80 Best Magazines & Websites That Publish Personal Essays

Well, you’re in luck because you’ve just found a list of magazines that accept essay submissions around pop culture, personal finance, personal stories, and many other topics. If you’re passionate about crafting personal essays and your work typically falls within a range of 600 to 10,000 words, consider submitting your essays to the organizations listed below. They generally offer compensation of $50-$250 for each accepted essay. After this guide, you may also want to check my list of the best essays of all time .

Here are the top magazines and publications that publish thought-provoking essays:

1. the new york times – modern love, 2. the new york times – opinion essays.

To submit an essay to this publication, fill out the provided submission form with the essay and a brief explanation of your professional or personal connection to its argument or idea. The essay should include sources for key assertions (either as hyperlinks or parenthetical citations). Although all submissions are reviewed, the publication may not be able to respond individually due to the high volume of entries. If there’s no response within three business days, authors are free to submit their work elsewhere. Submission info .

3. Dame Magazine

DAME is a women’s magazine that prioritizes accessible and intersectional journalism that dives into context rather than breaking news. Their stories are unexpected, emotional, straightforward, illuminating, and focused on people rather than policy. They aim to reveal new or surprising information, provoke action or empathy, simplify complex issues, introduce fresh ideas, and foreground the people most affected by discussed topics. Submission info .

4. The New Yorker

The New Yorker welcomes letters to the editor sent to [email protected] and includes your postal address and phone number. For fiction submissions, send your work as a PDF to [email protected] or mail it to their New York address. They review all submissions within ninety days and will only contact you if they decide to publish your work. Submission info .

5. The Atlantic

6. the globe and mail.

The Globe and Mail welcomes your original experiences, viewpoints, and unique perspectives for your daily first-person essay. A good essay should have an original voice, an unexpected view, humor, vivid details, and anecdotes that illuminate a wider theme. While a successful essay could be funny, surprising, touching, or enlightening, it should always be personal and truthful, rather than political or fictional. Submission info .

7. The Guardian

To contribute to this publication, you should identify the most relevant section and contact the commissioning editor with a brief outline of your idea. You may be invited to submit your work speculatively, meaning payment will only be provided if your contribution is published. It’s important to note that your contribution should be sent electronically and will be published under standard copyright terms with payment at normal rates unless agreed otherwise before publication. Submission info .

8. Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is open to opinion articles on any subject, with most published pieces being about 750 words long. Submissions must be exclusive to them and not published elsewhere, including personal blogs or social media. Full drafts of articles are required for consideration and should include the author’s name, the topic, the full text, a short author biography, and contact information. Submission info .

9. The Sun Magazine

Slate invites pitches that are fresh, and original, and propose strong arguments. They appreciate ideas that challenge conventional wisdom and encourage you to clearly articulate the insights your reporting can uncover. A concise pitch is preferred, even if a full draft is already written. You should include a short bio and any relevant published work. They advise waiting a week before pitching to other publications, and if an editor passes, refrain from sending it to another editor at Slate. Submission info .

VICE is primarily interested in mid-length original reports, reported essays, narrative features, and service journalism related to contemporary living and interpersonal relationships. They welcome stories informed by personal experiences and insight but advise writers to consider what makes their story unique, why they’re the right person to tell it, and why it should be on VICE. While all stories don’t need to be tied to current events, a timely element can distinguish a pitch. They also accept quick-turnaround blogs and longer features. Submission info .

12. Vox Culture

14. buzzfeed reader, 15. the boston globe, 16. the bold italic, 18. refinery29.

ELLE’s annual talent competition is back for, seeking out the next superstar in writing. The winner will have their 500-word piece, inspired by the hashtag #RelationshipGoals and focusing on a significant relationship in their life. Submission info .

20. Cosmopolitan

22. the walrus, 23. autostraddle.

Autostraddle welcomes pitches, works in progress, and completed submissions. Any issues with the submission form should be emailed to Laneia Jones with the subject line “SUBMISSION ERROR”. Questions about the submission process can be directed to Kayla Kumari Upadhyaya with “SUBMISSION PROCESS” in the subject line. Please note that pitches or submissions sent via email will not be accepted. Submission info .

24. Narratively

25. catapult, 26. jezebel, 27. bitch media.

Bitch Media seeks pitches offering feminist analysis of culture, covering a wide array of topics including social trends, politics, science, health, life aspects, and popular culture phenomena. They publish critical essays, reported features, interviews, reviews, and analyses. First-person essays should balance personal perspectives with larger themes. Both finished work and query letters are welcome. However, due to the volume of submissions, they cannot guarantee a response or that every pitch will be read. Submission info .

28. Broadview

29. briarpatch magazine, 30. maisonneuve, 31. room magazine, 32. hazlitt.

Hazlitt is currently not accepting submissions but it might reopen soon. They seek original journalism, investigative features, international reporting, profiles, essays, and humor pieces, but they are not considering unsolicited fiction. Pitches with proposed word counts are preferred, and they have a section called “Hazlitt Firsts” for reviews of experiencing mundane things for the first time as adults. Submission info .

33. This Magazine

34. geist magazine, 35. discover magazine, 36. eater voices, 37. the temper.

The Temper is an online publication focused on sobriety, addiction, and recovery, challenging drinking culture. They seek diverse and intersectional stories written through the lens of addiction, covering various topics like sex, food, relationships, and more. Submissions are currently closed, but they are especially interested in amplifying voices from marginalized and underrepresented groups. Submission info .

38. Chatelaine

39. conde nast traveler, 40. boston globe ideas, 41. babbel magazine, 42. huffpost personal.

HuffPost seeks to amplify voices from underrepresented communities, including BIPOC, LGBTQ, and people with disabilities. They accept freelance pitches on a wide range of topics, providing clear guidelines for submissions. They also encourage visual creatives to submit their work, and all published contributors are paid for their work. Please note that due to the volume of submissions, individual responses may not be possible. Submission info .

43. Adelaide Literary Magazine

44. biostories, 45. quarter after eight, 46. the rappahannock review.

Allure is seeking writers to contribute pieces that explore beauty, style, self-expression, and liberation. They are looking for writers with relevant credentials and experience in the field, and they offer compensation of $350 for reported stories and $300 for personal essays. Submission info .

48. MLA Style Center

49. marie claire, 51. her story, 52. griffith review, 53. literary review of canada, 54. harper’s magazine, 55. virginia quarterly review, 56. the new england review, 57. one story.

One Story seeks literary fiction between 3,000 and 8,000 words, any style, and subject. They pay $500 and provide 25 contributor copies for First Serial North American rights. Only unpublished material is accepted, except for stories published in print outside North America. Simultaneous submissions allowed; prompt withdrawals upon acceptance elsewhere. Accepts DOC, DOCX, PDF, and RTF files via Submittable. No comments on individual stories. No revisions of previously rejected work. Translations are accepted with proper attribution. No emailed or paper submissions, except for incarcerated individuals. Submission info .

58. The Threepenny Review

59. zoetrope: all-story, 60. american short fiction, 61. the southern review, 62. boulevard magazine.

Boulevard seeks to publish exceptional fiction, poetry, and non-fiction from both experienced and emerging writers. They accept works of up to 8,000 words for prose and up to five poems of up to 200 lines. They do not consider genres like science fiction, erotica, horror, romance, or children’s stories. Payment for prose ranges from $100 to $300, while payment for poetry ranges from $50 to $250. Natural Bridge Online publication offers a flat rate of $50. Submission info .

63. The Cincinnati Review

64. the antioch review, 66. barrelhouse, 67. tin house online.

Tin House is a good company that offers a two-day submission period three times a year for writers without a current agent and no previous book publication (chapbooks accepted). They accept fiction, literary nonfiction, and poetry, both in English and in translation (with formal permission). Completed drafts are required. They are particularly interested in engaging with writers from historically underrepresented communities. Submission info .

68. One Teen Story

69. bennington review, 70. epoch literary, 71. the gettysburg review, 72. alaska quarterly review.

The publication accepts submissions of fiction, poetry, drama, literary nonfiction, and photo essays in traditional and experimental styles. Fiction can be short stories, novellas, or novel excerpts up to 70 pages, and poetry submissions can include up to 6 poems. They aim to respond within 4 to 12 weeks, but authors can inquire about their manuscript status after 4 weeks if needed. Submission info .

73. Colorado Review

74. the georgia review, 75. new letters, 76. shenandoah, 77. triquarterly.

TriQuarterly, the literary journal of Northwestern University, welcomes submissions in poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, video essays, short drama, and hybrid work from both established and emerging writers. They are especially interested in work that engages with global cultural and societal conversations. Submissions are accepted through Submittable, and they charge a small reading fee. Submission windows vary by genre. Submission info .

78. E-International Relations

79. longreads, 80. education week, rafal reyzer.

Hey there, welcome to my blog! I'm a full-time entrepreneur building two companies, a digital marketer, and a content creator with 10+ years of experience. I started RafalReyzer.com to provide you with great tools and strategies you can use to become a proficient digital marketer and achieve freedom through online creativity. My site is a one-stop shop for digital marketers, and content enthusiasts who want to be independent, earn more money, and create beautiful things. Explore my journey here , and don't miss out on my AI Marketing Mastery online course.

Mobile Nav

50 Awesome Websites For Writing Submissions

From poetry submissions to short story submissions, here are the awesome websites looking to publish your writing.

publish personal essay

So, you’ve successfully managed to avoid your social commitments to sit down and write something. After combing through it to check the grammar and that there isn’t a trail of letters from when you fell asleep on your keyboard, what’s the next step? You need to find somewhere to submit your writing online.

The online writing community is bigger and better than ever before; one Google search later and you could find your new literary home. However, it might be a case of trial and error with some submission guidelines being stricter than others or your style of writing not quite matching the publication’s. Luckily, we’ve trawled the web for you, bringing you fifty awesome websites that will be happy to receive your writing submissions and potentially even publish them.

A couple of things to note before we jump right in:

1. This isn’t a comprehensive list, so you’re welcome to add a comment with your suggestions. 2. Some of these websites operate seasonally, which means that they might not accept your submission at this point in time.

We’ve also excluded the biggest names for literary (poetry, short stories) submissions because it’s a little arbitrary to list The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and so on.

Without further ado, here are the best websites for you to submit your writing to, whether it’s heartfelt poetry or a listicle on the best Adam Sandler movies.

Where to Submit Poetry

1. poetry foundation.

Who are they? Only one of the oldest poetry magazines in the world. They aren’t stuck in the past, though – you can find many fantastic poems from modern talent in this prose treasure trove. Maybe you could be one of them? Do they pay? Quite handsomely. $10 per every line published.

2. Carve Magazine

Who are they? A popular haven for creative types since 2000. They celebrate honest writing and work closely with writers to help promote their talent. Do they pay? Pretty well. $25 for every poem published.

3. The Legendary

Who are they? Another pillar of the online writing community, The Legendary regularly publishes some superb underground poetry and other interesting features. Do they pay? Not that I could see.

4. Boulevard

Who are they? They’ve been around for thirty years, so it’s fair to say they have their fans. Their typical output is varied, but is based on one central theme: quality. Do they pay?  Between $25-$300 for published materials under general submissions. They also hold two contests with massive cash incentives: $1500 for winning fiction and $1000 for winning poetry.

5. Drunk Monkeys

Who are they? As dedicated a team of editors and writers that you will find on the ol’ WWW, Drunk Monkeys are constantly working to promote and spotlight emerging excellence in the field of writing, including poetry. Due to demand, their submissions aren’t always open. Do they pay? No, but they work their fingers to the bone until they think you’ve been promoted properly.

6. All Poetry

Who are they? Probably the place online where poets congregate to discuss, dissect, and create. If you’re looking for feedback as a new poet, we’re pretty sure one of the 500,000 members will be happy to help. Do they pay? They hold regular poetry competitions with cash prizes as incentives.

7. The Rialto

Who are they? A seriously stylish outlet for poets based in the UK, though it seems like anyone of any background can submit. They’re on the rise and have been for the past three decades, helping to establish poetry newcomers and spotlight underrated names in the process. They’ve just released issue 85 of their magazine with them publishing at least three magazines per year. Do they pay? £20 per published poem.

Who are they? A diligent and passionate team that have been delivering poetic excellence since 1985. They receive a serious amount of poetry each year, so if you want to be one of the 150 published each year, you best make sure you’re sending your best work. Do they pay? Not that I could tell.

9. Arc Poetry Magazine

Who are they? A Canadian publication, but they know that writing talent doesn’t have borders, so submissions are open to all. They’ve been around for over three decades and have won more than their fair share of accolades and fans in that time. Do they pay? $40 for any poem published across multiple mediums.

10. United Press

Who are they? A shining light for British poetry, United Press has been around for many years, publishing and promoting new talent aplenty to success. They aren’t the flashiest, but poetry doesn’t need to be. Do they pay ? Looks like a no.

Where to Submit Short Stories

Who are they ? Well, they have a name that sort of explains everything. Story is a magazine dedicating to publishing the most innovative, exciting short stories out there. They run a print publication and, because they love spoiling us, regularly publish online, too. Do they pay? $20 per page. Don’t think making your font 48px will fly with them.

12. Flash Fiction Online

Who are they? Masters of the concise, FFO are after shorter than short stories – don’t send them anything over on 1000 words. They like immediately captivating prose, but they aren’t big fans of erotica, so be sure to be selective when dipping into your portfolio. Do they pay? $60 per story, which is pretty great.

13. Ideomancer

Who are they? Literary anarchists; they aren’t seeking traditional prose. Mess with the narrative and their minds and you will be in their good books. If you think outside-of-the-box and it’s reflected in your writing, you couldn’t ask for a better platform. Do they pay? Yes, but a maximum of $40 at a rate of 3 cents per word.

14. Shimmer

Who are they? Another group of writers who go against the grain, Shimmer mainly seek speculative fiction with a fantasy bent. Keep it tight at around 4000 words and the editors will be your new best friends. 7500 words is the maximum, but you can send them an email to justify your story if it exceeds that. Do they pay? Pretty well considering – a maximum of $50 at a rate of 5 cents per word.

15. One Story

Who are they? Evil geniuses: they only publish one short story roughly every month with a massive amount of money going to the published writer. Your odds may not be high with this publication, which is why you should probably get around to writing your Great Expectations sooner rather than later. Do they pay? $500! Five. Hundred. Dollars.

