Monday dots 10am – 5pm
  • Tuesday dots 10am – 5pm
  • Wednesday dots Closed (Scheduled Tours Only)
  • Thursday dots 10am – 5pm
  • Friday dots 10am – 5pm
  • Saturday dots Noon – 5pm
  • Sunday dots Noon – 5pm

The museum is closed to observe federal holidays as well as Jewish holidays.

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Final 2023 WHITE ROSE STUDENT RESEARCH CONTEST 5

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Your ticket for the: Final 2023 WHITE ROSE STUDENT RESEARCH CONTEST 5

Jewish Federation of Peoria

White Rose Essay Contest Winners

The White Rose Society Essay Contest is named in honor of the original White Rose Society, a group of university students in Munich, Germany, who united to call the German people to oppose Nazi oppression and inhumanity through an underground newspaper and leaflet campaign. The society, which chose the white rose as its symbol to represent purity in the face of evil, was originally inspired to speak out in opposition to Nazi eugenics and euthanasia programs.

Our Contestants were asked to research the history of a specific child or youth who was caught in or witnessed the events of the Holocaust in Europe, and then describe how learning about the Holocaust through the personal story of this one individual made the Holocaust more meaningful to them.

They are pictured below with the co-chairs of the White Rose Essay Contest committee: Evelyn Vogel and Terri Broms. Special thanks go to our judges: Barb Katz, Linda Leifeld, Gwen Milam and Joyce Waibel.

white rose essay contest 2023

Upcoming Events

Jewish telegraphic agency.

  • Hostage deal talks continue as Israel says more captives might be dead than previously known February 7, 2024
  • Argentina will move its embassy to Jerusalem, Javier Milei announces during emotional visit February 7, 2024
  • House votes down standalone bill giving funds to Israel, imperiling future of aid package February 7, 2024
  • Impeachment of Alejandro Mayorkas, opposed by coalition of Jewish groups, narrowly fails February 7, 2024
  • This very real Jewish family has been making artificial flowers in Manhattan for 107 years February 6, 2024

Support the Federation

Jewish federation of peoria.

2000 Pioneer Parkway, Suite 10B Peoria, IL 61615

Phone: (309) 689-0063 E-mail

Get Involved

Jewish Federation of North America (JFNA)

Jewish Telegraph Agency (JTA)

Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI)

American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC)

Jewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA)

white rose essay contest 2023

Peoria Holocaust Memorial

Never Forget, Never Again

White Rose Society Essay Contest

Never forget, never again.

white rose essay contest 2023

White Rose Society

“The White Rose was a non-violent, intellectual resistance group in Nazi Germany which was led by five students and one professor at the University of Munich: Willi Graf, Kurt Huber, Christoph Probst, Alexander Schmorell, Hans Scholl and Sophie Scholl. The group conducted an anonymous leaflet and graffiti campaign that called for active opposition to the Nazi regime. Their activities started in Munich on 27 June 1942; they ended with the arrest of the core group by the Gestapo on 18 February 1943. They, as well as other members and supporters of the group who carried on distributing the pamphlets, faced show trials by the Nazi People’s Court; many of them were imprisoned and executed.”   Excerpt from Wikipedia

Each year, the Peoria Holocaust Memorial and the Jewish Federation of Peoria honor the memory and work of the White Rose members with an essay contest for all Peoria area middle and high school students, focused on telling the stories of the child victims of the Holocaust.

United States Holocaust Memorial White Rose Page

Congratulations to the 2023 Winners

white rose essay contest 2023

Miley Roberts

Read Miley’s Essay

Video of Miley’s Award

white rose essay contest 2023

Lydia Lohnes

Read Lydia’s Essay

Video of Lydia’s Award

white rose essay contest 2023

Crew Fortin

Read Crew’s Essay

Video of Crew’s Award

White Rose Society Essay Contest Prompt

Information on next year’s contest coming soon.

