King's College London

Creative writing research phd.

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Key information

The PhD in Creative Writing at King’s is a practice-led course, incorporating taught elements and aspects of professional development. It is designed to cater for talented, committed writers who are looking to complete a book-length creative work for publication and sustain a long-term career in writing.

Key Benefits

Our unique programme offers students:

  • a varied, structured framework for the development of their creative work, with regular feedback from experienced author-lecturers in the department through supervision and workshops
  • purposeful engagement with professionals from the publishing and performance industries throughout the course, building potential routes to publication
  • valuable teaching experience in creative writing at HE-level through our Graduate Teaching Assistantship scheme
  • practical experience in public engagement, through curating and chairing public literary events at King’s
  • a community of fellow writers and collaborative projects

English Department

We have over 100 doctoral students from all over the world working on a wide range of projects. Together with our community of postdoctoral fellows, our early career researchers both organise and participate in our thriving seminar and conference culture.

The English department is home to award-winning novelists, poets, essayists, biographers, non-fiction authors, and literary critics, who supervise creative projects at doctoral level within their specialisms.

Works by our staff have won or been shortlisted for a number of literary accolades, including: the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Forward Prize, the Man Booker Prize, the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year, the Costa First Novel Award, the Costa Poetry Award, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Commonwealth Book Prize, the Biographers’ Club / Slightly Foxed First Biography Prize, the U.S. National Book Critics Circle Award, the CWA Gold Dagger Award, the European Union Prize for Literature, the RSL Encore Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Letters, le Prix du Roman Fnac, le Prix du Roman Etranger, the Kiriyama Prize, the Republic of Consciousness Prize, the Royal Society of Literature’s Encore Award, and the OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature. Many of the creative writing staff are Fellows of the Royal Society of Literature.

Their most recent publications are:

Benjamin Wood

The Young Accomplice (Penguin Viking, 2022) – fiction

A Station on the Path to Somewhere Better (Scribner, 2018) – fiction

Edmund Gordon

The Invention of Angela Carter (Chatto & Windus, 2016) – creative non-fiction

Loop of Jade (Chatto & Windus, 2015) – poetry

Anthony Joseph

Sonnets for Albert (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2022) – poetry

The Frequency of Magic (Peepal Tree Press, 2019) – fiction

Lara Feigel

The Group (John Murray Press, 2020) – fiction

Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing (Bloomsbury, 2018) – creative non-fiction

Homing: On Pigeons, Dwellings, and Why We Return (John Murray Press, 2019) – creative non-fiction

Daughters of the Labyrinth (Corsair, 2021) – fiction

Beethoven Variations: Poems on a Life (Chatto & Windus, 2020) – poetry

Emerald (Chatto & Windus, 2018) – poetry

Andrew O'Hagan

Mayflies (Faber & Faber, 2020) – fiction

The Secret Life: Three True Stories (Faber & Faber, 2017) – creative non-fiction

*may vary according to research leave and availability.

King's Alumni

The list of King’s alumni not only features many acclaimed contemporary authors—Michael Morpurgo, Alain de Botton, Hanif Kureishi, Marina Lewycka, Susan Hill, Lawrence Norfolk, Ross Raisin, Alexander Masters, Anita Brookner, and Helen Cresswell—it also includes major figures in literature, such as Maureen Duffy, Arthur C Clarke, Thomas Hardy, Christopher Isherwood, BS Johnson, John Keats, W. Somerset Maugham, and Virginia Woolf.

Course Detail

Our postgraduate writing students are given a supportive environment in which to enhance their technique, to explore the depths of their ideas, to sustain their creative motivation, and to prepare them for the demands of the writer’s life beyond the College.

At King's we know that writing well requires self-discipline and an ability to work productively in isolation; but we also appreciate that postgraduate writers thrive when they are part of a community of fellow authors, an environment of constructive criticism and shared endeavour.

That is why we offer our PhD students the guidance of knowledgeable and experienced practitioners. They will have frequent opportunities to interact and collaborate with peers and forge lasting connections within London’s writing industry.

Students will be expected to attend the quarterly Thesis Workshop, and also to take an active part in curating literary events at King’s, including the Poetry And… quarterly reading series. They will be invited to apply for positions teaching undergraduate creative writing modules as part of the Department’s Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA) scheme.

After three years (full-time) or six years (part-time), students are expected to submit either:

  • a novel or short story collection
  • a poetry collection
  • a full-length work of creative non-fiction

In addition, they are also required to submit an essay (up to 15,000 words) that examines their practical approach to the conception, development, and revision of their project, and which explores how their creative work was informed by research (archival, book-based, or experiential).

  • How to apply
  • Fees or Funding

Many of our incoming students apply for AHRC funding via the London Arts and Humanities Partnership. Please see their website ( www.lahp.ac.uk ) for more detail of deadlines, application procedure and awards available. Also the ‘Student Funding’ section of the Prospectus will give you more information on other scholarships available from King’s.

UK Tuition Fees 2023/24

Full time tuition fees:

£5,820 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

Part time tuition fees:

£2,910 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

International Tuition Fees 2023/24

£22,900 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

£11,450 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

UK Tuition Fees 2024/25

£6,168 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

£3,084 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

International Tuition Fees 2024/25

£24,786 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

£12,393 per year (MPhil/PhD, Creative Writing)

These tuition fees may be subject to additional increases in subsequent years of study, in line with King’s terms and conditions.

  • Study environment

Base campus

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Strand Campus

Located on the north bank of the River Thames, the Strand Campus houses King's College London's arts and sciences faculties.

PhD in Creative Writing students are taught through one-to-one sessions with an appointed supervisor in their chosen specialism (fiction, creative non-fiction, or poetry) as well as through quarterly thesis workshops. They are also appointed a second supervisor whose role is to offer an additional perspective on the work being produced.

We place great emphasis on pastoral care and are a friendly and welcoming department in the heart of London. Our home in the Virginia Woolf Building offers many spaces for postgraduate students to work and socialise. Studying in London means students have access to a huge range of libraries from the Maughan Library at King’s to the Senate House Library at the University of London and the British Library.

Our PhD Creative Writing students are taught exclusively by practicing, published writers of international reputation. These include:

Benjamin Wood (Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing)

Supervises projects in fiction.

Edmund Gordon (Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing)

Supervises projects in fiction and creative non-fiction.

Sarah Howe (Lecturer in Poetry)

Supervises projects in poetry.

Anthony Joseph (Lecturer in Creative Writing)

Supervises projects in poetry and fiction.

Jon Day (Senior Lecturer in English)

Supervises projects in creative non-fiction and fiction

Lara Feigel (Professor of Modern Literature)

Supervises projects in creative non-fiction and fiction.

Ruth Padel (Professor Emerita of Poetry)

Andrew O’Hagan (Visiting Professor)

*Teaching staff may vary according to research leave and availability.

Our programme also incorporates the following taught components:

Thesis Workshop

A termly writing seminar for the discussion and appraisal of works-in-progress. These are taught on a rotational basis by all members of the creative writing staff, so that students get the benefit of hearing a range of voices and opinions on their work throughout the course.

The Writing Life

A suite of exclusive guest talks and masterclasses from leading authors, publishers, and editors, in which students receive guidance from people working at the top level of the writing industry and learn about the various demands of maintaining a career as a writer.

Recent speakers have included Amit Chaudhuri, Chris Power, Rebecca Watson, Mendez, Frances Leviston, Joanna Biggs, Joe Dunthorne, Francesca Wade, Kishani Widyaratna, Jacques Testard and Leo Robson.

Other elements of professional development are included in the degree:

Agents-in-Residence

Candidates in fiction or creative-nonfiction will meet and discuss their work in one-to-one sessions with invited literary agents, who are appointed to yearly residencies. These sessions offer writers a different overview of the development of their project: not solely from the standpoint of authorial technique, but with a view towards the positioning of their writing within a competitive and selective industry. Poetry candidates will meet and discuss their work with invited editors from internationally recognised poetry journals and presses.

Undergraduate Teaching

Through our Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) training scheme, our PhD students can apply to lead undergraduate creative writing workshops in fiction, creative non-fiction, and/or poetry, enabling them to acquire valuable HE-level teaching experience that will benefit them long after graduation.

Reading Series

Our students are required to participate in the curation of literary events at King’s. They are also responsible for curating Poetry And… , a quarterly reading in which leading poets illuminate the powerful connections between poetry and other disciplines. Students will develop skills in public engagement by chairing discussions and may also perform excerpts of their own writing.

Postgraduate Training

There is a range of induction events and training provided for students by the Centre for Doctoral Studies, the Faculty of Arts and Humanities and the English Department. A significant number of our students are AHRC-funded through the London Arts and Humanities Partnership (LAHP) which also provides doctoral training to all students. All students take the ‘Doctoral Seminar’ in their first year. This is a series of informal, staff-led seminars on research skills in which students can share and gain feedback on their own work. We run a series of ‘Skills Lunches’, which are informal lunch meetings with staff, covering specific topics, including Upgrading, Attending Conferences, Applying for Funding and Post-Doctoral Awards, etc. Topics for these sessions are generally suggested by the students themselves, so are particularly responsive to student needs. We have an Early Career Staff Mentor who runs more formal workshops of varying kinds, particularly connected to career development and the professions.

Through our Graduate Teaching Assistantship Scheme, doctoral students can apply to teach in the department (usually in their second year of study) and are trained and supported as they do so.

  • Entry requirements

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Postgraduate study

Creative Writing PhD

Awards: PhD

Study modes: Full-time, Part-time

Funding opportunities

Programme website: Creative Writing

Upcoming Introduction to Postgraduate Study and Research events

Join us online on the 19th June or 26th June to learn more about studying and researching at Edinburgh.

Choose your event and register

Research profile

The PhD in Creative Writing offers committed and talented writers the opportunity to study Creative Writing at the highest level.

Supported by an expert supervisory team you will work independently towards the production of a substantial, publishable piece of creative writing, accompanied by a sustained exercise in critical study.

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, including well-published and prize-winning writers of poetry, prose, fiction and drama. They include:

  • Dr Jane Alexander - Fiction
  • Dr Lynda Clark - Fiction
  • Dr Patrick Errington - Poetry
  • Dr Miriam Gamble - Poetry
  • Dr Alan Gillis - Poetry
  • Nicola McCartney - Drama
  • Dr Jane McKie - Poetry
  • Dr Allyson Stack - Fiction
  • Kim Sherwood - Fiction
  • Alice Thompson - Fiction

Find out more about the programme and our team

Training and support

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a programme of seminars and visiting speakers.

We have an in-house Writer-in-Residence, annual writing prizes, and a range of opportunities to learn from experts in the publishing industry.

We also offer access to opportunities provided by the Sottish Graduate School for Arts & Humanities.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings and provides an opportunity to gain editorial experience.

  • Forum: postgraduate journal of culture and the arts

A UNESCO World City of Literature, Edinburgh is a remarkable place to study, write, publish, discuss and perform prose, poetry and drama.

Take a PhD with us and you will be based in the School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures (LLC) in the historic centre of this world-leading festival city.

Our buildings are close to:

  • National Library of Scotland (where collections include the Bute Collection of early modern English drama and the John Murray Archive)
  • Edinburgh Central Library
  • Scottish Poetry Library
  • Scottish Storytelling Centre
  • Writers’ Museum
  • Traverse Theatre

We have strong links with the Edinburgh International Book Festival, which annually welcomes around 1,000 authors to our literary city.

There are lots of opportunities to write and share your work, from Forum to The Selkie, which was founded by Creative Writing students in 2018 to showcase work by people who self-identify as underrepresented.

Around the city, you’ll find library readings and bookshop launches, spoken word gigs, cabaret nights and poetry slams, including events run by celebrated publishing outlets, from Canongate and Polygon / Birlinn to Luath Press, 404 Ink, Taproot Press and Mariscat.

You will have access to the University’s many literary treasures, which include:

  • William Drummond library
  • Lewis Grassic Gibbon library
  • Hugh MacDiarmid library
  • Norman MacCaig library
  • W.H. Auden collection
  • Corson collection
  • works by and about Sir Walter Scott
  • Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets

The Centre for Research Collections also holds a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays. These have been put together by the 19th century Shakespearean James Halliwell-Phillipps, the correspondence of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle (the focus of one of the major editorial projects in Victorian studies of the last half-century), and the extensive Laing collection of medieval and early modern manuscripts.

You will also have access to letters and papers by - and relating to - authors including:

  • Christopher Isherwood
  • Rudyard Kipling
  • John Middleton Murry
  • Walter de la Mare
  • George Mackay Brown
  • Compton Mackenzie

Many of the University's Special Collections are digitised and available online from our excellent Resource Centre, Computing Labs, and dedicated PhD study space in the School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures (LLC).