16. Crazyhorse

Who are they? Exhibitors of the wacky and strange, Crazyhorse is one of the most accepting literary magazines out there for short stories – there really aren’t many restrictions with what theme or form your submission can take. Its editors are after life’s eccentrics, so if you’re reading this while playing ping pong, you could be just their type of person. Do they pay? Very well indeed. A maximum of $200, $20 per printed page.

17. The Sun Magazine

Who are they? Thankfully not related to the British newspaper, The Sun Magazine are uncompromising with what sort of short story you can send to them. It’s essentially open house, so if you have something odd or a masterpiece to unveil, they will be happy to receive your submission. Do they pay? You could say that. $300 to $2,500 for nonfiction or $300 to $1,500 for fiction, plus a subscription with them for a year.

18. Brevity

Who are they? As their name suggests, Brevity love the succinct side of short stories. If you can convey your narrative in under 750 words or less, you have a brilliant community to become a part of. Both seasoned writers and burgeoning newcomers are welcomed. Do they pay? More than fairly. $45.

Who are they? Lovers of science-fiction, Tor has published plenty of talent in its esteemed history, including many short stories and novellas. Due to the volume of submissions received, however, they are on an indefinite hiatus, which means that they will be back, but only once they’ve reviewed previous submissions. It’ll be worth the wait when those doors open again, though. Do they pay? A rate depending on the commercial prospects and quality of your submission.

20. Word Riot

Who are they? Always looking for new talent, this celebrated literary journal will pass the 15-year mark since launch in 2017. They’re about, and always have been, finding new talent and helping them to capture the attention of new audiences. Do they pay? Not that I could see.

Where to Submit Personal Essays

Who are they? One of the biggest culture-centric websites around, Salon is bookmarked by many people looking for thought-provoking, important essays and personal experiences. They’re huge, so be aware that you might not be successful. Do they pay? Not sure, some previous contributors have said so.

22. The Awl

Who are they? Big believers in the value of personal essays. The Awl have been around for some time, helping writers to weave their own stories in big numbers. The mundane need not apply to be published by these guys. Do they pay? Anywhere between $30 and $250.

23. Huffington Post

Who are they? They’re either loved or hated, but there’s no denying that HuffPo is a big player, possibly one of the biggest websites ever made, and they want you to turn your personal experience into essays. Do they pay? Not even a penny, which I’ve always found a little weird.

24. New Statesman

Who are they ? A fairly large site, but not so large that they are completely unapproachable. They’re looking for timely pieces on what’s going on in the world right now, including your take — it’s likely the more salacious, the better. Do they pay? They do, but they don’t disclose rates publicly.

25. Tin House

Who are they? The destination for writers of all pedigrees – looking at their testimonials will make your head spin. Being published on Tin House is something every writer needs to tick off their bucket list, but don’t even think about writing over 10,000 words for them. Do they pay? Enough for a mortgage on a small house. $1000 max.

26. Full Grown People

Who are they? Full Grown People are fond of submissions and personal essays that center around being an adult, whether it’s a piece on the juxtaposition to childhood or something similar. They receive a mighty amount of submissions, so you may have to bear with them. It will be worth the wait, though – the community is great. Do they pay? Sadly not.

Who are they? Couldn’t say that I’d read much of their output before putting this list together, but once I was on that website, it had me. They publish some excellent content in an eclectic range of categories, including personal essays. Bear in mind that they’re huge , so you may have to be patient with your submission. Do they pay? Generously. Between $250 and $500.

Who are they? Massively popular, Bustle boast over a million fans on Facebook alone, so you can expect they receive their fair share of submissions, too. If you’re stuck on what to write for them, they accept a broad range of different works, including personal essays that capture the attention. Do they pay? Depends. Unsolicited, no. Otherwise, yes.

29. Good Old Days

Who are they? As you might be able to guess, Good Old Days love nostalgia. It’s essential that you have experience of life in the 50s or earlier that you want to turn into a personal essay for them. The website is full of heartwarming and heartbreaking tales in equal measure. Do they pay? Anywhere between $15 and $75.

30. Literal Latte

Who are they? Dedicated to the core. Literal Latte are accepting submissions every single day of the year and consider all submissions, no matter your experience. They thrive on giving chances to those who may never get them, so your personal essay could fit in well here. Do they pay? Not for general submissions (yet), but they do hold five contests a year with three of them having $1000 prizes.

Where to Submit Articles

31. the verge.

Who are they? A massive entertainment and technology website that certainly doesn’t accept half-measures. They are extremely particular about what they publish and aren’t after your opinions, but if you can bring them a breaking news story, they’ll be listening. Do they pay? Doesn’t say.

32. Travelicious

Who are they? A travel guide website that doesn’t suck. All of their features are packed with accurate information and opinion from people who have been there and done that. If you have 1000 words in you, you could be one of them. It’s also great exposure. Do they pay ? Yes, $40 for a published piece.

33. Writers Weekly

Who are they? A popular website for writers, by writers (hey, that sounds familiar). It’s filled to the brim with handy tips and guides for writers of all experiences and pedigrees – there’s bound to be something on there that can take your work to the next level. You could probably help someone out by imparting your wisdom and getting paid for it, too. Do they pay? How does $60 for about 600 words sound?

34. Write Naked

Who are they? Probably not naturists. What they absolutely are, though, is a hugely helpful resource for writers as the website is filled with anecdotes and guides from established names in the literature world. They also love interviews and discussions about freelance writing. Do they pay? Yes, but you might want to put the extra effort into writing something extraordinary. The editor will pay $200 for exemplary pieces.

35. Techopedia

Who are they? Proud geeks. Techopedia loves publishing anything to do with the world of tech, whether it’s an in-depth guide or an opinion piece. You might have to be well-versed in many fields to be able to competently write for them, but you’re a writer. Research is what you do. Do they pay? Yep, and they’re proud of it. Expect $50 to $150 for your published work.

36. HowlRound

Who are they? A website dedicated to the arts and those that inhabit the theater scene. They publish a wide range of differently themed content, but with a strong opinion and facts to back up your words, you could go quite far with HowlRound. Do they pay? Yup. $50 for 750-2000 of your fine words.

37. Hongkiat

Who are they? A very successful technology blog that has been around since 2007. They’re always on-the-ball with news and welcome submissions covering a range of different topics, but your best bet is to stick to design guides and recommendations. Do they pay? Not specified.

38. The Daily Spectacle

Who are they? Defenders of the arts. If you’re a fan of anything to do with film, TV, politics or anything within a similar category, you’re in luck. This is probably the smallest website on the list, but it looks like it’s going places – the content is great and the editorial team seem to be passionate, which is exactly what you need. Do they pay? Not yet.

39. Screen Rant

Who are they? A massively popular pop culture website with a huge following on social media. If you’re trying to become a journalist capable of turning over breaking news stories as quick as the idea lands in your inbox, Screen Rant is one of the best places to start. Do they pay? Yes, but payment rates are unclear.

40. GameSkinny

Who are they? A small-to-medium gaming website in terms of size, GameSkinny publish fairly frequently and promise to help you get to the top of your game. They operate on a “Bounty Program” and are looking for lists, guides, and all sorts of content. Do they pay? $0.50 per 1000 Views.

Where to Submit Listicles

41. cracked.

Who are they? The thinking man’s comedy website. Cracked started life as a decent magazine but have become an even better website, offering listicles with word counts that would make your typing fingers tremble. If you have a crazy theory about the newest superhero movie that you can turn into thousands of words, Cracked has to be one of the best places for you. Do they pay? “We will pay you if it’s good.”

42. College Humor

Who are they? Probably the biggest comedy website out there. They’re constantly posting lists, whether they’re funny or not, and can help you to collaborate with artists to really bring your content to life. They’re pretty selective about who they accept to write for them, though – I applied to write for them a while ago and didn’t hear anything back, which is odd because I am hilarious . Do they pay? Varies, but the maximum you can earn is $100.

Who are they? The slightly less socially acceptable sister site to College Humor. Only nerds need apply; if you don’t know your Pac-man from your Tetris, you might not be a good fit for them. If you’re an out-and-out nerd, writing for Dorkly will put you in touch with an awesome, unforgiving community of millions. Do they pay? $35 for a single-page article, $75 for multi-page.

44. WhatCulture

Who are they? The British Cracked. They haven’t been around for all that long, but they have the talent and community to become one of the world’s biggest websites and they certainly aren’t far off joining the elite, either. They cover everything from the world of pop culture with their list articles performing the best out of the hundreds of different things they publish each week. Do they pay? Yes, on a views basis.

45. ListVerse

Who are they? A titan of the list world that never seems to run out of content ideas. You name it, they will make a list out of it, but they expect nothing but quality on whatever topic you’re covering, whether it’s the best cheese in Holland or the worst impersonations of Sylvester Stallone. Go for a minimum of 1500 words and reap the rewards. Do they pay? Really well. $150 for your hard work.

46. The Richest

Who are they? Suppliers of all the lists one person could ever need. The Richest have an impressive scope of topics they cover, which means that it’s highly likely there will be something for you to write about. Their contributor program is a little complicated, but if you can stick to it, you can earn some decent money. Do they pay? Half a dollar per every 1000 views.

47. Top Tenz

Who are they? Obsessed with the bizarre, unknown, and obscure, Top Tenz is another list-based website with a big audience. One of their most popular articles has close to 50 million views, which isn’t too bad at all. There’s no guarantee that you will hit those figures with your own listicle, but who’s to say you won’t come close? Do they pay?  $50

48. The Sportster

Who are they? A sports-centric listicle website with a lot of content to give to pro wrestling fans. Thinking of submitting to them? You better go back and start watching some Royal Rumbles because wrestling lists are the bread and butter for these guys. Do they pay? Yes, on a views basis.

49. Lifehack

Who are they? A huge community of individuals all looking for ways to make life easier. The content on the website is predominantly to help and inform, so if there’s anything you know about that someone else might not, share your wisdom and reach a massive audience. Do they pay? Unclear.

50. Buzzfeed

Who are they? Come on. You know BuzzFeed. Writing for their community section is a pretty surefire way of getting your list read by a limitless audience. Do they pay? Nope.

There you have them: fifty awesome websites that are looking for your writing submissions. As mentioned, it obviously isn’t comprehensive, but it’s a good mixture of big names and upcoming publications you should be keeping an eye out for. If you’re an editor or publisher and your website didn’t make the cut, you are welcome to leave a comment below. MORE writing tips: Top 5 Networking Tips For Writers Why You Should Never Give Up Writing 6 Tools To Help You Concentrate When Writing

Some of the coverage you find on Cultured Vultures contains affiliate links, which provide us with small commissions based on purchases made from visiting our site. We cover gaming news , movie reviews , wrestling and much more.

Cultured Vultures

Gamezeen is a Zeen theme demo site. Zeen is a next generation WordPress theme. It’s powerful, beautifully designed and comes with everything you need to engage your visitors and increase conversions.

Latest Reviews

Really good rejects review – a music documentary that loses its way, moon knight: season 1 – episode 5 ‘asylum’ review, the bob’s burgers movie review – comfort food, beavis and butt-head do the universe review – a long-awaited laughfest.

  • Alone in the Dark 2024
  • Announcements
  • Assassin's Creed Mirage
  • Avatar: Frontiers of Pandora
  • Blu-Ray Reviews
  • Book Reviews
  • Cheats & Codes
  • Crunchyroll
  • Discworld Discussions
  • Disney Plus
  • Final Fantasy VII Rebirth
  • Football Manager 2024
  • Game Previews
  • Game Reviews
  • Games To Play Before You Die
  • Gaming Tips & Guides
  • Grand Theft Auto 6
  • Indie Gaming
  • Make the Case
  • Memorable Moments
  • Movie Reviews
  • Movies To See Before You Die
  • PlayStation 4
  • PlayStation 5
  • PlayStation Plus
  • Prime Video
  • Q&A Interviews
  • Short Stories
  • Video Game Release Dates
  • Video Games
  • Where To Watch
  • Writing Tips
  • Xbox Game Pass
  • Xbox Series X | S

Subscribe Today

7 publications that pay well for personal narrative essays

Despite The New Yorker declaring that the personal essay boom was over in 2017, I’ve seen the opposite. Whenever I look on Twitter, I see callouts from editors for candid, revealing and thought-provoking first person pieces. For freelance writers, the advantage of writing a personal narrative essay is that you are drawing on your own experience, so there is very little need for external research or case studies. Many writers also say that writing down their own experience and sharing it with others feels validating, affirming and therapeutic.

Before I became a full time freelancer , I wrote quite a few personal narrative essays.

Why? Because personal narrative essays are one of the fastest and easiest ways to get published.

When I was writing my first-person pieces, I found numerous articles about how to sell personal essays in the age of over-sharing   and how to write compelling first person pieces for major publications.

I quickly learnt that if you are willing to open up and share your own experience, you can be compensated well for it.

And if you’re interested to learn more about how to write a personal essay (and how to get paid for it!) I’ve created the ultimate guide to step you through the process.

It takes you through:

  • Choosing the perfect topic for a personal essay
  • How to start a personal essay (including what to do and not to do and examples of banging beginnings)
  • Common mistakes people make when writing first-person narratives
  • How to write a compelling personal essay that keeps people reading right to the end
  • Examples of great personal narrative essays
  • How to pitching your story to an editor
  • And lots more!

personal narrative essay guide

The guide also includes 15+ paying markets for personal narrative essays, but I know that it can be tricky to find publications that accept freelance submissions.

The good news is that there are plenty of online and print publications looking for personal essays.

So if you have a personal story you want to share, where can you pitch it?

If you’re a writer who has had a book published, it’s definitely worth pitching to Allure (a magazine predominantly for women about beauty) as they pay up to $3,000 for personal essays up to 2000 words.

For those mere mortals among us who haven’t written a book, the rate for personal essays seems to be more like $250 – $500.

Glamour is another women’s magazine that heavily focuses on beauty, fashion and entertainment stories. Personal essays published by Glamour are reported to fetch around $2/word.

3. The Guardian

You have to love an editor who puts what she wants from writers out there and Jessica Reed from The Guardian certainly delivers. For beautifully written personal essays, The Guardian reportedly pays 60c/word.

4. Marie Claire

If you’ve got something compelling, insightful, intimate, funny, relatable or awkward to say about your love or sex life, then a personal essay directed to Marie Claire might be just the ticket. Writers report that Marie Claire pays $2/word.

Are you spotting a theme here? Women’s magazines love personal essays. If you want to write first hand experience about fitness, food, health or culture, it’s worth pitching to SELF magazine, who pay up to $700 for 2000 words.