Topic: “CHILDREN AND THE HOLOCAUST”

A poet once remarked that the death of a child is the loss of infinite possibilities. What, then, can be said about the more than one-and-a-half million Jewish children who were murdered by the Nazis during the Holocaust years (1933-1945)? Of course, many more boys and girls suffered unimaginable hardships and bore witness to the brutality of the Nazis. Some survived. Many did not. Regardless of how experiences varied from country to country, children’s lives were changed forever. The purpose of this essay contest is to record the stories that must be told to yesterday’s, today’s and tomorrow’s children

Part A: Research the history of a specific child or youth who was caught in or witnessed the events of the Holocaust in Europe. This person could have lived in a ghetto, been hidden, carried out clandestine activities, been a part of a kindertransport, known the horrors of concentration camps and/or experienced the Holocaust in a myriad of other ways. He or she could have been a Jew or a non-Jew, or have been a part of a family or a group of children suffering the same fate. Describe the conditions under which this individual lived and the circumstances that impacted his/her life during the Holocaust years. If he or she survived, briefly explain what happened after 1945.

Part B: Tell how learning about the Holocaust through the personal story of this one individual makes the Holocaust more meaningful to you.

  • At the corner of Washington & Liberty Streets, on the grounds of the Peoria Riverfront Museum
  • For information on tours: 309.689.0063 or

The Peoria Holocaust Memorial is a project of the Jewish Federation of Peoria, a 501(3)c non-profit. All donations to the Memorial are fully tax-deductible. For more information contact the Federation at:

jewishpeoria.org  

email  

309.689.0063  

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2024 Civics Essay Contest Rules

Contest rules and regulations.

The National Center for State Courts (NCSC) Civics Education Essay Contest is open to students in grades 3-12. Students must reside in the United States and be enrolled in either a public, private or home school program. Students must also have the permission of a parent, guardian or teacher over the age of 18 years of age in order to enter the contest.

Each student must answer the essay question in their own words. Plagiarism is unacceptable and is cause for contest disqualification. Elementary (grades 3-5) school students should draft essays not to exceed 100 words. Middle (grades 6-8) and High (grades 9-12) school students should draft essays not to exceed 250 words. Essays longer than the stated lengths per grade level categories will be disqualified.

All essays must be submitted by midnight ET on March 22, 2024 . There is no fee to enter. 2023 winners are not eligible to apply. Students must use the electronic portal provided by NCSC to submit their essay. For special accommodations, please email Molly Justice .

All portions of the online entry form must be completed. Failure to submit required information or any false statements or misrepresentations made by the student, shall constitute a violation of the official contest rules and lead to disqualification.

Submitted essays are judged by NCSC staff, members of the court community and friends of the organization. Judging is based on the student’s ability to answer the essay question clearly and concisely, understanding of the topic, creativity and originality of thought pertaining to the topic, as well as grammar, spelling and style. Students agree to be bound by the official contest rules and decisions of the judges.

Students who submit an essay to the contest grant NCSC and its partners, including the news media, the right to use their names, photographs, statements, quotes and testimonials for advertising, publicity and promotional purposes without notification or further compensation. This includes, but is not limited to, NCSC’s social media accounts, as well as print or electronic publications. NCSC maintains the right to reproduce, reprint, distribute, perform, display or exhibit the project for advertising, publicity and promotional purposes on its website, at conferences or other venues.

  • St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg City Council rejects exploring straw poll on Rays deal

  • Colleen Wright Times staff

ST. PETERSBURG — A proposal to put the city’s portion of the Tampa Bay Rays stadium subsidy deal before the public in a nonbinding straw poll didn’t make it to first base.

Five City Council members on Thursday morning voted in favor of holding a discussion about the proposal next week, falling short of a required supermajority. City Council member Richie Floyd, who floated discussing the straw ballot, needed at least six of eight council members on his side, according to the board’s rules.

“I’m just disappointed that a small minority of council members were able to stop us from even discussing have public input,” Floyd said.

Council members Copley Gerdes, Ed Montanari and chairperson Brandi Gabbard voted no. They expressed concern over summing up the deal in a 75-word ballot question with a 15-word title, as required by law. They said there has already been ample opportunity for the public to weigh in on the deal to replace Tropicana Field and redevelop the land around it.