Look inside the PhD study space in LLC

Entry requirements

These entry requirements are for the 2024/25 academic year and requirements for future academic years may differ. Entry requirements for the 2025/26 academic year will be published on 1 Oct 2024.

A UK masters degree, or its international equivalent, in creative writing, normally with distinction.

We may also consider your application if you have equivalent qualifications or experience. For additional information please refer to the pre-application guidance in the 'How to apply' section.

International qualifications

Check whether your international qualifications meet our general entry requirements:

  • Entry requirements by country
  • English language requirements

Regardless of your nationality or country of residence, you must demonstrate a level of English language competency at a level that will enable you to succeed in your studies.

English language tests

We accept the following English language qualifications at the grades specified:

  • IELTS Academic: total 7.0 with at least 6.5 in each component. We do not accept IELTS One Skill Retake to meet our English language requirements.
  • TOEFL-iBT (including Home Edition): total 100 with at least 23 in each component. We do not accept TOEFL MyBest Score to meet our English language requirements.
  • C1 Advanced ( CAE ) / C2 Proficiency ( CPE ): total 185 with at least 176 in each component.
  • Trinity ISE : ISE III with passes in all four components.
  • PTE Academic: total 70 with at least 62 in each component.

Your English language qualification must be no more than three and a half years old from the start date of the programme you are applying to study, unless you are using IELTS , TOEFL, Trinity ISE or PTE , in which case it must be no more than two years old.

Degrees taught and assessed in English

We also accept an undergraduate or postgraduate degree that has been taught and assessed in English in a majority English speaking country, as defined by UK Visas and Immigration:

  • UKVI list of majority English speaking countries

We also accept a degree that has been taught and assessed in English from a university on our list of approved universities in non-majority English speaking countries (non-MESC).

  • Approved universities in non-MESC

If you are not a national of a majority English speaking country, then your degree must be no more than five years old* at the beginning of your programme of study. (*Revised 05 March 2024 to extend degree validity to five years.)

Find out more about our language requirements:

  • Fees and costs

Read our general information on tuition fees and studying costs:

Scholarships and funding

Featured funding.

There are a number of scholarship schemes available to eligible candidates on this PhD programme, including awards from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Please be advised that many scholarships have more than one application stage, and early deadlines.

  • Find out more about scholarships in literatures, languages and cultures

Other funding opportunities

Search for scholarships and funding opportunities:

  • Search for funding

Further information

  • Phone: +44 (0)131 650 4086
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures
  • 50 George Square
  • Central Campus
  • Programme: Creative Writing
  • School: Literatures, Languages & Cultures
  • College: Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

This programme is not currently accepting applications. Applications for the next intake usually open in October.

Start date: September

Awards: PhD (36 mth FT, 72 mth PT)

Application deadlines

Due to high demand, the school operates a number of selection deadlines. We will make a small number of offers to the most outstanding candidates on an ongoing basis, but hold the majority of applications until the next published selection deadline when we will offer a proportion of the places available to applicants selected through a competitive process.

Deadlines for applicants applying to study in 2024/25:

  • How to apply
  • Pre-application guidance

Before you formally apply for this PhD, you should look at the pre-application information and guidance on the programme website.

This will help you decide if this programme is right for you, and help us gain a clearer picture of what you hope to achieve.

The guidance details the writing samples you should send us as part of your application (either fiction or poetry, along with a shorter sample of your academic writing).

It will also give you practical advice for writing your project summary – one of the most important parts of your application.

Find out more about the general application process for postgraduate programmes:

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phd creative writing europe

Department of English » Research » Research Degrees in English and Creative Writing » Creative Writing PhD

The Creative Writing PhD at Manchester Metropolitan University

  • Creative Writing PhD
  • Distance Learning PhD Programmes

Our Creative Writing PhD is a practice based programme taught by teams of published creative writers and highly regarded literary scholars.

Staff have expertise in fiction, poetry, children’s and young adult fiction, creative non-fiction and scriptwriting. 78% of our research has been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent (REF 2014).

Creative PhD Structure

The PhD in Creative Writing (also known as the critical-creative, or practice-based PhD) combines a proposed manuscript (e.g. novel, short story collection, poems, playscript, narrative non-fiction, digital writing) with an element of supporting or contextualising research. The proposed creative manuscript will be volume-length (the natural length of a book, depending on genre). The length of the supporting research will be subject to negotiation with your tutor but would typically be 40,000 words. 

The emphasis is not on creating two separate pieces of work, but on integration. Your dissertation will consist of an interdependent project of contextual and practice-based creative work.

Both sections of the PhD should contain work of 'publishable standard', and the contextual and creative elements must make a new contribution to knowledge.

Full time students are expected to work full-time on their research and should not undertake more than six hours of formal duty or paid work in any given week. However, every attempt will be made to provide you with work experience in your chosen field.

Creative PhD Supervision and Research Training

Typically you will be allocated a team of two or three supervisors; specialists in the area of the creative part of your dissertation and in the critical or contextual component. Your supervisory team may also be a member of staff from another department e.g. History, where appropriate.

This is an independent research programme; there are no timetabled classes or modules, but you will need to attend supervision sessions as negotiated with your supervisors as well as specialist courses in e.g. Research Skills and Ethics Training. The frequency of supervisory sessions may vary depending on the stage of research, and whether you are full or part time, but in general these meetings will take place at least once a month.

Subject specific research training might include:

  • presentation of creative work at a PhD Masterclass Writing Workshop
  • the submission of a treatment to a publisher, attending one of the many professional events hosted by the Manchester Writing School, e.g. the National Creative Writing Industry Day, which features talks by agents, publishers and writers.
  • leading undergraduate creative writing seminars

General research training might take the form of:

  • a series of one-to-one tutorials with a supervisor on the subject of your contextualising critical research, or
  • the presentation of a paper at a relevant academic conference, or
  • the targeting of academic journals with material for publication

There is also a Research Training Programme  covering various aspects of research development and skills.

Staff and Supervisors

Academic and research staff are featured on the staff profiles page for the Department of English

Areas of Particular Supervisory Expertise

These include Poetry, Place Writing, Gothic Fiction and YA/Children’s Fiction.

An Example Doctoral Programme: The PhD in Children’s/YA Fiction

At Manchester Metropolitan we have expertise in both the critical and creative aspects of writing for children and young adults. A highly regarded team of writing professionals to guide you through the process of writing your novel and thesis:

  • Dr Ellie Byrne
  • Dr Chloe Buckley
  • Dr Ginette Carpenter
  • Iris Feindt , Graduate Teaching Assistant
  • Dr Blanka Grzegorczyk
  • Dr Livi Michael
  • Dr Muzna Rahman
  • Alex Wheatle
  • Dr Catherine Wilcox

Resources for Young Adult and Children’s fiction:

  • The Manchester Centre for Youth Studies (MCYS) which produces collaborative and interdisciplinary research into diversity, criminal justice, language and wellbeing;
  • The Manchester Children’s Book Festival (MCBF) with an ongoing programme of events and opportunities to work with children in schools and at festivals;
  • Former Poet Laureate, Professor Carol Ann Duffy DBE , who has written extensively for children.
  • Our Special Collections features a Children’s Book Collection featuring 19th and 20th century children’s book illustrations, and the opportunity to work with the Manchester School of Art who offer courses in Illustration and Animation.

An examination team assesses the PhD thesis and conducts an oral examination (viva) of the student. The examination team consists of one internal examiner and one external examiner.

Opportunities for PhD Students

Wherever possible, we try to offer our PhD students teaching, as it is an important part of professional development. The availability of part time teaching varies from year to year, and all candidates for teaching will be subject to an interview with the relevant Programme Leader. Further opportunities may arise in subject-specific areas, e.g. through the Manchester Children’s Book Festival, for work in schools or at literary events.

The university has a vibrant event-culture in which students are invited to participate. Former Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy hosts a series of events at the Royal Exchange Theatre at which selected poetry students read with established poets. And similar events are arranged at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation  where our novel-writing students are invited to read with established novelists.

Fees and Funding

Postgraduate Doctoral loans are available to eligible candidates and further information is available at www.gov.uk/doctoral-loan .

Any current studentships are advertised at www2.mmu.ac.uk/research/research-study/scholarships/

10 scholarships per year are available to non-EU applicants applying for Distance Learning PhD programmes within certain subject areas.  Please see www2.mmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/distance-learning-research-degrees/ for details.

For more information on fees visit our Postgraduate Research page www2.mmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/fees/

Manchester Metropolitan University is a member of the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership Consortium (NWCDTP) offers postgraduate studentships across the full range of arts and humanities including Creative Writing. See www.nwcdtp.ac.uk/prospective-students/ for more information.

Key Contacts

Dr Andrew Moor Research Degrees Co-Ordinator, Department of English 

Dr Nikolai Duffy Research Degrees Co-Ordinator for Creative Writing

Dr Myna Trustram Research Associate

How to Apply

Please look at this website: www2.mmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/research-degree-list/5047.php and click  ‘How to Apply’ to go to the online application form.

With your application form you will also need to upload:

  • Two recent academic references which have been signed by your referee and provided on headed paper from the relevant institution. They must be saved in a format which prevents alteration of the content e.g. PDFs.
  • A proposal – this should be written using the advice on the application form. You might like to try our online course on ‘How to Write a Research Proposal’ (see below for details).
  • Copies of your Masters and Bachelors degree certificates, including transcripts of your marks or grades if you are applying for a PhD.
  • Copies of any qualification you have in English Language, if English is not your first language.
  • Examples of your work (if requested)
  • A copy of your current passport.

The Admissions process for research degrees at the University includes assessment of your application form along with your supporting documents and an interview with a potential supervisor.  Some applicants may also need to apply for an ATAS certificate (depending on the research subject) and a visa to study in the UK.  You should therefore ensure that you apply with enough time to complete this process. The University has 3 possible start dates for research degrees, which are October, January and April.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why would i do a phd.

Increasingly, a PhD is a requirement for an academic career. As creative writing is a relatively new subject in British higher education, in the past academic staff have secured jobs without having doctorates, but this is changing gradually as more and more people complete PhDs.

The indispensable requirement if you want a permanent university job (as opposed to hourly paid teaching) is that you must be a published creative writer of some substance and reputation. It may be that this and a PhD will become the norm, though a successful writer will always be very attractive to departments.

University teaching may appeal to you if you enjoy your research and practice and want to share your expertise. Writers and artists usually find that university departments are sympathetic environments where their practice is valued as research and may therefore constitute part of their role.

You may also want to do a PhD in order to dedicate a substantial amount of time to your practice and to work with experts in your chosen field.

Finally there may be a particular aspect of your research that you want to pursue, and the university provides the best environment you’re your investigative study.

What qualifications do I need to do a PhD?

Our Creative Writing PhD students come from a variety of backgrounds, nationalities and writing experiences, but successful applicants display writing talent and experience, and the ability to engage critically with the contexts in which they write and their own process.

We would normally expect applicants to hold a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in a related subject, or a qualification which is regarded by the relevant Faculty Research Degrees committee as equivalent to an honours degree, e.g. professional qualifications. All doctoral candidates are normally expected to have completes a Masters degree successfully in a field relevant to the subject of their research. An MA/MFA in Creative Writing is an advantage, but evidence of creative writing engagement and achievement will be taken into consideration, as well as evidence of an ability to engage in the supporting research. Candidates holding other qualifications will be considered on their merits and in relations to the nature and scope of the proposed programme of work. Professional experience, publications, or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment may also be taken into consideration.

What is the difference between the MFA and the PhD?

On both programmes you will be expected to complete a creative project (novel, poetry collection) that is potentially publishable, but to obtain a PhD you will also be expected to make an original contribution to knowledge in your chosen field. The PhD incorporates an element of critical, theoretical or contextual argument and research which is submitted with the creative writing. At present, in the UK you are more likely to obtain academic work with a PhD. The MFA is allied to the MA, although it can be taken as a separate qualification. The primary requirement for the MFA is the submission of your creative writing.

Why is there so much emphasis on the academic part of the thesis when the creative is 70 – 80% of the project?

Your creative work will be considered when you apply and in your personal statement you should show evidence of relevant experience in your chosen field. The emphasis in the application process on the contextualising research ensures that you have an original contribution to make and that the research is rigorous and well-defined.

What are the starting dates?

The University has 3 possible start dates for research degrees, which are October, January and April.

How fast can I do it?

The minimum time for a full time PhD is three years. Part time is six years.

How long should the completed project be?

A traditional PhD is not usually longer than 80,000 words and a similar limit is suggested for the PhD in Creative Writing. The balance is typically weighted towards the creative work rather than the contextual dissertation, but this may be negotiated with your Director of Studies.

Do I have to do a PhD in one of the specialised areas mentioned above?

No; in fact it is expected that your own creative work will form the basis of your research and if your proposal is accepted, a supervisory team will be allocated accordingly.