A dynamic site covering world affairs, pop culture, science, business, politics and more, Vox pay around $500 for personal narrative essays. What’s even better is their clear pitching guidelines for their First Person section .

7. News.com.au

If you feel like a sharing a real life story like this one , you can pitch to the lifestyle vertical on the Australian website news.com.au. Writers are reportedly paid around $500 for a post.

Great examples of personal essays

You could spend years reading all the personal narrative essays that get published, but here are my picks for some of the best:

My washing line is heavy with the weight of our ash-ridden tent hung out to air. I wonder if the smell of smoke will ever be gone. I have no recollection of the tent being packed away – I was focused on the children, keeping them calm. All I know is that we’d never packed up a campsite so damn quickly. But then, we’d never fled a bushfire.  You can read the rest of the article here.

  “I love you so much.” Those whispered words make everything better – and when my soul mate and husband died, five years ago, I truly believed I would never hear them again.  You can read the rest of the article here.

My epiphany came, like many of them do, while I was taking a dump. Specifically, it came while I was trying to take a dump in the woods after three years of struggling with gastrointestinal issues. It went something like this: you don’t need to be gluten-free anymore. You just need to relax.  You can read the rest of the article here.

The rules for pitching a personal essay are much the same as when you query an editor for any other kind of writing assignment.

You just need a strong hook and engaging writing style.

The writers I know who create personal narrative essays love it.

They feel free and are absolutely thrilled when readers respond to their articles with “me too!”

After all, isn’t the point of writing to reach and connect with others? Personal essays tend to do that in a very special way.

Do you write personal narrative essays? Have you found other well-paying markets?

Previous Post How I built up to full time freelance writing (and hit $100K in my first year)

Next post "what's your rate" answering the trickiest question in freelance writing, you may also like.

publish personal essay

  • Pitch Perfect database
  • Personal essay
  • Travel writing
  • Foundations of freelance writing
  • Write Earn Thrive

Recent posts

  • How to build relationships with PRs June 14, 2024
  • How to write a personal narrative that’s vivid and compelling June 14, 2024
  • What no one ever tells you about being a travel writer June 14, 2024
  • Privacy policy
  • Terms and Conditions
  • Terms and conditions for WRITE.EARN.THRIVE
  • Foundations
  • Personal Essay
  • Write for magazines

© 2024 The Freelancer's Year. © Copyright Lindy Alexander 2017-23. All Rights Reserved.

There’s never been a better time to be a freelancer. But how do you make the leap from writing as a hobby to full time freelancing? The Freelancer’s Year has all the tips and tricks you need to be a successful freelance writer.

  • Courses Overview
  • Online Courses
  • Private Coaching
  • All Courses Directory
  • Member Publications
  • Photo Gallery
  • Video Gallery
  • Accreditation
  • Gift Vouchers

No products in the cart.

5 places to submit your personal essays

where to submit personal essays blog 1200

The best stories often come from real-life experiences. If you enjoy writing personal essays, consider submitting your work to one of the publications on this list. (Fiction writers and poets, there are some gems for you here too.) All the journals on our list are currently open for submissions and none charge fees.

Note: We are a creative writing school and compile these lists for the benefit of our students. Please don’t send us your publishing queries or submissions :). Click on the links to go to the publication’s website and look for their submissions page.

Adelaide Literary Magazine accepts personal essays and narrative nonfiction (up to 5,000 words) written in English and Portuguese. You can also submit short stories (up to 5,000 words) and poetry (up to 5 pieces per submission). They publish online once per month and generally respond within two months.

bioStories focuses exclusively on personal essays (500-7500 words). They publish essays on nearly any topic and are especially interested in work that celebrates the extraordinary within the ordinary. Pieces are published as they are accepted, and the editors generally respond to submissions within two months.

HuffPost Personal wants personal stories from writers of diverse experiences and welcomes essays on nearly any topic so long as they’re told with an authentic voice and point of view. There are no specific word limits, but writers are asked to pitch the editors before submitting their piece for consideration.

Quarter After Eight is an online literary journal published once per year. The editors are seeking work that ‘directly challenges the conventions of language, style, voice, or idea’. In addition to essays and creative nonfiction (no specific word limits), they also accept flash fiction, short stories (up to 7,500 words), and poetry (up to 4 pieces per submission). Submissions are open through 15 April 2021, and the average response time is 2-3 months.

The Rappahannock Review is an online literary magazine that publishes twice per year. In addition to essays and creative nonfiction (up to 8,000 words), they’re also looking for flash fiction, short stories (up to 7,500 words), and poetry (up to 5 poems per submission). They generally respond within one month.

' src=

3 responses on "5 places to submit your personal essays"

' src=

Just found this- Thanks for the info!

' src=

Hi, thank you very much for sharing this useful information. Now, I know where I can submit my personal essays. Writing essays make me occupied with writing and reading everyday.

' src=

Thank you! I was looking for places to submit personal essays!

Leave a Message Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Sign up to our new blog notification list

  • Recent Posts

journals that pay blog 600x315

List by Interest

Subscribe to our monthly update.

You’ll receive special discounts and invitations, plus writing tips, publishing opportunities and more.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

You are agreeing to our Privacy Policy

publish personal essay

29 Publishers that Pay for Personal Essays

publish personal essay

For those who have a true story to share, this list is for you. It’s a list of publishers that pay for personal essays.

I’ve included a wide variety of publications here. All of them pay for the essays they publish. You’ll find contact information, as well.

For those interested in learning more about writing and publishing personal essays, I highly recommend watching my hour long discussion with the editor of HuffPost Personal. (Essays published in HuffPost often reach millions of readers.)

Also, for those looking for even more options, you may want to look into literary journals that publish creative nonfiction. Literary journals tend to want submissions of complete drafts, and are less likely to pay, but are still a good option for many writers. Authors Publish has an older list of such journals here.

For paid subscribers, if you have any requests, in terms of future lists you would like me to put together, please let me know! (This list was requested by a subscriber.)

Open Secrets is an online magazine (hosted by Substack) that publishes memorable and revealing personal essays on the topics we are taught to keep “secret.” They are open to essays (1,000 to 1,500 words) on all personal experiences. They pay authors $100 per essay. For more information, refer to this page .

The Doe is a digital publication that shares anonymous, verified personal narratives to promote civil discourse. They are accepting pitches for stories from voices across the spectrum, including first-time writers. They publish anonymous, first-person narrative pieces and personal, verified non-fiction pieces full of vivid anecdotes. They want writers to keep their drafts to 500-700 words. According to their Twitter post, they pay around $100-300 per story. To learn more, visit this page .

HuffPost Personal is a personal stories section in HuffPost (a news and opinion website). Their personal stories are “original, authentic, compelling and told in the first person.” To pitch, refer to this page . Watch our interview with the editor here.

Oh Reader is a print and online magazine about reading. They are “looking for stories about your experiences as a reader, insight into the effect of reading on humans, humorous takes on the world of words, and anything else you as a reader or writer might be interested in sharing.” They pay a flat rate of $200 per published article. Details here .

Keep reading with a 7-day free trial

Subscribe to LitWorth to keep reading this post and get 7 days of free access to the full post archives.

Writers.com

After weeks of deliberating over the right words and fine-tuning your creative nonfiction piece , you’re ready to begin submitting to literary nonfiction journals. The only problem is finding the right home for your creative nonfiction submission. What journals or literary nonfiction magazines should you prioritize submitting your work to?

Find your answer here: we’ve searched the net for great creative nonfiction journals, and any of the following 24 publications is a wonderful home for creative nonfiction—guaranteed.

If you’re looking to submit multiple genres of work, take a look at the best places to submit poetry and the best places to submit fiction , too!

24 Creative Nonfiction Magazines to Submit To

Just like our other guides on the best literary journals to submit to, we’ve divided this article into three different categories:

  • Great journals to secure your first publications in
  • Competitive journals for writers with previous publications
  • High-tier creative nonfiction journals at the summit of publishing

Any publication in the following 24 journals is sure to jumpstart your literary career. So, let’s explore the best nonfiction magazines and journals!

Creative Nonfiction Magazines: Great First Publications

The following eight journals sponsor creative nonfiction from both emerging and established writers, making them great opportunities for writers in any stage of their journey.

1. Sundog Lit

Sundog Lit loves the weird and experimental, and it regularly seeks innovative nonfiction for its biannual journal. All submitted works should be well-researched and play with both form and content. Submit your hybrid content to this great creative nonfiction journal!

2. River Teeth Journal

River Teeth Journal specializes in narrative nonfiction. The journal operates with the motto “Good Writing Counts and Facts Matter,” which captures their preference for well-researched and thoughtfully composed CNF. Literary nonfiction submissions are open twice a year, typically between September and May.

3. Atticus Review

Atticus Review posts daily nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. They publish work that is unabashed and resilient, finding hope in even the toughest of situations. All published works after September 19th, 2020 receive a $10 award from this creative nonfiction journal!

4. Barren Magazine

Barren Magazine publishes nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and photography, preferring works with grit and muster. Each publication of this creative nonfiction magazine includes prompts: for their 17th issue, the prompts are “unorthodox, sensational, kinetic, quixotic, & transcendent.”

5. The Offing

The editors at The Offing look for work that’s innovative, genre-bending, and challenges conventions. The Offing is especially keen to support both new and established authors, making them a welcome home for your creative nonfiction submissions.

6. Crazy Horse

Crazy Horse sponsors emerging and diverse voices in its biannual publication. Submissions for this journal remain open between September and May, and they typically range between 2,500 and 5,000 words. This is a great literary journal to submit to for writers of all styles and narratives!

7. Dogwood: a Journal of Poetry and Prose

Dogwood is a journal of poetry and prose based out of Fairfield University. This annual publication only opens for submissions in the Fall, and each edition includes prizes for top pieces. Literary nonfiction from all walks of life are welcome here.

8. Montana Mouthful

Straight out of the Treasure State, Montana Mouthful seeks “just a mouthful” of fiction and nonfiction. Creative nonfiction submissions should not exceed 2,000 words but should still deliver a cogent, memorable story.

Creative Nonfiction Magazines: Reputable Literary Journals to Submit To

The following literary magazines and creative nonfiction journals can be tough competition, but with a few previous publications under your belt and a special story ready for print, the following journals could jumpstart your literary career. All of these journals have fantastic literary nonfiction examples!

9. Conjunctions

Conjunctions publishes daring works of poetry and prose, living by its motto to “Read Dangerously!” Submitted works should provoke, excite, and linger with the reader. Conjunctions publishes both a biannual magazine and a weekly online journal, both of which house fantastic literary journalism.

10. Black Warrior Review

Black Warrior Review is a biannual literary journal run by the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. This Whiting Awarded journal nurtures groundbreaking literary nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, with many of its authors going on to win Pushcarts and Best of the Net prizes!

11. Hippocampus

Hippocampus Magazine is one of the best creative nonfiction magazines out there, as it focuses solely on the publication of personal essays and nonfiction stories. Their strictly digital publication is highly literary and has many great creative nonfiction examples and pieces. Despite being a highly competitive journal, both new and emerging writers can find a home at Hippocampus .

12. American Literary Review

The American Literary Review , run out of the University of North Texas, publishes engaging and precise stories and poetry. The journal is currently on hiatus, but read some of its back issues and you’ll understand why it’s a great literary journal to submit to.

13. Fourth Genre

Fourth Genre is a biannual creative nonfiction journal published through Michigan State University. The journal amplifies diverse and powerful voices, seeking stories that are refreshing, earnest, and imaginative. Fourth Genre only publishes nonfiction, so read its back issues for some great creative nonfiction examples!

14. The Cincinnati Review

The Cincinnati Review is interested in literary nonfiction that can “knock your socks off.” Submissions for personal essays are open between September and January; writers can also submit flash nonfiction year-round to its miCRo series.

15. Creative Nonfiction

“True stories, well told” is the motto of Creative Nonfiction , the aptly-named journal of all things CNF. Creative Nonfiction celebrates a diverse range of voices and experiences, championing both new and established essayists. Between its literary publications and its creative nonfiction blog, writers can learn a lot from this journal. Send your creative nonfiction submissions to Creative Nonfiction !

16. Witness

Witness publishes prose and poetry that examines and analyzes the modern day. They seek stories about modern issues and events, often publishing bold and eclectic takes on serious issues. Witness is a more politically-oriented journal, making it a leader in contemporary literary journalism.

Creative Nonfiction Magazines: The Summit of Literary Nonfiction

The following journals are notoriously difficult to publish in, as writers often have to have a name built for themselves in the literary world. Nonetheless, the following publications exist at the summit of CNF, so keep these publications on your radar as top literary journals to submit to.

AGNI , a highly literary publication run at Boston University, publishes fiery, transformative prose and poetry. Creative nonfiction submissions should be polished, inventive, and highly original. Be sure to read their previous publications for an idea of what they look for!

18. The Atlantic

The Atlantic is well-respected for its literary journalism, making it a premier publisher of creative nonfiction. Though many of its published pieces are solicited, The Atlantic is always looking for fresh, bold stories and poetry, so it’s a premier place for nonfiction magazine submissions.

Salon does not present itself as a creative nonfiction journal, but many of its previous magazine issues are highly literary in nature, examining current issues with a sharp, educated lens. If you have nonfiction stories that are both personal and global in nature, Salon accepts queries for articles and editorials, so check them out!

20. The Antioch Review

The Antioch Review is a real page-turner, as their past publications can attest to. This highly literary journal publishes fantastic prose and poetry, and if you have a creative nonfiction piece that’s riveting and influential, The Antioch Review is looking for your creative nonfiction submissions.

21. The Colorado Review

The Colorado Review is a tri-annual publication steeped in history, with original issues featuring poetry and prose from Langston Hughes, E. E. Cummings, Henry Miller, etc. The journal is committed to contemporary literature, seeking voices that are transformative and capture today’s (or tomorrow’s) zeitgeist. The Colorado Review is a fantastic space for literary journalism and will certainly welcome your creative nonfiction.

22. The Virginia Quarterly

The Virginia Quarterly publishes a wide array of literary nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, promising both ample readership and ample pay. VQR seeks inventive and imaginative stories, and it accepts both personal essays and nonfiction pieces on literary and cultural criticism. Submissions are generally open in July, but keep tuned for any special announcements or brief reading periods!

23. New England Review

New England Review is a quarterly publication of all things literary. The journal is dedicated to publishing both emerging and established voices, though it remains a highly competitive journal for creative nonfiction. NER is a great literary journal to submit to for stories that are engaged, critical, and sparkling.