The deal would require a public subsidy from the city of more than $400 million before interest.

“I understand the desire to do a straw poll,” Montanari said. “But I can’t wrap my head around how you explain this in 75 words.”

Even some council members who voted in favor of discussing a straw vote made clear that did not mean they would actually support putting it on the ballot.

Assistant City Attorney Brett Pettigrew said it would cost between $30,000 and $90,000 to conduct the straw poll. The printing of an additional ballot card would cost another $60,000. The possible absence of a primary contest for the Republican or Democratic party would have raised the cost.

Gabbard said the city’s voters skew Democratic or as having no party affiliation. She said that may affect the outcome of the straw poll if there is no Democratic primary next year.

“You’re going to have a really challenging time, I think, getting a really broad spectrum of voices at that particular presidential preference primary,” she said. “We’re not going to be able to have something that really conveys what the voters are going to really, really be weighing in on. And at that point, it just feels a little like a disingenuous act for us to throw that out there.”

City Council member Lisset Hanewicz, who voted in favor of holding the discussion, said there is a public perception that the deal is already done. She said the straw poll would enhance transparency.

“This is about public funding, the most expensive decision to date, by far,” she said. “And they should have a voice on this issue through this straw poll.”

All 10 public speakers who weighed in on the issue were in favor of the straw poll discussion. There was no opposition during public comment.

“I think that since this is one of the largest developments the city will be taking place with and the amount of public funds that are going towards that, it just makes sense to let public input with that,” said resident Marley Price. “Since it’s not going to be a binding vote, I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t happen.”

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Rev. Andy Oliver of Allendale United Methodist Church said someone called one of his supervisors saying he needed to “back off” because he was “harassing the mayor.” He said the nonbinding straw poll would give the council one more data point before their final decision.

“Maybe we’ll learn overwhelmingly that the city approves and that will give you more cover from fringe people like me,” Oliver said. “Maybe the vote will be closer slightly against and that’s also a gift to you. It gives you a higher point of leverage for negotiating to make this deal even better. Your job isn’t to carry the administration’s water. We elected you to negotiate on behalf of us so that we can have the very best for the whole city.”

Colleen Wright is a reporter covering St. Petersburg. She can be reached at [email protected].

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White Rose Tribute Event 2023

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2023 WHITE ROSE TRIBUTE EVENT

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About florida blue and the florida blue foundation.

white rose essay contest 2023

About the 2023 Tess Wise White Rose Award Honoree, Florida Blue and the Florida Blue Foundation: Florida Blue and the Florida Blue Foundation are a fitting and deserving recipient for the Tess Wise White Rose Award given their dedicated support over the years of our Upstanders program in area middle schools and their mission for helping people and communities achieve better health. We are grateful for their incredible leadership and commitment to educate and help alleviate hatred and discrimination in our local communities and beyond.

Event Video, Press Release and Photos

white rose essay contest 2023

White Rose Tribute Event 2022

2023 White Rose Tribute Event

Laurie Levin and Gary Owens

Laura Abramson

Jamie Bellissimo

Carolyn Dymond

Michelle Feinberg

Lisa Goldberg Hali Poteshman Josh Roth Kathy Turner Paula Wyatt

Supporter Circles

Circle of valor.

Alexis & Jim Pugh

The Abe & Tess Wise Philanthropic Fund

Dottie & Dick Appelbaum

Val & Jim Shapiro

Kristy & Matt Jesson

Circle of Hope

AdventHealth

Bruce K. Gould Foundation

Burr Forman

Caryn & Mark Israel

Florida Blue Foundation

Ginsburg Family Foundation

Judy & Bob Yarmuth

Lauren & Scott Zimmerman Foundation

Louise & Richard Weiner Family Foundation

Marilyn Shapiro 

Nemours Children’s Health

Orlando Health  

Orlando Magic 

SmartWealth/Jan & Randy Ellington

The Pargh Foundation  

Wolfe-Rizor Interiors  

Circle of Resilience

Austin Commercial

Bounds Law Group

Brasfield & Gorrie

City of Orlando

Elevation Financial Group

Ellen & Mark Lang

Feinberg Feinberg Schelling Group at Morgan Stanley

GrayRobinson

Henrietta Katzen 

Holland & Knight

Jeffrey B. Friedman

Jeffrey Miller

Judy & David Albertson 

Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A.  