Will I be offered teaching while I’m doing my PhD?

Teaching experience is usually available to all Postgraduate Research Students who would like it. It is not usually available during the first year of study (FT) and will depend on what provision is needed on the English BA programme. 

Is there a sample form I can look at?

There are no examples of completed admissions forma available as yet. Please contact Dr Andrew Moor, Research Degrees Co-Ordinator, for a sample pro-forma. [email protected]

Any questions can be directed to  [email protected]

You may also like to try our four week online course on how to write a research degree proposal, aimed at explaining the main components of the written proposal.

You can browse the course by visiting the site collectiveonlinelearning.harts.online/register

If you want to follow the course and receive feedback, register by opening the link in your browser, inputting the password r3Gi5t3R and then completing the registration form - fields marked with a red asterisk are required. Make a note of your username and password - you’ll need them for future logins. 

Once you’ve successfully registered you’ll also be logged into the site - for that first session at least - and can start the course immediately. There is an FAQ's page and a comments form if you need assistance. At the end of the course, if you want to, you can submit your draft proposal for feedback from our research degrees team.

Department of English and Related Literature

PhD in English with Creative Writing

Join a thriving community of researchers to develop a substantial research project alongside an original piece of creative writing.

Join a passionate and intellectual research community to explore literature across all periods and genres.

Your research

Our PhD in English with Creative Writing encourages distinctive approaches to practice-based literary research. This route allows you to develop a substantial research project, which incorporates an original work of creative writing (in prose, poetry, or other forms). As part of a thriving community of postgraduate researchers and writers, you'll be supported by world-leading experts with a wide range of global and historical specialisms, and given access to unique resources including our   letterpress printing studio  and   Writer in Residence.

Under the guidance of your supervisor, you will complete a critical research component of 30-40,000 words and a creative component written to its natural length (eg a book-length work of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction). A typical semester will involve a great deal of independent research, punctuated by meetings with your supervisor who will be able to suggest direction and address concerns throughout the writing process. You will be encouraged to undertake periods of research at archives and potentially internationally, depending on your research.

Throughout your degree, you will have the opportunity to attend a wide range of research training sessions in order to learn archival and research skills, as well as a range of research and creative seminars organised by the research schools and our distinguished Writers at York series. This brings speakers from around the world for research talks, author conversations, and networking.

Applicants for the PhD in English with Creative Writing should submit a research proposal for their overall research project, along with samples of creative and critical writing, demonstrating a suitable ability in each, as part of the application. Proposals should include plans for a critical research component of 30-40,000 words and a creative component written to its natural length (eg a book-length work of poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction), while demonstrating a clear relationship between the two.

Students embarking on a PhD programme are initially enrolled provisionally for this qualification until they pass their progression review at the end of their first full year of study. 

[email protected] +44 (0) 1904 323366

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You also have the option of enrolling in a PhD in English with Creative Writing by distance learning, where you will have the flexibility to work from anywhere in the world. You will attend the Research Training Programme online in your first year and have supervision and progression meetings online.

You must attend a five-day induction programme in York at the beginning of your first year. You will also visit York in your second and third years (every other year for part-time students).

Apply for PhD in English with Creative Writing (distance learning)

World-leading research

We're a top ten research department according to the Times Higher Education’s ranking of the latest REF results (2021).

35th in the world

for English Language and Literature in the QS World University Rankings by Subject, 2023.

Committed to equality

We're proud to hold an Athena Swan Bronze award in recognition of the work we do to support gender equality in English.

Writers at York series

We host a series of hugely successful seminars, open to everyone, where a stellar cast of world-famous contemporary writers deliver readings and workshops.

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Explore funding for postgraduate researchers in the Department of English and Related Literature.

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Supervision

Explore the expertise of our staff and identify a potential supervisor.

Research student training

You'll receive training in research methods and skills appropriate to the stage you've reached and the nature of your work. In addition to regular supervisory meetings to discuss planning, researching and writing the thesis, we offer sessions on bibliographic and archival resources (digital, print and manuscript). You'll receive guidance in applying to and presenting at professional conferences, preparing and submitting material for publication and applying for jobs. We meet other training needs in handling research data, various modern languages, palaeography and bibliography. Classical and medieval Latin are also available.

We offer training in teaching skills if you wish to pursue teaching posts following your degree. This includes sessions on the delivery and content of seminars and workshops to undergraduates, a structured shadowing programme, teaching inductions and comprehensive guidance and resources for our graduate teaching assistants. Our teacher training is directed by a dedicated member of staff.

You'll also benefit from the rich array of research and training sessions at the Humanities Research Centre .

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Course location

This course is run by the Department of English and Related Literature.

You'll be based on  Campus West , though your research may take you further afield.

We also have a distance learning option available for this course.

Entry requirements

For doctoral research, you should hold or be predicted to achieve a first-class or high upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualification) and a Masters degree with distinction. 

The undergraduate and Masters degrees should be in literature and/or creative writing, or in a related subject that is related to the proposed research project. 

Other relevant experience and expertise may also be considered:

  • Evidence of training in research techniques may be an advantage.
  • It would be expected that postgraduate applicants would be familiar with the recent published work of their proposed supervisor.
  • Publications are not required and the Department of English and Related Literature does not expect applicants to have been published before they start their research degrees.

Supervisors interview you to ensure a good supervisory match and to help with funding applications.

The core deciding factor for admission is the quality of the research proposal, though your whole academic profile will be taken into account. We are committed to ensuring that no prospective or existing student is treated less favourably. See our  admissions policy  for more information.

Apply for the PhD in English with Creative Writing

Have a look at the supporting documents you may need for your application.

Before applying, we advise you to identify potential supervisors in the department. Preliminary enquiries are welcomed and should be made as early as possible. However, a scattershot approach – emailing all staff members regardless of the relationship between their research interests and yours – is unlikely to produce positive results. 

If it's not clear which member of staff is appropriate, you should email the   Graduate Chair .

Students embarking on a PhD programme are initially enrolled provisionally for that qualification. Confirmation of PhD registration is dependent upon the submission of a satisfactory proposal that meets the standards required for the degree, usually in the second year of study.

Find out more about how to apply .

English language requirements

You'll need to provide evidence of your proficiency in English if it's not your first language.

Check your English language requirements

Research proposal

In order to apply for a PhD, we ask that you submit a research proposal as part of your application.

When making your application, you're advised to make your research proposals as specific and clear as possible. Please indicate the member(s) of staff that you'd wish to work with

You’ll need to provide a summary of between 250 and 350 words in length of your research proposal and a longer version of around 800 words (limit of 1000). The proposal for the MA in English (by research) should be 400–500 words.

Your research proposal should:

  • Identify the precise topic of your topic and communicate the main aim of your research.
  • Provide a rigorous and thorough description of your proposed research, including the contributions you will make to current scholarly conversations and debates. Creative Writing proposals should include plans for a critical research and a creative component.
  • Describe any previous work you have done in this area, with reference to relevant literature you have read so far.
  • Communicate the central sources that the project will address and engage.
  • Offer an outline of the argument’s main claims and contributions. Give a clear indication of the authors and texts that your project will address.
  • Include the academic factors, such as university facilities, libraries resources, centres, other resources, and / or staff, which have specifically led you to apply to York.

What we look for:

  • How you place your topic in conversation with the scholarly landscape: what has been accomplished and what you plan to achieve. This is your chance to show that you have a good understanding of the relevant work on your topic and that you have identified a new way or research question to approach the topic.
  • Your voice as a scholar and critical thinker. In clean, clear prose, show those who will assess your application how your proposal demonstrates your original thinking and the potential of your research.
  • Your fit with York, including the reasons for working with your supervisor and relevant research schools and centres.
  • Above all, remember that there isn’t one uniform way to structure and arrange your research proposal, and that your approach will necessarily reflect your chosen topic.

Careers and skills

  • You'll receive support in applying to and presenting at professional conferences, preparing and submitting material for publication and applying for jobs.
  • You'll benefit from training in handling research data, various modern languages, palaeography and bibliography. Classical and medieval Latin are also available. The   Humanities Research Centre   also offers a rich array of valuable training sessions.
  • We also offer training in teaching skills if you wish to pursue a teaching post following your degree. This includes sessions on the delivery and content of seminars and workshops to undergraduates, a structured shadowing programme, teaching inductions and comprehensive guidance and resources for our graduate teaching assistants.
  • You'll have the opportunity to further your training by taking courses accredited by Advance HE:   York Learning and Teaching Award (YLTA)   and the   York Professional and Academic Development scheme (YPAD) .

Find out more about careers

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International

Mphil/phd creative writing, course information.

English and Creative Writing

3-4 years full-time or 4-6 years part-time

Course overview

The inter-relationship between theory, scholarship and the creative process is key to the Goldsmiths MPhil/PhD Creative Writing.

Programme content

  • You'll be expected to combine your own creative writing – whether poetry, fiction or life writing – with research into the genre or area of literature in which you are working, to gain insight into its history and development, and to engage with relevant contemporary debates.
  • This might be genre in the more traditional sense, for example satire, fictional autobiography, verse drama, or particular traditions to which you feel your work relates, for example projective verse, postmodernist fiction, or Caribbean poetics.
  • This element of the PhD – the critical commentary – will constitute around 30% of the final work; the major part – 70% – will be a creative work of publishable standard: a novel, memoir, book of poems or collection of stories, for example.
  • Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.
  • North American applicants especially should note that the British system does not include preparatory taught classes or examinations as part of the MPhil/PhD programme, except for an initial course in research methods.
  • Find out more about  research degrees at Goldsmiths . 

Goldsmiths creative writing students and alumni

Former and current PhD students include the following published writers and poets: 

  • 2019 Booker Prize-winning   Bernardine Evaristo , whose Jerwood Fiction Uncovered -winning book Mr Loverman was written, in part, at Goldsmiths
  • Season Butler
  • Benjamin Woolley
  • Linda Buckley-Archer
  • Wendy Jones
  • Justin Hill 
  • Sophie Ward
  • Francis Gilbert  
  • Emma Darwin
  • Virginia Peters
  • Thomas Sykes
  • Aoife Mannix
  • Katrina Naomi
  • Kate Miller  (winner of the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry Prize) 
  • Kathryn Maris
  • Jack Underwood
  • Abigail Parry
  • Matthew Gregory
  • Jenny Lewis

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Stephen Knight .

Entry requirements

You should normally hold a first or upper second class BA Honours degree and have either a good MA in Creative Writing or a track record of relevant publications with a reputable company.

International qualifications

We accept a wide range of international qualifications. Find out more about the qualifications we accept from around the world.

If English isn’t your first language, you will need an IELTS score (or equivalent English language qualification ) of 7.0 with a 7.0 in writing and no element lower than 6.5 to study this programme. If you need assistance with your English language, we offer a range of courses that can help prepare you for postgraduate-level study .

Fees, funding & scholarships

Annual tuition fees.

These are the fees for students starting their programme in the 2024/2025 academic year.

  • Home - full-time: £TBC
  • Home - part-time: £TBC
  • International - full-time: £TBC

If your fees are not listed here, please check our postgraduate fees guidance or contact the Fees Office , who can also advise you about how to pay your fees.

It’s not currently possible for international students to study part-time under a student visa. If you think you might be eligible to study part-time while being on another visa type, please contact our Admissions Team for more information.

If you are looking to pay your fees please see our guide to making a payment .

Additional costs

In addition to your tuition fees, you'll be responsible for any additional costs associated with your course, such as buying stationery and paying for photocopying. You can find out more about what you need to budget for on our study costs page .

There may also be specific additional costs associated with your programme. This can include things like paying for field trips or specialist materials for your assignments.

Funding opportunities

Find out more about postgraduate fees and explore funding opportunities . If you're applying for funding, you may be subject to an application deadline.

AHRC studentships

The  Department of English and Creating Writing  sometimes offers fee waivers for this programme.

How to apply

You apply directly to Goldsmiths using our online application system.

If you are interested in applying to the PhD Creative Writing programme, please send your academic CV, along with a sample of your writing (approx 3,000 words) to   graduateschool (@gold.ac.uk) . These will then be seen by the programme convenor, who will be able to advise on supervisor availability in the department, and whether you should submit a formal application via the 'Apply Now' link at the top of this page.

Before submitting your application you'll need to have: 

  • Details of  your education history , including the dates of all exams/assessments
  • The  email address of your referee  who we can request a reference from, or alternatively an electronic copy of your academic reference
  • Contact details of a second referee
  • A  personal statement – t his can either be uploaded as a Word Document or PDF, or completed online

           Please see our guidance on writing a postgraduate statement

  • If available, an electronic copy of your educational transcript (this is particularly important if you have studied outside of the UK, but isn’t mandatory)
  • Details of your  research proposal

You'll be able to save your progress at any point and return to your application by logging in using your username/email and password.