24. North American Review

The North American Review is the oldest literary magazine in the United States. Since its inception in 1815, it remains one of the best nonfiction magazines to submit to, publishing strong literary voices with imaginative story arcs and moving messages. Nonfiction magazine submissions at North American Review are always spectacular—go check them out!

Tips for Publishing Your Creative Nonfiction Submissions

“How do I get my nonfiction published with so many other voices in the room?” This is a question we hear often, and as writers in the modern day, we can’t help but notice how diverse the publishing world is, and how everything “has already been written.” How can you make sure your story gets published in the right creative nonfiction magazines?

Of course, no story is guaranteed publication, but if you’ve written an earnest, sparkling story with grit, character, and truth, then the right literary journals to submit to are in this list. Additionally, you can boost your chances of success with the following publishing tips:

Start With a Powerful Title

Your creative nonfiction submissions should draw the reader in right away, which means starting with an attention-grabbing title. Your title could be a singular and obscure word, or it could be a long description, or anything in-between—the goal is to stand out while representing your story faithfully.

Here are some great titles we saw from a brief glance at the literary nonfiction examples from Hippocampus :

  • Bar Bathroom Graffiti in New Orleans: A One Year Catalog by Kirsten Reneau
  • Necrokedeia for Children by Mark Hall
  • Ford Motor Company Tells Me About Perseverance by Alexis Annunziata

These titles give you an idea about the story itself while also drawing you in with wit, humor, or obscurity. Literary editors have thousands of stories to read each year; give them something to notice so you can stand out among the rest!

Follow the Creative Nonfiction Journal’s Formatting Guidelines

A surefire way to receive rejections on your literary nonfiction is to ignore the formatting guidelines. Each journal has its own requirements, though they often align with MLA formatting requirements, but be sure you follow the journal’s instructions faithfully, or else they may discard your submission without even reading it.

Read the Creative Nonfiction Magazine’s Past Issues

The 24 publications mentioned in this article are some of the best nonfiction magazines in the world, in part because they adhere so strongly to their tastes and preferences. As such, no two journals are alike, and each publication has its own expectations for the nonfiction they read and publish. Before you submit your creative nonfiction, be sure to read some past publications and gauge whether your essay will fit in with the journal’s literary tastes.

Keep Track of Your Submissions

Many creative nonfiction journals allow simultaneous submissions, meaning you can submit the same piece to multiple journals. However, if one journal accepts your work, you need to notify the other journals that it has been accepted and is no longer available for consideration.

Keeping track of your creative nonfiction submissions in a spreadsheet or personal organizer is essential: if multiple journals publish your story, it could harm your chances of getting published in the future.

Aim High—But Not Too High

Your personal essay deserves to be read, but if you’re only submitting to journals like VQR or The Atlantic, it might never see the light of day. Part of the publishing process means building your publication history and portfolio.

Your literary journalism will one day get published in Salon or the New York Times, but until then, focus on getting recognized in smaller and medium sized journals—and don’t let rejections bring you down, because it’s only up from here!

Fine-Tune Your Creative Nonfiction Submissions with Writers.com

Looking for extra help on writing your personal essay, lyric essay, or hybrid nonfiction piece? The instructors at Writers.com are ready to assist you. Gain valuable insight and diverse perspectives on your nonfiction stories before submitting them to the 24 creative nonfiction magazines we’ve listed.

Good luck, and happy writing!

' src=

Sean Glatch

' src=

This is a very well written, informative and inclusive article, and I will follow up. The art piece is wonderful.

' src=

Here is another market that pays authors https://www.authormag.com/paying-market/

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Harvard Kennedy School Library & Research Services

  • Harvard Library
  • Research Guides
  • HKS Library & Research Services

Publishing Your Scholarship

  • Essays & Op-Eds
  • Academic Journal Submissions & Rankings
  • Publisher Directories

Social Media Platforms

  • Harvard & HKS Resources
  • Open Access Publishing
  • Citation Management & Collaboration
  • Op-Ed Project Op-ed writing resources and submission advice for specific newspapers and online news sites.
  • 19 Websites and Magazines That Want to Publish Your Personal Essays Compiled by Lisa Rowan, this site provides links to websites and their submission guidelines for personal essays.
  • 20 Great Places to Publish Personal Essays Compiled by freelance writer, Meghan Ward, a list of popular magazines and websites that accept personal essays.
  • Tips to Help You Publish Your Personal Essays Authored by Sheila Bender, discusses strategies for identifying popular press, small presses and regional/local publishers to publish your essay in.
  • The Conversation To author an article on this site, you must be currently employed as a researcher or academic with a university or research institution. PhD candidates under supervision by an academic can submit articles to the site. Articles from Masters students are not accepted.
  • Medium Anyone can publish on this social media platform.Select the curated option for wider distribution to readers based on their selected topics of interest.
  • << Previous: Publisher Directories
  • Next: Harvard & HKS Resources >>
  • Last Updated: Aug 1, 2023 2:20 PM
  • URL: https://guides.library.harvard.edu/hks/publishing

Harvard University Digital Accessibility Policy

How To Publish Personal Essays – From Small Press To Collections

Though they get less press than novels and short fiction , personal essays actually have one of the most welcoming markets in publishing. Dedicated essayists have a great chance of seeing some form of publication, so long as they’re willing to put the work in and understand the marketplace.

Read, read, read

Reading should be a constant through your attempts to gain publication, but what you read should change according to where you are on the essayist’s pyramid.

The pyramid

Finding publications.

Local publications can be found… well… locally. Eateries, libraries, and healthcare centers are good places to search. Established local publications, especially newspapers, will often have adverts for less well-known magazines.

The submission system

Collections and anthologies of personal  essays, building the pyramid, robert wood, 1 thought on “how to publish personal essays – from small press to collections”, leave a comment cancel reply.

publish personal essay

Written by S. Kalekar January 16th, 2023

30 Magazines Accepting Creative Nonfiction and Essays

These literary magazines and other outlets publish a variety of nonfiction/essays. A few are looking for themed submissions. Some of them pay writers. Most, but not all, of them are open for submissions now. They’re in no particular order.

TOLKA Journal Their website says, “Tolka is a biannual literary journal of non-fiction: publishing essays, reportage, travel writing, auto-fiction, individual stories and the writing that flows in between. We are a journal for writers to express themselves beyond the limits of fixed genres, forms or subjects. … We encourage writers to test the creative boundaries of non-fiction.” They publish work by Irish and international writers, of 2,000-4,000 words. Pay is €500. The deadline is 22 January 2023. Details here .

Vast Chasm They publish “bold work that explores the expansive human experience, including flash and short fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and other nonconforming work.” Pay is $50 for prose up to 5,000 words. They read submissions on an ongoing basis. Details here .

Porkbelly Press They read for their chapbook series in January – these can be creative nonfiction such as lyric essays & flash, poetry or prose poems, collections of flash or micro fiction, graphic narratives, sequential artwork, or combinations of the above (tightly linked by theme, image, voice, etc.). Please submit 12 – 26 pages for chapbooks. They are queer friendly and feminist. “Our catalog favors lit & poetry leaning heavily toward fabulism, folklore, & magic—often confessional or intimate poems or personal lyric essay. All work should be tightly linked.” For nonfiction chapbooks, “We particularly enjoy multiple short essays, but will consider a one-essay chap if the essay is just that good. We lean toward braided forms (narratives with 3 or more threads tied together), and also consider things like character sketches, travel narratives, and collections of vignettes.” See guidelines and Submittable pages for further details. Pay is author copies. The deadline for chapbook submissions is 31 January 2023. Also see their reading periods for works in other genres. Details here and here .

The Christian Science Monitor: The Home Forum This news organization accepts pitches from freelancers and writers, and submissions for The Home Forum , where they want “upbeat personal essays of from 600 to 800 words. … For time-sensitive material (seasonal, news-related, holiday- or event-themed), you must submit at least SIX WEEKS in advance.” Also, “These are first-person, nonfiction explorations of how you responded to a place, a person, a situation, an event, or happenings in everyday life. Tell a story with a point; share a funny true tale. Describe a self-discovery. The humor should be gentle. We accept essays on a wide variety of subjects and encourage timely, newsy topics. However, we don’t deal with the topics of death, aging, medicine, or disease. We do not publish work that presents people in helpless or hopeless states.” They pay $250 for these essays. Details here .

The Every Animal Project This is an anthology about courageous animals, and they also will publish work on their website. “Stories must be true (non-fiction). They must relate to non-human animals (of any species) and can be about your personal experiences/growth because of an animal, an issue threatening animals today, or other aspects of the human/non-human animal relationship. For the upcoming anthology, please weave the theme of courage/bravery into your story. We are particularly interested in spotlighting species less familiar to people, like insects, marine animals, and reptiles.” One writer will get an award of $300, another will be awarded $200, and other writers whose work is chosen for the print anthology get $50; writers whose work features online get $20. The deadline is 31 March 2023. Details here .

The Lumiere Review Their website says, “We are intrigued by the inextinguishable sparks of truth and connection, the effervescent meddling of narrative, and the luminous creations that expand on perceptions of genre, language, and form.” They have a call for BIPOC creatives on the Justice theme (deadline – 15 February 2023). For general submissions, they publish creative nonfiction (up to 3,000 words), fiction, and poetry. They publish quarterly, pay $10, and read submissions on an ongoing basis. Details here .

The Four Faced Liar This is a new print journal; they published their first issue in January 2023. They publish creative nonfiction (up to 4,000 words), fiction, poetry, and art. Pay is €200 for short creative nonfiction and fiction, €100 for a poem or piece of flash, and €100 for art. Watch for their next submission period on Twitter . Details here .

Gray’s Sporting Journal This is a magazine about hunting and fishing, and they publish articles on those topics. They also have a feature called Yarns, which is campfire tales – fact or fiction, of 750-1,500 words. They also publish some poetry. Pay is an average of $600 for Yarns, and poems pay $100. Features for the magazine pay more. Details here .

Narrative This magazine publishes work in various genres – nonfiction (including written, audio, and video), fiction, poetry, and drama. They charge a submission fee through the year but during the first two weeks of April, they offer fee-free submissions made specifically in the Open Reading category. They pay $100-500. Details here .

MudRoom Magazine Their website says, “our mission is to provide every writer, emerging and established, the opportunity to both see their work published, and engage with a larger literary community.” They publish essays, essays in translation, fiction, and poetry. Send prose of up to 6,000 words. Pay is $15, and the deadline is 25 January 2023 for their Winter issue. Details here .

The Fieldstone Review This is the literary journal of the University of Saskatchewan. They accept submissions of creative nonfiction (up to 2,500 words), literature & book reviews (of Canadian literature), fiction and poetry, for its 2023 issue. They are reading submissions on the Reversals theme. “Turning points. Twists. Changing fortunes and shifting gears. We want your clever, surprising and dizzying reversals––be it through character, plot or formal elements!” One contributor will get awarded CAD100. The deadline is 1 March 2023. Details here .

The Meadowlark Review This journal is associated with the University of Wyoming. “Based in Laramie, Wyoming, we’re inspired by the American West, but we love work that pushes against the traditional Western narrative, as well as new perspectives, unexpected twists, and pieces that have absolutely nothing to do with the West. We are especially interested in hybrid works and works that break the mold and push the boundaries of today’s literature.” They publish nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Send work of 10-5,000 words. The deadline is 31 January 2023. Details here .

The Forge Literary Magazine They accept creative nonfiction (up to 3,000 words, but can accept up to 5,000) and fiction. They open on the 1 st of most months for fee-free submissions, and close when the cap is reached. They pay $75. Details here .

fron//tera This is a bilingual print magazine, in Spanish and English. They publish nonfiction (up to 5,000 words), fiction, poetry, art, and submissions can be in Spanish or English; they’ll also publish a couple of short dual-language English and Spanish pieces side by side (see guidelines). They pay $25-50. They’re reading work on the Phantoms theme till 1 February 2023. Details here .

The Healing Muse This is the annual journal of literary and visual art published by SUNY Upstate Medical University’s Center for Bioethics & Humanities. They publish narratives, memoirs, fiction, poetry, and art, particularly but not exclusively focusing on themes of medicine, illness, disability and healing. They accept prose up to 2,500 words. The deadline is 15 April 2023. They also have a poetry prize for medical students and physicians , of $250. Details here .

The Lascaux Review They publish creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry of literary quality, as well as essays on the craft and business of writing. “Creative nonfiction may include memoirs, chronicles, personal essays, humorous perspectives, literary journalism—anything the author has witnessed, experienced, learned, or discovered. Creative nonfiction should be written in a nonacademic style. For the Bistro (our blog), we’re looking for posts about writing, literature, agents, publishing, hangover recipes—anything to do with the craft and business of writing. Topics must be relevant to our audience, which consists of sophisticated journeyman writers and poets.” Submissions are open year-round. Details here .

The Paris Review They will reopen for prose submissions in March 2023. Currently, they are accepting poetry submissions; the Submittable cap is reached but they will read postal submissions, postmarked till 31 January 2023. They pay. Details here .

Nashville Review This magazine is associated with Vanderbilt University. They publish creative nonfiction (across the spectrum, including memoir excerpts, essays, imaginative meditations, of up to 8,000 words), fiction (including flash and novel excerpts), poetry, translations, and art. They accept submissions of art and comics year-round, and other genres are accepted in January, May, and September. Submissions may close earlier than scheduled if the cap is reached. Pay is $25 for poetry, and $100 for prose. The deadline is 31 January 2023, or until filled. Details here .

Porridge They publish a variety of genres, and are open for online and print issues occasionally. They are always open for their Comfort Food section – “The COMFORT FOODS series publishes creative responses to the relationship between food and culture, identity and cuisine, from people in diaspora or those from various marginalised identities. From eating away exile to 2,000 word philosophical treatises on biryani, we’re here for it. … We’ll accept creative non-fiction, food writing, poetry, and artwork on this theme.” Details here .

Electric Lit They are always open for detailed essay pitches. “Electric Literature’s essays examine books and culture through a personal and critical lens. … Pitches should describe the subject matter of the essay (which must be about books, writing, or narrative media like movies, games, and TV) and give a sense of the argument you plan to make or the story you plan to tell. We welcome thoughtful considerations of new releases, overlooked classics, childhood favorites—anything that can illuminate or be illuminated by the human experience.” They will open for other genres in February ( Recommended Reading – longer fiction, pays $300, open 1-12 February; and The Commuter – poetry, flash, graphic, and experimental narratives, pays $100, open 13-19 February 2023). Details here . Sojournal This is a travel journal, and their tagline is ‘One Image One Story’. “At present we only publish non-fiction travel stories that tell us about the black and white image you have supplied. We have a bias toward clear, concise, understandable work that communicates, surprises or disturbs – writing that bears witness to the world we live in.” Send work of up to 800 words. Details here .