Marilyn Goldman

Massey Services

OUC – The Reliable One

Publix Super Markets Charities

Rizwan Zaman

Susan & Jerry Roth

University of Central Florida

Weinberg Wheeler Hudgins Gunn & Dial

Wilf Family Foundation

Circle of Courage

BakerHostetler

Bank of America

Barbara Weinreich

Betty Brady & Hardy Vaughn

Charlotte & Winston Schwartz

Chris McCullion & Carlos Carbonell

Daniel Pelli

Ellen & Simon Snyder

First Horizon Foundation

Hali & Mike Poteshman

HuntonBrady Architects

Jill S. Schwartz & Associates  

Karen Middlekauff Minkow & Daniel Minkow

Katie & John Lehr

Kubicki Draper

Laura & Mark Abramson

Meitin Family Partnership

Nancy & Jonathan Wolf

Zelig O. & Bobbi Wise Philanthropic Fund

Neil Webman

One Florida Bank

Patti & Roy Ambinder

Rick Schell & Scott Joseph

Susan & Edward Kleiman

Susan & Paul Levine

Universal Orlando Resort

Valencia College

VyStar Credit Union

Tess Wise White Rose Honorees

2023 Tony Jenkins, Central Florida Market President, Florida Blue

2022 Dr. Rita Bornstein 2021 The Massey Family 2020 Mayor Jerry L. Demings 2019 Joanie Holzer Schirm 2018 Jeffrey Miller & Ted Maines 2017 Mayor Buddy Dyer 2016 Valeria & Jim Shapiro 2015 Susan & Gordon Arkin 2014 Harris Rosen 2013 Helen Greenspun 2012 Dr. Richard Lapchick 2011 Dr. Ron Blocker 2010 Governor Bob Graham 2009 Rita and John Lowndes 2008 Alexis and Jim Pugh 2007 Harriett and Hy Lake

2006 Tess and Abe Wise 2005 Marilyn & Sig Goldman 2004 Suntrust Bank, Central Florida 2003 Judy Albertson 2002 Joe R. Lee, CEO, Darden Restaurants 2001 Elie Wiesel, Nobel Laureate 2000 20 yr. Anniversary Celebration – Dreamers 1999 Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation 1998 Survivors 1997 Henri Landwirth/Give Kids The World 1996 Tom Werner, President, Florida Hospital 1995 University of Central Florida 1994 Junior League of Greater Orlando 1993 Linda Chapin, Chairman, Orange County Commission 1992 Scholars 1991 Dr. Schott, Superintendent, Orange County Public Schools 1990 Dr. Gianini, President, Valencia Community College 1989 Charlie Reese, Orlando Sentinel

Legacy of Leadership

White Rose Tribute Event 2022 // Press Release Previews

851 N. Maitland Avenue, Maitland FL, 32751

Museum Hours: Sunday: Noon – 4pm Monday: Closed Tuesday – Thursday: 10am – 4pm Friday: 10am – 1pm Saturday: Noon –  4pm

407-628-0555

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white rose essay contest 2023

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White Nights

Although the phenomenon known as the "White Nights" is not unique to St. Petersburg, in no other northern city have they received such poetic and literary acclaim. What could be more romantic than a walk along the banks of the city's rivers and canals in almost broad daylight, no matter what the time of day? No other major European city can rival this experience nor the atmosphere on the streets of St. Petersburg during the summer months - lively, friendly, romantic and bustling with people throughout the night as well as the day!