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. 

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application. 

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include: 

  • delineation of the research topic
  • why it has been chosen
  • an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
  • a brief list of major secondary sources

How detailed a research proposal are we looking for on the application form?   Obviously what you put on the form and exactly what you end up researching may be rather different, but in order to judge whether or not to offer you a place, the Department needs to know whether you have the broad outlines of a viable project. This means:

  • a project that is both worthwhile and interesting, but not over-ambitious
  • a project that can realistically be achieved within the confines of PhD on a full-time (4 years typically) or part-time (6 years maximum) basis
  • we need to be sure that you have thought about it carefully and are fully committed to the research
  • we need to be sure that you understand what is involved in doing a PhD
  • your research proposal should give us enough information to be able to interview you (if you are in the UK) or reach a decision as to whether to admit you if you are not based in the UK

When to apply  

We accept applications from October for students wanting to start the following September. 

We encourage you to complete your application as early as possible, even if you haven't finished your current programme of study. It's very common to be offered a place conditional on you achieving a particular qualification.  

If you're applying for external funding from one of the Research Councils, make sure you submit your application by the deadline they've specified. 

Selection process 

If your degree is in an unrelated field, you may be considered subject to a qualifying interview and/or submission of sample essays.

Find out more about applying .

Department of English and Creative Writing have a wide range of research specialisms; find out more about our staff and their research interests .

You'll develop transferable skills, including:

  • enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
  • the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
  • the ability to organise information
  • the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments
  • Public relations
  • Advertising
  • The civil service

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths .

Research training programme

Training in research methods and skills is provided both by the department and Goldsmiths' Graduate School. This begins with an intensive week-long induction in the first week of enrolment and continues later in the first term with a series of seminars focussing on the specific challenges of literary and linguistic research projects. The department will also inform you about any research training seminars or study-days offered elsewhere in the University of London (for exmaple, by the Institute of English Studies or the Institute of Modern Languages Research, School of Advanced Study) or beyond, such as at the British Library. The specific training requirements of your project will be assessed, and guidance provided on specialist seminars and conferences to attend, which can be supported where possible by assistance from departmental funds.

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Discover more about the Centre for New Writing

PhD Creative Writing / Programme details

Year of entry: 2024

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Programme description

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Our PhD Creative Writing programme gives you the opportunity to work on a significant piece of creative writing while developing your research skills.

You will benefit from creative supervision by an experienced poet or fiction writer and draw on the range of expertise within the University to find a supervisor for your critical element. 

There are two elements to the programme. The first is a creative element that can be a novel or a collection of short stories of up to 100,000 words, or a book-length collection of poetry of up to 60 poems.

The PhD also has a critical element, which is a piece of literary or cultural criticism of 30,000 to 50,000 words maximum.

Special features

Centre for New Writing

Undertake our PhD Creative Writing programme and you will become part of the University's Centre for New Writing, which has been championing contemporary fiction, poetry and creative writing since 2007 and is home to writers including Jeanette Winterson, Kamila Shamsie, Ian McGuire, Kaye Mitchell, Jason Allen-Paisant, Beth Underdown, Honor Gavin, Frances Leviston, Horatio Clare and John McAuliffe, and Luke Brown.

Additional programme information

Our Humanities Doctoral Academy combines the strengths of our four schools to bring expertise, knowledge, support and high-quality services for postgraduate researchers.

We are a community of academic leaders and postgraduate researchers across all levels in the Faculty of Humanities. The Doctoral Academy Hub houses our specialist professional service teams who support postgraduate researchers throughout the programme journey. This includes admissions, registration, student experience, progression, examination, and graduation.

We collaborate closely with other University directorates including Manchester Doctoral College, Researcher Development team, and the corresponding Doctoral Academies in the Faculty of Science and Engineering and the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health. Together we provide the best experience and support for your studies and research.

Equality, diversity and inclusion  is fundamental to the success of The University of Manchester, and is at the heart of all of our activities. 

We know that diversity strengthens our research community, leading to enhanced research creativity, productivity and quality, and societal and economic impact. 

We actively encourage applicants from diverse career paths and backgrounds and from all sections of the community, regardless of age, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender expression, sexual orientation and transgender status. 

All appointments are made on merit. 

The University of Manchester and our external partners are fully committed to equality, diversity and inclusion.

Teaching and learning

The PhD will require you to develop your research skills and, to this end, you will be able to undertake a research skills audit and attend seminars and workshops on research methods in the first year.

In this way, you will participate in training seminars across the field of arts, languages and cultures, which will develop useful research, teaching and IT skills.

You will also attend seminars in relation to publication, authors' rights etc, which will be particularly useful to students of creative writing.

Specialised research training, and a wider postgraduate research culture within which your work will develop, is given through a programme of writing workshop masterclasses in which students take it in turns to have their writing workshopped by the other Creative Writing PhD students, supervisors and visiting writers from outside the institution.

Coursework and assessment

The PhD will normally consist of an extended and original piece of creative work and a shorter piece of literary or cultural criticism on a related subject.

The creative element could be a novel, a collection of poems, or collection of short stories. For fiction writers, the word length of this section will normally be around 80,000 words (there is a maximum word length of 100,000 words).

The critical component will involve a critical study of a subject related to the creative work, usually 30,000 to 50,000 words in length. This may involve any of the currently debated topics in English and American Studies as they relate to your creative work. For example, you might explore particular thematic or generic preoccupations in the work of other writers, or investigate some of the wider literary, theoretical, or poetic contexts into which your writing fits. Please note that the critical element is not a commentary on your own work or a self-reflective essay on your own creative processes; it is a piece of literary or cultural criticism of the type you would undertake if you were working towards a PhD in English Literature.

See what our current PhD students are working on.

Related research

What our students say.

Manchester is home to one of the UK's five National Research Libraries - one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK and widely recognised as one of the world's greatest research libraries.

Find out more about libraries and study spaces for postgraduate research students at Manchester.

We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research. There are extensive computing facilities across campus, with access to standard office software as well as specialist programmes.

Find out more about facilities for our English Literature and Creative Writing students.

Disability support

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Creative and Critical Writing

The PhD Programme in Creative and Critical Writing is for students and writers wishing to complete a substantial creative work of marketable quality. Our own MA in Creative Writing provides an ideal basis for students wishing to undertake a PhD.

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  • Entry requirements
  • How to apply

The PhD programme at Cardiff caters to individuals keen to join a thriving community of writers—from novelists and memoirists to poets and scriptwriters—all of whom share the common purpose of immersing themselves in the composition of a substantial piece of creative research.

The programme includes a compulsory critical element in which students relate the creative work they produce to its wider critical and cultural contexts and evaluate the conceptual and theoretical contribution the work represents.

Programme aims

  • The PhD programme is designed to enable students to put together an original piece of creative work—a novel, collection of poems or short stories, a play, film script, or work of creative non-fiction—together with a reflective critical commentary.
  • The programme offers knowledge and expertise to take you on to a role in Higher Education, or employment requiring high-level skills in research or advanced subject knowledge.
  • The programme recruits a diverse range of Home/EU and International students who want to engage in a research environment characterised by world-leading research expertise in all aspects of creative writing.

Distinctive features

  • The PhD programme offers a monthly seminar series specific to Creative Writing research students.
  • The School makes funding available each year for PGR students who wish to attend conferences / undertake library or archive visits in order to assist with their PhD studies.
  • PhD students are encouraged to attend the annual writers’ retreat at Gregynog Hall , a country house with a distinguished artistic heritage that is set in glorious countryside in mid-Wales.
  • PhD students are also encouraged to publish and advice can be sought from Creative Writing staff, all of whom are published authors.
  • We offer teaching opportunities on the undergraduate degree and PhD students can undertake the School’s unique “Learning to Teach” programme, accredited by the Higher Education Academy.

Our PhD students in Creative and Critical Writing are producing dynamic work both in established modes and forms and across a range of (hybrid) genres from experimental poetry and short stories to radio and film scripts, ambitious novels and innovative narrative non-fiction and are supported by supervisors who are experienced, published writer-academics with emerging and established international reputations. Our students are further trained in the ability to reflect critically on their own work. Though the balance between self-reflective analysis of the creative element on the one hand and the wider disciplinary and intellectual context on the other will vary according to the contours of each doctoral project, the commentary should be a rigorous evaluative analysis of the territory in which the creative work intervenes, and of the ways in which that intervention is accomplished.

Examples of recent and current PhD topics are given below:

  • “Modest Venus: Experiments in Seeing” (Narrative Non-Fiction)
  • “World of Appearances: Defining a Post-Projective Method in Contemporary Poetics”
  • “Poetic Grief: Writing the Death of an Addict”
  • “Representations of Italy in Contemporary English Literature” and a Novel
  • “Root and Branch: Direction in the Urban Novel in Contemporary Welsh Fiction in English”
  • “The Gwerin and the Crachach: A Novel”
  • “The Myth and its Registration”: Intellectual Property and Trademarks and a Novel

The PhD programme involves the preparation of an original piece of creative work—fiction, non-fiction, script or screenplay, a collection of poems or short stories—and a critical commentary.

Candidates for the PhD in Creative and Critical Writing will submit one of the following:

  • Prose: novel, short story, work of creative non-fiction or play/film script; the creative portion and critical commentary will not normally exceed 100,000 words with the critical commentary comprising not less than 20,000 words.
  • Poetry: a collection of poetry, prose poetry or micro-fiction amounting to around 60 pages, with an accompanying critical commentary of not less than 20,000 words.
  • An integrated Creative-Critical submission of no more than 100,000 words.

"Positioned at the interface of different traditions, methodologies, theoretical approaches, disciplines and practices, our internationally recognized and pioneering research engenders challenging and fascinating questions for our staff and also, through our PhD supervision and research-led teaching, for our students at all levels." Professor Ann Heilmann, Director of Research in the School of English, Communication and Philosophy.

The School was ranked in the top ten for the quality of its English Language and Literature research, including Creative and Critical Writing, in the latest  Research Excellence Framework (REF2014). Cardiff University recently joined the world's top 100 universities for the study of English Language and Literature (again including Creative and Critical Writing) in the  2016 QS World University Rankings .

Research environment

The School takes the training of research students very seriously, providing the facilities and supervisory guidance to help them flourish intellectually and work productively. The School has a dedicated suite of PhD research rooms with excellent networked IT facilities. Each student has a conference budget and is given a contribution to photocopying costs, as well as free printing facilities.

We regularly check with students what training they need and ensure that it is provided. Our PhD students can apply to get teaching experience with us and our unique “Learning to Teach” programme is accredited by the Higher Education Academy. The School holds a yearly conference to allow PhD students the opportunity to share work with their peers in a supportive and stimulating multi-disciplinary environment. The Arts and Social Studies Library is well-stocked with books and academic journals in all our subject areas, substantial electronic resources and specialist collections such as Cardiff Rare Books, a rich archive of over 14,000 items ranging from fifteenth-century incunabula to twentieth-century fine press books.

In a competitive jobs market, our students are encouraged and supported in building up the skills that will make them employable, whatever their career direction. We value the rich experience of our many overseas students and actively attend to their specific needs in relation to their cultural context of study and the demands of writing elegantly in a second language.

The programme offers ideal preparation for those wishing to pursue careers in freelance writing and academia as well as journalism, publishing, teaching, public relations and arts management and administration.

Job roles: Writer, Lecturer, Editor, Head Teacher, English Teacher, EFL Teacher, PR Officer.

Employers: Universities from Cork (Ireland) to Wisconsin State (USA), Oxford University Press, Penguin Random House, Palgrave MacMillan, London Film School, Virgin Media, Literature Wales, Visit Wales.

UK government postgraduate doctoral loans

Candidates for the Professional Doctorate programme may be eligible to apply for a UK government postgraduate doctoral loan.

The School welcomes enquiries from applicants who are considering applying for funding for a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing from the South, West and Wales Doctoral Training Partnership .

See our latest PhD studentships and projects and find out more about other funding opportunities .

Tuition fees

Students from the uk.

Get the latest information on postgraduate fees.

Students from the EU, EEA and Switzerland

Students from the rest of the world (international).

In addition to the application form, research proposal and supporting documents we also require copies of recent creative work, the word count of which will depend very much on the genre of work produced but we would expect approximately 3,000 words of prose or 10-15 poems.

Applicants should include a research proposal (approx 1000 words), 2 academic references, a sample of creative writing, copies of BA and MA degree certificates and a transcript of the marks.

Further information and guidelines for Personal Statement or supporting material.

Research proposal

The research proposal should be approximately 1,000 words in length. This should provide an outline of the aims and objectives of your project and indicate how you see it intervening in the field, in creative and critical terms alike.