Chicken Soup for the Soul They publish uplifting, true stories and poems. They regularly post themes they are accepting submissions on (currently, these are: Angels ; How stepping outside my comfort zone changed me ; Miracles ; and The power of positive thinking ). They pay $250 for work up to 1,200 words, as well as 10 contributor copies. Details here (also see tabs on the page – Possible book topics, Submissions FAQ, and Submit your story).

Unfortunately, Literary Magazine For nonfiction, “We’re interested in memoir/personal essays, feature articles, and any mix thereof. Shameless navel-gazing is fine by us.” Also, “Send us your work that’s too quirky, too dark, too queer, not the right kind of queer, too female-driven, too literary, not literary enough. Too much, too little, we want to see it all. Our only requirement is that you get your piece rejected elsewhere at least once before submitting to us.” They also publish fiction, art, and poetry. They read submissions in January, April, July, and October. See this Twitter thread to see the kind of work they’d like to see more of. Details here and here .

Miracle Monocle This magazine is associated with the University of Louisville. “For creative nonfiction, please submit one piece of 500-10,000 words. We’re looking for essays with aspects of personal narrative, reporting, and the lyric; we’re also interested in flash. Please do not send excerpts of longer works unless the piece can stand alone.” They also publish fiction, hybrid, poetry, art, and have an award for young Black writers , which pays $200 – for this award, writers must be 25 years old or younger and identify as Black. The deadline is 31 January 2023, or until a submission cap is reached. Details here .

Round Table Literary Journal Their website says, this is “an award-winning, historic print literary journal now in our fifty-sixth year of existence. We publish literary fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and art once a year.” They are associated with Hopkinsville Community College. The deadline is 15 February 2023. Payment is contributor copies. Details here and here .

The Sunlight Press They publish personal essays (750-1,000 words), artists on craft series (up to 1,000 words), fiction, poetry, reviews, and photos. They pay $15-40. Details here .

Terrain.org This is a magazine that focuses on place, climate, and justice. They publish nonfiction (up to 5,000 words), fiction, poetry, and pay a minimum of $50. Submissions by marginalized creators are considered for an annual prize of $500. The deadline is 30 April 2023. Details here .

Motherwell This is a parenting magazine, and they take personal essays on parenting, as well as work on other themes and genres. For personal essays, “We are looking for evocative first-person narratives that have a unique focus, or take a novel angle, on a slice of the parenting experience. We are open to a range of styles and tones: the only requirement is that the essay works on its own terms—be it lyrical, humorous, research-oriented, etc—and conveys something fundamental about its writer. Up to 1,200 words.“ Some of the work they publish is paid, and some is unpaid (see guidelines). Details here . Masque & Spectacle They publish nonfiction essays, literary analysis pieces, and personal essay/memoirs of up to 7,500 words. They also accept fiction, poetry, drama, reviews, art, audio, and video submissions. The deadline is 31 January 2023. Details here .

The Sun This venerable magazine charges for online submissions via Submittable, but not for submissions by post, of essays, fiction, and poetry. Online submission of photos is not charged. Payment for regular essays starts at $300. And online submissions for themed short nonfiction pieces for the Readers Write section are fee-free – their upcoming themes are Idols , due 1 February, and Privacy , due 1 March 2023; payment for Readers Write is magazine subscription. Details here and here .

Bio:  S. Kalekar is the pseudonym of a regular contributor to this magazine. She can be reached  here .

We Send You Publishers Seeking Submissions.

Sign up for our free e-magazine and we will send you reviews of publishers seeking short stories, poetry, essays, and books.

Subscribe now and we'll send you a free copy of our book Submit, Publish, Repeat

Enter Your Email Address:

June 11, 2024

publish personal essay

Free Talk: How to Increase Your Chance of a Literary Magazine Acceptance by 50%

Please check your email to confirm your registration. If you don’t see the confirmation in your inbox, please check your spam folder. If you still can’t find it, please email [email protected] and we will send it to you directly.

Attend live on

May 17, 2024

publish personal essay

Free Talk: The Art & Craft of Sound in Creative Writing with Michael Kleber-Diggs

Available to watch right now, completely free.

June 19, 2024

8 Literary Journals Open to Longer Fiction

Publications open to publishing longer short stories.

publish personal essay

Verdant: Now Seeking Submissions

A journal of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction from emerging and established writers.

publish personal essay

77 Opportunities for Historically Underrepresented Authors in June 2024

Publications open to writers of color, LGBTQ+ writers, writers with disabilities, and more.

publish personal essay

Start Small and Write Books Later On

How small projects can make your writing life easier.

  • Entire Site Manuscript Publishers Literary Journals Search

A little something about you, the author. Nothing lengthy, just an overview.

  • 180 Literary Journals for Creative Writers
  • 182 Short Fiction Publishers
  • Authors Publish Magazine
  • Back Issues
  • Confirmation: The Authors Publish Introduction to Marketing Your Book
  • Download “How to Publish Your Book!”
  • Download Page: How to Market Your Novel on Facebook
  • Download Page: Self-Publishing Success – 8 Case Studies
  • Download Page: Submit, Publish, Repeat
  • Download Page: Submit, Publish, Repeat –– 4th Edition
  • Download Page: Submit, Publish, Repeat: 3rd Edition
  • Download Page: The 2015 Guide to Manuscript Publishers
  • Download Page: The Unofficial Goodreads Author Guide
  • Download: “The Authors Publish Compendium of Writing Prompts”
  • Download: Get Your Book Published
  • Download: The Authors Publish Compendium of Writing Prompts
  • Emily Harstone
  • Free Book: 8 Ways Through Publisher’s Block
  • Free Books from Authors Publish Press
  • Free Lecture & Discussion: Senior Book Publicist Isabella Nugent on Setting Yourself Up for Success
  • Free Lecture from Kim Addonizio: Make a Book – Shaping Your Poetry Manuscript
  • Free Lecture: Everyday Activities to Improve Your Writing
  • Free Lecture: How to Publish Your Writing in Literary Journals
  • Free Lecture: How to Write a Book that Keeps Readers Up All Night
  • Free Lecture: How to Write Layered Stories that Keep Readers Glued to the Page with Nev March
  • Free Lecture: Introduction to Diversity Reading for Authors
  • Free Lecture: Passion, Professionalized – How to Build an Authentic & Thriving Writing Career
  • Free Lecture: The Art of Book Reviewing — How to Write & Get Paid for Book Reviews
  • Free Lecture: The Art of Fresh Imagery in Poetry
  • Free Lecture: The Art of the Zuihitsu with Eugenia Leigh
  • Free Lecture: The Magic of Productivity – How to Write Effortlessly and Quickly
  • Free Lecture: Write Like a Wild Thing – 6 Lessons on Crafting an Unforgettable Story
  • Free Lectures from Award Winning Authors & Publishing Professionals
  • How to Promote Your Book
  • How to Revise Your Writing for Publication, While Honoring Your Vision as an Author
  • How to Write a Dynamic Act One ‒ A Guide for Novelists
  • How to Write With Surprising Perspectives — What Dutch Masters Can Teach Us About Telling Stories
  • Lecture: How to Keep Readers Glued to Every Page of Your Book with Microplotting
  • Lecture: How to Publish Your Creative Writing in Literary Journals
  • Lecture: How to Write a Memoir that Wins Over Readers and Publishers
  • Lecture: How to Write Opening Pages that Hook Readers and Publishers
  • Lecture: How to Write Romance Novels Readers Will Love
  • Lecture: The Art of Collaboration With Vi Khi Nao
  • Lecture: The Art of Poetic Efficiency – Strategies for Elevating Your Prose and Poetry
  • Lecture: The First Twenty Pages
  • Lecture: The Magic of Metaphor – How to Create Vivid Metaphors that Can Transform Your Writing
  • Lecture: Tips and Tricks for Revising Your Manuscript to Make It Shine
  • Lecture: Writing from Dreams
  • Lecture: Writing to Save the World with Danté Stewart
  • New Front Page
  • Now Available: The 2017 Guide to Manuscript Publishers
  • Now Available: The 2018 Guide to Manuscript Publishers
  • Office Hours With Ella Peary
  • Poem to Book: The Poet’s Path to a Traditional Publisher
  • Privacy Policy
  • Random Prompt
  • River Woman, River Demon Pre-Order Event: Discussing Book Marketing With Jennifer Givhan and Her Book Publicist, Isabella Nugent
  • Submit to Authors Publish Magazine
  • Submit, Publish, Repeat: 2023 Edition
  • Taming the Wild Beast: Making Inspiration Work for You
  • Test Live Stream
  • Thank You for Attending the Lecture
  • Thank You For Subscribing
  • The 2018 Guide to Manuscript Publishers — 172 Traditional Book Publishers
  • The 2019 Guide to Manuscript Publishers – 178 Traditional Book Publishers
  • The 2023 Guide to Manuscript Publishers – 280 Traditional Book Publishers
  • The Art of Narrative Structures
  • The Authors Publish Guide to Children’s and Young Adult Publishing – Second Edition
  • The Authors Publish Guide to Manuscript Submission
  • The Authors Publish Guide to Manuscript Submission (Fifth Edition)
  • The Authors Publish Guide to Memoir Writing and Publishing
  • The Authors Publish Quick-Start Guide to Flash Fiction
  • The First Twenty Pages
  • The Six Month Novel Writing Plan: Download Page
  • The Writer’s Workshop – Office Hours with Emily Harstone
  • How to Add a Document to a Discussion
  • How to Mark All of the Lessons in a Thinkific Course “Complete”
  • How to Navigate a Thinkific Course
  • How to Start a Discussion on Thinkific
  • How to Upload an Assignment in Thinkific
  • We Help Authors Find the Right Publisher for Their Books
  • Welcome to Authors Publish: We Help Writers Get Published
  • Work With Us
  • Writing from the Upside Down – Stranger Things, Duende, & Subverting Expectations
  • Your Book On The Kindle!
  • February 2024
  • January 2024
  • December 2023
  • November 2023
  • October 2023
  • September 2023
  • August 2023
  • February 2023
  • January 2023
  • December 2022
  • November 2022
  • October 2022
  • September 2022
  • August 2022
  • February 2022
  • January 2022
  • December 2021
  • November 2021
  • October 2021
  • September 2021
  • August 2021
  • February 2021
  • January 2021
  • December 2020
  • November 2020
  • October 2020
  • September 2020
  • August 2020
  • February 2020
  • January 2020
  • December 2019
  • November 2019
  • October 2019
  • September 2019
  • August 2019
  • February 2019
  • January 2019
  • December 2018
  • November 2018
  • October 2018
  • September 2018
  • August 2018
  • February 2018
  • January 2018
  • December 2017
  • November 2017
  • October 2017
  • September 2017
  • August 2017
  • February 2017
  • January 2017
  • December 2016
  • November 2016
  • October 2016
  • September 2016
  • August 2016
  • February 2016
  • January 2016
  • December 2015
  • November 2015
  • October 2015
  • September 2015
  • August 2015
  • February 2015
  • January 2015
  • December 2014
  • November 2014
  • October 2014
  • September 2014
  • August 2014
  • February 2014
  • January 2014
  • December 2013
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • Announcement 1
  • Calls for Submissions 92
  • Case Studies 9
  • Completely ready unscheduled article 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Two 1
  • Issue Eight 4
  • Issue Eighteen 5
  • Issue Eighty 6
  • Issue Eighty-Eight 6
  • Issue Eighty-Five 6
  • Issue Eighty-Four 5
  • Issue Eighty-Nine 7
  • Issue Eighty-One 6
  • Issue Eighty-Seven 4
  • Issue Eighty-Six 6
  • Issue Eighty-Three 5
  • Issue Eighty-Two 4
  • Issue Eleven 5
  • Issue Fifteen 4
  • Issue Fifty 6
  • Issue Fifty Eight 6
  • Issue Fifty Five 6
  • Issue Fifty Four 5
  • Issue Fifty Nine 5
  • Issue Fifty One 6
  • Issue Fifty Seven 5
  • Issue Fifty Six 6
  • Issue Fifty Three 4
  • Issue Fifty Two 6
  • Issue Five 4
  • Issue Five Hundred 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Eight 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Eighteen 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Eleven 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifteen 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Eight 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Five 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Four 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Nine 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty One 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Seven 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Six 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Three 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fifty Two 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Five 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Eight 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Five 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Four 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Nine 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty One 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Seven 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Six 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Three 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Forty Two 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Four 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Fourteen 6
  • Issue Five Hundred Nine 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Nineteen 4
  • Issue Five Hundred One 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Seven 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventeen 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy Five 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy Four 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy One 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy Seven 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy Six 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy Three 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Seventy Two 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Six 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixteen 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty 2
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Eight 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Five 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Four 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Nine 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty One 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Seven 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Six 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Three 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Sixty Two 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Ten 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirteen 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Eight 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Five 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Four 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Nine 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty One 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Seven 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Six 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Three 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Thirty Two 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Three 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Twelve 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty 5
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Eight 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Five 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Four 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Nine 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty One 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Seven 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Six 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Three 3
  • Issue Five Hundred Twenty Two 4
  • Issue Five Hundred Two 4
  • Issue Forty 4
  • Issue Forty Eight 5
  • Issue Forty Five 6
  • Issue Forty Four 6
  • Issue Forty Nine 6
  • Issue Forty One 4
  • Issue Forty Seven 5
  • Issue Forty Six 6
  • Issue Forty Three 5
  • Issue Forty Two 5
  • Issue Four 5
  • Issue Four Hundred 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Eight 2
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighteen 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Eight 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Five 5
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Four 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Nine 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty One 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Seven 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Six 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Three 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Eighty Two 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Eleven 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifteen 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Eight 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Five 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Four 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Nine 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty One 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Seven 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Six 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Three 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Fifty Two 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Five 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Eight 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Five 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Four 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Nine 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty One 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Seven 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Six 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Three 2
  • Issue Four Hundred Forty Two 5
  • Issue Four Hundred Four 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Fourteen 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Nine 5
  • Issue Four Hundred Nineteen 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Eight 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Five 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Four 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Nine 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety One 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Seven 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Six 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Three 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Ninety Two 5
  • Issue Four Hundred One 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Seven 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventeen 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Eight 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Five 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Four 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Nine 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy One 5
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Seven 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Six 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Three 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Seventy Two 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Six 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixteen 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Eight 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Five 5
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Four 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Nine 2
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty One 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Seven 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Six 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Three 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Sixty Two 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Ten 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirteen 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Eight 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Five 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Four 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Nine 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty One 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Seven 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Six 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Three 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Thirty Two 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Three 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Twelve 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Eight 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Five 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Four 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Nine 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty One 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Seven 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Six 3
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Three 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Twenty Two 4
  • Issue Four Hundred Two 3
  • Issue Fourteen 4
  • Issue Nine 5
  • Issue Nineteen 4
  • Issue Ninety 5
  • Issue Ninety-Eight 3
  • Issue Ninety-Five 4
  • Issue Ninety-Four 4
  • Issue Ninety-Nine 3
  • Issue Ninety-one 6
  • Issue Ninety-Seven 2
  • Issue Ninety-Six 3
  • Issue Ninety-Three 5
  • Issue Ninety-Two 4
  • Issue Nintey-Three 1
  • Issue One 5
  • Issue One Hundred 4
  • Issue One Hundred Eight 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighteen 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Eight 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Five 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Four 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Nine 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty One 4
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Seven 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Six 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Three 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eighty Two 3
  • Issue One Hundred Eleven 3
  • Issue One Hundred Fifteen 4
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty 3
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Eight 3
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Five 2
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Four 3
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Nine 4
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty One 2
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Seven 3
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Six 4
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Three 2
  • Issue One Hundred Fifty Two 6
  • Issue One Hundred Five 3
  • Issue One Hundred Forty 3
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Eight 4
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Five 4
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Four 2
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Nine 4
  • Issue One Hundred Forty One 3
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Seven 3
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Six 4
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Three 4
  • Issue One Hundred Forty Two 3
  • Issue One Hundred Four 4
  • Issue One Hundred Fourteen 4
  • Issue One Hundred Nine 3
  • Issue One Hundred Nineteen 5
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety 3
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Eight 3
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Five 4
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Four 3
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Nine 4
  • issue One Hundred Ninety One 3
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Seven 2
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Six 3
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Three 3
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety Two 3
  • Issue One Hundred One 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seven 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventeen 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy 4
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Eight 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Five 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Four 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Nine 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy One 4
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Seven 2
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Six 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Three 3
  • Issue One Hundred Seventy Two 2
  • Issue One Hundred Six 3
  • Issue One Hundred Sixteen 4
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty 4
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Eight 4
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Five 3
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Four 3
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Nine 3
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty One 4
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Seven 3
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Six 2
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Three 4
  • Issue One Hundred Sixty Two 4
  • Issue One Hundred Ten 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirteen 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Eight 3
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Five 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Four 7
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Nine 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty One 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Seven 3
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Six 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Three 4
  • Issue One Hundred Thirty Two 5
  • Issue One Hundred Three 3
  • Issue One Hundred Twelve 2
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty 4
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Eight 4
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Five 3
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Four 4
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Nine 4
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty One 4
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Seven 4
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Six 4
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Three 5
  • Issue One Hundred Twenty Two 3
  • Issue One Hundred Two 3
  • Issue Seven 4
  • Issue Seventeen 5
  • Issue Seventy 5
  • Issue Seventy-Eight 6
  • Issue Seventy-Five 7
  • Issue Seventy-Four 6
  • Issue Seventy-Nine 6
  • Issue Seventy-One 6
  • Issue Seventy-Seven 6
  • Issue Seventy-Six 6
  • Issue Seventy-Three 5
  • Issue Seventy-Two 6
  • Issue Six 4
  • Issue Six Hundred Thirty Four 1
  • Issue Sixteen 5
  • Issue Sixty 7
  • Issue Sixty Eight 6
  • Issue Sixty Five 5
  • Issue Sixty Four 5
  • Issue Sixty Nine 6
  • Issue Sixty One 5
  • Issue Sixty Seven 6
  • Issue Sixty Six 6
  • Issue Sixty Three 5
  • Issue Sixty Two 6
  • Issue Ten 5
  • Issue Thirteen 5
  • Issue Thirty 7
  • Issue Thirty Eight 4
  • Issue Thirty Five 3
  • Issue Thirty Four 6
  • Issue Thirty Nine 5
  • Issue Thirty One 5
  • Issue Thirty Seven 5
  • Issue Thirty Six 4
  • Issue Thirty Three 7
  • Issue Thirty Two 5
  • Issue Thirty Two 1
  • Issue Three 5
  • Issue Three Hundred 3
  • Issue Three Hundred and Eighty 4
  • Issue Three Hundred and Sixty Five 2
  • Issue Three Hundred Eight 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighteen 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Eight 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Five 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Four 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Nine 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty One 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Seven 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Six 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Three 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Eighty Two 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Eleven 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifteen 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Eight 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Five 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Four 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Nine 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty One 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Seven 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Six 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Three 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fifty Two 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Five 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Eight 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Five 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Four 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Nine 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty One 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Seven 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Six 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Three 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Forty Two 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Four 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Fourteen 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Nine 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Nineteen 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Eight 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Five 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Four 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Nine 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety One 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Seven 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Six 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Three 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Ninety Two 5
  • Issue Three Hundred One 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seven 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventeen 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Eight 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Five 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Four 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Nine 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy One 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Seven 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Six 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Three 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Seventy Two 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Six 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixteen 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty Eight 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty Four 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty Nine 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty One 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty Seven 5
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty Six 5
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty Three 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Sixty Two 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Ten 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirteen 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty 2
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Eight 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Five 2
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Four 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Nine 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty One 2
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Seven 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Six 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Three 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Thirty Two 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Three 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Twelve 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty Eight 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty Five 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty Four 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty Nine 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty One 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty Seven 3
  • Issue three hundred twenty six 2
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty Three 4
  • Issue Three Hundred Twenty Two 3
  • Issue Three Hundred Two 4
  • Issue Thrity Five 1
  • Issue Twelve 4
  • Issue Twenty 5
  • Issue Twenty Eight 5
  • Issue Twenty Five 4
  • Issue Twenty Four 4
  • Issue Twenty Nine 4
  • Issue Twenty One 5
  • Issue Twenty Seven 3
  • Issue Twenty Six 4
  • Issue Twenty Three 4
  • Issue Twenty Two 5
  • Issue Two 4
  • Issue Two Hundred 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Eight 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighteen 1
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Eight 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Five 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Four 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Nine 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty One 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Seven 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Six 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Three 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Eighty Two 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Eleven 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifteen 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Eight 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Five 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Four 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Nine 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty One 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Seven 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Six 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Three 1
  • Issue Two Hundred Fifty Two 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Five 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Eight 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Five 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Four 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Nine 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty One 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Seven 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Six 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Three 1
  • Issue Two Hundred Forty Two 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Four 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Fourteen 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Nine 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Nineteen 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Eight 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Five 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Four 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Nine 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety One 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Seven 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Six 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Three 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Ninety Two 3
  • Issue Two Hundred One 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seven 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventeen 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Eight 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Five 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Four 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Nine 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy One 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Seven 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Six 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Three 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Seventy Two 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Six 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixteen 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Eight 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Five 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Four 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Nine 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty One 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Seven 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Six 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Three 6
  • Issue Two Hundred Sixty Two 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Ten 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirteen 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Eight 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Five 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Four 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Nine 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty One 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Seven 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Six 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Three 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Thirty Two 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Three 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Twelve 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Eight 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Five 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Four 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Nine 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty One 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Seven 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Six 4
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Three 2
  • Issue Two Hundred Twenty Two 3
  • Issue Two Hundred Two 3
  • No Fee Contest 1
  • One Hundred Forty Seven 1
  • Letter from the Editor 8
  • Always open to submissions 40
  • Anthology 4
  • Chapbooks 2
  • Creative Non Fiction 267
  • Electronic 4
  • Fiction 391
  • Paying Market 50
  • Translation 3
  • Academic 16
  • Accept Previously Published Work 1
  • All Genres 29
  • Chick Lit 5
  • Children's Books 113
  • Christian 29
  • Cookbooks 15
  • Gift Books 15
  • Graphic Novel 6
  • Historical Fiction 20
  • Literary Fiction 65
  • New Adult 4
  • Non Fiction 180
  • Offers Advances 8
  • Paranormal 16
  • Science Fiction 60
  • Self Help 7
  • Southern Fiction 2
  • Speculative Fiction 8
  • Women's Fiction 17
  • Young Adult 79
  • Issue Four 1
  • Issue Six 1
  • Issue Three 1
  • Issue Two 1
  • Publishing Guides 76
  • Publishing Industry News 1
  • Quote of the Week 78
  • Self Publishing 22
  • Issue One Hundred Ninety One 1
  • Special Issue 363
  • Success Stories 6
  • The Authors Publish Fund for Literary Journals 1
  • The Other Side of the Desk 5
  • Uncategorized 108
  • Writing Prompt 85