From late May to early July the nights are bright in St. Petersburg, with the brightest period, the White Nights, normally lasting from June 11 th to July 2 nd . The White Nights (Beliye Nochi) are a curious phenomenon caused by St. Petersburg's very northerly geographical location - at 59 degrees 57' North (roughly on the same latitude as Oslo, Norway, the southern tip of Greenland and Seward, Alaska). St. Petersburg is the world's most northern city with a population over 1 million, and its stands at such a high latitude that the sun does not descend below the horizon enough for the sky to grow dark. In fact night becomes curiously indistinguishable from day, so much so that the authorities never need to turn the city's streetlights on!

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IMAGES

  1. 7 Essay Writing Contests to Look Out For in 2023

    white rose essay contest 2023

  2. 2023 White Rose Student Research Contest

    white rose essay contest 2023

  3. Jewish Federation of Peoria

    white rose essay contest 2023

  4. Jewish Federation of Peoria

    white rose essay contest 2023

  5. Winners of the 2021 White Rose Essay Contest

    white rose essay contest 2023

  6. UNESCO Youth Essay Contest 2023

    white rose essay contest 2023

COMMENTS

  1. White Rose Student Research Contest

    Contest Eligibility. The White Rose Research Contest is open to students in 8th through 12th grades. Entries are accepted in two categories-essay or documentary. Entrants compete in two age divisions-Lower (8th and 9th Grade) and Upper (10th, 11th, and 12th Grade). Students may submit one entry in one contest category per year.

  2. White Rose Student Essay Contest

    The White Rose Essay Contest provides an impactful research and writing experience for high school students. Using primary sources and survivor testimony, students are able to synthesize researched information to demonstrate understanding of the Holocaust and how it happened.

  3. White Rose Student Research Contest

    Contest Eligibility. The White Rose Research Contest is open to students in 8th through 12th grades. Entries are accepted in two categories-essay or documentary. Entrants compete in two age divisions-Lower (8th and 9th Grade) and Upper (10th, 11th, and 12th Grade). Students may submit one entry in one contest category per year.

  4. 2023 White Rose Research Contest

    2023 White Rose Research Contest Theme: Auschwitz and the Hungarian Deportations Seventy-seven years ago, the Germans occupied Hungary in the spring of 1944. Between May 14 and July 9, approximately 440,000 Hungarian Jews—the last remaining intact Jewish community in Europe—were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where most were subsequently murdered.

  5. 2022-2023 White Rose Student Research Contest Results

    About MCHE Programs & Events Survivor Testimonies Resources Students & Educators Membership and Giving The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education teaches the history of the Holocaust, applying its lessons to counter indifference, intolerance, and genocide.

  6. White Rose Student Competition

    The Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center is pleased to announce our third annual White Rose Student Research Contest, open to 7th - 12th grade students. About the Contest The 2022-2023 contest theme is JEWISH RESISTANCE IN THE GHETTOS. Photograph by Arnold Kramer

  7. Holocaust Education

    The deadline for the White Rose Essay Contest is Friday, May 3, 2024. Download Yom HaShoah Art Contest Information Here What is Yom HaShoah? Yom HaShoah, a Hebrew name for Holocaust Memorial Day, commemorates the six million Jewish lives lost during the Holocaust.

  8. PDF 2023 White Rose Memorial Essay Contest 1-18-2023

    Length: 750-1500 words Eligibility: Students in grades 9-12 at the beginning of the 2022-2023 academic year may participate. Students may win an award only once in each school category. Use entry form attached. • Addresses contest topic • Descriptive title • Required length

  9. PDF STUDENT RESEARCH WHITE ROSE

    WHITE WHITE 2023 STUDENT RESEARCH CONTEST ROSE Submissions due MARCH 31, 2023 Open to 8th-12th grade students CONTEST AWARDS The top prize winner in each category and age level will be awarded a $300 prize.

  10. White Rose essay contest

    March 10, 2023 Registration is open for the White Rose Essay Contest, offered by The Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center. This year's I nspiration draws from the PBS Documentary by Ken Burns, "The U.S. and the Holocaust" to answer the question "did the U.S. have a responsibility to intervene during the Holocaust?"