In addition to this, we require copies of recent creative work, the word-count of which will depend very much on the genre of work produced. We would expect approximately 3,000 words of prose or 10-15 poems.

Applicants should also include supporting documents in the form of two academic references, copies of BA and MA degree certificates and a transcript of marks.

Admission process

The Director of the Creative and Critical Writing Postgraduate Research Programme assesses all applications, taking into consideration the quality and viability of the project, as well as the capacity of staff to supervise it. This will include consultation with potential supervisors. Applicants who pass this initial stage of assessment will then be invited for interview.

A list of staff working within Creative Writing .

Applications are welcome from graduates with at least a 2.1 at undergraduate level (in any academic discipline). While an MA in Creative Writing or English Literature is an advantage, it is not a prerequisite.

You are recommended to email the postgraduate administrator at [email protected] with your research proposal and a sample of creative work prior to making a formal application.

English language requirements

The School welcomes applications from students outside the United Kingdom. For non-native speakers of English, an IELTS overall score of 7.5 with at least 7.0 in each sub score is essential.

Please read our English language requirements for more details.

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Creative Writing PhD

Course detail, entry requirements.

  • Fees & funding
  • Study & career progression

A PhD in Creative Writing gives you the opportunity to develop an original piece of writing (for example a novel, play, screenplay, radio drama) and an accompanying thesis, in which you connect this creative work to relevant theoretical, critical and historical thinking. Together, these assessed elements lead to the award of the prestigious PhD in Creative Writing.

Working collaboratively, we aim to help you craft your work to the highest possible standard as well as facilitate your engagement with the professional world. All writers are encouraged to develop their skills in the broadest way possible. This means participating in writing exercises across a spectrum including reviews and blogs.

Our academics are often consulted by publishers about book proposals and manuscripts. ee a list of potential PhD supervisors and read about their expertise, in the 'Supervisors' section lower down the page. 

Find out more about the full range of  PhD study    opportunities   in the School of Film, Media and Design.

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Select your desired study option, then pick a start date to see relevant course information:

Start date:

If your desired start date is not available, try selecting a different study option.

Why study Creative Writing with us?

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What our students say…

UWL has truly state-of-the-art facilities. I feel like I'm learning something new every day.

study full time or part time

Research Centres

We have seven Research Centres, staffed by experts with an enviable record of publications, conferences, media and public engagement work.

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World-leading Research

The University of West London has been recognised by the Government's Research Excellence Framework (REF) for its exceptional research work.

Research REF PHD World-leading

You will be supervised by active researchers/writers with considerable experience of publication, editing, and working with other writers. Our academics are widely published on topics as varied as Jane Austen, Rambo, and literary adaptations.

About PhD study

This course is available for you to study either on a full-time or part-time basis and you have the flexibility to switch should you need to.

A PhD is founded on independent research.  You will undertake a systematic and in-depth exploration of your chosen topic to produce a substantial body of knowledge and make an original and important contribution to the subject area.  

The support provided by your supervisory team will be vital to your student experience and scholarly advancement.  You and your supervisors will have regular one-to-one meetings which will provide you with opportunities to develop your research topic and discuss your progress.

Our research record

View our  academic journal 'New Vistas'   to see the work of students and academics who are making an impact both locally and globally through their research findings.

Based in the heart of Ealing, west London, you can make use of the excellent transport links to travel to the the capital or further afield - ideal for attending research meetings and networking events.

Got a question?

If you would like guidance or more information about studying for a research degree, you can contact  Professor Jeremy Strong .

To enable you to enhance your professional profile, we support you throughout your research degree by:

  • providing research seminars
  • organising doctoral events and activities
  • facilitating networking and collaboration opportunities
  • encouraging and supporting publication and dissemination of your research
  • offering opportunities to gain teaching expertise and experience.

We provide structured research training, expert supervision, and an environment where you can discuss your research with other PhD students and researchers.

We run seminars in research methods from the Graduate Centre, as well as an ongoing series of events and activities organised by Schools and Colleges. Specialist help with academic English for students for whom English is not their first language is available.

Our facilities include a fully equipped TV Studio containing a lighting grid with DMX lighting control, green and white screens, Ross Crossover Vision Mixer for live editing and audio and video recorder / playback devices.

Media Resource Centre

Our Media Resource Centre is available to all London School of Film Media and Design students for free. We hold a variety of cameras, lights, sound equipment and recording devices. Students can also loan equipment demonstrated in class.

The Paul Hamlyn Library

The Paul Hamlyn Library provides an extensive range of books, journals and digital resources, PC and Mac workstations and a variety of study spaces. Find out more about what the  Paul Hamlyn Library has to offer .

We contribute to national and international initiatives and promote collaboration and networking opportunities. We also encourage and support you to publish and disseminate your research in academic journals and via presenting papers at conferences.

We run an annual conference for doctoral students, where you are encouraged to present a paper about your research. As well as being an opportunity to discuss your work with other students, the conference is a chance to gain valuable experience in presenting your research and participating in open discussions with academic peers.

You will also find other opportunities such as postgraduate student seminars and forums within your specific subject area.

Once you start a PhD course at UWL, you become part of our research community. You will have access to a postgraduate common room, located at our Ealing campus on St Mary’s Road, where you will meet fellow researchers from other subject disciplines offering scope for collaborations or simply to discuss ideas, allowing you to be part of a vibrant research environment.

  • Requirements: UK
  • Requirements: International

The minimum entry requirements for a research degree are:

  • a good first degree (First Class or Upper Second Class), or equivalent qualification in a relevant field
  • a Masters Degree (MA, MSc, MBA or MRes) with Merit, or equivalent postgraduate or research experience.

We look for students with:

  • a passion for their chosen subject.

You will also have a well thought through and persuasive proposal.

  • Competence in written and spoken English is a pre-requisite for entrance to this programme. An IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of 6.5 (with no element under 6.0).

Fees & funding

  • Funding: UK
  • Funding: International

The fee above is the cost per year of your course.

If your course runs for two years or more, you will need to pay the fee for each academic year at the start of that year. If your course runs for less than two years, the cost above is for your full course and you will need to pay the full fee upfront.

Government regulation does affect tuition fees and the fees listed for courses starting in the 2025/26 academic year are subject to change.

If no fee is shown above then the fees for this course are not available yet. Please check again later for updates.

Funding your studies

Funding for postgraduate students usually comes from one or more of a range of key sources:

  • research councils
  • charities and trust funds, including those funded by the UK government
  • higher Education institutions
  • overseas governments (international students only)
  • professional and career development loans
  • self-funding (including family funds).

Find out more about funding opportunities. Examples of most of these types of funding are included on the postgraduate studentships website , (with the exception of funding you may be able to obtain from your employer and self-funding).

Bursaries and scholarships

We offer generous bursaries and scholarships to make sure your aspirations are your only limit. See our PhD scholarships , scholarships and bursaries .

For any overseas students, your first port of call should be grant-awarding bodies in your own country (eg The Ministry / Department of Education) and your local (or nearest) office of the British Council.

The British Council manage a small number of international studentship grants in some countries and should be able to tell you what other awards may be available to you - they also produce the Sources of funding for international students guide.

Supervisors

Professor jeremy strong.

Jeremy Strong

Dr Jonathon Crewe

Dr Jonathon Crewe

Study & career progression

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Studying for a PhD enables you to develop an area of specialism that will give you an edge whether you are planning to work in industry or to develop expertise to teach in academia.

Graduates of the PhD: Creative Writing will be highly accomplished writers, fluent and capable in what is – perhaps – the ultimate transferable skill. It will help position you for a  career in the many branches of the thriving media and cultural industries – nationally and internationally - as well as for academic careers in teaching and research

How to apply

  • How to apply: UK
  • How to apply: International

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To apply for one of our research courses, click the green 'apply now' link shown below to complete an online application form. You will need to attach the following documentation to your online application form:

  • research proposal outline (5000 words maximum)
  • transcript of your highest qualification.

The research proposal outline, or statement of research interests, enables us to assess your suitability for higher degree work including:

  • viability of the topic as a research study
  • the most appropriate supervisor(s) to be appointed.

Click here  for more information on applying for a PhD.

Apply for this course

Next steps after making your application.

We aim to make a decision on your application as quickly as we can. If we need any more information about your qualifications, we will be in touch.

In the meantime, come and visit us and find out more about what studying at UWL is like. Sign up for an  open day  or join a campus tour .

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Talk to our tutors and find out about our courses and facilities at our next open day or join a campus tour.

We're here to help

Any questions about a course or studying at UWL? We're here to help - call us on 0800 036 8888 (option 2, Monday – Friday 10am-4pm) or email us on [email protected].

To apply for one of our research courses, click the green 'apply now' link shown below to complete an online application form.  You will need to attach the following documentation to your online application form:

  • research proposal outline

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English at Leicester

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PhD in Creative Writing

Pursuing a PhD in Creative Writing at Leicester means becoming part of an exciting and dynamic research and creative environment.

The PhD programme helps give structure to your creative project, and invites you to ask searching questions about your practice, to reflect on the process of producing creative work, and so to write a long critical-reflective essay (usually 15-20,000 words) to accompany the creative work. The creative body of work normally makes up 70% of the PhD, and the reflective thesis 30%.

At its broadest, the emphasis is on trying to comprehend the practice of creation itself - surely one of the most fascinating subjects imaginable.

Creative Writing doctorates lead to a variety of potential career paths. These include novelist, poet, playwright or screenwriter, of course, but there are many related industries that Creative Writing research degree graduates nationally have gone on to work in, including (but not limited to):

  • TV storyline writing
  • Video game creation
  • TV and film production
  • Working as a literary agent
  • Teaching or lecturing
  • Working as a professional stand-up comedian
  • Post-doctoral academic research
  • Public relations
  • Advertising & marketing
  • Political research & speech writing
  • Arts management
  • Content provision
  • Tweet writing
  • Web editing
  • Franchise creation
  • Branding consultancy
  • Literary and other arts events management
  • Intellectual property advising

Application information

It is a good idea to make informal enquiries to the lecturer you believe might be interested in supervising your PhD, prior to making a formal application.

  • List of English at Leicester staff  
  • Recent creative publications by students and staff  

You should have a strong creative and academic track record - entry requirements are an MA or similar in Creative Writing and some prior publication history.

Otherwise, you should have compelling evidence of advanced writing experience, and an awareness of the technical and reflective elements of creative writing practice in an academic environment.

Your application should consist of a persuasive outline for a creative project: a body of poetry, a novel, a work of creative non-fiction, a graphic novel or a substantial film script. This should be accompanied by a theoretical and canonical series of questions that you believe will prove relevant as the creative work progresses.

You should be conscious of the fact that the critical element of a creative PhD is not separate literary critical study - although it may involve such. It is involved in the deeper comprehension of the creative process itself through an articulation of creative practice. As such it may involve historical, ethnographic, practice-based philosophical, social scientific and other theoretical models.

Places on the PhD are awarded on the basis of the quality of the creative sample submitted and the originality of the proposal.

Audio clip: Gwynne Harries discusses his Creative PhD

Listen to PhD student Gwynne Harries discuss his Creative PhD in Welsh Poetic Forms in English Verse.

  • Postgraduate Research

Creative Writing PhD

  • Part time available: yes

Studying in:

  • Department of English
  • School of Arts
  • Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

The Department of English conducts research in three main areas: literature, language, and creative writing. We aim to foster and develop strategic partnerships, particularly with local and national cultural organisations, to reach those who can benefit from our research.

Why study with us?

There is a close postgraduate community within the department.  There is always someone around to talk to about your research and plenty of activities to get involved in including, reading groups, lectures by visiting speakers and conferences. Emma Hayward - Creative Writing PhD student

of research environment was classified as 'world leading' (4*) or 'internationally excellent' (3*) in the latest Research Excellence Framework (2021)

in the sector for research impact classified as 'outstanding' (4*) in the latest Research Excellence Framework (2021)

in the sector for % of our research overall classified world leading or internationally excellent in the latest Research Excellence Framework (2021)

The School of English has an outstanding international reputation.  Students will benefit from this strong research-led teaching covering a wide and continuous range of writing which equips students with the critical and communication skills and the capacity for adaptable intelligence which are in demand in all areas of modern life.

Engagement with media has allowed our researchers to be at the forefront of developing a rich cultural agenda at national and international levels, opening access to literature to a diverse audience. This has resulted in four staff members succeeding in the New Generation Thinkers scheme. We also actively support impact in terms of reaching the general reader, through the publication of research in various, high-profile formats.  The impact of such intervention into the nation’s cultural life creates new and evolving long-term contexts for thinking, understanding, writing and imagining.