About Us: We're dedicated to helping authors build their writing careers. We send you reviews of publishers accepting submissions, and articles to help you become a successful, published, author. Everything is free and delivered via email. You can view our privacy policy here. To get started sign up for our free email newsletter .

publish personal essay

Search 45 years of archives

  • Popular Pages

Readers Write

Trust the sun  with your story..

We publish personal essays, short stories, poems, and black-and-white photography in print and online in our monthly magazine.

We’re looking for narrative writing and evocative photography from all over the world. Send us work that maps the human landscape, where the light catches on the faintest joy, where darkness sometimes threatens to overwhelm, and where ✗ never marks the spot because the truth is never so simple.

First-time authors and award-winners alike find their place in The Sun . We are particularly interested in submissions from marginalized voices.

Our uncommonly supportive community of readers includes 60,000 print subscribers and thousands more website visitors. And The Sun is ad-free, so when we share your work, we don’t crowd it with distracting sales pitches.

Detailed submission guidelines, including our compensation rates, are available below.

Essays, Fiction, & Poetry

We publish writers who aren’t afraid to be vulnerable, who don’t shy away from difficult truths, and who don’t always deliver what our readers expect. Does your work invite us into a moment of reflection?

In this popular section of The Sun we share our readers’ autobiographical responses to a monthly topic. See what’s coming up next — there might be a free subscription in it for you. Do you have a true story to share?

Letters to the Editor

In The Sun ’s Correspondence section we publish letters from readers about selections that move them, that fire them up, that they think miss the mark. Occasionally our contributors even reply. Want to start a conversation?

Photography

We're interested in black-and-white photographs — unique perspectives on the world around us, especially human interactions.

Send to a Friend

publish personal essay

Sign Up For Paid Writing Opportunities

33 publishers that pay for personal essays.

The following is a list of publishers that pay for personal essays or memoir. Included is a very wide variety of publications, covering a wide variety of topics.

Be sure to carefully study each publication before sending them your ideas, to ensure the best chance of success.

VFW Magazine

Extra crispy, mask magazine, modern love, aarp: the magazine, adoptive family magazine, women’s voices for change, herstories project, femme feminism, vela magazine, writer’s digest, the catholic digest, liguorian magazine, the bold italic, charleston style &amp; design, diabetes health, spirituality and health, transition magazine, the hamilton review of books, whole life times, westerly magazine, you and me magazine, solver stories by the new york times, the travel writer’s life, we send you writing jobs..

Sign up and we'll send you 3 companies hiring writers now. Plus, we'll send more companies as we find and review them. All in our free email magazine.

publish personal essay

We're the magazine for freelance writers.

We send you companies hiring writers., subscribe and we'll send you 3 companies hiring right now., we'll also send you a guide that gets you started., we're completely free., subscribe now. (it's free.).

We're dedicated to helping freelance writers succeed. We send you reviews of freelance writing companies, assignments, and articles to help build your writing career. You can view our privacy policy here, and our disclaimer. To get started, simply enter your email address in the form on this page.

Freedom With Writing | We Send You Paid Writing Opportunities | View Our Privacy Policy

The Sun Magazine

We publish personal essays, short stories, poems, and black-and-white photography in print and online in our monthly magazine.

We’re looking for narrative writing and evocative photography from all over the world. Send us work that maps the human landscape, where the light catches on the faintest joy, where darkness sometimes threatens to overwhelm, and where ✗ never marks the spot because the truth is never so simple.

First-time authors and award-winners alike find their place in The Sun . We are particularly interested in submissions from marginalized voices.

Our uncommonly supportive community of readers includes 60,000 print subscribers and thousands more website visitors. And The Sun is ad-free, so when we share your work, we don’t crowd it with distracting sales pitches.

Detailed submission guidelines, including our compensation rates, are available on our website .

Essays, Fiction, & Poetry

Writing that can turn heads, open hearts, and change minds..

We publish personal essays, short stories, and poems by established and emerging writers from all over the world. Click here for submission guidelines and payment rates.

Readers Write is a feature in The Sun where readers share their personal writing on a given topic — a unique fixture of the  magazine since the section’s inception in 1978. Send us your true story  on an upcoming topic, and if we publish it you’ll receive a  complimentary one-year subscription.

Not sure what to write? See below for some prompts to spark an idea. Writing style isn’t as important as thoughtfulness and sincerity, and topics are intentionally  broad to give room for expression and interpretation.

You can read a sample Readers Write section here . Upcoming Topics

Walking Out

Due July 1, 2024

Have you ever needed to leave a marriage, a friendship, or a community? Maybe it was the right decision, or maybe you’ve always regretted it. Have you cut ties with a religious group you’ve lost faith in? Ever walked out on the job to join a picket line? Don’t leave us hanging—send us your true stories by July 1.

Due August 1, 2024

The musty waxed-canvas ones at summer camp. The lightweight tech-y sort you pack in when you’re mountaineering. The big white ones you string with café lights and flowers for a wedding reception. Leaky ones, the ones with a circus inside, the kind with a raccoon sniffing around outside the door, the kind where you can take the rain fly off and see a giant sky hung with stars. Pitch us your true stories about tents by August 1.

We’re interested in black-and-white photographs. We’re not looking for photojournalism, just unique perspectives on the world around us — especially human interactions.