  11. PDF 2022

    Essay Code (For official use only) The Council for Holocaust Education 2022-2023 White Rose Essay Contest Entry Form All fields must be completed for eligibility to enter the contest. Essay Title Student's Name Student's Address City Zip code Student's email address

  12. Resources

    2023 White Rose Memorial Contest. Submission Deadline: February 27, 2023. The Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education's Fifteenth Annual White Rose Memorial Essay Contest For Middle and High School Students. ESSAY PROMPT: Consider the following: Moral Courage involves standing up for your beliefs and values even at the risk of your reputation ...

  13. Final 2023 WHITE ROSE STUDENT RESEARCH CONTEST 5

    2000 E Cary St, Richmond, VA 23223 . Parking. There is free, off-street parking directly across from the Museum on East Cary Street. Phone & Fax. P: (804) 257-5400 F: (804) 257-4314

  14. White Rose Essay Contest Winners

    April 19, 2023 The White Rose Society Essay Contest is named in honor of the original White Rose Society, a group of university students in Munich, Germany, who united to call the German people to oppose Nazi oppression and inhumanity through an underground newspaper and leaflet campaign.

  15. PDF 2024-White Rose Contest

    Length: 500-1000 words Eligibility: Oklahoma Students in grades 6-8 at the beginning of the 2023-2024 academic year may participate. Students may win an award only once in each school category. Use entry form attached.

  16. White Rose Tribute Event 2023

    The White Rose Award reminds us of the actions of a group of courageous students in Germany during WWII. Calling for non-violent resistance against Hitler and the Nazis, the group consisted of five students in their early twenties led by Hans and Sophie Scholl.

  17. Yom HaShoah 2023

    Yom HaShoah 2023 Video unavailable Watch on YouTube Watch on About the Program: The community gathered with us to observe Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day), which commemorates the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, the largest act of resistance to Nazi aggression during the Holocaust.

  18. White Rose Society Essay Contest

    Congratulations to the 2023 Winners 1st Place Miley Roberts Read Miley's Essay Video of Miley's Award 2nd Place Lydia Lohnes Read Lydia's Essay Video of Lydia's Award 3rd Place Crew Fortin Read Crew's Essay Video of Crew's Award White Rose Society Essay Contest Prompt Information on Next Year's Contest Coming Soon

  19. 2024 Civics Essay Contest Rules

    Elementary (grades 3-5) school students should draft essays not to exceed 100 words. Middle (grades 6-8) and High (grades 9-12) school students should draft essays not to exceed 250 words. Essays longer than the stated lengths per grade level categories will be disqualified. All essays must be submitted by midnight ET on March 22, 2024.

  20. St. Petersburg City Council rejects exploring straw poll on Rays deal

    The possible absence of a primary contest for the Republican or Democratic party would have raised the cost. ... Driver sought in St. Pete hit-and-run that seriously hurt bicyclist in 2023 3 hours ...

  21. White Rose Tribute Event 2023

    Tess Wise White Rose Honorees. 2023 Tony Jenkins, Central Florida Market President, Florida Blue. 2022 Dr. Rita Bornstein. 2021 The Massey Family. 2020 Mayor Jerry L. Demings. 2019 Joanie Holzer Schirm. 2018 Jeffrey Miller & Ted Maines. 2017 Mayor Buddy Dyer. 2016 Valeria & Jim Shapiro.

  22. White Nights in St. Petersburg, Russia

    From late May to early July the nights are bright in St. Petersburg, with the brightest period, the White Nights, normally lasting from June 11 th to July 2 nd.The White Nights (Beliye Nochi) are a curious phenomenon caused by St. Petersburg's very northerly geographical location - at 59 degrees 57' North (roughly on the same latitude as Oslo, Norway, the southern tip of Greenland and Seward ...

  23. 415 3rd St S #4, St. Petersburg, FL 33701

    4407 sq. ft. condo located at 415 3rd St S #4, St. Petersburg, FL 33701. View sales history, tax history, home value estimates, and overhead views. APN 193117934890000040.

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