Many of the Centre’s members specialize in Contemporary Literature that overlaps with science fiction, climate change, visual arts, comics and graphic novels, travel and nature writing as well as psychogeography and the urban environment. Putting gender and race at the forefront, Anglophone and postcolonial writing as well as the fostering of genuinely innovative interdisciplinary creative writing projects which have application and potential impact (e.g. Mental health, environment), is central to the way the Centre aims to diversify and expand the reading, writing and teaching of literature in the UK. Currently the Literature and Science Hub, formerly the Centre for Poetry and Science, established 2007, sits under the wing of the Centre.

Research themes

Our research themes are:

  • Citizenship and Identity
  • Poetry and Diversity
  • Literature and the Visual Arts.

We have access to a variety of subscription databases, such as Early English Books Online, Eighteenth-Century Collections Online, Literature Online and the Burney Collection of Newspapers.

In addition the Special Collections and Archives department of the library houses:

  • Literary manuscripts, including papers by Seamus Heaney, Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes
  • The Science Fiction Foundation collection, including the archive of John Wyndham
  • Rare and early printed books
  • Medieval manuscripts
  • Poetry archives from the Romantic period to the present day.

Study options and fees

The fees stated in the table above exclude potential research support fees also known as ‘bench fees’. You will be notified of any fee which may apply in your offer letter.

* Please note that if you are undertaking a PhD within the Faculty of Science and Engineering the fee you pay, Band A or Band B, will reflect the nature of your research project. Some research projects incur a higher fee than others e.g. if you are required to undertake laboratory work. You will be informed of the fee for your programme in your offer letter.

^ Self-funded, full-time international students studying a PhD programme classified as Band A will receive a £2,000 reduction in their fees for the first year only.

Entry requirements

Students will normally have a strong (2.1 or above) first degree in English, Creative Writing, or a related subject and a master's degree in Creative Writing. Creative and critical work will be required as part of the application.

English language requirements

How to apply.

Research degree applications can be made online.  You'll also need to ensure that you have funding to cover all fees.

Applications are  open all year round .

More about applying for research degrees

Apply online

Before you apply, we recommend that you identify a supervisor and develop a research proposal

Find a supervisor

Professor Deryn Rees-Jones Professor Sandeep Parmar Dr David Hering Dr Sam Solnick Dr Will Slocombe

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Need help finding a supervisor? Contact us

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phd creative writing europe

Creative Writing

You are viewing this course for September start 2024

Qualification

Course duration.

PhD Creative Writing

The English Department provides an excellent environment for postgraduate study, research, and creative work. The main University library is well stocked with standard texts and critical works on a very wide range of topics; and the National Library of Wales, adjacent to the campus, is one of the UK’s five copyright libraries, holding one of the most extensive collections of books and manuscripts in Europe. As a department that values a stimulating research ethos highly, we place great emphasis on the provision of high quality teaching, supervision and facilities for our postgraduate community. As a result, our postgraduate community is dynamic and thriving. It is very pleasing to note that our graduates secure employment in teaching, academia, publishing and various other professional fields.

Typical Entry Requirements

Entry Requirements 2:1 Bachelors (Honours) degree in a relevant subject area and Merit performance at Masters level (either complete or in process). Consideration will be given to applicants who can demonstrate a significant body of relevant professional experience in lieu of academic qualifications.

English Language Requirements IELTS 7.5 with minimum 7.5 in each component

Other Requirements Submission of a satisfactory writing portfolio. Please note that the above requirements are a minimum for entry, and successful applicants are likely to be able to demonstrate consistent academic performance at the higher levels (i.e. at least high 2.1 / high Merit). Marks transcripts must be provided at the point of application.

Course Overview

Research Strengths

This is a research-based course, 'research' in this context implying everything that is required to bring to completion a novel or substantial collection of poems, as well as to provide a critical/analytical account of the work produced. You will be expected, under the guidance of your supervisor, to demonstrate your skills in handling a sustained creative project, while at the same time establishing a critical framework for your writing. Your research will be closely supervised throughout by one or more core members of the Department’s Creative Writing staff.

Please visit our School's  Research pages for information regarding our staff, areas of interest, facilities and other information.

All academic staff in the Department of English and Creative Writing are active scholars and experts in their fields. They are either qualified to PhD level or have commensurate experience. Our Lecturers either hold or are working towards a Higher Education teaching qualification and the majority of academic staff also hold the status of Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

phd creative writing europe

We are happy to receive applications for research projects focusing on Literary Studies or Creative Writing and the Department welcomes enquiries from students who wish to pursue a PhD in any of the areas in which members of staff have expertise.   

  Part of what makes Aberystwyth special is our thriving research culture : you’ll get to join an engaging and interactive community where staff, students, and guest speakers come together to share and showcase their research. You’ll also work alongside researchers who are recognised internationally for their contributions to knowledge and the furthering of the discipline.   

Department Expertise  

The Department’s particular areas of expertise include:  

  • Contemporary poetry  
  • Crime fiction  
  • Life writing
  • Nature writing
  • Black diaspora literature
  • Postcolonial fiction
  • Women’s writing
  • Children’s literature
  • Literary geography and ecocriticism
  • LGBT writing
  • Welsh writing in English
  • Literatures of surveillance
  • Literature and disability
  • Irish writing
  • Gothic literature and ghost stories
  • Psychoanalysis
  • Late Medieval secular literature
  • Contemporary medievalism
  • Romanticism
  • Victorian literature
  • Modernism and late modernism
  • Postmodernism.

What does a PhD in the  Department of English and Creative Writing involve?  

A PhD in literary studies is awarded upon satisfactory completion of a thesis of 80–100,000 words followed by a viva voce examination.   

  A PhD in creative writing has two parts: the creative work (comprising 75–80,000 words of prose or 60 pages of poetry) plus a 20,000-word critical commentary. Award of the PhD in creative writing is subject to satisfactory completion of this twin written element, followed by a viva voce examination.  

  For both literary studies and creative writing PhDs, the normal period of registration is three years (full-time) or five years (part-time). For full-time students, it is expected that the thesis will be submitted within four years of initial registration. For part-time students, submission is expected within seven years of initial registration. Full-time research students are expected to be based in Aberystwyth. Part-time research students can pursue their studies at a distance but may need to be available to attend sessions on campus on occasion.  

  Each research student is assigned two supervisors, who offer support and advice at every stage of the research project. The primary supervisor works closely with the student and will be a specialist in the chosen field of research/creative writing.  

  All full-time doctoral candidates are required to undertake a selection of research skills and professional development modules that are provided by the Aberystwyth University Graduate School. These modules are undertaken over the first two years of study. Under the guidance of their supervisors, students will be expected to develop advanced skills in handling a sustained project, which makes an original, rigorous contribution to the candidate’s chosen field of literary studies or creative writing practice.  

For further information, or to discuss options for the shorter MPhil research degree, please contact us directly on [email protected]    

Guidelines for PhD Proposals  

PhD proposals should include the following information:  

Literary Studies (c. 3,000 words)   

  • Synopsis of project (your project’s primary research ideas/aims, key texts, and theoretical perspectives) (250 words)    
  • Contribution to knowledge (what your work will contribute to the relevant field of study) (250 words)   
  • Research questions (outline the two primary research questions that will drive your project, and briefly explain how your research will address them) (250 words)   
  • Full research proposal (detailed description of your planned research, including an outline plan of the proposed sections of the thesis) (2,000 words)    
  • Your work to date in this or related areas (250 words)  

You should also submit a sample of your critical work of c. 5000 words.   

  Creative Writing (c. 3,000 words)     

  • Synopsis of project (an outline of your project’s central creative ideas, proposed stylistic engagements, key critical engagements, and theoretical perspectives) (250 words) 
  • Contribution to creative and critical practice (what your work will contribute to the relevant creative and critical fields) (250 words) 
  • Creative Aims (outline the two primary creative aims that will drive your project and explain how your work will address them) (250 words) 
  • Full proposal (detailed description of your planned work, including outline plans of both the creative and critical components) (2,000 words)

You should also submit a sample of your creative work of c. 5000 words of prose or 100 lines of poetry. 

Best Universities for Creative Writing in Europe

Updated: February 29, 2024

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Below is a list of best universities in Europe ranked based on their research performance in Creative Writing. A graph of 1.17M citations received by 136K academic papers made by 486 universities in Europe was used to calculate publications' ratings, which then were adjusted for release dates and added to final scores.

We don't distinguish between undergraduate and graduate programs nor do we adjust for current majors offered. You can find information about granted degrees on a university page but always double-check with the university website.

Please note that our approach to subject rankings is based on scientific outputs and heavily biased on art-related topics towards institutions with computer science research profiles.

1. University of Oxford

For Creative Writing

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2. University College London

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3. University of Cambridge

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4. King's College London

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5. University of Manchester

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6. University of Edinburgh

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7. University of Exeter

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8. University of Sheffield

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9. University of Birmingham

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10. University of Nottingham

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Creative Writing (Online) PhD

  • Full-time: 48 months
  • Part-time: 96 months
  • Start date: October 2024, February 2025
  • UK fees: £5,100
  • International fees: £21,500

Research overview

The University of Nottingham is a fantastic place to study creative writing.

We have expertise in poetry and fiction that range from haiku poetry to digital storytelling. In addition, all our lecturers are actively publishing their work and collaborating with cultural institutions across the United Kingdom.

You can also get editing experience through The Letters Page online journal, working with award-winning writer Jon McGregor. 

Hear from our students

Creative Writing PhD student, James Aitcheson, discusses doing a PhD as a published author.

Watch the video >

Course content

A PhD in Creative Writing is mainly made up of independent study, with supervision meetings occurring online (e.g. via Microsoft Teams) and spread throughout the year.

There are no taught credits attached to a PhD, although it is compulsory for full-time students to attend the Arts Faculty Researcher Skills training programme, which is available for online attendance.

Some PhD students also choose to audit masters modules taught by their supervisors where appropriate. This is not compulsory, nor does it involve any formal assessment, and would be limited to modules offered online.

Part-time students

Part-time students are required to take part in all required research training, attend postgraduate seminars where possible, and one postgraduate researcher (PGR) symposium over the period of their registration.

You will complete a written thesis of up to 100,000 words, with expert support and advice from your academic supervisor(s). You will also take a verbal examination called a viva voce, where you explain your project in depth to an examination panel.

A creative writing thesis will mainly consist of your own original creative work. This could be a novel, a manuscript of poems, a collection of short stories, a play, or another form of creative output. Your thesis will also include a critical analysis of your creative work, which you will situate within a theorised or analytical context.

A PhD thesis should not normally exceed 100,000 words in length. It is expected that the creative element would usually comprise 50,000-70,000 words. The critical analysis component will normally be 15,000-30,000 words in length.

What is the thesis pending period?

All periods of registration are followed by a period of writing-up, called the thesis-pending period, when tuition fees are not paid and students are writing up their thesis.

Find out more in the university's Quality Manual .

Progression review

All PhD students take part in progression review assessments to ensure that their project is progressing satisfactorily. A progression review consists usually consists of written reports from both the student and the supervisory team.

All students have an independent assessment interview for their Stage 1 and Stage 2 reviews (end of years 1 and 2 for full-time students, years 2 and 4 for part-time students).

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2024 entry.

Meeting our English language requirements

If you need support to meet the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional English course. Presessional courses teach you academic skills in addition to English language. Our  Centre for English Language Education is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

If you successfully complete your presessional course to the required level, you can then progress to your degree course. This means that you won't need to retake IELTS or equivalent.

For on-campus presessional English courses, you must take IELTS for UKVI to meet visa regulations. For online presessional courses, see our CELE webpages for guidance.

Visa restrictions

International students must have valid UK immigration permissions for any courses or study period where teaching takes place in the UK. Student route visas can be issued for eligible students studying full-time courses. The University of Nottingham does not sponsor a student visa for students studying part-time courses. The Standard Visitor visa route is not appropriate in all cases. Please contact the university’s Visa and Immigration team if you need advice about your visa options.

We recognise that applicants have a variety of experiences and follow different pathways to postgraduate study.

We treat all applicants with alternative qualifications on an individual basis. We may also consider relevant work experience.

If you are unsure whether your qualifications or work experience are relevant, contact us .

As well as IELTS (listed above), we also accept other English language qualifications .

This includes TOEFL iBT, Pearson PTE, GCSE, IB and O level English.

You will be required to provide a PhD proposal with your application, which will set out the structure of your project.

The basis of a good proposal is usually a set of questions, approaches, and objectives which clearly outline your proposed project and what you want to accomplish. The proposal should also clearly demonstrate how you are going to accomplish this.