Please review our full submission guidelines and sample photographs before sending us your work.

publish personal essay

Top 10 Places to Publish Your Personal Essays

publish personal essay

A List of Sources Ready to Purchase a Personal Essay

The major part of what the newspaper, magazines and online publishing platforms present for readers by a large account are academic pieces with data, facts and statistics. An entertaining way and catchy manner of writing for these essays make them really appealing, informative and outlook-developing. However, essays that indeed deeply touch the reader are the personal essays.  The truth of life astonishes with its simplicity and tragedy, blessing and struggle, love and obduracy in each word. Life as it is. As they say, writing non-fiction is not presenting just your story – it’s writing about the conditions we all may experience.

If there is a story worth of sharing to the rest of the world, here is a list of the best websites and magazines to publish it. These are top 10 sources that will not only present the story to the world but provide writers with help and advice for a better result.

publish personal essay

Boston Globe

This magazine’s Connection Section is looking for 650-words essay on any personal relationships. The payment is not clearly set, though. Submitting is very easy via [email protected] .

Extra Crispy

Extra Crispy is probably looking for the most unusual topics: morning, breakfast or brunch stories to be covered. The magazine will publish your work for 40 cent per word. Submission is as well via email [email protected] .

Dame Magazine

As respectfully sounds the name of the magazine, as interesting is the context of the personal essay submitted from the dame   – the women over 30. Here’s the link for submission: [email protected] . The payment is not fixed.

Parenting is always full of great stories and experiences to share. If you feel like writing for a Jewish parenting website, this one is right for you.  The preferable word amount is 500-700. For each post you get 25$. The editors ask to briefly cover your biography, contact info and include the essay, of cause.

The New York Times

What can be more inspiring then love? The Modern Love section accepts essay up to 1,700 words long via [email protected] . To get some extra info go through Time’s page for pitching tips and Modern Life page on Facebook. Successful essay gets 300$ for a post.

s a specific cultural topic for each issue, including both fiction and non-fiction. Here is where you can make a fuss: you can submit an essay 5,000 words and earn pretty good money – up to 250$. As the themes change from an issue to issue, follow the guidelines for submission so the editor has time to review and approve your work. Submission is online.

The Bold Italic

Any one from sunny California? This magazine focuses on California’s Bay Are issues. Do you have a special style of writing and a firm personal point of view? If yes, you are the one they are looking for to publish.

The Rumpus concentrates on the works of “intersect culture”. Find the best matching category online and submit the essay. However, you will get the answer no fast than in three month.

It accepts essays maximum of 10,000 words long in September or March.  Check on your submission status first before emailing. You are asked to include a word count and the genre in the cover letter. The pay is variable.

It is a lifestyle site that will accept personal essays from women of 800-2000 words long. The average payment is 5 cents per word.

Summing up, it is better to research the magazines first and read some of the article to understand to what audience it is directed to. Take your chance!

Write Nonfiction NOW!

5 Tips To Help You Publish A Personal Essay

November 4, 2010 By nawnfinimport 4 Comments

Share this:

If writing a memoir feels like too big a project for the WNFIN challenge or you have no interest in writing a book, you might try composing a personal essay. This allows you to take a vignette, anecdote or scene from your life and write a piece based upon that experience that is closer to the length of a magazine or newspaper article. I’ve written several posts in the past on the  topic  of how to write an essay, such as this one , this one , and this one , too.

My guest blogger today comes from Writer’s Relief , an author’s submission service that assists writers with preparing their submissions and researching the best markets for those submissions. The five tips they offer cover ways to write and to submit your essay for greater likelihood of success, by which I mean acceptance by a publication. I encourage anyone who decides to write a personal essay during WNFIN (or anytime) to polish it up, find a few great markets, and submit! There’s nothing like getting an acceptance letter and a check for a personal essay. And if at first you don’ t succeed–you receive one or more rejection letters, just tell yourself you’ve sent your essay to the wrong editor and find the right one.

5 Tips To Help You Publish A Personal Essay By Writer’s Relief

Writing a personal essay is a personal experience—and as such, what matters most is your experience of your writing and your satisfaction with the work you’ve done. But if you’d like to see your personal essay published in a literary journal or magazine, here are a few specific things you can do to help ensure your work will get a strong read:

1. Keep it short. Thanks to the Internet, the days of long, rambling personal essays and memoirs are gone. Most modern readers are rushed, distracted, and looking for some level of instant payoff when they begin to read an essay. At Writer’s Relief, we advise our clients not to write essays that are longer than 3,500 words. And if you’re thinking of targeting online literary magazines (which are a great resource), you may want to aim for an even lower word count. With short prose, less is more!

2. Get engaged. No, we’re not talking about weddings. We’re talking about current events and the modern world. Essays that are reflections on the way we live today—especially those that tackle “big” issues in a personal way—are often favorably received at literary magazines. So if you can put a personal spin on a big issue—like foreclosure, obesity, racism, or any other social issue—you may be able to get a foot in the door at a literary magazine.

3. “Tell me something I don’t know.” You’ve heard there are no new ideas. But the fact is, no one can replicate your particular view of the world. For that reason, editors at literary magazines continue to accept prose that offers new viewpoints of modern work and play. But in order for your prose to be compelling, you’ve got to push for deeper, more surprising, and more insightful explorations. You’re competing for space when you submit to a literary magazine, and if your insights are stronger than the competition’s, then you’re in!

4. Check your ego at the door. Just because you’re writing a personal essay, doesn’t mean you can indulge in your every last whim of hedonism. Essays that are about “me, me, me” and “I, I, I” are not likely to be published. Strive to paint a bigger picture—to show how your experiences are relevant to all people—and you’ll turn editors into fans.

5. Submit your essays to the best-suited editors. If you’re going to submit your personal essay, you’ve got to know the right people to send your work to. At Writer’s Relief, we’ve got a database of thousands of editors who are accepting essays—and we track which editors like what specific type of work.

But you can also do this kind of research on your own. Spend time at the library or on the Web to determine which magazines are right for you, then send out your work regularly. Expect rejections and strive for acceptances. Although the odds may seem staggering, we see writers’ work being accepted all the time!

While personal essays are personal, it’s helpful to know what readers and editors are looking for when they read your work. We hope these tips will help you get published. Happy writing!

About the Author

Writer’s Relief ( www.WritersRelief.com ) is an author’s submission service. We assist writers with preparing their submissions and researching the best markets. We have a service for every budget, as well as a free e-publication for writers, Submit Write Now! Visit our site today to learn more.

Sign in as a WNFIN participant here . Log into the WNFIN Forum here .

' src=

April 24, 2013 at 4:13 pm

With havin so much content and articles do you ever run into any issues of plagorism or copyright infringement?

My blog has a lot of completely unique content I’ve either authored myself or outsourced but it appears a lot of it is popping it up all over the internet without my authorization. Do you know any methods to help prevent content from being ripped off? I’d certainly appreciate it.

' src=

April 25, 2013 at 10:11 am

There are some plugins that time stamp your material to prove you published it first. You can put a copyright symbol on your home page and also a notice somewhere saying the material may not be used without permission, but there are some that will still take it and use it without attribution. It actually is quite rare. I have one site now doing it with some of my material…and no way to even contact them. Usually if you can find a way to contact them, they will take it down or add attribution. Most legit bloggers will attribute. The good news is you are being found. If your site had no traffic, your material wouldn’t get “scraped.” As they say, you have more to fear of obscurity than plagorism. Sorry I can’t be of more help. Do try to contact the site owner, though.

[…] essay to the wrong editor and find the right one. You can read Writer’s Relief’s “5 Tips To Help You Publish A Personal Essay” here. Share and […]

[…] just tell yourself you’ve sent your essay to the wrong editor and find the right one. Click here to read “5 Tips To Help You Publish A Personal Essay.” Share and […]

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Nonfiction Writers University: Get the ULTIMATE nonfiction writers' shortcut...

publish personal essay

Walnut and Me

By Sam Anderson Illustrations by Gaia Alari

Listen to Episode 1 of the series, where Sam Anderson explains his love for his dog, Walnut. Find all episodes of ‘Animal’ at nytimes.com/animal .

play

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 audio. Try listening here.

Photo credit: Ryan Carll/Upstate Images

Sam Anderson is a staff writer for the magazine. He has written about rhinos, pencils, poets, water parks, basketball, weight loss and the fountain of youth.

Gaia Alari is a self-taught illustrator and animator, specializing in a traditional frame-by-frame style of hand animation.

  • Share full article

Advertisement

How I learned to stop worrying and love the Garfield

What a late-night standoff at motel 6 taught me about life, comedy and the famous lazy orange cat, by joey clift.

I love the classic newspaper comic character Garfield – from his lazy feline attitude, to his love for lasagna , to his petty hatred for a cute gray kitten named Nermal, If the goal of entertainment is to bring people closer together, Garfield is our society’s Monday-hating glue. It’s my enormous love for that wonderful sarcastic cat that brought my girlfriend and I to the Motel 6 near the Los Angeles airport at 10:30 p.m. on a Saturday night. We were checking into the hotel’s only Garfield Suite, a hotel room filled with Garfield merchandise and elaborate decorations to promote "The Garfield Movie." Just as I was about to sign my name, I heard the Motel 6 employee say the words, “Oh no, we double-booked the Garfield room.” 

I looked up and saw two cash registers over, a hotel guest covered in Garfield arm tattoos. My girlfriend and I were adorned in elaborate Garfield shirts. Both parties had arrived at the check in desk at the same time with valid bookings for the same Garfield movie tie-in hotel room. The stressed staff had no idea how to resolve the quickly escalating situation. It was that moment that I’d learned just how far I’d go for Jim Davis’ greatest creation.

I devoured it like Garfield gorged on lasagna.

When I first met Garfield, I was a young kid growing up on the Tulalip Indian Reservation in Washington State. I was at a Scholastic Book Fair . My two obsessive interests were cute cats and the color orange. My 7-year-old eyes fell on a “Fat Cat Three Pack” featuring Garfield, who was orange, cute and cuddly in ways that my below-the-poverty-line upbringing was rarely allowed to be. He was everything I wanted, and with one look at his sour feline face I was hooked. I begged my mom to buy the book for me. Even though it meant we’d be eating store brand generic cereal for the next month, she caved. 

Joey Clift Garfield Suite

I read that Garfield book at least a hundred times. His constant complaining, love for coffee and abuse of the overly loyal Odie burned into my young memories. It became the start of my Garfield obsession. Channel-flipping on a weekday afternoon, I landed on the cartoon series "Garfield and Friends" and couldn’t believe it. Of course he was more than a comic strip! I devoured it like Garfield gorged on lasagna. I collected Garfield stuffed animals, books, anything of my new orange feline best friend that I could find.

But as I got older, my tastes changed. The things I’d grown up loving became too pure for my sardonic teenage brain. My focus shifted from the Monday-hating orange cat, toward weirder, darker offerings like Gary Larson’s "The Far Side,"   "The Simpsons" and "Late Night with Conan O’Brien " – but like a shadow, Garfield still followed me.

I made my comedy fandom a career, moved from the Tulalip Reservation to Los Angeles and dove into the local comedy scene with both feet. I performed at some of the biggest improv and sketch comedy stages in the country and eventually graduated to television comedy writing. I even received an Emmy nomination , a Webby Award win and credits writing for many fun and silly cartoons that are not unlike the "Garfield and Friends" series I loved growing up.

In my adult life, I hadn’t forgotten about Garfield, but as someone who writes jokes for a living , my feelings about him changed. I’d grown to despise the larger-than-life cat from Muncie, Indiana. Garfield was a comedy from a simpler time, where hating dieting and loving lasagna were good enough jokes to base an entire comic strip around. Like Garfield himself, the strip was comedically lazy and an example of the bland mainstream offerings that many of us in the alternative comedy scene pushed against. Instead of reading classic "Garfield," my favorite Garfield content were parodies created by fans. From Lasagna Cat ’s surreal live action Garfield inspired videos, to Lumpy Touch ’s videos reframing Garfield as a horror movie villain, to " Garfield Minus Garfield ," a comic strip that edited the titular orange cat from the series and in the process, painted Garfield’s owner Jon Arbuckle as an even sadder maniac.

Dumb Jons & Nermals

I became an authority on him, which, as a Garfield denier, became as cruel a joke as a Monday without naps.

I even created my own viral Garfield parody content. Like the time I changed my Twitter handle to Garfield Official and used it to hijack an official Garfield Twitter Q & A by answering all of the fan questions before the actual official Garfield account could. The stunt was deeply frustrating for the Garfield social media team, but a hit among Twitter users and Garfield fans, receiving media coverage from The AV Club and The Daily Dot . Or the time I tried to get Paws, Inc. to give me the Garfield license for a Garfield pen and paper RPG I called “Dumb Jons & Nermals,” which was a great idea in practice, but Paws was worried it would compete with other Garfield board game projects they were working on. Then there’s the time I built a campaign to increase my social media followers over the pandemic in exchange for filming myself eating lasagna with my bare hands like Garfield. It turns out, throwing lasagna isn’t the most efficient way to eat, and only a fraction of the airborne cheese dish made it into my mouth. Afterwards, it took several showers to wash the marinara smell out of my hair.

Eventually, I posted about Garfield so much that to a lot of the people, I became an authority on him, which, as a Garfield denier, became as cruel a joke as a Monday without naps. My phone and social media blew up with texts and tags whenever any weird Garfield news would drop, and most holidays, my friends and loved ones gifted me merchandise or art inspired by the almighty orange cat.

At first, the gifts and mentions were ironic, and an easy way for my friends and followers to have a laugh, but it slowly became something more. Then one day, when I guested on a live recording of a popular NPR series, a fan approached me after the show and gave me a Garfield sweater she’d hand sewn into a ribbon shirt. When my grandmother passed away a few years ago, my uncle sent me a few of her old things to remember her. At the top of the package was a well-worn Garfield stuffed animal absolutely infused with the smell of cigarettes that my grandmother must have owned since the 1970s.

Select items from Joey Clift's Garfield memorabilia

Garfield has been around for 46 years, and he means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. From older folks who remember him with fond nostalgia, to millennials and zoomers who spend their time creating ironic Garfield memes, to young kids discovering Garfield for the first time. In my life, I’ve been all of those things. I’m a visible Garfield fan, often posting on social media about him and even wearing a custom Garfield bolo tie to fancy Hollywood parties. In the process, I’ve become a conduit for people’s love of the ever-present funny monotone kitty. 

I used to view Garfield with a Monday’s worth of disdain.

Ask anyone of any age how they feel about Garfield, and they’ll have an opinion or a memory and honestly, that’s kind of beautiful. Whether you love him or hate him, he sticks to us like a '90s suction-cupped Garfield plushie hanging from a minivan window. And, in a lot of ways, Garfield is a self-care icon who lived his best life on his terms, which, as many of us are focusing on ourselves whilst surviving a global pandemic, is more relevant than ever.

So, we stood in the lobby of the Motel 6 near the Los Angeles airport a few weeks ago: my girlfriend Goldie Chan wearing a vintage 1970s Garfield sweater and I in a knockoff Garfield t-shirt with “F**k Mondays” printed on it in old English. With our bellies full of Olive Garden lasagna – in a polite, but quickly escalating showdown with a tattooed Garfield fan over a fully rented out hotel suite we both had valid bookings for – I saw tears in the other fan’s eyes.

Joey Clift and his girlfriend Goldie Chan in Hollywood Motel 6 Garfield Suite

At that moment, it wasn’t about who was right. It was about our mutual love for a comic character from our youth, that we were expressing by booking a stay in a limited availability hotel room brand tie-in decked out in Garfield merchandise like the “Garfield House” sketch from "I Think You Should Leave."

I gave them our booking in exchange for a few photos of my girlfriend and I in the Garfield-themed room. We left, hotel-less, and complimented the guest’s Garfield tattoos on the way out of the Motel 6 lobby.

Want a daily wrap-up of all the news and commentary Salon has to offer? Subscribe to our morning newsletter , Crash Course.

As we left the hotel at around midnight, blasting Lou Rawls' song “Here Comes Garfield” from the speakers of my Toyota Corolla Hybrid, we were sad that we’d missed our opportunity to stay in a suite themed after Garfield, but we were also happy. Happy that by giving up the room, we’d brought a Garfield fan the same joy that Garfield had given us. 

Though we lost the hotel room, that’s not the end of this adventure. After posting about our story on social media , many friends and followers rallied to our side. Motel 6 even reached out, offering us a free weekend stay in their Hollywood Garfield suite, the only one in the country with an immersive experience. And that’s where I find myself right this second, wearing a Garfield cardigan, a plate of lasagna at my side and in a hotel room absolutely covered in orange fur and Garfield memorabilia, writing about my time with the orange kid.

Joey Clift Garfield Suite

I used to view Garfield with a Monday’s worth of disdain, but now, he’s my deep, multi-layered lasagna, with infinite levels of cheese, marinara sauce and personal meaning. Today, I’m grateful to live in a world where I, and billions of people around the world can appreciate Garfield and all of his amazing and hilarious friends. Except for Nermal. He’s the worst.

about cats, cats and more cats

  • A "talking" cat is giving scientists insight into how felines think
  • Cats know the names of other cats that are their friends, study says
  • Why we love cat memes

Joey Clift is an Emmy nominated comedian, TV writer, enrolled Cowlitz Indian Tribal member and Garfield fanatic based out of Los Angeles

Related Topics ------------------------------------------

Related articles.

publish personal essay

  • Seize The Summer

How I Learned to Embrace My Frizzy Hair

how to love frizzy hair

I was born in Indonesia and lived there most of my life. In my country, curly hair wasn't celebrated — in fact, people revered bone-straight styles and still do to this day. So being born with a more wavy texture made me feel like something was inherently wrong with me. I thought my hair was just a frizzier version of everyone else's so I hated it for a long time. This constant negativity about my natural waves impacted my confidence.

Because of this, I started getting keratin treatments . Essentially it was kind of like a perm that kept my hair straight for six months at a time. I did this routine regularly up until about 2019 when I'd had enough. I was extremely tired of the routine. It fried my hair to the point where it would be falling out regularly and was damaged to what felt like beyond repair.

Once I stopped the treatments, I decided to learn how to blow out my hair on my own since it was an affordable way to get a similar look. At this point, I still didn't accept my waves — I was still trying to beat my hair into what was supposed to be its "natural straight state" in my eyes. I started going on YouTube to teach myself the best blowout technique and came across this video of a woman who explained that if you find your hair very frizzy, it may be your natural wavy texture trying to come through. At that moment it clicked for me. I started looking up information on wavy hair and sharing my journey to rediscovering my hair on social media, and the response was overwhelmingly positive.

What I saw on TV and what I saw in the mirror in real life were different. It impacted my perception of my hair.

It was certainly a lack of media representation that led to me developing this narrative about my hair. Growing up, there were so many movies and TV shows that portrayed the evil, poor, or dirty, characters with frizzy, wavy hair. Korean beauty standards were also lauded as the ideal when I was growing up, so what I saw on TV and what I saw in the mirror in real life were different. It impacted my perception of my hair and my inability to see it as beautiful.

Even though I got to a stage where I wasn't getting keratin treatments anymore, my relationship with my natural hair was also extremely unhealthy at first. I'd want to make sure that it looked as defined as possible and had no frizz at all. This would lead to me spending hours in the shower and loading as many products onto my hair as possible. I was almost trying to tame it differently. Though this wash-day routine was something I'd only do twice a week, after a while the maintenance got physically taxing and I realized that me doing all of this was inadvertently admitting to myself that I still didn't like my natural hair. So I took it one step further and started to embrace my frizz.

Since then, I've felt like a load has been lifted off my shoulders. I've regained so much of my freedom and time, plus I'm not avoiding certain activities like swimming on family vacations out of fear that my hair will get frizzy. I feel liberated and mentally much happier.

Hair is a big part of my life but in the end, that's all it is: hair. I've realized that embracing my waves is resistance. It's a rejection of the impossible beauty standards that have been imposed on me before I was even born and a decided effort to reclaim my joy and embrace the way I look. It's incredible how many doors have opened for me since I've decided to stop caring what others think and just embrace my hair natural hair. It's been an incredible journey.

— As told to Ariel Baker

Ariel Baker is the associate editor for PS Beauty. Her areas of expertise include celebrity news, beauty trends, and product reviews. She has additional bylines with Essence and Forbes Vetted.

  • Beauty Interview

IMAGES

  1. Learn How to Write a Personal Essay on Trust My Paper

    publish personal essay

  2. Writing a Compelling Personal Narrative Essay: Tips and Examples

    publish personal essay

  3. 19 Websites and Magazines That Want to Publish Your Personal Essays

    publish personal essay

  4. Personal Essay

    publish personal essay

  5. Looking for freelance writing jobs for beginners and for seasoned

    publish personal essay

  6. Steps to Write an Essay about Yourself

    publish personal essay

VIDEO

  1. Self publishing with Amazon KDP

  2. How to Publish Research Paper as an International High School Student

  3. Research Paper Publish

  4. Writing a Synthesis Essay Exam or Term Paper (CC)

  5. Personal Essay with Mark McDevitt

  6. How To Write A Publishable Manuscript

COMMENTS

  1. Publish Your Personal Essay: 22 Magazines and Websites

    To help you find the right fit, we've compiled a list of 22 publications that will consider your personal narrative essay, as well as tips on how to pitch the editor, who to contact and, whenever possible, how much the outlet pays. Here are 22 places to submit your personal essay. 1. Boston Globe. The Boston Globe Magazine Connections section ...

  2. 80 Best Magazines & Websites That Publish Personal Essays

    They accept personal essays that are true stories about the author, with a length between 500 to 3,000 words. They pay $10 for each published personal essay here, but there is a $3 submission fee (with limited free submission periods). Stories are read blind, and explicit or offensive content is not accepted. Submission info. 52. Griffith Review

  3. 34 Publications That Will Pay for Your Personal Essay

    Published pieces typically run from 400 to 1,200 words, but drafts of any length within the bounds of reason will be considered." Submissions may be sent to [email protected]. The Sun Magazine. The Sun Magazine is looking for "personal essays, fiction, and poetry. Personal stories that touch on political and cultural issues are welcome…

  4. 50 Awesome Websites For Writing Submissions

    Between $25-$300 for published materials under general submissions. They also hold two contests with massive cash incentives: $1500 for winning fiction and $1000 for winning poetry. 5. Drunk Monkeys.

  5. 7 publications that pay well for personal narrative essays

    Women's magazines love personal essays. If you want to write first hand experience about fitness, food, health or culture, it's worth pitching to SELF magazine, who pay up to $700 for 2000 words. 6. VOX. A dynamic site covering world affairs, pop culture, science, business, politics and more, Vox pay around $500 for personal narrative essays.

  6. 70 Publishers that Pay for Personal Essays & Memoir

    They publish personal essays "about what it's like to be a Gen-X woman at midlife. " Payment is $80. To learn more, read their submission guidelines. Lady Science is a monthly magazine about "women and gender in the history and popular culture of science, technology, and medicine." They publish well-researched and reviewed articles ...

  7. 5 places to submit your personal essays

    bioStories focuses exclusively on personal essays (500-7500 words). They publish essays on nearly any topic and are especially interested in work that celebrates the extraordinary within the ordinary. Pieces are published as they are accepted, and the editors generally respond to submissions within two months.

  8. 29 Publishers that Pay for Personal Essays

    They publish personal essays and narrative nonfiction, reported features, op-eds, interviews, flash fiction, creative and experimental nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. They prefer full draft submissions but consider pitches from writers who share relevant examples of their work. They pay $150 to $345, depending on length, and $100 for poetry ...

  9. 24 of the Best Places to Submit Creative Nonfiction Online

    11. Hippocampus. Hippocampus Magazine is one of the best creative nonfiction magazines out there, as it focuses solely on the publication of personal essays and nonfiction stories. Their strictly digital publication is highly literary and has many great creative nonfiction examples and pieces.

  10. Essays & Op-Eds

    Compiled by freelance writer, Meghan Ward, a list of popular magazines and websites that accept personal essays. Tips to Help You Publish Your Personal Essays. Authored by Sheila Bender, discusses strategies for identifying popular press, small presses and regional/local publishers to publish your essay in.

  11. How to publish personal essays

    Here the need to tailor your writing to the publication in question is more important than ever. Hang a list of their guidelines in your writing space and stick to it. Anthologies gather most of their audience based on interest in the overall theme, so deviating from it will get your work quickly dismissed.

  12. » 30 Magazines Accepting Creative Nonfiction and Essays

    They publish personal essays (750-1,000 words), artists on craft series (up to 1,000 words), fiction, poetry, reviews, and photos. They pay $15-40. Details here. Terrain.org This is a magazine that focuses on place, climate, and justice. They publish nonfiction (up to 5,000 words), fiction, poetry, and pay a minimum of $50.

  13. The Sun Magazine

    We publish personal essays, short stories, poems, and black-and-white photography in print and online in our monthly magazine. We're looking for narrative writing and evocative photography from all over the world. Send us work that maps the human landscape, where the light catches on the faintest joy, where darkness sometimes threatens to ...

  14. 25 Best Places to Get Published Online

    Send query in body of e-mail (no attachments, please) to Tricia Gilbert, managing editor. Accepts short stories, literary and/or writing-related essays and poetry. Pays $10/story, essay or poem, on acceptance. Buys right to publish work online for a particular month. Content used in 1-3 months. Guidelines available by e-mail and on Web site.

  15. 33 Publishers that Pay for Personal Essays

    They publish articles, personal essays, and fiction. They pay 12 to 17 cents per word. They offer a free sample copy -- just send them a stamped envelope. To learn more, read their submission guidelines. The Bold Italic. The Bold Italic is a blog covering the San Francisco Bay area. They cover the ways the bay area is rapidly changing, and ...

  16. Tips to Help You Publish Your Personal Essays

    Focusing on publishing essay by essay pays off. Concentrating on three areas helps you do this. Read publications that use personal essays to get a first-hand feel for what editors like, where essayists are finding publishers, and how essays are used in periodic literature.

  17. How to Pitch a Personal Essay

    How to Pitch a Personal Essay. Anyone can write a first-person piece of creative nonfiction based on personal experience. New writers at the beginning of a writing career can jump right into essay writing and transform their personal narratives into completed essays. If you're a new writer, learning the ins and outs of freelance writing can ...

  18. The Sun Magazine Submission Manager

    We publish personal essays, short stories, poems, and black-and-white photography in print and online in our monthly magazine.We're looking for narrative writing and evocative photography from all over the world. Send us work that maps the human landscape, where the light catches on the faintest joy, where darkness sometimes threatens to overwhelm, and where never marks the spot because the ...

  19. Publish Your Personal Essays

    Chapter 1. 1 Lesson. How to Publish Your Personal Essays. Veteran essayist Melissa Hart explains how to revise your rough draft, and how to write a winning title and cover letter to accompany a polished and professional personal essay submission.

  20. 9 Publications That Pay for Personal Essays

    It's an online system that some publications use to manage submissions —and in my opinion, it's far easier than email. 1. Slate. Slate specialises in news, politics, and culture, but they take pitches on a wide range of topics including personal essays. Advice: On their submissions page, they have a template pitch email.

  21. Top 10 Places to Publish Your Personal Essays

    Bustle. It is a lifestyle site that will accept personal essays from women of 800-2000 words long. The average payment is 5 cents per word. Summing up, it is better to research the magazines first and read some of the article to understand to what audience it is directed to. Take your chance!

  22. How to Write a Personal Essay: 6 Tips for Writing Personal Essays

    Written by MasterClass. Last updated: Sep 9, 2021 • 3 min read. People write personal essays for a number of reasons. High school students write them for college admissions and writers use them to share personal stories with others. A personal narrative essay can enlighten and inspire an audience with information gained from real life ...

  23. 5 Tips To Help You Publish A Personal Essay

    Strive to paint a bigger picture—to show how your experiences are relevant to all people—and you'll turn editors into fans. 5. Submit your essays to the best-suited editors. If you're going to submit your personal essay, you've got to know the right people to send your work to. At Writer's Relief, we've got a database of thousands ...

  24. What My Dog Taught Me About Mortality

    Richard Linklater's Killer Instinct: The director's latest movie, "Hit Man," manages to sneak in a provocative exploration of one of his pet themes: the nature and malleability of personal ...

  25. How I learned to stop worrying and love the Garfield

    PERSONAL ESSAY. How I learned to stop worrying and love the Garfield ... Published June 15, 2024 1:30PM (EDT) Joey Clift has a lost weekend ... he's my deep, multi-layered lasagna, with infinite ...

  26. Lala Fitriani's Journey to Loving Her Hair

    It was certainly a lack of media representation that led to me developing this narrative about my hair. Growing up, there were so many movies and TV shows that portrayed the evil, poor, or dirty ...