A PhD proposal should be a minimum of 1000 words. There is no upward limit for proposals, although successful proposals are often not much longer than about 2000-3000 words. You should consider:

  • The methodologies that you will use in your project (as appropriate)
  • The necessary resources and facilities you will need to carry out your project

In addition, the proposal should outline your reasons (academic and/or personal) for registering for online study rather than by full or part-time on-campus options. In particular, you should make clear how will be able to carry out your project in your chosen location. The proposal must include evidence of:

  • Experience and ability to work independently e.g. papers/presentations at professional and academic conferences or publications in professional journals or previous completion of an independent research project, etc
  • Access to local library facilities (where needed)
  • Access to suitable IT facilities
  • Access to online communications, e.g. Microsoft Teams
  • Access to facilities to support any study-related disability (where appropriate)

It is also helpful to include:

  • A summary of any further research experience, in addition to your academic qualifications. This could include work undertaken at undergraduate or masters level, or outside the educational system
  • The name of the supervisor who may supervise the project (see the full list of supervision areas in the school )

Find out more about how to write a research proposal .

You may find it helpful to get in touch with a member of academic staff about your research proposal before submitting an application. They may be able to help you with your proposal and offer support to find funding opportunities in your area.

Our step-by-step guide contains everything you need to know about applying for postgraduate research.

How to apply.

Additional information for international students

If you are a student from the EU, EEA or Switzerland, you may be asked to complete a fee status questionnaire and your answers will be assessed using guidance issued by the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) .

These fees are for full-time study. If you are studying part-time, you will be charged a proportion of this fee each year (subject to inflation).

Additional costs

All students will need at least one device to approve security access requests via Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA). We also recommend students have a suitable laptop to work both on and off-campus. For more information, please check the equipment advice .

All students will need at least one device to approve security access requests via Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA). Students must also have a suitable desktop/laptop to carry out their research. For more information, please check the equipment advice .

You'll be able to access many of the books and journal papers you’ll need through our libraries, though you may wish to buy your own copies of core texts. Because some resources may not be available online, the University of Nottingham library offers postal loans for online learners and can scan up to one chapter or article from a book or journal on request. For details on postal loans, see the library website, and for scanning requests, use the dedicated request form .

For students studying elsewhere in the UK, as a University of Nottingham student, you can also access many other university libraries across the country. The SCONUL Access scheme allows you access to the buildings and resources on offer at other UK campuses, so you can study closer to home. For more information on participating libraries and to sign up, check out their main webpage.

Many academic libraries worldwide allow students to become library members. You may need to provide a letter confirming your student status: these can be ordered from the university's online store .

There are many ways to fund your research degree, from scholarships to government loans.

Check our guide to find out more about funding your postgraduate degree.

Regular supervision

You will have a team of at least two supervisors. Full-time students will meet with their supervisory team at least 10 times each year (six times for part-time students).

Your supervisors will help you to realise your research project and to guide you through your research. Many students will also attend conferences and publish papers in conjunction with their supervisors, to gain valuable experience and contacts in the academic community.

Professional development

Research students in the School of English may benefit from:

  • Student-led research seminars and an annual symposium (recorded and/or hybrid for online students)
  • Research networks created by the research centres and individual research projects
  • Research council-funded international research exchange visits with leading universities
  • Co-authorship with members of staff
  • Dedicated staff-postgraduate reading groups
  • Support for participation in international conferences and seminars

Postgraduate seminars and conference attendance

A seminar series is run by and for the postgraduate students in the school during term time, which will be hybrid and/or recorded for online students.

The seminars provide a forum for students to share work in progress with staff and peers, to hear from invited speakers, and to explore key academic and career topics in a supportive atmosphere.

Researcher training and development

The Researcher Academy is the network for researchers, and staff who support them. We work together to promote a healthy research culture, to cultivate researcher excellence, and develop creative partnerships that enable researchers to flourish.

Postgraduate researchers at Nottingham have access to our online Members’ area, which includes a wealth of resources, access to training courses and award-winning postgraduate placements.

Graduate centres

Our graduate centres are dedicated community spaces on campus for postgraduates.

Each space has areas for:

  • socialising
  • computer work
  • kitchen facilities

Student support

You will have access to a range of support services , including:

  • academic and disability support
  • childcare services
  • counselling service
  • faith support
  • financial support
  • mental health and wellbeing support
  • visa and immigration advice
  • welfare support

Students' Union

Our Students' Union represents all students. You can join the Postgraduate Students’ Network or contact the dedicated Postgraduate Officer .

There are also a range of support networks, including groups for:

  • international students
  • black and minority ethnic students
  • students who identify as women
  • students with disabilities
  • LGBT+ students

SU Advice provides free, independent and confidential advice on issues such as accommodation, financial and academic difficulties.

phd creative writing europe

Where you will learn

Special collections - english phd online learning.

While many of our Special Collections have been or are being digitised, some of the following offering will only available on-campus and would require visits to Nottingham to access:

  • manuscripts from the 12th-15th centuries and books in Old and Middle English, Old Icelandic, Viking Studies, and runology
  • the English Place-Name Society library and archive
  • Hallward Library's DH Lawrence archive (containing Lawrence family papers, manuscripts, first editions, and books owned by Lawrence)
  • the Cambridge Drama Collection (over 1,500 items including plays and works about the British theatre from 1750-1850)

If your PhD research will require access to these collections, please consult with a potential supervisor about the suitability of the topic for online study. 

Whether you are considering a career in academia, industry or haven't yet decided, we’re here to support you every step of the way.

Expert staff will work with you to explore PhD career options and apply for vacancies, develop your interview skills and meet employers. You can book a one-to-one appointment, take an online course or attend a workshop.

International students who complete an eligible degree programme in the UK on a student visa can apply to stay and work in the UK after their course under the Graduate immigration route . Eligible courses at the University of Nottingham include bachelors, masters and research degrees, and PGCE courses.

Careers advice

Whether you are considering a career in academia, industry or haven't yet decided, we’re here to support you every step of the way.

International students who complete an eligible degree programme in the UK on a student visa can apply to stay and work in the UK after their course under the Graduate immigration route. Eligible courses at the University of Nottingham include bachelors, masters and research degrees, and PGCE courses.

Graduate destinations

This course will develop key transferable skills, including:

  • analysis and problem-solving
  • independent research
  • information gathering and data management
  • construction of logical and persuasive arguments

As a result, our graduates enter a wide range of careers. These include:

  • lecturing, teaching and academic research
  • specialist archive, librarian, heritage and museum work
  • journalism, publishing and research
  • local and central government
  • social policy

100% of postgraduates from the School of English secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £37,402.*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2019/20 data published in 2022 . The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on data from graduates who completed a full-time postgraduate degree with home fee status and are working full-time within the UK.

Spencer Jordan Creative Writing

Related courses

English (online) phd, applied linguistics (online) phd, applied linguistics and english language teaching (online) phd, research excellence framework.

The University of Nottingham is ranked 7th in the UK for research power, according to analysis by Times Higher Education. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) is a national assessment of the quality of research in UK higher education institutions.

  • We are proud to be in the top 10 UK universities for research into English, while our ranking of 9th by 'research power' reflects our research excellence
  • 90%* of our research is classed as 'world-leading' (4*) or 'internationally excellent' (3*)
  • 100%* of our research is recognised internationally
  • 51% of our research is assessed as 'world-leading' (4*) for its impact**

*According to analysis by Times Higher Education ** According to our own analysis.

This content was last updated on 27 September 2023 . Every effort has been made to ensure that this information is accurate, but changes are likely to occur between the date of publishing and course start date. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply.

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Course type

Qualification, university name, phd degrees in creative writing.

49 degrees at 41 universities in the UK.

Customise your search

Select the start date, qualification, and how you want to study

About Postgraduate Creative Writing

Creative writing extends beyond the boundaries of normal professional journalism or academic forms of literature. It is often associated with fiction and poetry, but primarily emphasises narrative craft, character development, and the use of traditional literary forms.

A PhD level exploration of creative writing is a three-year full-time programme, where candidates delve into the complexities of literary expression, developing their own research and create projects with the goal of making an original contribution to the field.

There are more than fifty creative writing PhD programmes in the UK, and these give candidates a platform to fully immerse themselves in their ideas and take their work to the next level.

What to expect

A PhD in creative writing offers the time and space to develop personal creative methods, combined with advanced workshops, critical seminars, and guest lectures from working authors. Under an academic mentor's supervision, candidates typically work towards completing a novel, poetry collection or screenplay.

Postgraduate programmes such as these often foster a supportive community of writers and scholars, and collaboration with peers is encouraged. Graduates can expect to emerge as confident and aspirational authors, with a developed style and professional aspiration, prepared for careers in writing, publishing, academia, or other creative industries. The degree provides a pathway for making significant contributions to the world of literature through original and innovative creative works.

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Related subjects:

  • PhD Creative Writing
  • PhD Biography Writing
  • PhD Broadcasting Studies
  • PhD Communication Design
  • PhD Communication Skills
  • PhD Communication Studies
  • PhD Communications and Media
  • PhD Digital Arts
  • PhD Digital Media
  • PhD Film Special Effects
  • PhD Film Studies
  • PhD Film and Television Production
  • PhD Film and Video Production
  • PhD Media Production
  • PhD Media Studies
  • PhD Multimedia
  • PhD Photography
  • PhD Play Writing
  • PhD Television Programme Production
  • PhD Television Studies
  • PhD Television and Radio Production
  • PhD Visual Communication
  • PhD Writing

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  • Course title (A-Z)
  • Course title (Z-A)
  • Price: high - low
  • Price: low - high

University of Hull

About our programmes English at Hull is friendly, inclusive and supportive, and characterised by the internationally excellent research Read more...

  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 5 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

English and Creative Writing PhD

University of gloucestershire.

What is History, Religion, Philosophy and Politics A research degree in the Humanities offers a multitude of opportunities, depending on Read more...

  • 4 years Full time degree: £5,100 per year (UK)
  • 6 years Part time degree: £3,400 per year (UK)

PhD English and Creative Writing

University of roehampton.

Research conducted in the School of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences covers a wide range of diverse and innovative arts practices, Read more...

  • 4 years Full time degree: £4,711 per year (UK)
  • 7 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

Creative and Critical Writing PhD

Bangor university.

If you take this Creative and Critical Writing PhD or MPhil course you will experience One-to-one teaching and supervision by Read more...

  • 2 years Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)

Creative Writing PhD

Bath spa university.

The PhD in Creative Writing combines a proposed manuscript (e.g. novel, short story collection, poems, playscript, narrative non-fiction, Read more...

  • 24 months Full time degree: £7,325 per year (UK)

PhD Postgraduate Research in Creative Writing

University of east anglia uea.

We are a top tier, research-led university and are committed to making a substantial impact on the global challenges facing society. Our Read more...

  • 6 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

Text, Practice and Research - PhD

University of kent.

This programme addresses one of our main aims at Kent, which is to enable research students to take risks and use cross-disciplinary Read more...

PhD Theatre Studies (Playwriting)

University of essex.

Theatre and Drama in the Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies is led by a vibrant group of playwrights and theatre Read more...

  • 4 years Full time degree: £9,375 per year (UK)

Creative Writing PhD, MPhil

University of leicester.

PhD study in the area of Creative Writing is offered by the School of English at Leicester and this means becoming part of an exciting and Read more...

  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,786 per year (UK)
  • 6 years Part time degree: £2,393 per year (UK)

Creative Writing MPhil, PhD

Newcastle university.

Our MPhil, PhD in Creative Writing offers you the opportunity to develop a substantial, original piece of creative work and a related Read more...

  • 36 months Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 72 months Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

University of Nottingham

Nottingham is a fantastic place to study creative writing. From readings to workshops, to guest lectures, we have a wide range of literary Read more...

  • 48 months Online/Distance degree: £5,100 per year (UK)
  • 96 months Online/Distance degree

University of Plymouth

Plymouth’s PhD in Creative Writing is one of the longest running in the UK, going back to the late 1990s. Our MA, and PhD students have had Read more...

  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,500 per year (UK)
  • 4 years Part time degree: £3,030 per year (UK)

PhD/ MPhil/ MRes Creative Writing

University of strathclyde.

As well as the popular MLitt in Creative Writing, we also offer a research-led Creative Writing route, which may suit those who wish to Read more...

University of Surrey

Why choose this programme We belong to the interdisciplinary School of Literature and Languages, which has research-active staff in Read more...

  • 4 years Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 8 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

Contemporary Writing PhD

Brunel university london.

Research profile From modernist and post-war women's writing to Caribbean and migrant fiction, our research interests span a wide range of Read more...

  • 3 years Full time degree
  • 6 years Part time degree

University of West London

These courses feature four specially designed modules which will improve your academic and English skills. Once completed you can progress Read more...

  • 4 years Full time degree: £3,995 per year (UK)
  • 6 years Part time degree: £2,000 per year (UK)

Aberystwyth University

PhD Creative Writing The English Department provides an excellent environment for postgraduate study, research, and creative work. The Read more...

Journalism, Communication & Creative Writing PhDs and MPhils

University of portsmouth.

If you're ready to take your expertise in Journalism, Communication and Creative Writing into a postgraduate research degree, Portsmouth is Read more...

PhD in Creative Writing and English Literature

Manchester metropolitan university.

RESEARCH CULTURE We are a leading centre for the study of literature and culture. We host a large and vibrant community of renowned Read more...

  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,850 per year (UK)

Drama and Theatre Studies Practice-Based PhD (through Playwriting or Performance)

University of birmingham.

Our Drama and Theatre Studies Practice-Based programme allows academic research to be conducted through practical experimentation. It also Read more...

  • 3 years Distance without attendance degree: £2,389 per year (UK)
  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,778 per year (UK)

1-20 of 49 courses

Course type:

  • Distance learning PhD
  • Full time PhD
  • Part time PhD

Qualification:

Universities:.

  • Cardiff University
  • University of Suffolk
  • University of Buckingham
  • The University of Edinburgh
  • King's College London, University of London
  • University of Aberdeen
  • University of Sussex
  • University of Lincoln
  • Anglia Ruskin University
  • Keele University
  • University of Manchester
  • University of York
  • Swansea University
  • Lancaster University
  • University of Liverpool
  • University of Hertfordshire
  • University of Bristol
  • Leeds Beckett University
  • Goldsmiths, University of London
  • University of Derby

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Postgraduate Courses in Creative Writing in Europe - 384 Courses

Swansea university english language and literature.

Swansea University

  • Creative Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD MA Master of Philosophy - MPhil
  • Creative Writing (Extended) MA

University of Aberdeen School of Language, Literature, Music and Visual Culture

University of Aberdeen

  • Comparative Literature MLitt
  • Creative Writing MLitt
  • Cultural and Creative Communication MSc
  • English Language and Literature MLitt
  • Ethnology and Folklore MLitt

Aberystwyth University Department of English and Creative Writing

Aberystwyth University

  • Creative Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD MA

Bangor University School of English Literature

Bangor University

  • Creative Writing MA Postgraduate Diploma - PgDip

Bangor University School of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics

  • Creative and Critical Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD Master of Philosophy - MPhil

Bangor University School of Music and Media

  • Creative Practice Master of Research - MRes
  • Professional Writing Master of Research - MRes
  • Professional Writing, Film, Media, New Media, Journalism, Creative Studies, Drama, Professional Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD Master of Philosophy - MPhil

Bath Spa University School of Creative Industries

Bath Spa University

  • Creative Writing MA
  • Writing for Young People MA

Bath Spa University School of Writing, Publishing and the Humanities

  • Children's Publishing MA
  • Nature and Travel Writing MA
  • Scriptwriting MA

Birkbeck, University of London School of Creative Arts, Culture and Communication

Birkbeck, University of London

  • Creative Writing and Contemporary Studies MA
  • Screenwriting MA Postgraduate Certificate - PgCert
  • Text and Performance MA

University of Birmingham Department of Film and Creative Writing

University of Birmingham

  • Creative Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD

University of Birmingham School of English, Drama, and Creative Studies

Bournemouth university department of communication and journalism.

Bournemouth University

  • Creative Writing and Publishing MA

University of Brighton School of Humanities and Social Science

University of Brighton

Canterbury Christ Church University School of Humanities

Canterbury Christ Church University

Cardiff University School of English, Communication and Philosophy

University of chichester humanities - english and creative writing.

University of Chichester

  • English and Creative Writing (Including Literature) Doctor of Philosophy - PhD Master of Philosophy - MPhil

City, University of London Department of English

City, University of London

  • Creative Writing MA Master of Fine Arts - MFA (PG)

City, University of London School of Communication and Creativity

University for the creative arts school of fine art, crafts and photography.

University for the Creative Arts

  • Art Writing MA
  • Art Writing (with Integrated International Pre-Masters) MA

De Montfort University Arts, Design and Humanities

De Montfort University

University of Derby Humanities

University of Derby

University College Dublin UCD School of English, Drama and Film

University College Dublin

  • Creative Writing MA MFA
  • Writing for Stage & Screen MA

Durham University English Studies

Durham University

University of East Anglia UEA School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing

University of East Anglia UEA

  • Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA
  • Creative Writing Crime Fiction MA
  • Creative Writing Poetry MA
  • Creative Writing Prose Fiction MA
  • Creative Writing Scriptwriting MA
  • Literary Translation MA

The University of Edinburgh School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures

The University of Edinburgh

  • Creative Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD MSc

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phd creative writing europe

Winners per language 2024 | Flash Fiction Contest

After the first race of our EACWP Flash Fiction Contest, 13 winning texts (one per each participating language) have been proudly selected for the last European round. You may find all the texts here both in the original language and in English and make your own top ranking. Popular votes will be open until June, 30, 2024 at 13.00 pm (CET)

phd creative writing europe

NAWE Virtual Conference 2024 | Call for submissions

The deadline for proposals is Friday 31 May 2024 with selection being made by 30 June 2024, and notifications being sent out by Friday 12 July 2024. Non-members may also participate

phd creative writing europe

Symposium on Words, Music and Silence: Call for papers

A Symposium is being held on Friday 28th June, 2024 at Bournemouth University (BH12 5BB) organised by the Literature and Music Research Group at The Open University, in partnership with University Music Bournemouth. The day will conclude with a lecture recital exploring words, music, silence and disability given by the concert pianist Duncan Honeybourne, whose career has been shaped by his autism

phd creative writing europe

VIII Premium Virtual Edition | A sense of place

From the 16th to the 18th of April, 2024, the EACWP launches the VIII Premium Virtual Edition of its European Course for Teachers of Creative Writing. Worldwide participants are welcome to join us. Enrollments are already open until April, 10th, 2024

phd creative writing europe

VII Flash Fiction Contest | Deadline extended!

The competition has been extended up to April, 8th (2024)

phd creative writing europe

L’Inventoire | Poetry Contest in French

Our partners from Aleph-Écriture & its literary magazine L’Inventoire open up this poetry contest in partnership with the publisher la Boucherie littéraire. The deadline for participants is April 4 (2024). Texts must be submitted before 18.00 around the writing topic “Nuit(s).” You may find here all the relevant info + requirements in French

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COMMENTS

  1. 59 PhD programmes in Creative Writing in Europe

    Creative Writing. 23,910 EUR / year. 3 years. This PhD Creative Writing programme at University of Reading can accommodate imaginative projects in any genre relating to the interests of writer-researchers in the Department of English Literature. Ph.D. / Full-time, Part-time / On Campus.

  2. Creative Writing Research PhD

    Creative Writing Research PhD. The PhD in Creative Writing at King's is a practice-led course, incorporating taught elements and aspects of professional development. It is designed to cater for talented, committed writers who are looking to complete a book-length creative work for publication and sustain a long-term career in writing.

  3. Creative Writing PhD

    Research profile. The PhD in Creative Writing offers committed and talented writers the opportunity to study Creative Writing at the highest level. Supported by an expert supervisory team you will work independently towards the production of a substantial, publishable piece of creative writing, accompanied by a sustained exercise in critical ...

  4. 59 PhD programmes in Creative Writing in Europe

    Creative Writing. 27,620 EUR / year. 3 years. During your Creative Writing PhD at Durham University you will produce a complete and coherent creative writing project in your chosen form, plus a literary-critical dissertation of a high academic standard. Ph.D. / Full-time, Part-time / On Campus.

  5. Creative Writing PhD · Manchester Metropolitan University

    Our Creative Writing PhD is a practice based programme taught by teams of published creative writers and highly regarded literary scholars. Staff have expertise in fiction, poetry, children's and young adult fiction, creative non-fiction and scriptwriting. 78% of our research has been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent (REF 2014).

  6. PhD in English with Creative Writing

    Applicants for the PhD in English with Creative Writing should submit a research proposal for their overall research project, along with samples of creative and critical writing, demonstrating a suitable ability in each, as part of the application. Proposals should include plans for a critical research component of 30-40,000 words and a ...

  7. PhD Creative Writing (2024 entry)

    Fees. For entry in the academic year beginning September 2024, the tuition fees are as follows: PhD (full-time) UK students (per annum): £4,786. International, including EU, students (per annum): £21,500. PhD (part-time) UK students (per annum): £2,393. Further information for EU students can be found on our dedicated EU page.

  8. MPhil/PhD Creative Writing

    Goldsmiths creative writing students and alumni. Former and current PhD students include the following published writers and poets: 2019 Booker Prize-winning Bernardine Evaristo, whose Jerwood Fiction Uncovered -winning book Mr Loverman was written, in part, at Goldsmiths. Season Butler. Tom Lee.

  9. PhD Creative Writing

    Our PhD Creative Writing programme gives you the opportunity to work on a significant piece of creative writing while developing your research skills. ... We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research. There are extensive computing facilities across campus, with access to standard ...

  10. PhD Creative Writing

    There are two elements to the programme. The first is a creative element that can be a novel or a collection of short stories of up to 100,000 words, or a book-length collection of poetry of up to 60 poems. The PhD also has a critical element, which is a piece of literary or cultural criticism of 30,000 to 50,000 words maximum.

  11. Creative and Critical Writing

    Administrative contact. [email protected]. +44 029 2087 0322. Cardiff was one of the first universities in the UK to offer a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing and over two decades we have prepared graduates for careers as writers and for positions in the publishing and communications industries, academia and arts administration.

  12. PhD Creative Writing

    A PhD in Creative Writing gives you the opportunity to develop an original piece of writing (for example a novel, play, screenplay, radio drama) and an accompanying thesis, in which you connect this creative work to relevant theoretical, critical and historical thinking. Together, these assessed elements lead to the award of the prestigious PhD ...

  13. PhD in Creative Writing

    Pursuing a PhD in Creative Writing at Leicester means becoming part of an exciting and dynamic research and creative environment. The PhD programme helps give structure to your creative project, and invites you to ask searching questions about your practice, to reflect on the process of producing creative work, and so to write a long critical-reflective essay (usually 15-20,000 words) to ...

  14. Creative Writing PhD

    Putting gender and race at the forefront, Anglophone and postcolonial writing as well as the fostering of genuinely innovative interdisciplinary creative writing projects which have application and potential impact (e.g. Mental health, environment), is central to the way the Centre aims to diversify and expand the reading, writing and teaching ...

  15. Aberystwyth University

    Key Facts. PhD Creative Writing. The English Department provides an excellent environment for postgraduate study, research, and creative work. The main University library is well stocked with standard texts and critical works on a very wide range of topics; and the National Library of Wales, adjacent to the campus, is one of the UK's five ...

  16. PhD : Department of English & Creative Writing , Aberystwyth University

    A PhD in literary studies is awarded upon satisfactory completion of a thesis of 80-100,000 words followed by a viva voce examination. A PhD in creative writing has two parts: the creative work (comprising 75-80,000 words of prose or 60 pages of poetry) plus a 20,000-word critical commentary. Award of the PhD in creative writing is subject ...

  17. Europe's 100+ best Creative Writing universities [Rankings]

    Multimedia 595. Music 356. Painting and Drawing 385. Performing arts 393. Photography 414. Sculpture 385. Singing and Vocal Performance 365. UX/UI Desgin 380. Below is the list of 100 best universities for Creative Writing in Europe ranked based on their research performance: a graph of 1.17M citations received by 136K academic papers made by ...

  18. Creative Writing Online PhD 2024

    A PhD in Creative Writing is mainly made up of independent study, with supervision meetings occurring online (e.g. via Microsoft Teams) and spread throughout the year. There are no taught credits attached to a PhD, although it is compulsory for full-time students to attend the Arts Faculty Researcher Skills training programme, which is ...

  19. PhD Degrees in Creative Writing

    Creative writing extends beyond the boundaries of normal professional journalism or academic forms of literature. It is often associated with fiction and poetry, but primarily emphasises narrative craft, character development, and the use of traditional literary forms. A PhD level exploration of creative writing is a three-year full-time programme, where candidates delve into the complexities ...

  20. 7 Best Creative Writing Schools in Europe

    The University of Edinburgh is definitely among Europe's best creative writing schools. It offers postgraduate programs for literature including a Master's in Creative Writing and a PhD in Creative Writing. Their encouraging professors and intensive workshops shape the students to develop their creative skills as a writer.

  21. Postgraduate Courses in Creative Writing in Europe

    Bangor UniversitySchool of Music and Media. Institution website Institution Profile. Creative Practice Master of Research - MRes. Professional Writing Master of Research - MRes. Professional Writing, Film, Media, New Media, Journalism, Creative Studies, Drama, Professional Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD Master of Philosophy - MPhil.

  22. EACWP

    After the first race of our EACWP Flash Fiction Contest, 13 winning texts (one per each participating language) have been proudly selected for the last European round. You may find all the texts here both in the original language and in English and make your own top ranking. Popular votes will be open until June, 30, 2024 at 13.00 pm (CET)